Uzbek terrorist in norway

uzbek terrorist in norway

Terrorism and Environmental Security. Below are some examples of projects led by Uzbekistan and NATO Allies under the framework of the NATO SPS. Programme. However, weaknesses exist in the implementation of targeted financial sanctions relating to terrorist financing and proliferation financing and the lack of. Norwegian far-right leaders told the court trying Anders Behring Breivik on Tuesday the mass killer was right to fear his nation's "planned.

Uzbek terrorist in norway - consider

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Marc Nathanson

Ambassador

Sharon Hudson-Dean

Deputy Chief of Mission

Marc Nathanson

Ambassador

Sharon Hudson-Dean

Deputy Chief of Mission

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U.S. Citizens with emergencies, please call (+47) 21 30 85 40

Outside of Office Hours, contact: (+47) 21 30 85 40

Outside of Norway: 011 47 2130 8540

Oslo

The visiting address is:
U.S. Embassy Oslo
Morgedalsvegen 36
0378 Oslo

The postal address is:
U.S. Embassy Oslo
PO Box 4075 AMB
0244 Oslo

(+47) 21 30 85 40
(open 08:30 to 17:00 Monday-Friday)
The Embassy is closed on Norwegian and American holidays.

Consular

The Consular Section of the U.S. Embassy provides assistance to American citizens residing in or visiting Norway and visa services for temporary visitors to the United States.

American Citizen Services

  • Passport Issuance and renewal, registration of Americans living in Norway, birth reports for American children born in Norway, voter registration, notarial services, and emergency services.
  • Opening hours Monday through Thursday from 10:00-11:00 by appointment only
  • Email: [email protected]

Visa Information

Federal Benefits Unit

  • Assistance with benefits from U.S. government: Social Security Administration, Veterans Administration, Office of Personnel Management (civil service), and Railroad Retirement Board.
  • Visit by appointment only can be scheduled via email
  • Email: [email protected]

Public Affairs

The Public Affairs Section  works to promote people-to-people ties between the United States and Norway. We advocate and explain U.S. policies and culture to the Norwegian public. In addition the Section manages media relations, encourages educational and professional exchange among Norwegians and Americans, and supports the work of our bilateral Fulbright Commission to strengthen educational links between the U.S. and Norway.

Press Section

Information Resource Center (IRC)

  • The IRC is the “information booth” of the Embassy.
  • We provide reference, referral and documentation service for researchers, journalists, government officials and others with a professional or scholarly interest in the United States.
  • Contact Us: [email protected]

Education USA

Meet America

  • We invite high school classes to the embassy for interactive sessions on various U.S. related topics.
  • We can send an embassy speaker to come to your school (in the larger Oslo area).
  • Contact us: [email protected]

Thematic Programs and Grants

  • American Speaker Program: we recruit and fund specialists to come from the U.S. to lecture and participate in workshops and seminars with local audiences.
  • Grants: we give small grants to local organizations for projects related to the U.S.
  • Contact Us: [email protected]

Defense Cooperation

The Office of Defense Cooperation (ODC) Norway is responsible to the U.S. Ambassador and the Commander, U.S. European Command, for administering U.S. Security Cooperation and Defense Cooperation in Armaments Programs, and defense logistics activities with Norway.

The primary constituency of ODC-Norway includes U.S. Department of Defense personnel, Norwegian Ministry of Defense staff, Norwegian Chief of Defense staff, the Norwegian National Defense Logistics Organization, U.S. defense vendors, and Norwegian defense-related industries wishing to participate in cooperative programs in order to gain access to the market. Specific areas in which the ODC may provide assistance include:

  • National and defense decision-making process
  • Defense procurement regulations and policies
  • Defense budget and procurement plans
  • Defense industries and product lines
  • Points of contact for specific procurement programs
  • Coordination with other U.S. Embassy offices
  • Industrial cooperation requirements
  • Bilateral logistics agreements
  • Data Exchange Agreements
  • Foreign Comparative Testing programs

Security Cooperation

Security Cooperation includes Foreign Military Sales (FMS) of U.S. defense equipment, training, and related services. Such transfers are carried out under the principle that if they are essential to the security and economic well-being of friendly foreign governments, they are equally vital to the security and economic well being of the United States.

Defense Cooperation in Armaments

Defense Cooperation in Armaments includes support for bilateral government-to-government cooperative programs such as the Joint Strike Fighter Program Sustainment and Follow-on Development, the F-16 Multinational Fighter Program, numerous Data Exchange Agreements, Foreign Comparative Testing, Engineer & Scientist Exchanges, and support to U.S. defense industries seeking to do business in Norway.

Logistics Planning

Logistics planning includes coordinating bilateral mutual logistics support agreements, which provide the U.S. and Norway flexible and responsive logistics support during peacetime and war.  Key programs include the Marine Corps Pre-Positioning – Norway (MCPP-N) and Collocated Operating Bases (COB).

Useful links

  • US Defense Security Cooperation Agency
  • Under Secretary of Defense for Acquisition, Technology and Logistics (Coming soon)
  • Defense Procurement and Acquisition Policy (Coming soon): Department of Defense Regulations regarding acquisitions
  • OSD Comparative Testing Office (Coming soon): Provides links to Foreign Comparative Testing program and provides guidance for doing business with the US Department of Defense
  • US Air Force Material Command (Coming soon)
  • US Navy Research, Development and Acquisition (Coming soon)

Contact details

Office of Defense Cooperation
U.S. Embassy
Morgedalsvegen 36
0378 Oslo
Norway

Commercial Section

The Embassy’s Commercial Section is part of the U.S. Commercial Service, the trade promotion unit of the U.S. Department of Commerce.

U.S. Commercial Service — Creating Prosperity Through Global Trade

The U.S. Commercial Service promotes and protects U.S. commercial interests abroad and delivers customized solutions to ensure that U.S. businesses compete and win in the global marketplace.

The U.S. Commercial Service promotes economic prosperity, enhance job creation, and strengthen national security through a global network of international trade professionals. U.S. Commercial Service trade specialists in 107 U.S. cities and in more than 80 countries work with U.S. companies to help them get started in exporting or increase their sales to new global markets. Our services include:

  • World class market research
  • Trade events that promote U.S. products or services to qualified buyers
  • Introductions to qualified buyers and distributors
  • Coordination of resources across federal departments and agencies relevant to business investment in the U.S. See also www.selectusa.gov.
  • Counseling and advocacy through every step of the export process.

The U.S. Commercial Service also assists Norwegian companies in accessing U.S. suppliers of products and services for their operations or for distribution in Norway. We offer a variety of services to both U.S. and Norwegian companies to fit almost any need.

To learn more about how the U.S. Commercial Service in Oslo, Norway, can assist your company, check out the Embassy Business page or the U.S. Commercial Service in Norway website.

Political and Economic Section

The combined Political-Economic Section engages with the Norwegian Government and Parliament, local governments, political parties and organizations, the business/commercial sector, academia, and civil society on political and economic policy matters.

Working with governmental and non-governmental contacts, we advocate policies consistent with U.S. interests, promote support for U.S. policy priorities, and maximize cooperation with Norwegians in areas of mutual interest. Some examples include our common effort through the North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO) to help Afghanistan become self-sufficient; developing new sources of energy; supporting sustainable development in the Arctic, including through the work of the Arctic Council, and promoting democracy and respect for human rights throughout the world.

