Ubuntu error raw edid

ubuntu error raw edid

[drm:radeon_dvi_detect] *ERROR* HDMI Type A-1: probed a monitor but no|invalid EDID The first problem is that there is NO monitor from which these "*ERROR*". Sometimes the log shows only one EDID and different remainders, but same EDID have same remainder. As the display is built in, there should be. 3. Details of edid-decode.x86_64 package Last metadata expiration check: 0:00:57 ago on Sat Jan 22 13:56:38 Description: Decodes raw monitor EDID.

Ubuntu error raw edid - for

EDID detection error with Qnix 1440p monitor in Linux #336

  • Are you using the latest driver? Yes - 5.5 beta

  • Are you using the latest EVDI version? Yes, the current devel from Github (1.10)

  • If you are using a DisplayLink device, have you checked 'troubleshooting'
    on DisplayLink's website? - Yes

  • Is this issue related to evdi/kernel? EVDI I believe

  • Linux distribution and its version- Ubuntu Budgie 20.04

  • Linux kernel version - x86_64 Linux 5.11.0-43-generic

  • Xorg version (if used) - 2:1.20.13-1ubuntu1~20.04.2

  • Desktop environment in use - Budgie

Hi,
I have a Qnix 1440p monitor connected via dual-link DVI (using an active displayport adapter). This setup works well with Displaylink on Windows, but has trouble on Linux. I receive the following after connecting the monitor in Ubuntu:

evdi: [E] evdi_painter_connect:864 Wrong edid size. Expected 256 but is 128

I got crafty and modified the evdi_painter.c module to calculate the expected_edid_size by looking at the size of the edid struct only (as that was correctly reported as 128).

expected_edid_size = sizeof(struct edid);

This allowed the monitor to be detected by the OS but at the wrong resolution. I then assigned a resolution via xrandr (using cvt/gtf to generate the Modeline)

xrandr --newmode "qnix2560x1440_60.00" 311.83 2560 2744 3024 3488 1440 1441 1444 1490 -HSync +Vsync
xrandr --output DVI-I-1-1 --mode qnix2560x1440_60.00

Now the monitor is fully working at 1440p 60.

I see my dmesg is clogged with wrong EDID's and warnings.

[ 1014.526113] evdi: [I] (card0) Connector state: connected
[ 1014.526131] [drm] EDID checksum is invalid, remainder is 38
[ 1014.526134] Raw EDID:
[ 1014.526137] 80 43 02 00 80 07 d8 07 04 08 98 08 00 00 38 04
[ 1014.526141] 3c 04 41 04 65 04 00 00 05 00 00 00 00 00 00 00
[ 1014.526144] 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00
[ 1014.526146] 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 40 00
[ 1014.526149] 14 08 bd 19 4f ac b5 35 22 01 00 00 00 00 ad de
[ 1014.526152] 31 39 32 30 78 31 30 38 30 00 00 00 00 00 00 00
[ 1014.526154] 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00
[ 1014.526157] 00 00 00 00 02 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00
[ 1014.526166] evdi evdi.0: [drm] DVI-I-1: EDID invalid.
[ 1014.526172] evdi: [I] (card0) Edid property set

I am wondering how/why this is happening in Ubuntu but not Windows. I can pull the EDID via the Displaylink adapter in Windows.

00 ff ff ff ff ff ff 00 31 d8 00 00 00 00 00 00
05 16 01 03 6d 42 25 78 ea 5e c0 a4 59 4a 98 25
20 50 54 00 00 00 21 c0 01 01 01 01 01 01 01 01
01 01 01 01 01 01 56 5e 00 a0 a0 a0 29 50 30 20
35 00 9a 77 21 00 00 1e 00 00 00 ff 00 4c 69 6e
75 78 20 23 30 0a 20 20 20 20 00 00 00 fd 00 3b
3d 57 59 19 00 0a 20 20 20 20 20 20 00 00 00 fc
00 32 35 36 30 78 31 34 34 30 0a 20 20 20 00 69

Thank you!

