Wrong cmos settings error

wrong cmos settings error

A checksum is computed as an error detecting code to guard the BIOS settings stored in the CMOS memory. The CMOS Checksum Bad Error is an error that occurs. CMOS Settings Wrong - Quick fix in seconds - YouTube · Bios Problems | Common Bios Error and Solutions | Update Your Bios · USB key is not found during. BIOS settings are corrupt – The problem can also be caused by wrong BIOS settings which may be related to new devices you might have added. wrong cmos settings error

Wrong cmos settings error - rather

How to reset CMOS or BIOS settings

Updated: 07/06/2021 by Computer Hope

Reset CMOS

If the computer has problems booting, errors during boot, or other abnormal problems that cannot be resolved, try resetting the CMOS settings to the default settings as explained below.

Load or Reset defaults

CMOS restore defaults

To reset your computer's CMOS or BIOS settings back to the default settings, follow the steps below.

  1. Enter CMOS setup.
  1. In CMOS setup, look for an option to reset the CMOS values to the default setting or an option to load the fail-safe defaults. With many CMOS setup screens, there is a function key to do this. For example, the , , , , or key, as shown in the picture, may be set up as a shortcut to load the default settings. Other setups may list an option that you can arrow over to using the arrow keys and pressing .
  2. When found and selected, you are asked if you're sure you want to load the defaults. Press Y for yes or arrow to the yes option.
  3. Once the default values are set, make sure to Save and Exit.

Reset configuration data

If you've recently added new hardware or resetting the default values did not help resolve your boot issues, you may also want to reset the configuration data.

Note

Not all CMOS setup screens have this feature.

Under Advanced

A Phoenix BIOS with Main - Advanced - Security at the top of the screen, you can get to this setting using the right arrow to move over to Advanced. Under Advanced, arrow down to the Reset Configuration Data option and change the value from Disabled or No to Enabled or Yes.

Once the above is done, press the key and Save and Exit CMOS setup.

In PnP/PCI Configurations

If you're working with a Phoenix BIOS with PnP/PCI Configuration, move the cursor down to this option and press . In the PnP/PCI Configurations, change the Reset Configuration Data from Disabled to Enabled.

Once the above is done, press the key and Save and Exit the CMOS setup.

Hard reset the CMOS

Caution

When inside your computer, make sure you're aware of ESD and all its potential dangers.

CMOS battery

If the steps above do not reset the CMOS settings, we suggest removing the CMOS battery, which causes the computer to forget all CMOS settings, including the password. Wait 5 minutes after removing the battery, then put the battery back into the motherboard and turn on the computer.

If the CMOS battery cannot be found, you need to do a hard reset on the CMOS using a jumper or DIP switch on the motherboard. Information on finding these is in your computer or motherboard documentation.

Motherboard manufacturer support sites

Every motherboard is different. If you're still having problems, it's important to consult the documentation for your specific motherboard. See our motherboard company listing for a full list of computer motherboards.

In Windows, CMOS stands for Complementary Metal-Oxide Semiconductor. It is a battery-powered memory located on your computer’s motherboard. The term also describes a memory technology that helps the Basic Input/Output System (BIOS) program on your PC store vital system data like date & time settings, boot sequence, disk drive information, and other system configurations.

If there’s a problem with this memory, your PC will display a “CMOS Checksum Bad” error before it boots Windows. In this guide, we’ll show you what causes the error and how to get it fixed.

What Causes CMOS Checksum Error in Windows?

“Checksum” describes a value (number or letter) used to monitor or verify the integrity of files in a storage device. You’ll get the “CMOS Checksum Bad” error on your PC if values in the CMOS memory are corrupt. This could be due to installing an incorrect or corrupt BIOS update. The CMOS itself is powered by a dedicated battery, so you might also get the CMOS checksum error if the CMOS battery is weak, bad, or old.

Power surges or improperly disconnecting your PC from a power outlet can also cause the CMOS checksum error. Despite having numerous causative factors, the “CMOS Checksum Bad” is easy to fix.

Fun Fact: CMOS is also referred to as Real-Time Clock (RTC), Complementary-Symmetry Metal-Oxide-Semiconductor (COS-MOS), or Non-Volatile RAM (NVRAM).

How to Fix CMOS Checksum Bad Error

If your Windows PC displays a “CMOS Checksum Bad” error when booting up, the troubleshooting solutions listed below should resolve the problem.

Perform an Automatic Repair

You can also use the Start-Up Repair tool to fix issues preventing Windows from booting correctly. Shut down your computer and follow the steps below.

  1. If your PC is powered on, head to Settings > Update & Security > Advanced startup > Restart Now.

If Windows won’t boot, shut down your computer and power it back on. When the screen lights up, press the F8 or F11 key repeatedly until the advanced startup menu comes on the screen.

Another way to load the advanced startup menu is to restart your PC in three successions. That is, power on your PC and hold the power button immediately until your PC goes off. Repeat that three times and your PC should load the advanced startup menu on the third try.

  1. Select Troubleshoot.
  1. Select Advanced options.
  1. Select Start-up Repair.
  1. Enter your account’s password click Continue. Leave the dialog box empty and click Continue if your account isn’t password-protected.