The Section also ensures the U.S. Department of State and other U.S. government agencies are aware of significant political and economic developments in and around Norway.

Norway

Overview:  Norway and the United States maintained good collaboration on CT.  Norway’s Police Security Service (PST) continued to assess that individuals and groups inspired by “extreme Islamist groups” represented the most significant terrorist threat to Norway.  Norway saw an increased level of mobilization and recruitment among REMT groups, which it calls “right wing extremist groups.”  The PST reintroduced a five-level scale to describe the national terror threat level and set the risk level at 3, which indicates a moderate chance of a terrorist attack taking place.

Norway is a member of the Global Coalition to Defeat ISIS.  The government co-sponsored UNSCRs 2178 and 2396 and contributed to the Coalition’s five lines of effort, including military personnel support to a capacity-building mission for Iraqi security forces in Anbar, Iraq.  In 2019, Norway provided country specific funding of approximately US $334 million to address the humanitarian crises in Iraq and Syria.

2019 Terrorist Incidents:  In August, Philip Manshaus attempted to commit a mass shooting at an Islamic center in a municipality neighboring the capital, Oslo.  He entered the mosque when few people were present and was overpowered by a member before being apprehended by police.  He is being investigated for terrorism and the murder of his stepsister and is in pretrial detention.  The investigation revealed he was active in online forums for white supremacists and inspired by the mass shooting in Christchurch, New Zealand.  Following this attack, PST updated its assessment of the likelihood of “right-wing extremists” attempting to carry out terrorist attacks from “unlikely” to “possible.”

Legislation, Law Enforcement, and Border Security:  Terrorism is a criminal offense in Norway, and it is illegal to conduct or plan to conduct a terrorist attack, receive terrorism-related training, or provide material support to a terrorist organization.  In addition, it is a criminal offense to travel or intend to travel to fight on behalf of a terrorist organization.  The maximum prison sentence for serious terrorism offenses is 30 years.

Norway continued to prosecute individuals for terrorism-related offenses.  In separate cases, a Norwegian court convicted a woman of attempting to join a terrorist organization and a man of participating in a terrorist organization.  The woman received a prison sentence of two years and nine months, and the man received seven years and three months.  In at least one instance, Norwegian officials used the Immigration Act to arrest a white supremacist on the grounds that he could influence others to commit violence.

The Norwegian government changed the Immigration Directorate’s guidance so that those possessing or seeking residence permits who have spent time in ISIS-controlled areas or have some affiliation with ISIS or other terrorist networks in Syria and Iraq may have their permits revoked and shall have their applications denied, to the extent consistent with the Norwegian Constitution and International Law.

The PST is responsible for domestic security, including CT activities.  The Joint Counter Terrorism Center, a joint analysis cell, includes participants from the PST and the Norwegian Intelligence Service (NIS), the external security service.  Both PST and NIS have devoted significant resources to identifying, tracking, and taking action against Norwegian citizens intending to travel to and from Syria or Iraq to fight for terrorist groups.

Norway shares fingerprint information in criminal investigations with the EU and the parties to the Prüm Convention.  Norway continued to explore an agreement on sharing PNR data with the EU and is simultaneously developing a national PNR system, which remained in the pilot phase at the end of 2019.  Immigration to Norway is facilitated and regulated by the Norwegian Directorate of Immigration, which processes all applications for asylum, visas, family immigration, work and study permits, permanent residence, and travel documents.  The Norwegian Immigration Database serves as a central repository for immigration authorities and contains biographic data and facial photos for all applicants for admission.  The Norwegian police and the Ministry of Foreign Affairs issue passports that, since 2005, have contained biometric data accessible for review by border security officials.  Norway coordinates with INTERPOL and Europol to enhance its vetting processes and has access to the Schengen Information System and the Visa Information System to share and receive information regarding suspected terrorists.

Security measures to protect soft targets in Oslo include physical barriers in the streets of one of the city’s main pedestrian thoroughfares and directly outside the neighboring buildings.  Measures may be enhanced for specific events.  Police at Oslo’s Gardermoen Airport are armed on a permanent basis.  The government and its underlying agencies continued to implement measures to secure public infrastructure, such as government and defense facilities, against potential terrorist attacks.  This followed criticism for slow progress by the National Auditor in 2018.

Countering the Financing of Terrorism:  Norway is a member of the FATF.  Norway’s FIU, the Financial Intelligence Unit Norway, is a member of the Egmont Group.  Norway is a member of the Defeat-ISIS Coalition’s CIFG.  There were no significant updates in 2019.

Countering Violent Extremism:  Norway continued to implement its National Action Plan against Radicalization and Violent Extremism, published in 2014, which is a whole-of government approach to countering terrorist radicalization and recruitment.  Priorities include strengthening CVE research, improving national and local cooperation on counter-radicalization efforts, promoting the reintegration of former terrorists, and preventing online recruitment and radicalization.  The plan is dynamic and is reviewed regularly with all stakeholders to ensure continued effectiveness.  A review process begun in 2019 has been particularly comprehensive because of changes in the threat environment.

Norway coordinates among authorities responsible for managing the release from prison and reintegration of those convicted of terrorism-related offenses.  Municipalities considered home to populations and individuals most vulnerable to terrorist radicalization have created action plans for prevention activities.  The national government hosts an annual conference on terrorist radicalization, which in 2019 focused in part on racially or ethnically motivated terrorism.

Norway supports the Youth Civil Activism Network.  Oslo and Kristiansand are members of the SCN.

International and Regional Cooperation:  Norway is active in multilateral fora in efforts to counter terrorism, including NATO, the EU’s Radicalization Awareness Network, and the OSCE.  In 2019, the OSCE launched a Norwegian-funded handbook on gender perspectives in countering violent extremism and radicalization.  Norway provided financial support to the GCTF Working Group on Capacity-Building in East Africa, supported INTERPOL’s capacity-building programs on border security and rule of law in North Africa and the Sahel, and funded counter-radicalization programs in prisons in Kenya, Indonesia, and Morocco.  Norway supports implementation of the UN Secretary-General’s Plan of Action to Prevent Violent Extremism and is co-chair with Jordan of the Group of Friends at the UN on preventing violent extremism.  Norway is contributing $1.2 million to the UNOCT for the 2018-2021 period, in partnership with UNDP.  Norway provides funding for the International Civil Society Action Network and in 2019 hosted the eighth annual Women, Peace and Security forum, which focused on situational and trends analysis regarding the threat of terrorism and conflict.  Norway supports the GCERF.

Norway

Overview:  Norway’s law enforcement capacity for proactively detecting, deterring, and preventing acts of terrorism in its territory is strong despite some underfunding issues.  Norway is responsive to information requests and postured to prevent acts of terrorism, and its bilateral counterterrorism cooperation is strong. Norway is a supporter and donor to GCERF.

The Police Security Service’s (PST’s) annual threat assessment rated an “even chance,” the third on its five-tier threat scale, that REMVE actors will try to carry out a terrorist attack in Norway.  The threat from Islamist terrorists increased to “probable,” its fourth tier, following attacks elsewhere in Europe in October.

