Zotac cmos checksum error

zotac cmos checksum error

Hi getting this error each time my grand daughter starts up her Dell AIO and she has to Realtime clock error. System CMOS checksum bad. I could probably make one but I figured I'd ask, is there such a plug out there? It is a bit of a pain to get to mine on the MSI X Gaming. View online (88 pages) or download PDF (3 MB) Zotac GValue series 69 BIOS Error Messages. CMOS Checksum Bad The CMOS checksum is incorrect. zotac cmos checksum error

Zotac cmos checksum error - consider

Thread: won't boot after being turned off overnight

OK, the short answer is: the problem persists. Long answer is below.

I am wondering if the power supply might be the cause. But that is described as usually being either a total loss of power, or power troubles that happen during use, too, neither of which describes what my computer is doing.

The reset button no longer works at all. To get the computer going I am using the power button on the front of the box, pressing it on and off at different intervals until it finally "catches", and sometimes using the "on/off" power toggle switch at the back of the box. Just trying different things until I get that POST beep.

I may be at the point of looking at a new computer. Frustrating, though, as all the components seem to work just fine as long as I never turn the durn thing off. On the plus side, if I get a new computer up and running, perhaps I can use this one to finally poke around inside enough to become familiar and comfortable with the hardware.

Again, many thanks to you who have helped me troubleshoot my problem.

THE LONG ANSWER:

-- Normal shutdown, no problems.

-- Opened box and vacuumed light dust (no worse than I normally see when I vacuum it once or twice per year)

-- Checked all power connections, memory slots, etc. Everything snug and fine.

-- Looked at capacitors, all smooth and shiny, no signs of breaks or leaks.

-- Looked at motherboard for any small dark streaks, none found (I read that a short could show up that way - this computer's power cord is plugged into a surge protector, but not a UPS.)

-- Replaced CMOS battery.

-- Kept the box open and turned on, same fussing with the power button needed to get it going, then went straight to BIOS screen with CMOS checksum error, with asking me to re-enter information. The only thing obvious to me on that screen was the incorrect time, so I entered the current time, and hit save.

-- Boot proceeded with some error messages that flashed by - I found them later in the boot log: " fsck superblock last write time is in the future probably due to hardware clock being incorrectly set - FIXED. " Got on the internet, used a few programs, everything seemed to be working normally. Shutdown normal.

-- Waited an hour, turned on, which required fussing with power button, got more than one POST beep so hit DEL to go into BIOS. Set to "Fail-safe defaults" and continued. Booted right up. Used computer for a couple of hours. Shutdown normal.

-- Waited overnight. Turned on, more fussing with power button, when finally got going, procedure seemed normal: one POST beep, everything smooth after that. Used computer for about half hour, then normal shutdown.

-- Waited an hour, then turned on. Same old thing: fussing with power button, finally gets going, one POST beep and everything normal. It's still on now, no funny things happening with power. I've got it set to suspend, and the hard drive always spins back up without hesitation. The fans are humming along. Can't find any problems during operation.

In this post I describe my experience while upgrading the BIOS, in order to support 4GB of memory.

This is the third post in a series of posts related to the Zotac ZBOX ZBOXHD-ID

Summary:
&#; 4GB is supported after upgrading the BIOS.
&#; BIOS has to be updated using less than 4GB, else ID11 fails to post.

[Update: 20 May ]
After writing this post, the machine started bluescreen / BSOD crashing.
Mostly MEMORY_MANAGEMENT / 0xA errors, with occasional 0xBE and 0xB crashes.
When I initially installed the 4GB RAM, I ran memtest for one cycle, and the RAM tested fine. I just reran memtest, and it is reporting that the memory as bad.
I replaced the memory with a new stick, I ran memtest overnight, and everything seems back to normal.
I hope it was just a bad stick, and not the ID11 that killed the memory.

When I ordered my ID11, I also ordered a 4GB Kingston SODIM RAM stick.
When I received the ID11, the specs said 2GB only, and after contacting Zotac support, and posting in their support forum, they confirmed that 4GB is not supported.
I reverted to using a 2GB Kingston SODIM RAM stick.

I was pleasantly surprised when Zotac announced a BIOS update that added 4GB support.

The BIOS changes are described as follows:
Version 05/11/10
.Added support on 4GB memory modules
.Added CMOS selection on Logo LED

I downloaded the BIOS update, extracted the contents, and tried running the AFUWIN AMI BIOS update utility. After a warning message appeared telling me to not run other apps and not to power down, on clicking ok, nothing happened. I tried again this time running sprers.eu as administrator, still nothing.

I went to the AMI site, and downloaded their latest Windows BIOS update utility. Since I was running Windows 7 Ultimate x64, I ran AFUWINxexe, this binary automatically UAC prompted for elevated access, and presented this warning:

I opened the APArom file, and the information tab showed the following:

I started the flash, and got this warning:

I accepted, and the flash completed:

I rebooted, and the POST screen showed a CMOS Checksum Bad error:

I pressed F1 to enter setup, and I made the following changes:
[Exit] [Load Optimal Defaults]
[Advanced] [PC Health Monitor] [CPUFAN TargetTemp Value] = 50
[Advanced] [IDE Configuration] [Configure SATA as] = AHCI
[Advanced] [PCIPnP] [Plug & Play OS] = Yes

The two BIOS changes are visible under these sections:
[Chipset] [North Bridge Configuration] “PCI MMIO Allocation: 4GB to MB”
[Chipset] [South Bridge Configuration] [LOGO LED indicator:]

I rebooted, and everything worked fine.

Next I powered down, and replaced the 2GB RAM with 4GB RAM.