DisplayLink Forum > DisplayLink Graphics Technology > Linux and Open Source > "EDID Invalid" On Xubuntu 16.04


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OIKgnPdgNWHf

05-18-2016, 01:10 PM

Display worked at first, but after a few reboots now dmesg reports this error and the display is no longer working.


[D] evdi_detect (dev=1) Painter is connected
[D] evdi_painter_get_edid (dev=1) 54 c4 ff
evdi evdi.0: DVI-I-1: EDID invalid.


This is an HP Envy laptop. While I appreciate there is a support tool to dump more info, this is a work computer which cannot have its debug info publicly disclosed.


mlukaszek

05-18-2016, 01:49 PM

The information you provided indicates that the EDID is indeed invalid. The first three bytes that are printed out should be 00 ff ff.
What monitor is it? Does it work without problems if it's connected directly to any PC? Can you dump an EDID from it and attach here?

Cheers,
Michal


OIKgnPdgNWHf

05-19-2016, 06:00 PM

Monitor is an Acer R240HY which works fine connected directly to the HDMI port on the same computer. FWIW, now dmesg reports 3 different bytes for the EDID: "54 64 52".


mlukaszek

05-20-2016, 05:24 PM

This is interesting. Any chance you could send us at least DL logs from /var/log/displaylink?

Cheers,
Michal


OIKgnPdgNWHf

06-03-2016, 12:04 PM

Today when I booted the driver produced a SIGSEGV ("Cannot access memory at address") error without a monitor plugged into the adapter. So I tried a different monitor of the same model with the adapter and got the following EDID:

Raw EDID:
54 d4 7f 0b 2e 7f 00 00 00 01 00 00 2d 7f 00 00
00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00
00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00
00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00
00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00
00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00
00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00
00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00


The other monitor also produced a mostly null/zero EDID like the one above.

DisplayLink version is 1.1.68. I recall trying 1.0.335 first; not sure if that is a factor.


OIKgnPdgNWHf

06-03-2016, 12:14 PM

This is interesting. Any chance you could send us at least DL logs from /var/log/displaylink?

Sent over PM


mlukaszek

06-08-2016, 09:34 AM

Thanks, I've raised this internally for analysis.

Cheers,
Michal


TomStaels

09-26-2016, 11:30 AM

having the same issue...
any solution to this yet ?
[ 49.032846] usb 2-1.1: new high-speed USB device number 3 using ehci-pci
[ 49.128660] usb 2-1.1: New USB device found, idVendor=17e9, idProduct=0033
[ 49.128672] usb 2-1.1: New USB device strings: Mfr=1, Product=2, SerialNumber=3
[ 49.128677] usb 2-1.1: Product: K33907
[ 49.128682] usb 2-1.1: Manufacturer: DisplayLink
[ 49.128686] usb 2-1.1: SerialNumber: 0033-100831
[ 50.148085] [drm] vendor descriptor length:e0 data:00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00
[ 50.148095] [drm:udl_driver_load [udl]] *ERROR* Unrecognized vendor firmware descriptor
[ 50.196976] EDID block is all zeroes
[ 50.196991] udl 2-1.1:1.0: DVI-I-1: EDID invalid.
[ 50.197561] udl 2-1.1:1.0: fb1: udldrmfb frame buffer device
[ 50.197564] [drm] Supports vblank timestamp caching Rev 2 (21.10.2013).
[ 50.197564] [drm] No driver support for vblank timestamp query.
[ 50.197566] [drm] Initialized udl on minor 1
[ 50.197591] usbcore: registered new interface driver udl
[ 50.390848] EDID block is all zeroes
[ 50.390864] udl 2-1.1:1.0: DVI-I-1: EDID invalid.
[ 50.438966] EDID block is all zeroes
[ 50.438977] udl 2-1.1:1.0: DVI-I-1: EDID invalid.
[ 120.941994] EDID block is all zeroes
[ 120.942011] udl 2-1.1:1.0: DVI-I-1: EDID invalid.
[ 121.081365] EDID block is all zeroes
[ 121.081383] udl 2-1.1:1.0: DVI-I-1: EDID invalid.
[ 306.286639] EDID block is all zeroes
[ 306.286655] udl 2-1.1:1.0: DVI-I-1: EDID invalid.
[ 758.287223] EDID block is all zeroes
[ 758.287230] udl 2-1.1:1.0: DVI-I-1: EDID invalid.
[ 758.364453] EDID block is all zeroes
[ 758.364460] udl 2-1.1:1.0: DVI-I-1: EDID invalid.
[ 758.441228] EDID block is all zeroes
[ 758.441235] udl 2-1.1:1.0: DVI-I-1: EDID invalid.
[ 758.459631] evdi: module verification failed: signature and/or required key missing - tainting kernel
[ 758.461167] evdi: [I] Initialising logging on level 5
[ 759.439734] EDID block is all zeroes
[ 759.439761] udl 2-1.1:1.0: DVI-I-1: EDID invalid.
[ 759.488616] EDID block is all zeroes
[ 759.488628] udl 2-1.1:1.0: DVI-I-1: EDID invalid.