2020 Terrorist Incidents:  There were no terrorist incidents reported in Norway in 2020.  

Legislation, Law Enforcement, and Border Security:  It is illegal to conduct or plan to conduct a terrorist attack, receive terrorism-related training, provide material support to a terrorist organization, or travel or intend to travel to fight on behalf of a terrorist organization.  The maximum prison sentence is 21 years, after which the convicted person may be placed in a mental health facility as long as the person is deemed a danger to others.

The PST’s activities focus on information collection, threat assessments, and investigations.  The civilian police tactical unit responds to terrorist attacks and is on 24-hour standby.  An independent investigation into Norway’s handling of a 2019 domestic terror attack on a mosque criticized PST and police coordination, a lack of transparency that a right-wing attack on a Muslim target was highly probable, and the police’s response time.

The Police Department (PD) requires large municipalities and private sector companies that operate hotels, stadia, and public centers to conduct their own risk assessments and contingency planning.  Oslo PD conducts its own soft target contingency planning and bolsters security at venues as needed.

After terrorist attacks elsewhere in Europe, the Ministry of Justice in November approved the temporary armament of Norwegian police task forces, which was in effect during the reporting period.  Police at Oslo’s Gardermoen International Airport are permanently armed.

Norway shares information on criminal investigations with the EU and the parties to the Prüm Convention.  The Norwegian Immigration Database contains biographic data and facial photos for all applicants for admission into Norway.  Norwegian passports contain biometric data accessible by border security officials.  Norway coordinates with INTERPOL and EUROPOL and has access to suspected terrorist information in the Schengen Information System and the Visa Information System.

The PST estimates 20 out of 200 Norwegian-affiliated individuals who traveled to Syria and Iraq to fight on behalf of ISIS remain in those countries.  The PST and the Norwegian Intelligence Service coordinate to identify, track, and take action against Norwegian citizens intending to travel to and from Syria or Iraq to fight for a terrorist group.  Norway immediately took into custody a Norwegian-Pakistani woman with known ISIS connections upon her repatriation from the Syrian al-Hol camp in January.

Philip Manshaus received a 21-year sentence for the attempted terrorist attack on a mosque and the racially motivated murder of his stepsister in 2019.  The sentence is the maximum allowable and strictest ever given by a Norwegian court.  Manshaus must serve 14 years before parole consideration.

Norway extradited a man convicted for leading the ISIS-connected Kurdish Rawti Shax network to Italy after previously denying extradition petitions by Italy, Iraq, and the United States.  Norway extradited a man to France who was connected to a 1982 Parisian terrorist bombing attack after originally rejecting France’s 2015 extradition request.

Countering the Financing of Terrorism:  Norway is a member of FATF.  Its FIU, the Financial Intelligence Unit Norway, which operates within the National Authority for the Investigation and Prosecution of Economic and Environmental Crimes, is a member of the Egmont Group.  The PST economic crimes unit investigates terrorist financing.  Norway is also a member of the Defeat-ISIS CIFG.

Norway released its second strategy to combat the financing of terrorism on June 12, following a national risk assessment on terrorist financing.  Norway will research a registration system for fundraising organizations under its June 17 Revised Action Plan Against Radicalization and Violent Extremism (APRVE).

The country implements sanctions adopted by UNSC and has largely supported restrictive measures adopted by the EU.  Sanctions must be adopted into Norwegian law to be binding on private legal entities in Norway.  Sanctions adopted by UNSC are implemented into Norwegian law as a general rule under a 1968 legal framework.

Norwegian authorities arrested and charged a Syrian-Norwegian resident in May with financing terrorism connected to multiple money transfers to an ISIS-connected man in Syria.  The trial is pending.

Countering Violent Extremism:  The APRVE expands the 2014 plan’s focus on violent extremism, creating a national CVE center, guidelines on caring for children of FTFs, and new methods to reintegrate extremists after prison.  A 2020 religious funding law removes funding from groups that practice or give support to violent activities or receive funding from abroad.

Oslo and Kristiansand are members of the Strong Cities Network.  Ten cities are part of the Nordic Safe Cities Network.

International and Regional Cooperation:  Norway is active in multilateral counterterrorism efforts.  The country began its two-year tenure on the UNSC in 2021, during which time it will chair the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea Sanctions Committee, the ISIL and al-Qaida Sanctions Committee, and the Working Group on Children and Armed Conflict and will be penholder for issues in Afghanistan and Syria.  Norway supports the UN Secretary-General’s Plan of Action to Prevent Violent Extremism and provides resources support to the UN Multidimensional Integrated Stabilization Mission in Mali.  Norway supports the Global Community Engagement and Resilience Fund.  The country was a member of the troika nations that led the Sudan and South Sudan peace process, along with the United States and Great Britain.  Norway also contributes to INTERPOL’s capacity-building programs on border security and rule of law in North Africa and the Sahel.  Norway is a strong ally in NATO.  It is a member of the EU’s Radicalization Awareness Network, the OSCE, and the Christchurch Call to Action.  Norway participates in the Global Counterterrorism Forum Working Group on Capacity-Building in East Africa.  Norway provides troop support to Operation Inherent Resolve and NATO Mission Iraq and current has Norwegian Special Forces in the Afghanistan Resolute Support Mission.  Norway is a large donor country.  It contributed $1.2 million to the UN Office of Counter-Terrorism for the 2018-21 period.  Norway earmarked $74 million to Afghanistan and $75 million to Syria in 2021 development assistance.  Norway also has provided $213.5 million in humanitarian aid to Iraq since 2010 and provides an annual $7.1 million to Afghan security forces.

VG and Views and News from Norway Published Ambassador Tang Guoqiang's Article Introducing Xinjiang

On August 11, 2010, VG and Views and News from Norway published Ambassador Tang Guoqiang's article entitled "Xinjiang is China's Largest Province". The article is as follows:

It has been almost one year since I took the post as the Chinese Ambassador to Norway. I am following closely the Norwegian media's coverage on China. I noticed that recently when the Norwegian TV and newspapers reported China, the words "Xinjiang" and "Uyghur" were frequently used. I think that it might have something to do with the Uyghur terrorist suspect arrested by the Norwegian police not long ago. Actually, when I met the Norwegian friends, they often asked me some questions regarding Xinjiang and expressed their views on the case and China. During my diplomatic career for several decades, I have visited Xinjiang several times. I see by myself that Xinjiang is a beautiful land of harmony and peace.

Xinjiang, situated in the northwest of the country, is China's largest province. It covers an area of 1.6 million square kilometers, which is four times that of Norway. It used to be the passage between Europe and Asia for land transportation and cultural exchanges. The famous Silk Road went through there.

Today, the population in Xinjiang has reached 22 million and there are 55 ethnic groups living there. Among them, the largest group is Uyghur, which accounts for 45.7% of the total. Han is the second largest group, and there are also Kazak, Hui, Kirgiz, Mongolian, Tajik, Manchu, Uzbek, Russian and Tatar ethnic groups.

The policy of ethnic regional autonomy is implemented in Xinjiang. The Xinjiang Autonomous Region was established in 1955, and all the ethnic groups, with the Uyghur as the main group, are managing their internal affairs in the region. The Uyghurs account for 66% of all the delegates of the region's people's congresses, which are the top legislature bodies. The posts of the top executive and judicial officials are both taken by the citizens of the minority ethnic groups. It not only effectively guarantees the rights of the people in the region, but also enables more and more talents of the minority ethnic groups to go into politics.