On reboot the following changes were visible on the POST screen and in the BIOS:

Booting into Windows, the following 4GB related changes were visible:

So far everything appears to work fine.
One of these days I will really get to testing media playback performance.

By the way.
In my first impressions post I reported that the ID11 came with the wrong power cable. Zotac support sent me the correct replacement cables free of charge:

Like this:

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Related


When you turn your Toshiba computer on, you see an error message like: **** Bad RTC battery **** **** Bad Checksum (CMOS) **** Check system, then press [F1] key The Real Time Clock (RTC) battery provides power for the internal clock/calendar and for maintaining system configuration settings.

This error can occur when a machine has been left turned-off for an extended period of time (approximately one to four months), and it is the result of a depleted RTC battery. Other symptoms include not being able to execute Windows Update properly, errors/problems executing application software (like Norton Antivirus), and the appearance of the Windows XP "Desktop Clean Wizard".


  1. Set BIOS defaults
    1. Press the [F1] key as instructed in the error message: **** Bad RTC battery **** **** Bad Checksum (CMOS) **** Check system, then press [F1] key
    2. In the BIOS setup screen press the [Home] key to restore the default values, then press the [End] key to save and exit, then the [Y] key to confirm and restart the system.
  2. Set the correct date and time in Windows
    As Windows starts-up, you may see an error message about an "Invalid System Time". Go ahead and click "OK" to clear the error dialog.

    Open the Windows Control Panel and open the "Date and Time" control by double-clicking its icon. Set the correct date and time, then click OK to save.

  3. Charge the Real Time Clock (RTC) battery
    To charge the RTC battery, connect the AC adapter and turn the computer on (both the DC IN and Power LEDs must be green). Leave the machine on for approximately 24 hours to ensure a full charge in the RTC battery. Please note that the RTC battery does not charge while the PC is turned off, regardless of whether the AC adapter is connected or not.

Other Information:
If, on subsequent reboots, the error persists, it's quite likely that you actually do have a bad RTC battery. If that's the case, you should contact a Toshiba Authorized Service Provider to have the system serviced.

Windows XP Desktop Cleanup Wizard
The first time you reboot Windows XP after resetting the system clock, Windows XP may try to run the "Desktop Cleanup Wizard". Simply Cancel the "Desktop Cleanup Wizard" at the first dialog.

If you do manage to clean your shortcuts from the desktop and want to recover them, you will find them in a folder called "Unused Desktop Shortcuts". You can recover them as follows:

  1. Double-click to open the "Unused Desktop Shortcuts" folder
  2. Click to expand the "Edit" menu, and click "Select All"
  3. Drag the selected items back to your desktop
  4. Close the "Unused Desktop Shortcuts" folder. You can delete this folder if it is empty.

Note:

If, on subsequent reboots, the "Bad RTC Battery" error persists, it's quite likely that you actually do have a bad RTC battery. If that's the case, you should contact a Toshiba Authorized Service Provider to have the system serviced (the battery is not user replaceable).

AMIBIOS Beep Code Troubleshooting

1 Short Beep

A single short beep from an AMI-based BIOS means there has been a memory refresh timer error.

If you could boot a bit further, you might run one of the best free memory test programs, but since you can't, you'll need to start by replacing the memory (RAM).

If replacing the RAM doesn't work, you should try replacing the motherboard.

2 Short Beeps

Two short beeps mean there has been a parity error in base memory. This problem affects the first 64 KB block of memory in your RAM.

Like all RAM problems, this isn't something you'll be able to fix yourself or get repaired. Replacing the RAM modules that cause the problem is almost always the fix.

3 Short Beeps

Three short beeps means there has been a base memory read/write test error in the first 64 KB block of memory.

Replacing the RAM usually solves this AMI beep code.

4 Short Beeps

Four short beeps mean that the motherboard timer is not working properly but it could also mean that there's a problem with the RAM module that's in the lowest (usually marked 0) slot.

Usually, a hardware failure with an expansion card or a problem with the motherboard itself could trigger this beep code.

Start by reseating the desktop memory module and then replacing it if that doesn't work. Next, assuming those ideas have failed, reseat any expansion cards and then replace any that seem to be the culprit.

Replace the motherboard as the last option.

5 Short Beeps

Five short beeps mean there has been a processor error. A damaged expansion card, the CPU, or the motherboard could be prompting this AMI beep code.

Start by reseating the CPU. If that doesn't work, try reseating any expansion cards. Chances are, however, the CPU needs replaced.

6 Short Beeps

Six short beeps mean that there has been an Gate A20 test error.

This beep code is usually caused by an expansion card that has failed or a motherboard that is no longer working.

You might also be dealing with a certain kind of keyboard glitch if you hear 6 short beeps. When troubleshooting A20 errors, you may need to reseat or replace any expansion cards.

Lastly, you might be dealing with a failure severe enough that you'll need to replace your motherboard.

7 Short Beeps

Seven short beeps indicates a general exception error. This AMI beep code could be caused by an expansion card problem, a motherboard hardware issue, or a damaged CPU.

Replacing whatever faulty hardware is causing the problem is usually the fix for this beep code.

8 Short Beeps

Eight short beeps mean that there has been an error with the display memory.

This beep code is usually caused by a faulty video card. Replacing the video card usually clears this up but verify it's sitting properly in its expansion slot before buying a replacement. Sometimes this AMI beep code arises from just a loose card.

9 Short Beeps

Nine short beeps mean that there has been an AMIBIOS ROM checksum error.

Literally, this would indicate an issue with the BIOS chip on the motherboard. However, since replacing a BIOS chip is sometimes impossible, this AMI BIOS issue is usually corrected by replacing the motherboard.

Before you go that far, try clearing CMOS first. If you're lucky, that'll take care of the problem for free.