mlukaszek

09-27-2016, 07:20 AM

Don't use udl and evdi together. For devices requiring evdi, make sure udl is blacklisted. For USB 2.0 devices using DL-1xx chips, stick to udl, and don't install evdi.

Cheers,
Michal


TomStaels

09-27-2016, 04:30 PM

Thanks for helping out Michal!

uninstalled evdi
un-blacklisted udlfb
screen works, but can't set native resolution (1280x1024), only options are 800x600 and 1024x768

help?


mlukaszek

09-28-2016, 09:09 AM

DRM driver for USB 2.0 DisplayLink Devices is udl, a rewrite of the original udlfb driver (which you shouldn't use). Which one have you unblacklisted?

Thanks,
Michla


TomStaels

09-28-2016, 12:27 PM

i was trying to get it to work with udlfb, since this seems to be a "Bad Idea" (tm), I tried udl :


$ lsmod poly-p-ux projects main page

HDMI Resolutions testing

Ok, I’ve tested it with VIM3_Ubuntu-gnome-focal_Linux-4.9_arm64_SD-USB_V0.9-20200530 and display is working! :slight_smile: Without touchscreen, but same display shows image properly.
You need to change env.txt as @tedal said:
line 62 to hdmi=1024x600p60hz
and also
line 19 to hdmi_autodetect=no

It is quite suprising, because
On EMMC image we have: Linux Khadas 4.9.224 #29 SMP PREEMPT Sat May 30 14:20:51 CST 2020 aarch64 aarch64 aarch64 GNU/Linux
On SD/USB image we have: Linux Khadas 4.9.224 #29 SMP PREEMPT Sat May 30 14:20:51 CST 2020 aarch64 aarch64 aarch64 GNU/Linux

It seems to be the same build. Why SD/USB is working while EMMC not?

Quite suprising is that dmesg also says:

Any ideas what to do to make now Android working with display? :slight_smile:

So, summary:
Android:
None of tested working (Vims-Pie-V200103, V200320, V200617, either installed by USB-burn-installer and Krescue)

Ubuntu:
VIMx.Ubuntu.mainline.5.5.xfce.bionic.test.emmc installed from Krescue - works display and touchscreen
VIM3_Ubuntu-gnome-focal_Linux-5.7-rc7_arm64_SD-USB_V0.9-20200530.img - works display and touchscreen
Ubuntu Focal with kernel 5.7 and xfce build from sources using Fenix works - works display and touchscreen
VIM3_Ubuntu-gnome-focal_Linux-4.9_arm64_SD-USB_V0.9-20200530 - works display, but not touchscreen
VIM3_Ubuntu-gnome-focal_Linux-4.9_arm64_EMMC_V0.9-20200530.img - none of display and ts working
VIM3_Ubuntu-xfce-bionic_Linux-4.9_arm64_EMMC_V20191231.img - none of display and ts working