For thousands of years, the people of different ethnic groups in Xinjiang have lived in harmony, helped each other and showed their talents. For example, Uyghurs and Huis are good at running business and catering, Hans specialize in planting vegetables, and Kazaks are competent in herding horses and sheep. The different living styles and the same aim of becoming well-off make them cooperate with each other and develop together. In the past 30 years, the per capita net income of the farmers in Xinjiang has grown by 28 folds and the per capita disposable income of the residents in towns has risen by 35 folds. The people's living standard is improving steadily.

In Xinjiang, the different ethnic groups live in peace while the different religions coexist in harmony and develop together. There are 24, 000 mosques and millions of Muslim believers. You can feel the deep Islamic culture in the streets. Apart from that, there is also a large number of Buddhist temples and Cathedrals, as well as monks and priests coming to worship. In such an environment, sometimes you could be confused about whether you are in the East or the West.

Xinjiang is abundant in resources and has very beautiful landscape. The people are hospitable and good at singing and dancing. Local special products, such as Tianshan Snow Lotus, Yilin horses, Manaizi grapes and Hami sweet melons, are famous both in China and abroad. The tourists were deeply impressed by the unique yellow sand oasis, the sheep herd under the blue sky, the affectionate folk songs and the passionate dances. Last year, there were over 21 million domestic and foreign tourists visiting Xinjiang, some of them were Norwegian. The people from Xinjiang also work and live in other places of China to pursue better life. You are able to find Xinjiang restaurants and taste the unique lamb kebab in many places, whether in Beijing, Shanghai, Guangzhou or Harbin.

Like other provinces in China, Xinjiang also encounters plenty of problems and challenges in the process of its development, such as unbalanced development, widening gap between the rich and the poor, increasing pressure on employment and environmental protection. As a western province, Xinjiang's development also lags behind the regions in the coastal areas of the east. To cope with it, China's central government has recently decided to expand the investment in the road, railway and other infrastructure in Xinjiang. In the next five years, the total investment will be over 2 trillion yuan (296 billion US dollars). At the same time, a lot of efforts will be made to improve people's living standard. We have every reason to believe that there is a promising future for Xinjiang.

I also noticed that the Norwegian media quoted the attacks from some overseas "East Turkistan" organizations to the policy of China's central government, such as "plundering the resources in Xinjiang", "suppressing the human rights of the minority ethnic groups in Xinjiang", and their claims that "the contradictions between Uyghurs and Hans are intensifying", "Uyghurs in Xinjiang should break up with the other ethnic groups in China and Xinjiang should gain independence from China". In fact, these accusations and instigations have been used by some radical organizations to incite chaos in China. The "East Turkistan Islamic Movement", which was included by the United Nations in the terrorist groups' list, and some other organizations have masterminded a series of terror activities in China. There were over 200 such cases between 1990 and 2001. The "July 5 incident" last year deprived many kind people in Xinjiang of their beloved ones forever. The terror acts are strongly condemned by all ethnic groups in Xinjiang and they do not allow their quiet and peaceful life to be destroyed. Now the Uyghur suspect arrested by Norwegian police is said to be a member of the "East Turkistan Islamic Movement" and his target is said to be Chinese interests in Norway. It fully indicates that there is no boundary for terrorist activities and the terrorists are the common enemies of the whole world. That is why the international community must unite and counter terrorism together.

Uyghur is one of the 56 ethnic groups in the big family of the Chinese nation, and the prosperity, harmony and unification have always been China's national goal. The fate of all ethnic groups is closely linked with Chinese nation's prosperity. As China develops and makes progress, the history and culture of all ethnic groups will surely be better protected and carried forward.

uzbek terrorist in norway

Uzbek terrorist in norway - many thanks

Belarus And Norway Reflected In The Mirror Of Terrorism

The terrorist bombing in the Minsk subway in April and the terrorist bombing and shooting in Oslo on July 22 have at least one thing in common: according to official accounts, both attacks were the work either of lone terrorists or a small group of acquaintances.

But only about one-third of Belarusians, according to opinion polls, believe one man carried out the Minsk attack, in which 15 people were killed. In Norway, the official reports have also been greeted skeptically. Many analysts have expressed the opinion that some sort of force or organization would have to be behind the bombing outside the prime minister's residence and the mass shooting at the summer camp.

In part, this is a reflection of ordinary human psychology -- every serious, important event must have such foundations. Conspiracy theories, many of which either directly or indirectly place blame on the authorities, have swirled in every country where a major terrorist attack takes place. In this way, the mind shields itself from the terrible truth of the fundamental vulnerability of modern society -- and in particular from the fact that it is vulnerable first of all to attacks from lone terrorists.

Terrorism experts acknowledge that preventing such an attack is virtually impossible. And, as we can see, neither the repressive, all-controlling nature of Belarusian society nor the open, democratic character of Norwegian society offered any immunity. Incidentally, by nearly all measures, Norway ranks among the freest and most prosperous societies in the world. But this did not prevent mass slaughter.

Such a thing wouldn't be possible in a premodern society. A person doesn't blow up his own village. Without modern technology, one person cannot sweep away dozens of people in just a few moments. And both Norway and Belarus are modern societies -- mass cultures with a high level of technology, where harmless things that are legally purchased can be turned into bombs.

The fact that Norwegian Anders Behring Breivik, unlike the Belarusian terrorists, has presented a political rationale for his crimes does not really matter much. Every society has its problems and conflicts, but only in a particular type of mind can they be transformed into a desire to commit the mass murder of one's own countrymen.

What Can Be Done?

In fact, the Belarus experience shows the senselessness of trying to find some sort of explanation for what happened in the endless ramblings of Breivik's manifesto. The real motivation might be something completely different, something completely nonpolitical. The Muslim community in Norway, incidentally, is not nearly as large as the ones in France or Germany, where we have not seen such incidents. In considering these events, rational explanations lead to a dead end since the response simply does not match the purported stimulus and was not essentially determined by it.

The reaction to a terrorist attack is sort of a mirror of society. The reason why the public in Belarus is so strongly inclined toward conspiracy theories lies not only in the nature of the attack, but also in the closed nature of a society in which people endlessly hear official pronouncements about the evil plottings of the country's enemies. Now how can we live without them?

What's more, the attitude toward the authorities is somewhat ambivalent -- many look to the state for benefits and protection, but at the same time, we see it as capable of almost anything. Capable of lies, most of all. And a lot of people hold both these views at the same time.

The portrait of a society can also be found in the answer to the question: What now? The idea that Norway should respond to the terrorist attack with increased openness is now very popular and, at first glance, seems rather strange. After all, Norway is already a global leader in this respect. What is the point of more openness if the openness the country already has didn't prevent such a tragedy in Norway? There is no point. The reasoning, rather, is that if Norway responds by, say, reducing immigration, then Breivik will have achieved his goal. And that would be a bad precedent for achieving one's political ends.