The tool will diagnose your PC and attempt to fix all system errors preventing it from booting correctly. Restart your computer when the operation reaches completion and check if that fixes the CMOS checksum.

Reset BIOS to Factory Default

Performing a BIOS reset will erase all information saved in the CMOS. On the positive side, the operation will also remove corrupt data and incorrect BIOS values. How you access your BIOS and reset it to factory default would depend on your motherboard and your PC’s brand.

Refer to our tutorial on resetting BIOS in Windows for more information. Ensure you reboot your computer after resetting BIOS. That’ll rebuild the checksum values and fix the CMOS error.

Press F1 or F2 on the error page to enter the BIOS setup page and select Load Defaults, Load Set Defaults, or whatever option is assigned to restoring BIOS to default.

Some computers may require you to press a different key (usually Del or F8) to enter the Windows BIOS setup page. Check the instructions on the error page to be sure.

If you exited the error page, you can reset the BIOS from the Windows Advanced Startup menu. Power off your PC and wait for about 20-30 seconds for it to shut down completely.

  1. Press the power button and hold the F8 or F11 key as your PC boots up, precisely before the Windows logo appears on the screen.
  2. Select Troubleshoot.
  1. Select Advanced options.
  1. Select UEFI Firmware Settings.
  1. Click Restart to boot your PC to the BIOS setup utility.

The BIOS setup interface will vary based on your PC’s brand. Nonetheless, you should find the option to reset BIOS in the “Exit” section of the BIOS utility.

  1. Go to the Exit, use the arrow-down key to move the selector to Load Default Settings, and press Enter.

If you don’t find the option to reset the BIOS settings to default, contact your PC’s manufacturer or check your device’s instruction manual.

  1. Select Yes and press Enter.
  1. Move the cursor to the Exit Saving Changes and press Enter.

That will restore your PC’s BIOS to default settings and boot Windows. To confirm if that fixed the problem, shut down your PC and turn it back on. Try the next troubleshooting step if you still get the “CMOS Checksum Bad” error when your PC comes on.

Update BIOS

You should perform a BIOS update if your PC’s BIOS version doesn’t correspond with the latest version on the manufacturer’s website (check the “Driver Download” or “BIOS” section). Download the BIOS utility containing the update that matches your PC model, run it with administrative privileges, and let the tool automatically update your device’s BIOS.

Before you proceed, understand that the BIOS is a delicate component of your PC’s motherboard. Installing the incorrect update, or updating BIOS wrongly, can do permanent damage to the motherboard. Follow the PC manufacturer’s instructions to the letter so you don’t ruin your device.

That said, we strongly advise that you download BIOS files only from your PC manufacturer’s website. Also, be extra sure that the BIOS update belongs to your PC model. Installing another device’s BIOS file on your PC will brick the motherboard. 

Finally, do not power off or restart your PC during the BIOS update. Any interruption (e.g., power surge or outage) during the operation can damage the BIOS or motherboard.

Replace the CMOS Battery

As mentioned earlier, your computer may be unable to verify the integrity of BIOS files if the battery powering the CMOS is weak. Signs of a failing CMOS battery include incorrect data & time, unresponsive peripherals, problems connecting to the internet, etc.

If you still get the CMOS checksum error after trying these troubleshooting fixes, the CMOS battery is probably bad. Or perhaps, it’s displaced from its position.

You should only attempt to readjust or replace the CMOS battery if you’re a skilled computer technician. Otherwise, visit a nearby repair center or contact your PC manufacturer.

Check for Hardware Damage

Partial or complete damage to your PC’s motherboard can also trigger the “CMOS Checksum Bad” error. Take your PC to a repair center to get your motherboard examined for physical damage.

How to Fix a CMOS Checksum Error

A CMOS Checksum error is a conflict between the CMOS (Complementary Metal Oxide Semiconductor) and BIOS (Basic Input Output System) that happens when you boot up a computer. It occurs when the computer isn't able to read startup information or the data does not match up.

In this guide, we explain what causes a CMOS Checksum error and offer instructions for troubleshooting and fixing the problem.

Causes of CMOS Checksum Errors

There are several potential reasons for a CMOS checksum error, but almost all come back to the information on the CMOS being corrupt for one reason or another.

Before an operating system boots, the computer's motherboard handles many lower-level tasks, preparing the system components to run and eventually handing those tasks off to the operating system. The software on the motherboard is called the BIOS. In addition to booting up a computer, the BIOS contains several settings for its hardware, like speeds, voltages, system time, and boot priorities. The BIOS settings aren't saved on the hard drive. They're on a chip called the CMOS.

Whenever you make changes to the BIOS settings, start your computer up, or shut it down, those events are written to the CMOS. It keeps track of the data to make sure that things run normally the next time you start the computer. The CMOS stays on while the rest of the computer is off because it's powered independently by a watch battery. When the computer starts, it reads the state it was last in from the CMOS. Usually, it can read the information and restore itself without an issue. A CMOS Checksum error occurs when the computer isn't able to read that information.

One of the more common causes of a checksum error is also the simplest to solve. The battery that powers the CMOS is a watch battery, and it can run out of power. When the battery is dead, the CMOS can't store information anymore.