Provided by: edid-decode_0.1~git20201230.95d81c9-2_amd64bug

NAME

edid-decode - Decode EDID data in human-readable format

SYNOPSIS

edid-decode<options>[in[out]]

DESCRIPTION

edid-decode decodes EDID monitor description data in human-readable format. If [in] is not given, or [in] is '-', then the EDID will be read from standard input. If [out] is given then the EDID that was read from [in] is written to [out] or to standard output if [out] is '-'. By default the output is written as a hex dump when writing to standard output or a raw EDID if written to a file. If [out] is given then edid-decode only does the conversion, it will skip the decoding step. Input files may be raw binaries or ASCII text. ASCII input is scanned for hex dumps; heuristics are included to search for hexdumps in edid-decode(1) output (as long as the initial hex dump was included), xrandr(1) property output and Xorg(1) log file formats, otherwise the data is treated as a raw hexdump. EDID blocks for connected monitors can be found in /sys/class/drm/*/edid on modern Linux systems with kernel modesetting support. All timings are shown in a short format, for example: VIC 16: 1920x1080 60.000 Hz 16:9 67.500 kHz 148.500 MHz (native) VIC 5: 1920x1080i 60.000 Hz 16:9 33.750 kHz 74.250 MHz VIC 39: 1920x1080i 50.000 Hz 16:9 31.250 kHz 72.000 MHz Each format starts with a timings type prefix, the resolution, an optional interlaced indicator ('i'), the frame rate (field rate for interlaced formats), the picture aspect ratio, the horizontal frequency, the pixelclock frequency and optionally additional flags between parenthesis. Note that for interlaced formats the frame height is given, not the field height. So each field in a 1920x1080i format has 540 lines. Detailed timings have another 2-3 lines of data: VIC 16: 1920x1080 60.000 Hz 16:9 67.500 kHz 148.500 MHz (native) Hfront 88 Hsync 44 Hback 148 Hpol P Vfront 4 Vsync 5 Vback 36 Vpol P VIC 5: 1920x1080i 60.000 Hz 16:9 33.750 kHz 74.250 MHz Hfront 88 Hsync 44 Hback 148 Hpol P Vfront 2 Vsync 5 Vback 15 Vpol P Vfront +0.5 Odd Field Vfront 2 Vsync 5 Vback 15 Vpol P Vback +0.5 Even Field VIC 39: 1920x1080i 50.000 Hz 16:9 31.250 kHz 72.000 MHz Hfront 32 Hsync 168 Hback 184 Hpol P Vfront 23 Vsync 5 Vback 57 Vpol N Both Fields These describe the horizontal and vertical front porch, sync, backporch and sync polarity values. For interlaced formats there are two lines for the vertical information: one for the Odd Field (aka Field 1) and one for the Even Field (aka Field 2). The vertical front porch of the Odd Field is actually 2.5 (hence the 'Vfront +0.5' at the end of the line), and the back porch of the Even Field is actually 15.5 (hence the 'Vback +0.5' at the end of the line). There is a special 'VIC 39' interlaced format where both fields have the same vertical timings, in that case this is marked with 'Both Fields'. The following timing types can be shown: DMT #: Discrete Monitor Timing (see DMT 1.3 standard). The number is the DMT ID in hexadecimal. CVT: Coordinated Video Timings (formula-based, see CVT 1.2 standard) GTF: Generalized Timing Formula (formula-based, see GTF 1.1 standard) IBM: Old IBM Timings Apple: Old Apple Timings VIC #: Video Identification Code (see CTA-861 standard). The number is the actual VIC code. HDMI VIC #: HDMI-specific Video Identification Code (see HDMI 2.1 standard). The number is the actual HDMI VIC code. DTD #: Detailed Timings Descriptor (see EDID standard). Also used for DisplayID Video Timing Modes Types I, II, VI and VII. The number denotes that this is the Nth DTD in the EDID. By default DTDs are shown in the long format while others are just shown in the short format. With the option --short-timings all timings are shown in short format only. With the option --long-timings all timings are shown in long format. Alternate formats for long timings can be chosen via the --xmodeline or --fbmode options.