The reaction in Belarus -- at least the reaction of the authorities -- seems more logical: bolster state control. The methods that should have prevented a terrorist attack failed to do so and so, logically, they must be given the opportunity to work better. But in reality this reaction is also senseless. There were, after all, terrorist incidents in the Soviet Union and in Nazi Germany (we need only think of the assassination attempts against Leonid Brezhnev and Adolf Hitler), and today's Belarus, thankfully, is far from achieving those levels of total control.

Some observers see the expansion of the role of the secret services following the April Minsk explosion as proof that the state was involved. But that isn't necessarily the case. It is just that both societies -- Belarus and Norway -- are responding to an existential challenge to their essential foundations.

But the really rational answer might be that there is nothing to be done. That this is the price of modern society, the price of technology, the price of the constant stress of an information society. But people aren't computers. They can't think this way. Society does not seek merely to prevent the repetition of such horrors in the future, but also is looking to find some sense in life after such an event. Solidarity. Mutual aid. This is really the main response to such threats, the only one that provides the opportunity to go on.

Yuri Drakakhrust is a broadcaster with RFE/RL's Belarus Service. The views expressed in this commentary are the author's own and do not necessarily reflect those of RFE/RL

Rebiya Kadeer condemns terrorism

Here is Rebiya’s Kadeer reaction to 8 July 2010 arrests of three suspected terrorists in Oslo and Duisberg, Germany, sent on 15 July to Views and News from Norway and other media in Norway, published at the Rafto Foundation website.

According to the author, Norway has become a new home for many Uyghur refugees, who escaped Chinese oppression. She and the entire Uyghur community are very thankful for Norwegian government for accepting them and granting them asylum.

Rebiya Kadeer condemns any and all violence and fully supports the Norwegian government’s efforts to investigate suspected terrorist activity and to bring the perpetrators to justice. At the same time she asks Norway and the international community not to perceive the Uyghurs as terrorists. According to her it is China’s aim to taint her nation, which struggles peacefully for six decades for freedom.

Uyghur terror and Norway
“In the fall of 2004, when I was still languishing in a dark prison cell for opposing China’s six-decade long suppression of Uyghurs, Norway’s Rafto Foundation presented my family its prestigious Rafto Prize in Washington, DC in recognition of the plight of the Uyghur people and my peaceful advocacy.

The Prize, coupled with the international pressure from Western governments, including Norway and the U.S. and the international human rights organizations, secured my release in March 2005. Upon my release to the U.S., the first country I wanted to visit was Norway because I really wanted to thank the Rafto Foundation for supporting the long-suffering Uyghurs. I also wanted to thank the government of Norway for accepting Uyghur refugees and granting them asylum.

I visited Norway for the first time in October 2005. I was so pleased to see the very people who gave me the Rafto Prize without ever meeting me. Their love of oppressed peoples and their passion for human rights moved me into tears. I immediately fell in love with Norway and her freedom-loving people. The last time I visited Norway was just three months ago to attend the Oslo Freedom Forum. There I met Nobel Peace Prize laureates and prisoners of conscience as well as a selection of authors, together with business, political and cultural leaders from both Norway and internationally.

Norway always has a special place in my heart. It is a country of peace, freedom, and refuge. It is a country many Uyghur refugees who escaped Chinese oppression call home.

However, I was brutally awakened last Thursday by the news that an Al-Qaeda linked Uyghur terror suspect who was planning a bomb attack with another Uzbek and Iraqi was arrested in Norway. This piece of news sent immediate shockwaves around the world. Like my fellow Uyghurs across the world, I could not believe the news. I asked how this could be possible – how a Uyghur who was granted asylum and citizenship in Norway could be linked to Al-Qaeda and target Norway.

This is completely against Uyghurs’ cultural traditions, which value hospitality and kindness. What kind of Uyghur is he? I even had second thoughts about whether he was Uyghur or not. When I later learned that his Uyghur identity had been confirmed, I felt terrible. I still have a hard time believing that he is indeed Uyghur.

For the Uyghur people, who have been persecuted for more than half a century under China’s communist rule, this is probably the worst news we have ever heard. Since the terrorist attacks in the U.S. on September 11, 2001, the Chinese government hijacked the purpose of the global war on terror and began to create artificial links between certain murky Uyghur groups and Al-Qaeda.

the People´s Republic of China claimed itself a “victim of terrorism” and aggressively portrayed Uyghurs’ legitimate grievances against its brutal rule as “terrorism.” the People´s Republic of China presented the Uyghur people’s struggle as an Islamic threat not only to the People´s Republic of China but to the West as well. However, the People´s Republic of China had always failed to provide substantive evidence for this.

Thanks to Rashidin Muhammed, the Uyghur terror suspect in Norway, now the People´s Republic of China can proudly say, “We told you so.” the People´s Republic of China will certainly use his case as an opportunity to intensify the persecution of Uyghurs and to prove to the world that the Uyghur struggle is closely linked to international terrorism.

As a result, many Uyghurs will suffer and many people in the West will have second thoughts about supporting the Uyghur people’s peaceful and legitimate struggle, believing it is being tainted with the brush of Al-Qaeda. What a price we Uyghurs have to pay as a people and nation for the act of one suspected terrorist. It will surely be immeasurable.

Since 9/11, China’s hardline repressive policies have played the most important role in the radicalization of few young Uyghurs.  In fact, Western analysts warned long ago that China’s zero tolerance of any kind of Uyghur dissent would eventually make some Uyghurs “sitting targets for potential fundamentalists,” which will later add “legitimacy to Beijing’s cause and risk the ire of Western governments, now terrified of any group linked to Islamic terrorism.” The case of Rashidin perfectly illustrates this point.

We Uyghurs are a hospitable and peace-loving people. In spite of the fact that one Uyghur terror suspect shattered the confidence of many governments and peoples in the West toward the Uyghur people and our peaceful struggle for freedom, human rights and democracy, we will continue to peacefully struggle.

One alleged Uyghur terrorist by no means represents the entire Uyghur nation. The vast majority of Uyghur people are peaceful. In fact, we are victims of six decades of China’s state terrorism. Therefore, we do not believe that terrorism or violence are a means to end our suffering, or that they will create peaceful conditions for the resolution of our legitimate grievances.

In fact, I am personally glad that Rashidin Muhammed and the other two terror suspects were arrested before they could commit a terrorist act. I condemn any and all violence and fully support the Norwegian government’s efforts to investigate suspected terrorist activity and to bring the perpetrators to justice.

If Rashidin is found guilty of such activity, then he should be punished. Norway is the second homeland of many Uyghur refugees. Norway gave them protection and freedom. They are eternally indebted to the generosity of the Norwegian government and hospitality of the Norwegian people. Unlike Rashidin, they are more than grateful to Norway. Therefore, we stand side by side with the freedom-loving people and government of Norway in condemning terrorism and the planned terrorist activity of these three terror suspects, including one Uyghur.

At the same time, I respectfully ask the international community, including the Norwegian government, to refrain from using the possible terrorist activity of this single Uyghur to ascertain or judge the aspirations or characters of the broader Uyghur population or any other Uyghur individuals.

The Chinese government has consistently labeled the broader Uyghur population as terrorist, and if history is any guide, Chinese officials will use Norway’s arrest and prosecution of a Uyghur to try to bolster their extremely flawed and biased characterization of Uyghur people as terrorists and bolster their justification for the persecution of the Uyghur people as part and parcel of the global war on terror.