10 Short Beeps

Ten short beeps mean that there has been a CMOS shutdown register read/write error. This beep code is usually caused by a hardware failure with the AMI BIOS chip.

A motherboard replacement will usually solve this problem, although it could be caused by a damaged expansion card in rare situations.

Before you go replacing things, start by clearing CMOS and reseating all the expansion cards.

11 Short Beeps

Eleven short beeps means that the cache memory test has failed.

Some piece of essential failing hardware is usually to blame for this AMI BIOS beep code. Often times it's the motherboard.

1 Long Beep + 2 Short Beeps

One long beep and two short beeps is usually an indication of a failure within the memory that's part of the video card.

Replacing the video card is almost always the route to go here, but try removing and reinstalling it first, just in case the only problem is that it has wiggled a bit loose.

1 Long Beep + 3 Short Beeps

If you hear one long beep followed by three short ones, this is due to a failure above the 64 KB mark in the computer's system memory.

There's little practicality in this test versus some of the earlier tests because the solution is the same—replace the RAM.

1 Long Beep + 8 Short Beeps

One long beep followed by eight short beeps means that the video adapter test has failed.

Try reseating the video card and making sure any auxiliary power it needs is connected to the power supply.

If that doesn't work, you'll need to replace the video card.

Alternating Siren

Finally, if you hear an alternating siren-type noise at any time during your computer use, at boot, or afterward, you are dealing with either a voltage level problem or a processor fan that's running too low.

This is a clear indication that you should turn off your computer and inspect both the CPU fan and, if possible, the CPU voltage settings in BIOS/UEFI.

Not Using an AMI BIOS (AMIBIOS) or Not Sure?

If you're not using an AMI-based BIOS then the troubleshooting guides above won't help. To see troubleshooting information for other types of BIOS systems or to figure out what kind of BIOS you have, learn how to troubleshoot beep codes.

Thanks for letting us know!

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deutsch CMOS-Reset - How to reset the CMOS? (Reset BIOS settings)

CMOS-Reset instructions for PC-Mainboards and Notebooks

CMOS-Reset
When should i reset the CMOS?
  • Computer don't boot or freezes during boot process.
  • BIOS-Error messages like "CMOS Checksum Error".
  • Reset lost BIOS-Password (only PC-Mainboards).
  • After making a BIOS-Update (recommendation by many PC-Mainboard manufacturers).
  • After inserting a new BIOS-Chip.

There are of course other situations, but the above are by far the most common reasons to make a CMOS reset.

What is CMOS?
On which computers can i reset a BIOS-Password?
CMOS-Reset with Jumper
CMOS-Reset without Jumper
CMOS-Reset did not solved the problem! What can i do?

 

AT YOUR OWN RISK !

I assume no liability for the accuracy, completeness or topicality of the following instructions. These instructions describe only in general, how to erase the CMOS on PC-Mainboards and Notebooks. It may be completely different for your computer!

 

What is CMOS?

First of all: the CMOS is not the BIOS!
The CMOS (Complementary Metal-Oxide Semiconductor) is a static Random Access Memory (SRAM), which stores the BIOS values. The CMOS will lost its data when removing the voltage/battery (CMOS-Battery, see picture). The duration for a complete loss of data could differs between some seconds, hours, or several days. So it usually won't help to remove the CMOS-Battery for a short time! For this reason, most of all PC-Mainboards have a jumper to immediately reset the CMOS. Notebooks don't have any jumper.

 

On which computers can i reset a BIOS-Password?

YES, on PC-Mainboards you can clear the BIOS-Boot password resp. BIOS-Setup password by resetting the CMOS.

NO, on Notebooks you can not clear the BIOS-Boot password resp. BIOS-Setup password by resetting the CMOS, because most of all (99%) notebooks have a better theft protection. They have an additional small, hidden IC which stores the password. That means: the password is not stored inside the CMOS! But you can also try to reset the CMOS. Other notebooks are able to store the password on a hidden hard disk sector. Your only chance is to contact the support of your notebook manufacturer. Depending on the manufacturer, you have to send him the serial number of the notebook and you'll get (in many cases free of charge) an individual master password to unlock the notebook. Some other manufacturers even offer only the replacement of the notebook's mainboard - which will be really expensive!

 

CMOS-Reset with Jumper

CMOS-Reset

Most mainboard manufacturers have a download section on their websites where you can find the manual of your specific mainboard type. Inside the manual there should be a layout drawing which shows the jumper position.

Read the manual to find out how you can reset the CMOS! Because the procedure can be very different! For instance, most mainboards have to be completely dead, but there are others where you have to reset the CMOS when power is on.

In most cases you can find the jumper (green jumper cap, see picture) nearby the CMOS-Battery. There should be a label like JBAT1, RTCLR, CLRCMOS, CLRCMS, CMOS_CLEAR, Clear RTC, or similar.

There are 4 different CMOS-Jumper types:

3-Pin CMOS-Jumper: The connector strip has 3 pins and the default jumper position is pins 1+2 (see picture). To reset the CMOS move the jumper cap to position pins 2+3.

2-Pin CMOS-Jumper: Depending on the default position, you have to remove or place the jumper.

Soldered points: Sometimes there is no connector strip and you'll only find 2 soldered points which must be bridged (e.g. with a paper clip) to reset the CMOS.

CMOS-Reset-Button: On newer mainboards you'll find different buttons for e.g. Power, Reset and CMOS-Reset. The CMOS-Reset-Button works like a normal CMOS-Reset-Jumper.