STANDARDS

The following EDID standards are supported by edid-decode: EDID 1.3: VESA Enhanced Extended Display Identication Data Standard, Release A, Revision 1 EDID 1.4: VESA Enhanced Extended Display Identication Data Standard, Release A, Revision 2 DisplayID 1.3: VESA Display Identification Data (DisplayID) Standard, Version 1.3 DisplayID 2.0: VESA DisplayID Standard, Version 2.0 DI-EXT: VESA Display Information Extension Block Standard, Release A LS-EXT: VESA Enhanced EDID Localized String Extension Standard, Release A VTB-EXT: VESA Video Timing Block Extension Data Standard, Release A DTCDB: VESA Display Transfer Characteristics Data Block Standard, Version 1.0 DDDB: VESA Display Device Data Block (DDDB) Standard, Version 1 HDMI 1.4b: High-Definition Multimedia Interface, Version 1.4b HDMI 2.1: High-Definition Multimedia Interface, Version 2.1 HDMI 2.1: Amendment A1 to HDMI Specification Version 2.1 CTA-861-H: A DTV Profile for Uncompressed High Speed Digital Interfaces SPWG Notebook Panel Specification, Version 3.5 EPI Embedded Panel Interface, Revision 1.0 The following related standards are also used by edid-decode: DMT 1.3: VESA and Industry Standards and Guidelines for Computer Display Monitor Timing (DMT), Version 1.0, Rev. 13 CVT 1.2: VESA Coordinated Video Timings (CVT) Standard, Version 1.2 GTF 1.1: VESA Generalized Timing Formula Standard, Version: 1.1

OPTIONS

-h, --help Prints the help message. -o, --output-format=<fmt> If [out] is specified, then write the EDID in format <fmt>. The output format can be one of: hex: hex numbers in ascii text (default for stdout) raw: binary data (default unless writing to stdout) carray: c-program struct xml: XML data -c, --check Check if the EDID conforms to the standards. Warnings and failures are reported at the end. -C, --check-inline Check if the EDID conforms to the standards. Warnings and failures are reported as they happen. -n, --native-timings Report the native timings at the end. There may be multiple native timing reports depending on whether the Source only parses Block 0 (e.g. DVI outputs) or Block 0 and the CTA-861 Extension Blocks (HDMI). -p, --preferred-timings Report the preferred timings at the end. There may be multiple native timing reports depending on whether the Source only parses Block 0 (e.g. DVI outputs), or Block 0 and the CTA-861 Extension Blocks (HDMI), or Block 0 and the DisplayID Extension Blocks (typical for DisplayPort). -P, --physical-address Just report the HDMI Source Physical Address and nothing else. Reports f.f.f.f if the EDID could not be parsed, or if there was no CTA-861 Vendor-Specific Data Block with OUI 00-0C-03. Otherwise it reports the Source Physical Address as provided in that Data Block. This can be used as input to HDMI CEC utilities such as the linux cec-ctl(1) utility. -S, --short-timings Report all video timings in a short format. -L, --long-timings Report all video timings in a long format. -X, --xmodeline Report all long video timings in the ModeLine format as defined in xorg.conf(5). This ModeLine can be used in the xorg.conf file or passed to xrandr(1) with the xrandr --newmode option. -F, --fbmode Report all long video timings in the video mode format as defined in fb.modes(5). -V, --v4l2-timings Report all long video timings in the video mode format as defined in the linux header v4l2-dv-timings.h for use with the V4L2 VIDIOC_S_DV_TIMINGS ioctl. -s, --skip-hex-dump Skip the initial hex dump of the EDID. --skip-sha Don't show the SHA hash. Normally edid-decode will show the SHA, i.e. the hash of the git commit used to compile edid-decode. This uniquely identifies the version of edid-decode that is used to generate the warnings and failures. But it will also change the output of edid-decode for every new commit in the git repository, even if nothing else changed in the edid-decode output. Use this option to avoid including the SHA in the edid-decode output. --hide-serial-numbers Replace any serial numbers in the human readable output by '...'. Note that they are still easily extracted from the EDID hex dump at the start. --version Show the SHA hash and the last commit date.