The international community should refrain from accepting China’s ill-intentioned claims and prevent China’s intensified persecution of Uyghur people in the wake of the Rashidin case.”

Rebiya Kadeer
Uyghur democracy leader and the 2004 Rafto Prize laureate

Related links:

China razes Uyghur homes

– My people are living in an open prison

Uyghurs treated as second-class citizens by China

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Marc Nathanson

Ambassador

Sharon Hudson-Dean

Deputy Chief of Mission

Marc Nathanson

Ambassador

Sharon Hudson-Dean

Deputy Chief of Mission

VG and Views and News from Norway Published Ambassador Tang Guoqiang's Article Introducing Xinjiang

On August 11, 2010, VG and Views and News from Norway published Ambassador Tang Guoqiang's article entitled "Xinjiang is China's Largest Province". The article is as follows:

It has been almost one year since I took the post as the Chinese Ambassador to Norway. I am following closely the Norwegian media's coverage on China. I noticed that recently when the Norwegian TV and newspapers reported China, the words "Xinjiang" and "Uyghur" were frequently used. I think that it might have something to do with the Uyghur terrorist suspect arrested by the Norwegian police not long ago. Actually, when I met the Norwegian friends, they often asked me some questions regarding Xinjiang and expressed their views on the case and China. During my diplomatic career for several decades, I have visited Xinjiang several times. I see by myself that Xinjiang is a beautiful land of harmony and peace.

Xinjiang, situated in the northwest of the country, is China's largest province. It covers an area of 1.6 million square kilometers, which is four times that of Norway. It used to be the passage between Europe and Asia for land transportation and cultural exchanges. The famous Silk Road went through there.

Today, the population in Xinjiang has reached 22 million and there are 55 ethnic groups living there. Among them, the largest group is Uyghur, which accounts for 45.7% of the total. Han is the second largest group, and there are also Kazak, Hui, Kirgiz, Mongolian, Tajik, Manchu, Uzbek, Russian and Tatar ethnic groups.

The policy of ethnic regional autonomy is implemented in Xinjiang. The Xinjiang Autonomous Region was established in 1955, and all the ethnic groups, with the Uyghur as the main group, are managing their internal affairs in the region. The Uyghurs account for 66% of all the delegates of the region's people's congresses, which are the top legislature bodies. The posts of the top executive and judicial officials are both taken by the citizens of the minority ethnic groups. It not only effectively guarantees the rights of the people in the region, but also enables more and more talents of the minority ethnic groups to go into politics.

For thousands of years, the people of different ethnic groups in Xinjiang have lived in harmony, helped each other and showed their talents. For example, Uyghurs and Huis are good at running business and catering, Hans specialize in planting vegetables, and Kazaks are competent in herding horses and sheep. The different living styles and the same aim of becoming well-off make them cooperate with each other and develop together. In the past 30 years, the per capita net income of the farmers in Xinjiang has grown by 28 folds and the per capita disposable income of the residents in towns has risen by 35 folds. The people's living standard is improving steadily.

In Xinjiang, the different ethnic groups live in peace while the different religions coexist in harmony and develop together. There are 24, 000 mosques and millions of Muslim believers. You can feel the deep Islamic culture in the streets. Apart from that, there is also a large number of Buddhist temples and Cathedrals, as well as monks and priests coming to worship. In such an environment, sometimes you could be confused about whether you are in the East or the West.

Xinjiang is abundant in resources and has very beautiful landscape. The people are hospitable and good at singing and dancing. Local special products, such as Tianshan Snow Lotus, Yilin horses, Manaizi grapes and Hami sweet melons, are famous both in China and abroad. The tourists were deeply impressed by the unique yellow sand oasis, the sheep herd under the blue sky, the affectionate folk songs and the passionate dances. Last year, there were over 21 million domestic and foreign tourists visiting Xinjiang, some of them were Norwegian. The people from Xinjiang also work and live in other places of China to pursue better life. You are able to find Xinjiang restaurants and taste the unique lamb kebab in many places, whether in Beijing, Shanghai, Guangzhou or Harbin.

Like other provinces in China, Xinjiang also encounters plenty of problems and challenges in the process of its development, such as unbalanced development, widening gap between the rich and the poor, increasing pressure on employment and environmental protection. As a western province, Xinjiang's development also lags behind the regions in the coastal areas of the east. To cope with it, China's central government has recently decided to expand the investment in the road, railway and other infrastructure in Xinjiang. In the next five years, the total investment will be over 2 trillion yuan (296 billion US dollars). At the same time, a lot of efforts will be made to improve people's living standard. We have every reason to believe that there is a promising future for Xinjiang.

I also noticed that the Norwegian media quoted the attacks from some overseas "East Turkistan" organizations to the policy of China's central government, such as "plundering the resources in Xinjiang", "suppressing the human rights of the minority ethnic groups in Xinjiang", and their claims that "the contradictions between Uyghurs and Hans are intensifying", "Uyghurs in Xinjiang should break up with the other ethnic groups in China and Xinjiang should gain independence from China". In fact, these accusations and instigations have been used by some radical organizations to incite chaos in China. The "East Turkistan Islamic Movement", which was included by the United Nations in the terrorist groups' list, and some other organizations have masterminded a series of terror activities in China. There were over 200 such cases between 1990 and 2001. The "July 5 incident" last year deprived many kind people in Xinjiang of their beloved ones forever. The terror acts are strongly condemned by all ethnic groups in Xinjiang and they do not allow their quiet and peaceful life to be destroyed. Now the Uyghur suspect arrested by Norwegian police is said to be a member of the "East Turkistan Islamic Movement" and his target is said to be Chinese interests in Norway. It fully indicates that there is no boundary for terrorist activities and the terrorists are the common enemies of the whole world. That is why the international community must unite and counter terrorism together.

Uyghur is one of the 56 ethnic groups in the big family of the Chinese nation, and the prosperity, harmony and unification have always been China's national goal. The fate of all ethnic groups is closely linked with Chinese nation's prosperity. As China develops and makes progress, the history and culture of all ethnic groups will surely be better protected and carried forward.

Newsroom

 

18/12/14 - Norway has taken some good initiatives to combat money laundering and terrorist financing, but needs to establish overarching policies and strategies, and address significant weaknesses in a number of key areas, according to a new report by the Financial Action Task Force.


In its Mutual Evaluation of Norway, the FATF said that despite good legal foundations and sound institutions, the investigation and prosecution of money laundering is not a high priority for competent authorities in Norway, resulting in very few convictions for such offences.

Norwegian authorities are taking appropriate action to detect and disrupt terrorist financing and have taken significant measures to implement proliferation financing sanctions. However, weaknesses exist in the implementation of targeted financial sanctions relating to terrorist financing and proliferation financing and the lack of supervision is a concern.

The FATF found that Limited action has been taken since 2009 to update laws and other measures. A priority for Norway is to update and supplement its laws and guidance for preventive measures. Basic measures are being implemented, but effectiveness is variable, with banking, accountant and audit, and real estate sectors being stronger than other sectors, including the legal sector and other parts of the financial sector. There is a need for a stronger application of the risk-based approach. The frequency, scope and intensity of supervision of these sectors are not sufficient and sanctioning powers for non-compliance are limited.

