Windows socket version 2 api error code

windows socket version 2 api error code

These error codes appear to be documented here, found with a Google search on (Windows Socket Version 2 API error code documentation in MSDN). If addr_type is TIPC_ADDR_NAME, then v1 is the server type, v2 is the port identifier, errors, i.e. for functions that use h_errno in the POSIX C API. In Winsock applications, error codes are retrieved using the WSAGetLastError function, the Windows Sockets substitute for the Windows GetLastError function.

Remarkable: Windows socket version 2 api error code

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Windows socket version 2 api error code
UWP apps]Minimum supported serverWindows Server 2003 [desktop apps

C# – How to discover the reason Socket.Select() reporting an error

I don't know C# but I do know UNIX sockets. My first thought was that you hadn't called accept() on the socket before selecting for read but (and this is proof I know less about sockets than I thought) you can select in the listen state to see which sockets can be accepted. Oh well, we live and learn, even at my advanced age :-)

Anyhow, referring to the MSDN docs here, found through Google with ("c#" socket bind listen select), it states:

These error codes appear to be documented here, found with a Google search on (Windows Socket Version 2 API error code documentation in MSDN).

I'm mentioning the Google search terms in case MSDN move their pages around. I'd output the error code from the exception caught, then look it up in the list on that second link to get the actual reason for failure. Once we know that, we may be able to help you further (or it might become blindingly obvious to blue screen registry error 0x51 point you don't need to ask us again :-).

One thing that seems incongruous: the prototype for the call has a fourth argument, number of microseconds to wait if no activity, windows socket version 2 api error code. Your code in the question doesn't have that. Now, as I said, I know little about C# so it may default to something (or maybe you've just left it off the question by accident).

But I would watch for a known bug if you're using -1 (or it defaults to -1): see here for details but it basically means -1 returns immediately rather than waiting forever. Workaround is to use -2 to give you an hour or so but you'll still have to cater for the fact it may return even though there's been no activity.

If it's not throwing an exception, but simply setting the error indication inthat's a hairier problem. I can see nothing is the docs that show how to easily figure it out but I'd look at these possibilities.

  • You may be able to call the WSA functions (e.g., ) to figure it out. I'm not sure how easy this is from C#. You could try to the errant socket and see if that gives you an exception detailing why it's a problem.
  • The class has a member which is the operating system handle for the socket. It may be possible to extract error information by following that.
  • Have you thought about add url serfing users error to database threads for connection processing and bypassing the use of altogether (i.e., using only but from multiple threads)?

Another thing I found has to do with socket debugging. This page has a section at the bottom which shows how to do network tracing. .NET 2 apparently didn't support this for but that may have changed in the latest version.

An Intro to Windows Socket Programming with C

< Winsock 2 C Programming Index

Differences between socket programming on Windows, Linux, windows socket version 2 api error code, and macOS

This site, and my book, both focus on writing portable networking code. Of course, it's not possible to write portable code until you know the differences between platforms.

This article aims to provide a quick run-down of the major differences between network programming on Windows using Winsock and network programming on Linux or macOS using BSD sockets / Berkeley sockets.

The needed header files for Winsock (Windows) and Berkeley sockets (Linux and macOS) differ.

On Windows, you may want to include your headers like this:

#ifndef _WIN32_WINNT #define _WIN32_WINNT 0x0600 #endif #include <winsock2.h> #include <ws2tcpip.h>

To use Berkeley sockets on Linux or macOS windows socket version 2 api error code will probably want the following headers:

#include <sys/types.h> #include <sys/socket.h> #include <netinet/in.h> #include <arpa/inet.h> #include <netdb.h> #include <unistd.h> #include <errno.h>

Linking

On Windows, you will need to link your networked programs with the Winsock library. Some compliers may let you do this with a pragma:

#pragma comment(lib, "ws2_32.lib")

Other compliers will need you to pass in a command line parameter to link the library.