Instruction: CMOS-Reset with Jumper

  1. Turn OFF the computer and unplug the power cord (on notebooks remove all accus).
  2. Press the Power On/Off button (PC-Case) times to discharge the mainboard condensers.
  3. Remove the coin cell battery (CMOS battery).
  4. Move the CMOS-Jumper to his clear-position (read your mainboard manual to find the jumper).
  5. Wait ~ 15 seconds (the longer the better).
  6. Move the CMOS-Jumper to his default position.
  7. Insert the coin cell battery (CMOS battery).
  8. Plug the power cord (on notebooks insert all accus).
  9. Turn ON the computer, enter the BIOS-Setup and load the "Setup Defaults/Optimized Settings".
  10. Save the BIOS settings and restart the computer.
  11. No success? Repeat the steps

Never turn on the mainboard during a CMOS-Reset!
It could cause a short circuit which would damage your mainboard!

 

CMOS-Reset without Jumper

CMOS-Batterie-SockelCMOS-Batterie-Centmuenze

If your mainboard has no jumper (like most of all notebooks) to reset the CMOS, you can try to remove the CMOS-Battery for a few days and hope that this will clear the CMOS. If you don't like to wait, you can try the following instructions, but as I said at your own risk.

Instruction: CMOS-Reset without Jumper

  1. Turn OFF the computer and unplug the power cord (on notebooks remove all accus).
  2. Press the Power On/Off button (PC-Case) times to discharge the mainboard condensers.
  3. Remove the coin cell battery (CMOS battery).
  4. Insert a 10 Euro Cent coin into the CMOS battery socket (or bridge the +/- contacts with a paper clip).
  5. Wait ~ 15 seconds (the longer the better).
  6. Remove the 10 Euro Cent coin (or the paper clip).
  7. Insert the coin cell battery (CMOS battery).
  8. Plug the power cord (on notebooks insert all accus).
  9. Turn ON the computer, enter the BIOS-Setup and load the "Setup Defaults/Optimized Settings".
  10. Save the BIOS settings and restart the computer.
  11. No success? Repeat the steps

Never turn on the mainboard during a CMOS-Reset!
It could cause a short circuit which would damage your mainboard!

 

CMOS-Reset did not solved the problem! What can i do?

First you should try the following:

  1. Repeat the CMOS-Reset and increase the time to clear the CMOS from 15 seconds to a few minutes!
  2. Check the voltage of your CMOS-Battery (~3V).
  3. Remove all unnecessary additional hardware like e.g. TV-, Sound-, and Controller cards on your PC-Mainboard (not on Notebooks!). You only need CPU, RAM and Graphic adapter!
  4. If you have more than 1 RAM module, remove the other (maybe one module is defective?).
  5. Reset the Hardware table (DMI):
    the DMI (Desktop Management Interface) manages the integration of various hardware in a computer. Sometimes the DMI data table gets corrupted and you could try to reset it.
    Remove the following hardware components:
    • RAM
    • Graphic adapter (on Desktop-PCs!)
    • all drives like Harddisk, CD, DVD, Floppy, (on Notebooks remove only the Harddisk!)
    • TV-, Sound-, and Controller cards, etc. (on Desktop-PCs!)
    Power on the computer for ~ seconds.
    Power off the computer, insert all hardware components and restart the computer.
    Note: if a working BIOS recognizes that some components are missed, the BIOS automatically scans for new hardware and refreshes the DMI hardware table.

 

Nothing works?

  1. Check all cable connections.
  2. Check all components and remove any existing dirt.
  3. Replace CPU, Graphic adapter and the Power Supply Unit. Or use a second PC to check these components.
  4. ElkoCheck all Electrolytic Condensers.

    An electrolytic condenser is a cylindrical electronic component that stores electricity.

    The cylinder is mostly green, blue or black, and has a pressed aluminum cover.
    On older mainboards, it often happened, that the condensers get faulty. In most cases you can identify a defective condenser, when fluid leaked out of the cover, or when the cylinder itself is arched.

 

User-Comments: CMOS-Reset

Einträge: 44

franca Nov

pc ASUS all&#;avvio schermata nera e 3 beep, cosa fare? Grazie a chi mi risponde.

Homayoun Nobarani Mar

Thank you very much for creating this wonderful page with real information. Thank you!

MelanieWeber Jan

Hi Great resource, thank you. I have bought lenovo x with bios settings supervisor password protected. Not too good with electronics, so will probably not go beyond the battery and 10 cent trick. Quick question I haven&#;t found addressed. If I just accept the inability to use Bluetooth or change the booting order, what will happen when the CMOS battery eventually dies and I replace it? Would you expect any problems making the laptop unable to start? The bios clock is now set to , but this is not causing any problems to windows 7. Thank you

some dude Oct

Thank you for creating this wonderful page with all this information. Thank you!

George Apr

Similar boot prob, but with no video. Did procedure above: now power on button press does nothing. ??? What now?

TomW sprers.eu

Hello: Still not working. I left the M/B completely unplugged, no power, no battery, no hard drives, no cards, and the CLR_CMOS pins shorted for a day. Pressed the main PC on/off button several times, etc. Only using M/B, power supply, 1 RAM card in first slot, 1 CPU, built-in graphics, PS2 keyboard, no mouse, no usb, no controller cards, no sound cards, no usb3, as plain as it can be. When I switch on the PC, it tries to boot, then turns itself off for a few seconds, then turns itself on again and boots to the screen asking me for a password. This PC was working fine, I went into the setup a few days ago to check the user and admin passwords, but noticed the one was what it should be, but the other, which should have been the same word, just would not accept, giving wrong password error for the old password to be typed in etc. I thought that was strange as both PW&#;s should be the same word etc. I guess the CMOS chip must be faulty, which is why it won&#;t reset ??. Thanks TomW.

biosflash sprers.eu

@TomW
Try this

Please note: while testing, you should remove all unnecessary additional hardware components from your PC (not on Laptops)! You only need: 1 CPU, 1 RAM 1 Graphic adapter, Power supply unit + mainboard. No CD- and HDD drives! No USB-Sticks! No TV-, Sound-, and other Controller cards, etc.! Connect USB Mouse and USB Keyboard only on USB ports! Don't use USB!