NOTES

Not all fields are decoded, or decoded completely. Some fields' decoding may appear to corrupt the output (for example, detailed string sections have their contents printed literally). edid-decode does attempt to validate its input against the relevant standards, but its opinions have not been double-checked with the relevant standards bodies, so they may be wrong. Do not rely on the output format, as it will likely change in future versions of the tool as additional fields and extensions are added.

SEEALSO

Xorg(1), xrandr(1), cec-ctl(1), xorg.conf(5), fb.modes(5)

AUTHORS

edid-decode was written by Adam Jackson, with contributions from Eric Anholt, Damien Lespiau, Hans Verkuil and others. For complete history and the latest version, see http://git.linuxtv.org/cgit.cgi/edid-decode.gitedid-decode(1)

Ubuntu error raw edid - sorry

HDMI Resolutions testing

Ok, I’ve tested it with VIM3_Ubuntu-gnome-focal_Linux-4.9_arm64_SD-USB_V0.9-20200530 and display is working! :slight_smile: Without touchscreen, but same display shows image properly.
You need to change env.txt as @tedal said:
line 62 to hdmi=1024x600p60hz
and also
line 19 to hdmi_autodetect=no

It is quite suprising, because
On EMMC image we have: Linux Khadas 4.9.224 #29 SMP PREEMPT Sat May 30 14:20:51 CST 2020 aarch64 aarch64 aarch64 GNU/Linux
On SD/USB image we have: Linux Khadas 4.9.224 #29 SMP PREEMPT Sat May 30 14:20:51 CST 2020 aarch64 aarch64 aarch64 GNU/Linux

It seems to be the same build. Why SD/USB is working while EMMC not?

Quite suprising is that dmesg also says:

Any ideas what to do to make now Android working with display? :slight_smile:

So, summary:
Android:
None of tested working (Vims-Pie-V200103, V200320, V200617, either installed by USB-burn-installer and Krescue)

Ubuntu:
VIMx.Ubuntu.mainline.5.5.xfce.bionic.test.emmc installed from Krescue - works display and touchscreen
VIM3_Ubuntu-gnome-focal_Linux-5.7-rc7_arm64_SD-USB_V0.9-20200530.img - works display and touchscreen
Ubuntu Focal with kernel 5.7 and xfce build from sources using Fenix works - works display and touchscreen
VIM3_Ubuntu-gnome-focal_Linux-4.9_arm64_SD-USB_V0.9-20200530 - works display, but not touchscreen
VIM3_Ubuntu-gnome-focal_Linux-4.9_arm64_EMMC_V0.9-20200530.img - none of display and ts working
VIM3_Ubuntu-xfce-bionic_Linux-4.9_arm64_EMMC_V20191231.img - none of display and ts working

grep "udl"
udl 32768 1
drm_kms_helper 147456 2 udl,i915
drm 364544 7 udl,i915,drm_kms_helper