Power surges and sudden losses of power are other causes. If a computer doesn't have a chance to write information to the CMOS before it's abruptly powered off, it has a hard time picking up where it left off. Power surges can also cause corruption or hardware damage.

The final cause is less common, but it can happen. If the BIOS is damaged or corrupted, it will cause a mismatch between the BIOS and CMOS. It's uncommon but possible for a virus to infect and corrupt the BIOS. Still, it's more common that a BIOS update failed or the operating system updated something which caused it to get out of sync with the BIOS.

How to Fix CMOS Checksum Errors

While it is not always possible to fix a CMOS checksum error, especially in the case of hardware damage, the fix is usually simple. Follow these steps, in order, to resolve the error.

  1. Restart the computer. A normal restart usually creates a new checksum and eliminates the error. An error lingering after a normal restart requires some more work.

  2. Download and flash a BIOS update. Download the update from the motherboard manufacturer's website. Many motherboards can download an update from within the BIOS while they're plugged into your network using an Ethernet cable.

  3. Reset the BIOS. Some motherboards have a switch either on the board or on the back of the computer to reset the BIOS settings. If there isn't a switch like that, remove the CMOS battery from your system for a minute or two. The loss of power causes everything in the CMOS to reset.

  4. Replace the CMOS battery. If the cause is a dead battery, all you need is a new one. The CMOS battery is located on the computer's motherboard. On desktops, it's easy to get to, and it's only held in place with a metal clip. On laptops, you'll need to open the machine up to get to the motherboard, and that might be better left to a professional.

  5. Consult a technician or computer repair expert. If all of the above fail, the problem may be due to hardware damage. Before you buy a new motherboard or recycle the machine, have a professional check it out to be sure.

FAQ

  • A checksum is an algorithm used in many programs to confirm the integrity of a file. This is used frequently in downloaded programs to confirm the file hasn't been tampered with or corrupted.

  • Try using WinZip to repair the file. To do this, right-click on the file and select Extract file. Next, go to Miscellaneous and place a checkmark next to Keep Broken Files then choose an extraction location and select OK.

Thanks for letting us know!

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Before this happened I was trying to fix another problem, I wanted to boot into my USB flash drive but spamming Esc, F1, F2, F8, F11, F12, DEL didn't take me to the BIOS screen nor the boot selection screen. So I tried resetting CMOS settings by taking the CMOS battery out and let it sit for about 8 minutes before putting it back in, after that I power up my PC and thats what led me to this problem. The keyboard backlights are on, and it says that its detecting the keyboard. The numlock lights are also blinking though I dont know what it means

Things I've tried:
  • Resetting the battery again
  • Bought a new CMOS battery
  • Taking off 1 RAM stick
  • Taking off the SSD and HDD
  • Short the jumper by touching it with a screwdriver (I never had a CMOS jumper on my motherboard)
  • Reseating the PSU connector cable, all my USB devices, HDD/SSD
CPU: Intel Xeon X5670
Motherboard: Koloe X58 LGA1366
RAM: 1x8gb 1x4gb
GPU: GTX 750TI 1G
PSU: Delta DPS-750CB

Also my BIOS is Legacy and not UEFI, I dont understand what the differences is though, just heard that I can't boot to BIOS from Windows with Legacy

 

Hi,

This error usually indicates that your hard drive has failed or is about to fail and in most cases. We would highly recommend getting in touch with your device manufacturer for assistance regarding this concern.

If you have any software-related concerns and need assistance in the future, don't hesitate to let us know.

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Hi Michelle,

I checked; the problem wasn't the drive. It was the battery, I had put that loosely, I think. Now I have re-inserted it properly and it's working fine.

Thanks

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CMOS Checksum Bad Error

Computer users frequently encounter CMOS Checksum Bad Error for many reasons. This error may be frustrating, but the good part is that it can be solved easily. There are very few reasons for the CMOS Checksum Bad Error, hence they can be handled effectively.

The Error Explained

A checksum is computed as an error detecting code to guard the BIOS settings stored in the CMOS memory. The CMOS Checksum Bad Error is an error that occurs when the CMOS values turn out to be incorrect. The CMOS memory stores a specific value normally to guard the BIOS software. Each time the computer is booted, this value, which is a number is checked against the stored value in the CMOS memory. If these two values are different, it causes a CMOS Checksum error message. If these values are the same, the computer boots normally.

Each computer usually deals with the CMOS Checksum Bad Error differently. Some computers warn the user and continue to boot up using settings in the CMOS, while other computers might warn the user and use the default settings in the BIOS as the correct settings and carry on with a normal boot or reboot. Usually, the strategy the computer employs is stated in the error message.

Causes of CMOS Checksum Bad Error

There are usually three main reasons that a CMOS Checksum Bad Error occurs. They include:

  • CMOS Battery may not be functioning properly. The battery life may have expired.
  • The user or a virus may have updated the BIOS.
  • The computer may not have been shut down properly e.g. shutting off the computer’s main power without first shutting down the computer (MS Windows requires the computer to be shut down before the power is shut off).