Norway takes an open and collaborative approach to international cooperation and there is a transparent set of national registers with information on the ownership and control of companies when they are owned by Norwegians. However, Norwegian authorities are not able to get timely access to beneficial ownership information on companies incorporated in Norway when these companies are owned by foreign entities.

The President of the FATF, Roger Wilkins, said: “The completion of a Mutual Evaluation report is a starting point for an assessed country to strengthen its measures to combat money laundering and terrorist financing. Norway’s report gives clear recommendations to Norway on the priority actions it should take. Norway will now work towards addressing the identified weaknesses and I am confident that they will do so very successfully.”

The FATF is the global body responsible for setting and monitoring international standards on combatting money laundering and the financing of terrorism. A FATF Mutual Evaluation is a year-long peer-review conducted by an international panel of experts. The Mutual Evaluation Report provides a detailed and complete assessment of Norway’s system to combat money laundering and terrorist financing, and assesses Norway’s level of compliance with the FATF Recommendations. The report also includes recommendations to Norway on the improvements needed.

Norway’s evaluation, which looks at measures ranging from law enforcement to financial supervision, is the first comprehensive review of a country’s anti money laundering and terrorist financing system and the first to be completed using the revised FATF Recommendations adopted in 2012.

For further information, journalists are invited to contact Alexandra Wijmenga-Daniel (tel. 33 1 45 24 95 23) in the Financial Action Task Force.

 

 

Norway

Overview:  Norway and the United States maintained good collaboration on CT.  Norway’s Police Security Service (PST) continued to assess that individuals and groups inspired by “extreme Islamist groups” represented the most significant terrorist threat to Norway.  Norway saw an increased level of mobilization and recruitment among REMT groups, which it calls “right wing extremist groups.”  The PST reintroduced a five-level scale to describe the national terror threat level and set the risk level at 3, which indicates a moderate chance of a terrorist attack taking place.

Norway is a member of the Global Coalition to Defeat ISIS.  The government co-sponsored UNSCRs 2178 and 2396 and contributed to the Coalition’s five lines of effort, including military personnel support to a capacity-building mission for Iraqi security forces in Anbar, Iraq.  In 2019, Norway provided country specific funding of approximately US $334 million to address the humanitarian crises in Iraq and Syria.

2019 Terrorist Incidents:  In August, Philip Manshaus attempted to commit a mass shooting at an Islamic center in a municipality neighboring the capital, Oslo.  He entered the mosque when few people were present and was overpowered by a member before being apprehended by police.  He is being investigated for terrorism and the murder of his stepsister and is in pretrial detention.  The investigation revealed he was active in online forums for white supremacists and inspired by the mass shooting in Christchurch, New Zealand.  Following this attack, PST updated its assessment of the likelihood of “right-wing extremists” attempting to carry out terrorist attacks from “unlikely” to “possible.”

Legislation, Law Enforcement, and Border Security:  Terrorism is a criminal offense in Norway, and it is illegal to conduct or plan to conduct a terrorist attack, receive terrorism-related training, or provide material support to a terrorist organization.  In addition, it is a criminal offense to travel or intend to travel to fight on behalf of a terrorist organization.  The maximum prison sentence for serious terrorism offenses is 30 years.

Norway continued to prosecute individuals for terrorism-related offenses.  In separate cases, a Norwegian court convicted a woman of attempting to join a terrorist organization and a man of participating in a terrorist organization.  The woman received a prison sentence of two years and nine months, and the man received seven years and three months.  In at least one instance, Norwegian officials used the Immigration Act to arrest a white supremacist on the grounds that he could influence others to commit violence.

The Norwegian government changed the Immigration Directorate’s guidance so that those possessing or seeking residence permits who have spent time in ISIS-controlled areas or have some affiliation with ISIS or other terrorist networks in Syria and Iraq may have their permits revoked and shall have their applications denied, to the extent consistent with the Norwegian Constitution and International Law.

The PST is responsible for domestic security, including CT activities.  The Joint Counter Terrorism Center, a joint analysis cell, includes participants from the PST and the Norwegian Intelligence Service (NIS), the external security service.  Both PST and NIS have devoted significant resources to identifying, tracking, and taking action against Norwegian citizens intending to travel to and from Syria or Iraq to fight for terrorist groups.

Norway shares fingerprint information in criminal investigations with the EU and the parties to the Prüm Convention.  Norway continued to explore an agreement on sharing PNR data with the EU and is simultaneously developing a national PNR system, which remained in the pilot phase at the end of 2019.  Immigration to Norway is facilitated and regulated by the Norwegian Directorate of Immigration, which processes all applications for asylum, visas, family immigration, work and study permits, permanent residence, and travel documents.  The Norwegian Immigration Database serves as a central repository for immigration authorities and contains biographic data and facial photos for all applicants for admission.  The Norwegian police and the Ministry of Foreign Affairs issue passports that, since 2005, have contained biometric data accessible for review by border security officials.  Norway coordinates with INTERPOL and Europol to enhance its vetting processes and has access to the Schengen Information System and the Visa Information System to share and receive information regarding suspected terrorists.

Security measures to protect soft targets in Oslo include physical barriers in the streets of one of the city’s main pedestrian thoroughfares and directly outside the neighboring buildings.  Measures may be enhanced for specific events.  Police at Oslo’s Gardermoen Airport are armed on a permanent basis.  The government and its underlying agencies continued to implement measures to secure public infrastructure, such as government and defense facilities, against potential terrorist attacks.  This followed criticism for slow progress by the National Auditor in 2018.

Countering the Financing of Terrorism:  Norway is a member of the FATF.  Norway’s FIU, the Financial Intelligence Unit Norway, is a member of the Egmont Group.  Norway is a member of the Defeat-ISIS Coalition’s CIFG.  There were no significant updates in 2019.

Countering Violent Extremism:  Norway continued to implement its National Action Plan against Radicalization and Violent Extremism, published in 2014, which is a whole-of government approach to countering terrorist radicalization and recruitment.  Priorities include strengthening CVE research, improving national and local cooperation on counter-radicalization efforts, promoting the reintegration of former terrorists, and preventing online recruitment and radicalization.  The plan is dynamic and is reviewed regularly with all stakeholders to ensure continued effectiveness.  A review process begun in 2019 has been particularly comprehensive because of changes in the threat environment.

Norway coordinates among authorities responsible for managing the release from prison and reintegration of those convicted of terrorism-related offenses.  Municipalities considered home to populations and individuals most vulnerable to terrorist radicalization have created action plans for prevention activities.  The national government hosts an annual conference on terrorist radicalization, which in 2019 focused in part on racially or ethnically motivated terrorism.

Norway supports the Youth Civil Activism Network.  Oslo and Kristiansand are members of the SCN.

International and Regional Cooperation:  Norway is active in multilateral fora in efforts to counter terrorism, including NATO, the EU’s Radicalization Awareness Network, and the OSCE.  In 2019, the OSCE launched a Norwegian-funded handbook on gender perspectives in countering violent extremism and radicalization.  Norway provided financial support to the GCTF Working Group on Capacity-Building in East Africa, supported INTERPOL’s capacity-building programs on border security and rule of law in North Africa and the Sahel, and funded counter-radicalization programs in prisons in Kenya, Indonesia, and Morocco.  Norway supports implementation of the UN Secretary-General’s Plan of Action to Prevent Violent Extremism and is co-chair with Jordan of the Group of Friends at the UN on preventing violent extremism.  Norway is contributing $1.2 million to the UNOCT for the 2018-2021 period, in partnership with UNDP.  Norway provides funding for the International Civil Society Action Network and in 2019 hosted the eighth annual Women, Peace and Security forum, which focused on situational and trends analysis regarding the threat of terrorism and conflict.  Norway supports the GCERF.