If all this do not work, then the motherboard or bios chip itself could be defective or some other connected hardware components prevents the PC to boot up.

TomW sprers.eu

Hello: I have a FOXCONN H61MXE motherboard. Everything has been working fine. Recently, I tried to clear the CMOS passwords since the &#;User&#; password would not change whilst in the setup, must be an old PW I have forgotten what it is. Following the simple manual instructions to short out the 2 CLR_CMOS pins on the M/B, even removing the battery, and left short out overnight, the CMOS just will not clear. I have also removed all hard drives etc. I have also shorted out the M/B battery pins whilst the CMOS pins are shorted, and also pressed the PC&#;s main on/off button on and off at this time too. Nothing works. What do I do ?. Thanks

Richard Gross Jul

I have a DELL XPS one AIO. While flashing / upgrading the BIOS the electric power went out. Now the PC has power and attempts to start. After approx. 4 seconds (no display on screen) it tries to restart and continues this loop. On the initial try the power button light displays normally. Of the three diagnostic lights on the front of the PCthe 2nd light illuminates on the first power-up, but not after subsequent power=ups. CMOS resets have not been successful. Any advise would be greatly appreciated. Thanks in advance!!!

Tobie Jul

Thanks it works!!

biosflash May

@Johnnie
You can edit time + date inside the bios setup.

Johnnie May

I try to format laptop (hp Compaq NW) and it was showing me date and time not set, so i remove the CMOS battery and replace without another one but it was still showing me the Same thing, please what can i do to solve that?

Ted Oct

Thanks man, the 10 cent trick worked for me and could reset the BIOS and restart my laptop :)

vishnu sprers.eu

thanks for the clear instructions. it worked for me

biosflash sprers.eu

@Zidan
That's hard to say. Maybe your southbridge (sprers.eu:Motherboard_sprers.eu) is defective, because it contains also the CMOS MEMORY to store date & time. You should better ask the Acer support.

Zidan sprers.eu

Hello. After browsing the web I have decided that this site is the most knowledgeable in these matters. I have an unusual problem with an Acer Asprire that I bought second hand a year ago. I have been working with laptops for the past 20 years so I am fairly conversant with their inner parts. I noticed that this machine loses its time and date each time the main battery is removed or goes completely flat. Naturally I thought that the CMOS battery was dead so today I replaced it. However when I removed the old battery I discovered that it was still giving 3V. I made sure that the terminals and contact surfaces were thoroughly cleaned before I fitted the new battery. However upon rebooting and resetting the Bios (I am running the machine in IDE mode not SATA mode) I discovered that after removing the main battery as a test the clock an the BIOS settings reverted to their defaults again. It therefore appears that the CMOS is not drawing any power from the on-board battery, instead it is using the main battery. Any suggestions as to what is happening here?

ishan Nov

i had a problem last night when i was upgrading my msifxa-gd65 board using gui upgrade process after that my system hanged and i restart using button on my rig then it's generate a cycle reboot process everyime and i didn't get anything on display and tried everything what u post and it's not worked for me plz help me sir

padayappa May

very very useful infomation thanks very much

srikar sprers.eu

sprers.eu works

saeed Jan

hi,i have GA-P43T-ES3G rev i have boot loop too after i upgrade bios version with @bios program ..i do every things u say in this page but don't fix it.. i clear cmos with jumper and remove battery but problem don't sprers.eu can i do now please help me thank you.

 

deutsch BIOS Error messages - Troubleshooting

 

1. First try a CMOS-Reset by BIOS problems!
2. To use a USB keyboard under DOS, the option USB Legacy Support must be activated in the BIOS setup!

 

Error message: "CMOS Checksum Error"

First of all, the CMOS is not the BIOS. It's only a memory IC which stores the BIOS setup settings of the mainboard.
The CMOS (Complementary Metal-Oxide Semiconductor) is rather a battery-buffered, static, thus volatile memory module (SRAM), zotac cmos checksum error, in which the BIOS parameters are stored, and sits recently in the Southbridge together with other controllers (SATA, USB, ), zotac cmos checksum error, sensors, real-time clock, etc. The BIOS software generates a checksum over operativing progress error whole CMOS data content to ensure the integrity of the CMOS data. The CMOS memory loses its contents (data) when the backup battery (CMOS battery, see picture) is removed or the battery has become empty with the years. This causes the motherboard to lose its configuration (date, zotac cmos checksum error, time, CPU, RAM settings, boot order, etc.) and issue the error message "CMOS Checksum 49 ff04 service error hp lj 2420dn Perform a CMOS-Reset!
2. Check the contact and the voltage (~3V) of the CMOS battery. If the voltage is below ~2V, the battery should be changed.
3. If the voltage is still above ~ V, the battery should be ok, and a major hardware defect could be present. In some cases it could also be a defective BIOS-Chip (which can be easily replaced if it is socketed and not soldered). Or worse: it's a defective mainboard (defective CMOS memory, or Southbridge).

CMOS-Battery CR
CMOS-Battery, e.g. CR button cell

 

Error message: "BIOS ROM Checksum Error"

A checksum is formed over the entire data content of the BIOS-Chip and was stored inside the BIOS-Chip itself, or in the CMOS memory. Usr bin dpkg error the PC is zotac cmos checksum error up, the BIOS software reads out its own data content, generates again a checksum and compares this checksum with the already stored checksum. If the checksums differ, the error message "BIOS ROM Checksum Error" or "Bad BIOS Checksum" occurs.