This isn't needed on Linux or macOS.

Winsock needs to be initialized

Before you can use Winsock on Windows, you need to initialize it. This is done with a call to the function. An example follows:

WSADATA d; if (WSAStartup(MAKEWORD(2, 2), &d)) { fprintf(stderr, "Failed to initialize.\n"); }

The macro is used to request the version of Winsock — 2.2 in this case. The returned by indicates the actual version of Winsock returned. It's worth noting that the Winsock API has been stable for a very long autocad2012 internal error namespace mismatch. Winsock version 2.2 was first released in 1996, and at the time of this writing (2020), it's still the latest version.

You will also want to call the function when your Windows program is finished using Winsock.

On Linux and macOS, there is no need to call any initialization functions or cleanup functions when using the Berkeley socket libraries.

Creating a socket

When creating a new socket, you'll need to call the function, windows socket version 2 api error code. On Windows, this function returns anwhile on Linux and macOS returns a normal (signed) .

The way you check if your call to succeeded or failed varies between platforms.

I've written an article about the return value of. You'll want to check that out to learn how to determine if the call to succeeded or failed.

Closing a socket

Closing a socket on Windows/Winsock uses the function.

Closing a socket on Linux or macOS uses the function. This is because on Unix-like systems socket handles are essentially equivalent to file handles. This means that on Linux and macOS, you can generally use all of the general purpose file functions with socket handles (e.g.), windows socket version 2 api error code. On Windows, socket handles can only be used with special socket functions.

Configuring a socket

On Windows you can set some socket features with the function. On Unix-like systems, you can use the (or the older and not recommended ) function.

Both platforms implement the function. However, the type of the parameter of that function on Windows iswhile on other platforms it is. This is a tiny difference, and it won't affect most C programmers. If you're writing code to be complied as C++, you may need an explicit cast before calling .

Error codes and messages

On Linux and macOS, you can get the last socket error by simplying reading the global variable. On Windows you'll want to use the function.

Once you have the error code, you may also want a more descriptive error message. On Linux and macOS, you can use the function for this, while on Windows you will want to use the function.

You can read about a cross-platform approach to socket error messages here.

Other issues

There are many other differences as well. For example, the function used to multiplex sockets works very similar on both Windows and Unix-like systems, but the way this function stores socket identifiers is different between platforms. So you can and should use on both platforms, but you have to be careful about how you interact with it. The same is true of many other socket functions as well.

For more information on the differences between Winsock and Berkeley sockets, there is a really good write-up from Microsoft about porting socket applications to Windows.

For new programs, I suggest you take a nuanced approach and attempt to write code that works on both platforms, whenever possible. For example, on Linux you could use to send data through a socket. However, if you use the function instead, it will work on both Linux and Windows. Instead of working to port code between systems, it's easier to simply use portable methods from the beginning. That's blood magic error fileinarchive_c lot of what I windows socket version 2 api error code to address in my book.




I hope you found this article helpful. I'd love to hear any feedback you might have. Don't hesitate to get in touch.

You can find the rest of my network programming articles here.

UWP apps]Target PlatformWindowsHeaderwinsock2.h (include Winsock2.h)LibraryWs2_32.libDLLWs2_32.dll

See also

Error Codes - errno, h_errno and WSAGetLastError

FormatMessage

WSASetLastError

WSAStartup

Windows Sockets Error Codes

Winsock Functions

Winsock Reference

getsockopt

Error Codes - errno, h_errno and WSAGetLastError

descriptionms.assetidtitlems.topicms.date

In Winsock applications, error codes are retrieved using the WSAGetLastError function, the Windows Sockets substitute for the Windows GetLastError function.

cb73fc92-74bd-4c8b-a1c0-6daf4d298aa1

Error Codes - errno, h_errno and WSAGetLastError

article

05/31/2018

In Winsock applications, error codes are retrieved using the WSAGetLastError function, the Windows Sockets substitute for the Windows GetLastError function. The error codes returned by Windows Sockets are similar to UNIX socket error code constants, but the constants are all prefixed with WSA. So in Winsock applications the WSAEWOULDBLOCK error code would be returned, while in UNIX applications the EWOULDBLOCK error code would be returned.