Solutions to CMOS Checksum Bad Error

The CMOS Checksum Bad Error can be fixed easily by following the listed steps carefully.

CMOS Battery May Not be Functioning Properly

If the user suspects that the CMOS battery is not functioning properly, he/she can easily change it. Before changing the battery, reboot the computer to make sure that the error still exists. If it does, go into the CMOS and write down all of the settings. If all the settings are lost, they can usually be retrieved from the computer manufacturer. Now locate the battery and remove it. Consult the computer manual or technical support to remove your battery (the battery is flat, shiny silver colored, and coin-shaped) if needed. Take down the CMOS battery’s information such as volt, size, etc. Replace the old battery with a new one and reenter the CMOS settings. If the battery caused the CMOS Checksum Bad Error, the problem should be solved.

The BIOS May Have Been Updated

If the BIOS was recently updated, the CMOS settings may have reset. Make sure that the values entered in the BIOS are correct or simply reset them to the default settings. If a virus has updated the BIOS settings, run a virus scan and make sure that the BIOS settings are back to the default.

The Computer May Not Have Been Shut Down Properly

Sometimes when running MS Windows, if the computer is shut down without first properly shutting down the operating system, the CMOS settings will get corrupted, causing the CMOS Checksum Bad Error. Easily avoid this error by making sure that the computer is shut down properly before turning off the main power. This usually entails going into the Start Menu and clicking Turn Off Computer/ Shut Down. If improper shutdown caused the error,  the issue may have been solved.

CMOS Checksum Bad – Date Time Not Set

cmos checksum bad - date time not set error

When you boot your PC and get a CMOS Checksum Bad – Date Time Not Set error, do not panic. It simply means that the CMOS battery on your motherboard is failing or is drained. The good news is that fixing this problem is quite easy – just replace the CMOS battery.

CMOS Checksum Bad – Date Time Not Set error is a common problem that can occur on any computer. If you are seeing this error, don’t worry – we can help! In this guide, we will walk you through the steps to fix CMOS Checksum Bad – Date Time Not Set error. We will also discuss some of the causes of this error and how to prevent it from happening in the future. Let’s get started!

What is CMOS

CMOS is short for Complementary Metal-Oxide-Semiconductor and it keeps your PC’s clock running while it is turned off so it can remember your current settings when you turn it on again. A typical CMOS battery is a 3-volt CR2032 button battery that is mostly used on scientific calculators. It can last for years (5 years or longer) and is fairly cheap.

Common causes of CMOS Checksum Bad – Date Time Not Set error

The CMOS Checksum Bad – Date Time Not Set error can be caused by a variety of things, including:

– A bad CMOS battery

– Incorrect CMOS settings

– A faulty motherboard

Fortunately, there are a few things you can do to fix CMOS Checksum Bad – Date Time Not Set error. We will go over each of these methods in the sections below.

Methods to fix CMOS Checksum Bad – Date Time Not Set error

One way to fix CMOS Checksum Bad – Date Time Not Set error is to replace the CMOS battery. The CMOS battery is responsible for keeping the CMOS settings stored in memory, and if it fails, the settings may become corrupt. You can usually find the CMOS battery on the motherboard, and it is usually a small, round, silver-colored battery. Once you have found the CMOS battery, simply remove it and replace it with a new one.

Another way to fix CMOS Checksum Bad – Date Time Not Set error is to reset the CMOS settings. You can do this by removing the CMOS battery for a few minutes and then replacing it. This will cause the CMOS settings to be reset to their default values. Once the CMOS settings have been reset, you can then enter your new settings and save them.

When you get the CMOS Checksum Bad – Date Time Not Set error, you will get two choices – you can run SETUP (BIOS) and enter the correct date and time there, or you can continue to boot with default values and set the right date and time there.

Theoretically, your PC will still to power-on if you do not replace this battery but you will continue to get this error. That means you will have to go through those extra steps on BIOS every time you turn off your machine and then boot up which can be annoying.

It is recommended to set the correct date and time in BIOS than to do it after you enter your system though. Because if any of your software is set to auto-update, it can look ugly when you do not correct your system date and time quickly enough. Imagine your anti-virus saying that it is out-of-date because you last updated in 1990 – and the only way you can get rid of that is to wait until your anti-virus sends out another update while your PC system date and time are current.

The good news is that replacing the CMOS battery is quite simple. Make sure all power is off on your machine and unplug all cables on your CPU case (make sure you remember where all of them go for when you plug them back in). Open the case and you will see the battery on the motherboard. Carefully take it out and replace it with a new one. Now, it is just a matter of putting the cover and cables back.

But if you could not be bothered with replacing the CMOS battery or want to hold it off for a little while, it may still boot normally without the CMOS error if you keep your machine plugged in your wall outlet (or if it is on a power-strip and you keep the power-strip turned on). In a way, that keeps the CMOS clock running even if the PC is off.

Then again, if you will be out for weeks or months, it is not practical to keep your PC plugged in for that duration. It is best to replace the CMOS battery as soon as you get the chance. If you do, you can forget about it for maybe another 5-10 years again which by then, you may want to upgrade your machine anyway.