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Emergencies

U.S. Citizens with emergencies, please call (+47) 21 30 85 40

Outside of Office Hours, contact: (+47) 21 30 85 40

Outside of Norway: 011 47 2130 8540

Oslo

The visiting address is:
U.S. Embassy Oslo
Morgedalsvegen 36
0378 Oslo

The postal address is:
U.S. Embassy Oslo
PO Box 4075 AMB
0244 Oslo

(+47) 21 30 85 40
(open 08:30 to 17:00 Monday-Friday)
The Embassy is closed on Norwegian and American holidays.

Consular

The Consular Section of the U.S. Embassy provides assistance to American citizens residing in or visiting Norway and visa services for temporary visitors to the United States.

American Citizen Services

  • Passport Issuance and renewal, registration of Americans living in Norway, birth reports for American children born in Norway, voter registration, notarial services, and emergency services.
  • Opening hours Monday through Thursday from 10:00-11:00 by appointment only
  • Email: [email protected]

Visa Information

Federal Benefits Unit

  • Assistance with benefits from U.S. government: Social Security Administration, Veterans Administration, Office of Personnel Management (civil service), and Railroad Retirement Board.
  • Visit by appointment only can be scheduled via email
  • Email: [email protected]

Public Affairs

The Public Affairs Section  works to promote people-to-people ties between the United States and Norway. We advocate and explain U.S. policies and culture to the Norwegian public. In addition the Section manages media relations, encourages educational and professional exchange among Norwegians and Americans, and supports the work of our bilateral Fulbright Commission to strengthen educational links between the U.S. and Norway.

Press Section

Information Resource Center (IRC)

  • The IRC is the “information booth” of the Embassy.
  • We provide reference, referral and documentation service for researchers, journalists, government officials and others with a professional or scholarly interest in the United States.
  • Contact Us: [email protected]

Education USA

Meet America

  • We invite high school classes to the embassy for interactive sessions on various U.S. related topics.
  • We can send an embassy speaker to come to your school (in the larger Oslo area).
  • Contact us: [email protected]

Thematic Programs and Grants

  • American Speaker Program: we recruit and fund specialists to come from the U.S. to lecture and participate in workshops and seminars with local audiences.
  • Grants: we give small grants to local organizations for projects related to the U.S.
  • Contact Us: [email protected]

Defense Cooperation

The Office of Defense Cooperation (ODC) Norway is responsible to the U.S. Ambassador and the Commander, U.S. European Command, for administering U.S. Security Cooperation and Defense Cooperation in Armaments Programs, and defense logistics activities with Norway.

The primary constituency of ODC-Norway includes U.S. Department of Defense personnel, Norwegian Ministry of Defense staff, Norwegian Chief of Defense staff, the Norwegian National Defense Logistics Organization, U.S. defense vendors, and Norwegian defense-related industries wishing to participate in cooperative programs in order to gain access to the market. Specific areas in which the ODC may provide assistance include:

  • National and defense decision-making process
  • Defense procurement regulations and policies
  • Defense budget and procurement plans
  • Defense industries and product lines
  • Points of contact for specific procurement programs
  • Coordination with other U.S. Embassy offices
  • Industrial cooperation requirements
  • Bilateral logistics agreements
  • Data Exchange Agreements
  • Foreign Comparative Testing programs

Security Cooperation

Security Cooperation includes Foreign Military Sales (FMS) of U.S. defense equipment, training, and related services. Such transfers are carried out under the principle that if they are essential to the security and economic well-being of friendly foreign governments, they are equally vital to the security and economic well being of the United States.

Defense Cooperation in Armaments

Defense Cooperation in Armaments includes support for bilateral government-to-government cooperative programs such as the Joint Strike Fighter Program Sustainment and Follow-on Development, the F-16 Multinational Fighter Program, numerous Data Exchange Agreements, Foreign Comparative Testing, Engineer & Scientist Exchanges, and support to U.S. defense industries seeking to do business in Norway.

Logistics Planning

Logistics planning includes coordinating bilateral mutual logistics support agreements, which provide the U.S. and Norway flexible and responsive logistics support during peacetime and war.  Key programs include the Marine Corps Pre-Positioning – Norway (MCPP-N) and Collocated Operating Bases (COB).

Useful links

  • US Defense Security Cooperation Agency
  • Under Secretary of Defense for Acquisition, Technology and Logistics (Coming soon)
  • Defense Procurement and Acquisition Policy (Coming soon): Department of Defense Regulations regarding acquisitions
  • OSD Comparative Testing Office (Coming soon): Provides links to Foreign Comparative Testing program and provides guidance for doing business with the US Department of Defense
  • US Air Force Material Command (Coming soon)
  • US Navy Research, Development and Acquisition (Coming soon)

Contact details

Office of Defense Cooperation
U.S. Embassy
Morgedalsvegen 36
0378 Oslo
Norway

Commercial Section

The Embassy’s Commercial Section is part of the U.S. Commercial Service, the trade promotion unit of the U.S. Department of Commerce.

U.S. Commercial Service — Creating Prosperity Through Global Trade

The U.S. Commercial Service promotes and protects U.S. commercial interests abroad and delivers customized solutions to ensure that U.S. businesses compete and win in the global marketplace.

The U.S. Commercial Service promotes economic prosperity, enhance job creation, and strengthen national security through a global network of international trade professionals. U.S. Commercial Service trade specialists in 107 U.S. cities and in more than 80 countries work with U.S. companies to help them get started in exporting or increase their sales to new global markets. Our services include:

  • World class market research
  • Trade events that promote U.S. products or services to qualified buyers
  • Introductions to qualified buyers and distributors
  • Coordination of resources across federal departments and agencies relevant to business investment in the U.S. See also www.selectusa.gov.
  • Counseling and advocacy through every step of the export process.

The U.S. Commercial Service also assists Norwegian companies in accessing U.S. suppliers of products and services for their operations or for distribution in Norway. We offer a variety of services to both U.S. and Norwegian companies to fit almost any need.

To learn more about how the U.S. Commercial Service in Oslo, Norway, can assist your company, check out the Embassy Business page or the U.S. Commercial Service in Norway website.

Political and Economic Section

The combined Political-Economic Section engages with the Norwegian Government and Parliament, local governments, political parties and organizations, the business/commercial sector, academia, and civil society on political and economic policy matters.

Working with governmental and non-governmental contacts, we advocate policies consistent with U.S. interests, promote support for U.S. policy priorities, and maximize cooperation with Norwegians in areas of mutual interest. Some examples include our common effort through the North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO) to help Afghanistan become self-sufficient; developing new sources of energy; supporting sustainable development in the Arctic, including through the work of the Arctic Council, and promoting democracy and respect for human rights throughout the world.

The Section also ensures the U.S. Department of State and other U.S. government agencies are aware of significant political and economic developments in and around Norway.

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