Error codes set by Windows Sockets are not made available through the errno variable. Additionally, for the getXbyY class of functions, error codes are not made available through the h_errno variable. The WSAGetLastError function is intended to provide a reliable way for a thread in a multithreaded process to obtain per-thread error information.

For compatibility with Berkeley UNIX (BSD), early versions of Windows (Windows 95 with the Windows Socket 2 Update and Windows 98, for example) redefined regular Berkeley error constants typically found in errno.h on BSD as the equivalent Windows Sockets WSA errors. So for example, ECONNREFUSED was defined as WSAECONNREFUSED in windows socket version 2 api error code Winsock.h header file. In subsequent versions of Windows (Windows NT 3.1 and later) these defines were commented out to avoid conflicts with errno.h used with Microsoft C/C++ and Visual Studio.

The Winsock2.h header file included with the Microsoft Windows Software Development Kit (SDK), Platform Software Development Kit (SDK), and Visual Studio still contains a commented out block of defines within an #ifdef 0 and #endif block that define the BSD socket error codes to be the same as the WSA error constants. These can be used to provide some compatibility with UNIX, BSD, and Linux socket programming. For compatibility with BSD, an application may choose to change the Winsock2.h and uncomment this block. However, application developers are strongly discouraged from uncommenting this block because of inevitable conflicts with errno.h in most applications. Also, the BSD socket errors are defined to very different values than are used in UNIX, BSD, and Linux programs. Application developers are very strongly encouraged to use the WSA error constants in socket applications.

These defines remain commented out in the Winsock2.h header within an #ifdef 0 and #endif block. If an application developer insists on using the BSD error codes for compatibility, then an application may choose to include a line of the form:

#include<windows.h> #defineerrnoWSAGetLastError()

This allows networking code which was written to use the global errno to work correctly in a single-threaded environment. There are some very serious drawbacks. If a source file includes code which inspects errno for both socket and non-socket functions, this mechanism cannot be used. Furthermore, it is not possible for an application to assign a new value to errno. (In Windows Sockets, the function WSASetLastError may be used for this purpose.)

Typical BSD Style

r = recv(.); if (r == -1 && errno == EWOULDBLOCK) {.}

Preferred Style

r = recv(.); if (r == -1/* (but see below) */ && WSAGetLastError() == EWOULDBLOCK) {.}

Although error constants consistent with Berkeley Sockets 4.3 are provided for compatibility purposes, applications are strongly encouraged to use the WSA error code definitions. This is because error codes returned by certain Windows Sockets functions fall into the standard range of error codes as defined by Microsoft C©. Thus, a better version of the preceding source code fragment is:

r = recv(.); if (r == -1/* (but see below) */ && WSAGetLastError() == WSAEWOULDBLOCK) {.}

The original Winsock 1.1 specification defined in 1995 recommended a set of error codes, and listed the possible windows socket version 2 api error code that can be returned as a result of each function. Windows Sockets 2 added functions and features with other Windows Sockets error codes returned in addition to those listed in the original Winsock specification. Additional functions have been added over time to windows socket version 2 api error code Winsock for use by developers. For example, new name service functions (getaddrinfo and getnameinfo, for example) were added that support both IPv6 and IPv4 on Windows XP and later. Some of the older IPv4-only name service functions (the getXbyY class of functions, for example) have been deprecated.

A complete list of possible error codes returned by Windows Sockets functions is given in the section on Windows Sockets Error Codes.

Related topics

Handling Winsock Errors

Porting Socket Applications to Winsock

Windows Sockets Error Codes

Winsock Programming Considerations

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