Replacing the CMOS battery is a whole lot better than worrying about keeping your PC plugged in or having to reset the date and time on BIOS every single time you get the CMOS Checksum Bad – Date Time Not Set error. Besides, a CR2032 battery lasts a really long time so you will probably only have to replace it once and not think about it again.

If neither of these methods work, you may need to replace your motherboard. A faulty motherboard can cause a variety of problems, including CMOS Checksum Bad – Date Time Not Set error. If you think your motherboard may be the problem, we recommend taking it to a qualified technician for further diagnosis.

Preventive measures for CMOS Checksum Bad – Date Time Not Set Error

Now that we’ve gone over how to fix CMOS Checksum Bad – Date Time Not Set error, let’s talk about how to prevent it from happening in the first place. One of the best ways to do this is to keep your CMOS settings backed up. That way, if something does go wrong, you can simply restore your CMOS settings from a backup and avoid having to troubleshoot the problem.

Another way to prevent CMOS Checksum Bad – Date Time Not Set error is to regularly check your CMOS battery. As we mentioned earlier, the CMOS battery is responsible for keeping the CMOS settings stored in memory, and if it fails, the settings may become corrupt. To avoid this, we recommend checking the CMOS battery every few months to make sure it is still working properly.

We hope this guide has been helpful in troubleshooting CMOS Checksum Bad – Date Time Not Set error. If you have any further questions, please feel free to reach out to us in the comments section below. Thanks for reading!

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How to reset CMOS or BIOS settings

Updated: 07/06/2021 by Computer Hope

Reset CMOS

If the computer has problems booting, errors during boot, or other abnormal problems that cannot be resolved, try resetting the CMOS settings to the default settings as explained below.

Load or Reset defaults

CMOS restore defaults

To reset your computer's CMOS or BIOS settings back to the default settings, follow the steps below.

  1. Enter CMOS setup.
  1. In CMOS setup, look for an option to reset the CMOS values to the default setting or an option to load the fail-safe defaults. With many CMOS setup screens, wrong cmos settings error, there is a function key to do this. For example, thewrong cmos settings error,or key, as shown in the picture, may be set up as a shortcut to load the default settings. Other setups may list an option that you can arrow over to using the arrow keys and pressing .
  2. When found and selected, you are asked if you're sure you want to load the defaults. Press Y for yes or arrow to the yes option.
  3. Once the default values are set, make sure to Save and Exit.

Reset configuration data

If you've recently added new hardware or resetting the default values did not help resolve your boot issues, you may also want to reset the configuration data.

Note

Not all CMOS setup screens have this feature.

Under Advanced

A Phoenix BIOS with Main - Advanced - Security at the top of the screen, you can get to this setting using the right arrow to move over to Advanced. Under Advanced, arrow down to the Reset Configuration Data option and change the value from Disabled or No to Enabled or Yes.

Once the above is done, press the key and Save and Exit CMOS setup.

In PnP/PCI Configurations

If you're working with a Phoenix BIOS with PnP/PCI Configuration, move the cursor down to this option and presswrong cmos settings error. In the PnP/PCI Configurations, change the Reset Configuration Data from Disabled to Enabled.

Once the above is done, press the key and Save and Exit the CMOS setup.

Hard reset the CMOS

Caution

When inside your computer, make sure you're aware of ESD and all its potential dangers.

CMOS battery

If the steps above do not reset the Wrong cmos settings error settings, we suggest removing the CMOS battery, which causes the computer to forget all CMOS settings, including the password. Wait 5 minutes after removing the battery, then put the battery back into the motherboard and turn on the computer.

If the CMOS battery cannot be found, you sql s1000 error to do a hard reset on the CMOS using a jumper or DIP switch on the motherboard. Information on finding these is in your computer or motherboard documentation.

Motherboard manufacturer support sites

Every motherboard is different. If you're still having problems, it's important to consult the documentation for your wrong cmos settings error motherboard. See our motherboard company listing for a full list of computer motherboards.

In Windows, CMOS stands for Complementary Metal-Oxide Semiconductor. It is a battery-powered memory located on your computer’s motherboard. The term also describes a memory technology that helps the Basic Input/Output System (BIOS) program on your PC store vital system data like date & time settings, boot sequence, disk drive information, and other system configurations.

If there’s a problem with this memory, your PC will display a “CMOS Checksum Bad” error before it boots Windows. In this guide, we’ll show you what causes the error and how to get it fixed.

What Causes CMOS Checksum Error in Windows?

“Checksum” describes a value (number or letter) used to monitor or verify the integrity of files in a storage device. You’ll get the “CMOS Checksum Bad” error on your PC if values in the CMOS memory are corrupt. This could be due to installing an incorrect or corrupt BIOS update. The CMOS itself is powered by a dedicated battery, wrong cmos settings error, so you might also get the CMOS checksum error if the CMOS battery is weak, bad, or old.

Power surges or improperly disconnecting your PC from a power outlet can also cause the CMOS checksum error. Despite having numerous causative factors, wrong cmos settings error, the “CMOS Checksum Bad” is easy to fix.

Fun Fact: CMOS is also referred to as Real-Time Clock (RTC), Complementary-Symmetry Metal-Oxide-Semiconductor (COS-MOS), or Non-Volatile RAM (NVRAM).