Troubleshooting:
1. Perform a CMOS-Reset!
2. Maybe it's only a defective BIOS-Chip (which can be easily replaced, if it is socketed and not soldered). Or worse: it's a defective mainboard (defective CMOS memory, or Southbridge).
3. In rare cases, it could also be a BIOS virus, which has changed the data content of the BIOS-Chip.

 

Error message: " GUID are invalid in both CMOS and Flash"

After a BIOS-Update, or the use of a newly programmed BIOS-Chip, the error message " GUID are invalid in both CMOS and Flash" sometimes occurs.

This FireWire error message occurs mainly on some ASROCK motherboards, zotac cmos checksum error, and the ASROCK Support provides the file sprers.eu, which must be run under DOS, to correct the error.

There are 2 ways to fix the error:


Troubleshooting: a ready-to-use ISO file for a bootable CD:
1. Unzip sprers.eu, and burn the ISO file GUID_iso, as an ISO image to a CD or CD-RW (no DVD!), zotac cmos checksum error, with a burning software that supports ISO images, like the free CDBurnerXP.
Attention: take the CDBurnerXP version, without installCore or OpenCandy! (Adware!)
2. Go to number 3.

Troubleshooting: create your own bootable medium:
1. Create a bootable DOS diskette/CD/USB pendrive.
2. Unzip sprers.eu and copy the sprers.eu to the bootable medium.
3. On the mainboard, find the sticker with the ID (see pictures) and write it down.
4. Boot from the bootable medium and insert the following command at the DOS cursor:
fwguid c GUID and press ENTER.
Attention: instead of GUID you must insert your own ID from the mainboard sticker!
(Complete example call: fwguid c F)
5. A success message like "Write GUID function call OK" should appear, and after a restart everything should be ok again.

ID Sticker Floppy connector
GUID Sticker on Floppy connector
ID Sticker PCI-Slot
GUID Sticker on PCI-Slot

The ID oracle nls error a digit serial number (8 bytes), e.g. F, and is located on a sticker.

 

Error message: "MAC address are invalid in both CMOS and Flash"

The error message "MAC address are invalid in both CMOS and Flash" sometimes appears on ASUS and ASROCK mainboards after a BIOS update, zotac cmos checksum error, or after a newly programmed BIOS chip has been inserted.

The BIOS update files are taken directly from the mainboard manufacturer, e.g. from ASUS or ASROCK, so these files can not contain a unique network address (MAC), otherwise all motherboards would have the same MAC address after a BIOS update. Normally, the BIOS should determine the lack of the MAC address during the boot process, and should be able to get this address from the network card to insert it into the BIOS. Unfortunately, for some reason this is not always correct.

There are 2 ways to fix the error:


Troubleshooting: with DMI Tool:
1. Create a bootable DOS diskette/CD/USB pendrive.
2. Unzip macfix_sprers.eu and copy the sprers.eu to the bootable medium.
3. On the mainboard, find the sticker with the MAC address (see picture) and write it down. The sticker can be located anywhere on the mainboard, where space is available. Nevertheless, I would zotac cmos checksum error look near the network adapter.
4. Boot from the bootable medium and insert the following command at the DOS cursor:
dmi /o 1 "MACADDRESS" (including the quotation marks!) and press ENTER.
Attention: instead of MACADDRESS you must insert your own MAC kx audio driver error from the mainboard sticker!
(Complete example call: dmi /o 1 "B6AE")
5. A success message like "successful" should appear, and after a restart everything should be ok again.

Troubleshooting: with ASROCK MAC Address Writer Tool:
1. Zotac cmos checksum error a bootable DOS diskette/CD/USB pendrive.
2. Download Asrock MAC Address Writer Tool:

3. Extract all files and directories to the bootable medium.
4. On the mainboard, find the sticker with the MAC address (see picture) and write it down. The sticker can be located anywhere on the mainboard, where space is available. Nevertheless, I would first look near the network adapter.
5. Boot from the bootable medium and insert the following command at the DOS cursor:
mac c MACADDRESS and press ENTER.
Attention: instead of MACADDRESS you must insert your own MAC address from the mainboard sticker!
(Complete example call: mac c MB6AE)
6. A success message like "done" or "successful" should appear, zotac cmos checksum error, and after a restart everything should be ok again.

Sticker MAC-Address
Sticker MAC-Address

The MAC-Address is a digit serial number (6 Bytes), e.g. B6AE, and is located on a sticker.

 

If necessary, there zotac cmos checksum error still a 3rd possibility to enter a MAC address to restore a network connection (but the BIOS error message is still displayed).
Troubleshooting: with WINDOWS Device Manager:
1. Open the Device Manager under "System Control".
2. Select under "Network Adapter" the appropriate network adapter (eg "Intel® V Gigabit Network Connection" or "Realtek PCIe GBE Family Controller").
3. Right-click "Properties / Advanced / Settings".
4. Enter the digit MAC address under "locally managed address" and confirm with OK.
5. Restart the PC.

Where can I find the MAC address?
1. The MAC address is a digit serial number (6 bytes), e.g. B6AE, and is often located on a sticker near the rear back panel connectors (for LAN, monitor, USB, audio, etc.), or the MAC address is located at a free spot on the outside edge of the motherboard.
2. Inside the Internet router, this MAC address should also be traceable. E.g. on a Fritz!Box router the MAC address can be found under: "Home network / Network / Name of your PC/Notebook".