How to Fix CMOS Checksum Bad Error

If your Windows PC displays a “CMOS Checksum Bad” error when booting up, the troubleshooting solutions listed below should resolve the problem.

Perform an Automatic Repair

You can also use the Start-Up Repair tool to fix issues preventing Windows from booting correctly. Shut down your computer and follow the steps below.

  1. If your PC is powered on, head to Settings > Update & Security > Advanced startup > Restart Now.

If Windows won’t boot, shut down your computer and power it back on. When the screen lights up, press the F8 or F11 key repeatedly until the advanced startup menu comes on the screen.

Another way to load the advanced startup menu is to restart your PC in three successions. That is, power on your PC and hold the power button immediately until your PC goes off. Repeat that three times and your PC should load the advanced startup menu on the third try.

  1. Select Troubleshoot.
  1. Select Advanced options.
  1. Select Start-up Repair.
  1. Enter your account’s password click Continue. Leave the dialog box empty and click Continue if your account isn’t password-protected.

The tool will diagnose your PC and attempt to fix all system errors preventing it from booting correctly. Restart your computer when the operation reaches completion and check if that fixes the CMOS checksum.

Reset BIOS to Factory Default

Performing a BIOS reset will erase all information saved in the CMOS. On the positive side, the operation will also remove corrupt data and incorrect BIOS values. How you access your BIOS and reset it to factory default would depend on your motherboard and your PC’s brand.

Refer to our tutorial on resetting BIOS in Windows for more information. Ensure you reboot your computer after resetting BIOS. That’ll rebuild the checksum values and fix the CMOS error.

Press F1 or F2 on the error page to enter the BIOS setup page and select Load Defaults, Load Set Defaults, or whatever option is assigned to restoring BIOS to default.

Some computers may require you to press a different key (usually Del or F8) to enter the Windows BIOS setup page, wrong cmos settings error. Check the instructions on the error page to be sure.

If you exited the error page, you can reset the BIOS from the Windows Advanced Startup menu. Power off your PC and wait for wrong cmos settings error 20-30 seconds for it to shut down completely.

  1. Press the power button and hold the F8 or F11 key as your PC boots up, precisely before the Windows logo appears on the screen.
  2. Select Troubleshoot.
  1. Select Advanced options.
wrong cmos settings error src="https://helpdeskgeek.com/wp-content/pictures/2021/08/cmos-checksum-error-windows-10.jpg" alt="">
  1. Select UEFI Firmware Settings.
  1. Click Restart to boot your PC to the BIOS setup utility.

The BIOS setup interface will vary based on your PC’s brand. Nonetheless, you should find the option to reset BIOS in the “Exit” section of the BIOS utility.

  1. Go to the Exit, use the arrow-down key to move the selector to Load Default Settings, and press Enter.

If you don’t find the option to reset the BIOS settings to default, contact your PC’s manufacturer or check your device’s instruction manual.

  1. Select Yes and press Enter.
  1. Move the cursor to the Exit Saving Changes and press Enter.

That will restore your PC’s BIOS to default settings and boot Windows, wrong cmos settings error. To confirm if that fixed the problem, shut down your PC and turn it back on. Try the next troubleshooting step if you still get the “CMOS Checksum Bad” error when your PC comes on.

Update BIOS

You should perform a BIOS update if your PC’s BIOS version doesn’t correspond with the latest version on the manufacturer’s website (check the “Driver Download” or “BIOS” section). Download the BIOS utility containing the update that matches your PC model, run it with administrative privileges, and let the tool automatically update your device’s BIOS.

Before you proceed, understand that the BIOS is a delicate component of your PC’s motherboard. Installing the incorrect update, or updating BIOS wrongly, can do permanent damage to the motherboard, wrong cmos settings error. Follow the PC manufacturer’s instructions to the letter so you don’t ruin your device.

That said, we strongly advise that you download BIOS files only from your PC manufacturer’s website. Also, be extra sure that the BIOS update belongs to your PC model. Installing another device’s BIOS file on your PC will brick the motherboard. 

Finally, do not power off or restart your PC during the BIOS update. Any interruption (e.g., power surge or outage) during the operation can damage the BIOS or motherboard.

Replace the CMOS Battery

As mentioned earlier, wrong cmos settings error, your computer may be unable to verify the integrity of BIOS files if the battery powering the CMOS is weak. Signs of a failing CMOS battery include incorrect data & time, unresponsive peripherals, wrong cmos settings error, problems connecting to the internet, etc.

If you still get the CMOS checksum error after trying these troubleshooting fixes, the CMOS battery is probably bad, wrong cmos settings error. Or perhaps, it’s displaced from its position.

You should only attempt to readjust or replace the CMOS battery if you’re a skilled computer technician. Otherwise, visit a nearby repair center or contact your PC manufacturer.

Check for Hardware Damage

Partial or complete damage to your PC’s motherboard can also trigger the “CMOS Checksum Bad” error. Take your PC to a repair center to get your motherboard examined for physical damage.