 

Asrocks official FAQ- and Download website:
Download: MAC Tools (MAC Address Writer vF, vB, vA)
FAQ: How to write MAC address of your motherboard?(6/1/)
Mirror sprers.eu: MAC Tools (MAC Address Writer vF, vB,vA)

 

User-Comments: BIOS Error messages

Einträge: 3

Williams Feb

Very good one

pcp04 Mar

Gracias es lo que estaba buscando para arreglar el problema de la MAC

pasarayaneh Jan

Thank you very much

 

AMIBIOS Beep Code Troubleshooting

1 Short Beep

A single short beep from an AMI-based BIOS means there has been a memory refresh timer error.

If you could boot a bit further, you might gameguard errorcode 153 one of the best free memory test programs, but since you can't, you'll need to start by replacing the memory (RAM).

If replacing the RAM doesn't work, you should try replacing the motherboard.

2 Short Beeps

Two short beeps mean there has been a parity error in base memory. This problem affects the first 64 KB block of memory in your RAM.

Like all RAM problems, this isn't something you'll be able to fix yourself or get repaired. Replacing the RAM modules that cause the problem is almost always the fix.

3 Short Beeps

Three short beeps error + not found 0x80070490 there has been a base memory read/write test error in the first 64 KB block of memory.

Replacing the RAM usually solves this AMI beep code.

4 Short Beeps

Four short beeps mean that the motherboard timer is not working properly but it could also mean that there's a problem with the RAM module that's in the lowest (usually marked 0) slot.

Usually, a hardware failure with an expansion card or a problem with the motherboard itself could trigger this beep code, zotac cmos checksum error.

Start by reseating the desktop memory module and then replacing it if autocad 2008 error graphics not generated doesn't work. Next, assuming those ideas have failed, connectify cf00b001error configuring hotspot any expansion cards and then replace any that seem to be the culprit.

Replace the motherboard as the last option.

5 Short Beeps

Five short beeps mean there has been a processor error. A damaged expansion card, the CPU, or the motherboard could be prompting this AMI beep code.

Start by reseating the CPU. If that doesn't work, try reseating any expansion cards, zotac cmos checksum error. Chances are, however, the CPU needs replaced.

6 Short Beeps

Six short beeps mean that there has been an Gate A20 test error.

This beep code is usually caused by an expansion card that has failed or a motherboard that is no longer working.

You might also be dealing with a certain kind of keyboard glitch if you hear 6 short beeps. When troubleshooting A20 errors, you may need to reseat or replace any expansion cards.

Lastly, you might be dealing with a failure severe enough that you'll need to replace your motherboard.

7 Short Beeps

Seven short beeps indicates a general exception error. This AMI beep code could be caused by an expansion card problem, a motherboard hardware issue, or a damaged CPU.

Replacing whatever faulty hardware is causing the problem is usually the fix for this beep code.

8 Short Beeps

Eight short beeps mean that there has been an error with the display memory.

This beep code is usually caused by a faulty video card. Replacing the video card usually clears this up but verify it's sitting properly in its expansion slot before buying a replacement. Sometimes this Pioneer error 2 beep code arises from just a loose card.

9 Short Beeps

Nine short beeps mean that there has been an AMIBIOS ROM checksum error.

Literally, this would indicate an issue with the BIOS chip on the motherboard. However, since replacing a BIOS chip is sometimes impossible, zotac cmos checksum error, this AMI BIOS issue is usually corrected by replacing the motherboard.

Before you go that far, zotac cmos checksum error, try clearing CMOS first. If you're lucky, that'll take care of the problem for free.

10 Short Beeps

Ten short beeps mean that there zotac cmos checksum error been a CMOS shutdown zotac cmos checksum error read/write error. This beep code is usually caused by a hardware failure with the AMI BIOS chip.

A motherboard replacement will usually solve this problem, although it could be caused by a damaged expansion card in rare situations.

Before you go replacing things, start by clearing CMOS and reseating all the expansion cards.

11 Short Beeps

Eleven short beeps means that the cache memory test has failed.

Some piece of essential failing hardware is usually to blame for this AMI BIOS beep code. Often times it's the zotac cmos checksum error.

1 Long Beep + 2 Short Beeps

One long beep and two short beeps is usually an indication of a failure within the memory that's part of the video card.

Replacing the video card is almost always the route to go here, but try removing and reinstalling it first, just in case the only problem is that it has wiggled a bit loose.

1 Long Beep + 3 Short Beeps

If you hear one long beep followed by three short ones, this is due to a failure above the 64 KB mark in the computer's system memory.

There's little practicality in this test versus some of the earlier tests because the solution is the same—replace the RAM.

1 Long Beep + 8 Zotac cmos checksum error Beeps javascript error friends One long beep followed by eight short beeps means that the video adapter test has failed.

Try reseating the video card and making sure any auxiliary power it needs is connected to the power supply.

If that doesn't work, you'll need to replace the video card.

Alternating Siren

Finally, if you hear an alternating siren-type noise at any time during your computer use, at boot, or afterward, you are dealing with either a voltage level problem or a processor fan that's running too low. zotac cmos checksum error This is a clear indication that you should turn off your computer and inspect both the CPU fan and, if possible, the CPU voltage settings in BIOS/UEFI.

Not Using an AMI BIOS (AMIBIOS) or Not Sure?

If you're not using an AMI-based BIOS then the troubleshooting guides above won't help. To see troubleshooting information for other types of BIOS systems or to figure out what kind of BIOS you have, learn how to troubleshoot beep codes, zotac cmos checksum error.

Thanks for letting us know!

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Thread: won't boot after being turned off overnight

OK, the short answer is: the problem persists. Long answer is below.

I am wondering if the power supply might be the cause. But that is described as usually being either a total loss of power, or power troubles that happen during use, too, neither of which describes what my computer is doing.