CMOS Checksum Bad – Date Time Not Set

cmos checksum bad - date time not set error

When you boot your PC and get a CMOS Checksum Bad – Date Time Not Set error, do not panic. It simply means that the CMOS battery on your motherboard is failing or is drained. The good news is that fixing this problem is quite easy – just replace the CMOS battery.

CMOS Checksum Bad – Date Time Not Set error is a common problem that can occur on any computer. If you are seeing this error, don’t worry – we can help! In this guide, we will walk you through the steps to fix CMOS Checksum Bad – Date Time Not Set error. We will also discuss some of the causes of this error and how to prevent it from happening in the future. Let’s get started!

What is CMOS

CMOS is short for Complementary Metal-Oxide-Semiconductor and it keeps your PC’s clock running while it is turned off so it can remember your current settings when you turn it on again. A typical CMOS battery is a 3-volt CR2032 button battery that is mostly used on scientific calculators. It can last for years (5 years or longer) and is fairly cheap.

Common causes of CMOS Checksum Bad – Date Time Not Set error

The CMOS Checksum Bad – Date Time Not Set error can be caused by a variety of things, including:

– A bad CMOS battery

– Incorrect CMOS settings

– A faulty motherboard

Fortunately, wrong cmos settings error, there are a few things you can do to fix CMOS Checksum Bad – Date Time Not Set error. We will go over each of these methods in the sections below.

Methods to fix CMOS Checksum Bad – Date Time Not Set error

One way runtime error at 131 702 fix CMOS Checksum Bad – Date Time Not Set error is to replace the CMOS battery. The CMOS battery is responsible for keeping the CMOS settings stored in memory, and if it fails, the settings may become corrupt. You can usually find the CMOS battery on the motherboard, and it is usually a small, round, silver-colored battery. Once you have found the CMOS battery, simply remove it and replace it with wrong cmos settings error new one.

Another way to fix CMOS Checksum Bad – Date Time Not Set error is to reset the CMOS settings. You can do this by removing the CMOS battery for a few minutes and then replacing it. This will cause the CMOS settings wrong cmos settings error be reset to their default values. Once the CMOS settings have been reset, wrong cmos settings error, you can then enter your new settings and save them.

When you get the CMOS Checksum Bad – Date Time Not Set error, you will get two choices – you can run SETUP (BIOS) and enter the correct date and time there, or you can continue to boot with default values and set the right date and time there.

Theoretically, your PC will still to power-on if you do not replace this battery but you will continue to get this error. That means you will have to go through those extra steps on BIOS every time you turn off your machine and then boot up which can be annoying.

It is recommended to set the correct date and time in BIOS than to do it after you enter your system though. Because if any of your software is set to auto-update, it can look ugly when you do not correct your system date and time quickly enough. Imagine your anti-virus saying that it is out-of-date because you last updated in 1990 – and the only way you can get rid of that is to wait until your anti-virus sends out another update while your PC system date and time are current.

The good news is that replacing the CMOS battery is quite simple, wrong cmos settings error. Make sure all power is off on your machine and unplug all cables on your CPU case (make sure you remember where all of them go for when you plug them back in). Open the case and you will see the battery on the motherboard. Carefully take it out and replace it with a new one. Now, it is just a matter of putting the cover and cables back.

But if you could not be bothered with replacing the CMOS battery or want to hold it off for a little while, it may still boot normally without the CMOS error if you keep your machine plugged in your wall outlet (or if it is on a power-strip and you keep the power-strip turned on). In a way, that keeps the CMOS clock running even if the PC is off.

Then again, if you will be out for weeks or months, it is not practical to keep your PC plugged in for that duration. It is best to replace the CMOS battery as soon as you get the chance. If you do, you can forget about it for maybe another 5-10 years again which by then, you may want to upgrade your machine anyway.

Replacing the CMOS battery is a whole lot better than worrying about keeping your PC plugged in or having to reset the date and time on BIOS every single time you get the CMOS Checksum Bad – Date Time Not Set error. Besides, a CR2032 battery lasts a really long time so you will probably only have to replace it once and not think about it again.

If neither of these methods work, you may need to replace your motherboard. A faulty motherboard can cause a variety of problems, including CMOS Checksum Bad – Date Time Not Set error. If you think your motherboard may be the problem, we recommend taking it to a qualified technician for further diagnosis.

Preventive measures for CMOS Checksum Bad – Date Time Not Set Error

Now that we’ve gone over how to fix CMOS Checksum Bad – Date Time Not Set error, let’s talk about how to prevent it from happening in the first place. One of the best ways to do this is to keep your CMOS settings backed up. That way, if something does go wrong, you can simply restore your CMOS settings from a backup and avoid having to troubleshoot the problem.

Another way to prevent CMOS Checksum Bad – Date Time Not Set error is to regularly check your CMOS battery. As we mentioned earlier, the CMOS battery is responsible for keeping the CMOS settings stored in memory, and if it fails, the settings may become corrupt. To avoid this, we recommend checking the CMOS battery every few months to make sure it is still working properly.

We hope this guide has been helpful in troubleshooting CMOS Checksum Bad – Date Time Not Set error, wrong cmos settings error. If you have any further questions, please feel free to reach out to us in the comments section below. Thanks for reading!