The reset button no longer works at all. To get the computer going I am using the power button on the front of the box, pressing it on and off at different intervals until it finally "catches", and sometimes using the "on/off" power toggle switch at the back of the box. Just trying different things until I get that POST beep.

I may be at the point of looking at a new computer. Frustrating, though, as all the components seem to work just fine zotac cmos checksum error long as I never turn the durn thing off. On the plus side, if I get a new computer up and running, perhaps I can use this one to finally poke around inside enough to become familiar and comfortable with the hardware.

Again, many thanks to you who have helped me troubleshoot my problem.

THE LONG ANSWER:

-- Normal shutdown, no problems.

-- Opened box and vacuumed light dust (no worse than I normally see error cant install driver - error 1073 I vacuum it once or twice per year)

-- Checked all power connections, memory slots, etc. Everything snug and fine.

-- Looked at capacitors, all smooth and shiny, no signs of breaks or leaks.

-- Looked at motherboard for any small dark streaks, none found (I read that a short could show up that way - this computer's power cord is plugged into a surge protector, but not a UPS.)

-- Replaced CMOS battery.

-- Kept the box open and turned on, same fussing with the power button needed to get it going, then went straight to BIOS screen with CMOS checksum error, with asking me to re-enter information. The only thing obvious to me on that screen was the incorrect time, so I entered the current time, and hit save.

-- Boot proceeded with some error messages that flashed by - I found them later in the boot log: " fsck error c2275 uchar last write time is in the future probably due to hardware clock being incorrectly set - FIXED. " Got on the internet, used a few programs, everything seemed to be working normally. Shutdown normal.

error p08 canon mp250 Waited an hour, turned on, which required fussing with power button, got more than one POST beep so hit DEL to go into BIOS. Set to "Fail-safe defaults" and continued. Booted right up. Used computer for a couple of hours. Shutdown normal.

-- Waited overnight. Turned on, more fussing with power button, when finally got going, procedure seemed normal: one POST beep, everything smooth after that. Used computer for about half hour, then normal shutdown.

-- Waited an hour, then turned on. Same old thing: fussing with power button, finally gets going, one POST beep and everything normal. It's still on now, no funny things happening with power. I've got it set to suspend, and the hard drive always spins back up without hesitation. The fans are humming along. Can't find any problems during operation, zotac cmos checksum error.

Real time clock error

Jose Jeswin said:

replace your bios battery on the motherboardthe battery model is CR

Click to expand

^^^THIS^^^

Unplug the computer from the wall, touch bare metal of the case interior to discharge any static in your body BEFORE reaching in, then pull the battery and get another. You can get a new battery for a couple dollars at just about any battery/watch/camera counter at your local home improvement or discount store. As indicated, it most likely is a CR or equivalent. Do NOT touch the new battery with your bare skin as skin oils promote corrosion and attract dust. I put a clean sock over my hand. Be sure to touch bare metal again before reaching in. Upon first boot, go straight into the BIOS Setup Menu and set your date and time, and verify your drives are detected and the boot order is correct. Then Save and Exit to boot normally. The "Save" part is very important.

 


When you turn your Toshiba computer on, you see an error message like: **** Bad RTC battery **** **** Bad Checksum (CMOS) **** Check system, then press [F1] key The Real Time Clock (RTC) battery provides power for the internal clock/calendar and for maintaining system configuration settings.

This error can occur when a machine has been left turned-off for an extended period of time (approximately one to four months), and it is the result of a depleted RTC battery. Other symptoms include not being able to execute Windows Update properly, errors/problems executing application software (like Norton Antivirus), and the appearance of the Windows XP "Desktop Clean Wizard".


  1. Set BIOS defaults
    1. Press the [F1] key as instructed in the error message: **** Bad RTC battery **** **** Bad Checksum (CMOS) **** Check system, then press [F1] key
    2. In the BIOS setup screen press the [Home] key to restore the default values, then press the [End] key to save and exit, then the [Y] key to confirm and restart the system.
  2. Set the correct date and time in Windows
    As Windows starts-up, you may see an error message about an "Invalid System Time". Go ahead and click "OK" to clear the error dialog.

    Open the Windows Control Panel and open the "Date and Time" control by double-clicking its icon. Set the correct date and time, then click OK to save.

  3. Charge the Real Time Clock (RTC) battery
    To charge the RTC battery, connect the AC adapter and turn the computer on (both the DC IN and Power LEDs must be green). Leave the machine on for approximately 24 hours to ensure a full charge in the RTC battery. Please note that the RTC battery does not charge while the PC is turned off, regardless of whether the AC adapter is runtime error 203 explorer or not.

Other Information:
If, on subsequent reboots, the error persists, it's quite likely that you actually do have a bad RTC battery. If that's the case, you should contact a Toshiba Authorized Service Provider to have the system serviced.

Windows XP Desktop Cleanup Wizard
The first time you reboot Windows XP after resetting the system clock, Windows XP may try to run the "Desktop Cleanup Wizard". Simply Cancel the "Desktop Cleanup Wizard" at the first dialog.

If you zotac cmos checksum error manage to clean your shortcuts from the desktop and want to recover them, you will find them in a folder called "Unused Desktop Shortcuts". You can recover them as follows:

  1. Double-click to open the "Unused Desktop Shortcuts" folder
  2. Click to expand the "Edit" menu, and click "Select All"
  3. Drag the selected items back to your desktop
  4. Close the "Unused Desktop Shortcuts" folder. You can delete this folder if it is empty.

Note:

If, on subsequent reboots, the "Bad RTC Battery" error persists, it's quite likely that you actually do have a bad RTC battery. If that's the case, you should contact a Toshiba Authorized Service Provider to have the system serviced (the battery zotac cmos checksum error not user replaceable).

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