Debajyoti Banerjee is the Founder, Director & CEO of Seven Boats- A leading digital marketing agency & digital marketing training institute in India since 2011. He is a Google & LinkedIn Certified Digital Marketer & Trainer, Brand Strategist, Consultant & Entrepreneur. Debajyoti has 17+ years of domain expertise & successful track records in Digital Marketing & emerging technologies. Learn moreSchedule an appointment with Debajyoti Banerjee

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Hi,

This error usually indicates that your hard drive has failed or is about to fail and in most cases. We would highly recommend getting in touch with your device manufacturer for assistance regarding this concern.

If you have any software-related concerns and need assistance in the future, don't hesitate to let us know.

wrong cmos settings error 2 people found this reply helpful

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Hi Michelle,

I checked; the problem wasn't the drive. It was the battery, I had put that loosely, wrong cmos settings error, I think. Now I have re-inserted it properly and it's working fine.

Thanks

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Before this happened I was trying to fix another problem, I wanted to boot into my USB flash drive but spamming Esc, F1, F2, F8, F11, wrong cmos settings error, F12, DEL didn't take me wrong cmos settings error the BIOS screen nor the boot selection screen. So I tried resetting CMOS settings by taking the CMOS battery out and let it sit for about 8 minutes before putting it back in, after that I power up my PC and thats what led me to this problem. The keyboard backlights are on, and it says that its detecting the keyboard. The numlock lights are also blinking though I dont know what it means

Things I've tried:
  • Resetting the battery again
  • Bought a new CMOS battery
  • Taking off 1 RAM stick
  • Taking off the SSD and HDD
  • Short the jumper by touching it with a screwdriver (I never had a CMOS jumper on my motherboard)
  • Reseating the PSU connector cable, all my USB devices, HDD/SSD
CPU: Intel Xeon X5670
Motherboard: Koloe X58 LGA1366
RAM: 1x8gb 1x4gb
GPU: GTX 750TI 1G
PSU: Delta DPS-750CB

Also my BIOS is Legacy and not UEFI, I dont understand what the differences is though, just heard that I can't boot to BIOS from Windows with Legacy

 

CMOS Checksum Bad Error

Computer users frequently encounter CMOS Checksum Bad Error for many reasons. This error may be frustrating, but the good part is that it can be solved easily. There are very few reasons for the CMOS Checksum Bad Error, hence they can be handled effectively.

The Error Explained

A checksum is computed as an error detecting code to guard the BIOS settings stored in the CMOS memory. The CMOS Checksum Bad Error is an error that occurs when the CMOS values turn out to be incorrect. The CMOS memory stores a specific value normally to guard the BIOS software. Each time the computer is booted, this value, which is a number is checked against the stored value in the CMOS memory. If these two values are different, it causes a CMOS Checksum error message. If these values are the same, the computer boots normally.

Each computer usually deals with the CMOS Checksum Bad Error differently. Some computers warn the user and continue to boot up using settings in the CMOS, while other computers might warn the user and use the default settings in the BIOS as the correct settings and carry on with a normal boot or reboot. Usually, the strategy the computer employs is stated in the error message.

Causes of CMOS Checksum Bad Error

There are usually three main reasons that a CMOS Checksum Bad Error occurs, wrong cmos settings error. They include:

  • CMOS Battery may not be functioning properly. The battery life may have expired.
  • The user or a virus may have updated the BIOS.
  • The computer may not have been shut down properly e.g. shutting off the computer’s main power without first shutting down the computer (MS Windows requires the computer to be shut down before the power is shut off).

Solutions to CMOS Checksum Bad Error

The CMOS Checksum Bad Error can be fixed easily by following the listed steps carefully.

CMOS Battery May Not be Functioning Properly

If the user suspects that the CMOS battery is not functioning properly, he/she can easily change it. Before changing the battery, reboot the computer to make sure that the error still exists. If it does, go into the CMOS and write down all of the settings. If all the settings are lost, they can usually be retrieved from the computer manufacturer. Now locate the battery and remove it. Consult the computer manual or technical support to remove your battery (the battery is flat, shiny silver colored, and coin-shaped) if needed. Take down the CMOS battery’s information such as volt, size, etc. Replace the old battery with a new one and reenter the CMOS settings. If the battery caused the CMOS Checksum Bad Error, the problem should be solved.

The BIOS May Have Been Updated

If the BIOS was recently updated, wrong cmos settings error, the CMOS settings may have reset. Make sure that the values entered in the BIOS are correct or simply reset them to the default settings. If a virus has updated the BIOS settings, run a wrong cmos settings error scan and make sure that the BIOS settings are back to the default.

The Computer May Not Have Been Shut Down Properly

Sometimes when running MS Windows, if the computer is shut down without first properly shutting down the operating system, the CMOS settings will get corrupted, causing the CMOS Checksum Bad Error. Easily avoid this error by making sure that the computer is shut down properly before turning off the main power. This usually entails going into the Start Menu wrong cmos settings error clicking Turn Off Computer/ Shut Down. If improper shutdown caused the error,  the issue may have been solved.

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CMOS Checksum Bad - Quick Easy Fix 1

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