Turning ON the "Unknown Display" in Displays, the system becomes nearly unresponsive, and the display never actually turns on.
syslog is spammed with :
[ 104.344500] [drm] wait for urb interrupted: ffffffc2 available: 0
[ 105.344655] [drm] wait for urb interrupted: ffffffc2 available: 0
[ 106.344680] [drm] wait for urb interrupted: ffffffc2 available: 0
[ 107.356719] [drm] wait for urb interrupted: ffffffc2 available: 0
[ 107.456677] EDID block is all zeroes
[ 107.456687] udl 2-1.1:1.0: DVI-I-1: EDID invalid.
[ 108.564776] [drm] wait for urb interrupted: ffffffc2 available: 0
[ 109.656798] [drm] wait for urb interrupted: ffffffc2 available: 0
[ 110.696848] [drm] wait for urb interrupted: ffffffc2 available: 0
[ 111.712881] [drm] wait for urb interrupted: ffffffc2 available: 0
[ 112.728887] [drm] wait for urb interrupted: ffffffc2 available: 0
[ 113.748959] [drm] wait for urb interrupted: ffffffc2 available: 0
[ 114.776999] [drm] wait for urb interrupted: ffffffc2 available: 0
[ 115.797050] [drm] wait for urb interrupted: ffffffc2 available: 0
[ 116.817072] [drm] wait for urb interrupted: ffffffc2 available: 0
[ 117.837127] [drm] wait for urb interrupted: ffffffc2 available: 0
[ 118.857171] [drm] wait for urb interrupted: ffffffc2 available: 0
[ 119.873186] [drm] wait for urb interrupted: ffffffc2 available: 0
[ 120.893225] [drm] wait for urb interrupted: ffffffc2 available: 0
[ 121.925288] [drm] wait for urb interrupted: ffffffc2 available: 0
[ 122.945319] [drm] wait for urb interrupted: ffffffc2 available: 0
[ 123.973343] [drm] wait for urb interrupted: ffffffc2 available: 0
[ 124.431887] EDID block is all zeroes
[ 124.431904] udl 2-1.1:1.0: DVI-I-1: EDID invalid.


mlukaszek

09-28-2016, 12:42 PM

This looks like a genuine problem with finding out what the EDID for the monitor is. Note the messages telling that the block is all zeros. How is the monitor connected to the device? Do you use an adapter (DVI-VGA) - some of them could block lines reponsible for EDID read?

Thanks,
Michal


TomStaels

09-28-2016, 01:11 PM

the cable is DVI-DVI, no adapter used...
The system dual boots Win/Linux, all screens work just fine in windows.
I will try to get my hands on a 2nd DVI cable for testing.


TomStaels

09-29-2016, 01:45 PM

tried with another DVI-D Single link cable, no joy
tried another screen...no joy.
Every test with udl results in a near unresponsive system, and syslog being spammed as before.

This is a fresh install of Ubuntu 16.04, there's nothing else on there.
Anything else I could try ?


Gabor

10-08-2016, 09:13 AM

Hi,

I have an old usb 2.0 displaylink device with hdmi, also tried with different displays and have the same behaviour and outputs, my session is also crashes, when I disconnect the device, and drops me to login screen.

I know I should use fbl, but before I knew I have tried EVDI, and it doesn't work as well, but I had not all zeros invalid EDID
kernel: [ 1002.378434] [drm:drm_edid_block_valid [drm]] *ERROR* EDID checksum is invalid, remainder is184
kernel: [ 1002.378438] Raw EDID:
kernel: [ 1002.378440] 00 ff ff ff ff ff ff 00 41 2f 00 00 01 01 01 01
kernel: [ 1002.378442] 00 15 01 03 80 00 00 78 0a da ff a3 58 4a a2 29
kernel: [ 1002.378443] 17 49 4b 00 00 00 01 01 01 01 01 01 01 01 01 01
kernel: [ 1002.378444] 01 01 01 01 01 01 01 1d 00 bc 52 d0 1e 20 b8 28
kernel: [ 1002.378446] 55 40 ba 88 21 00 00 1e 01 1d 00 72 51 d0 1e 20
kernel: [ 1002.378447] 6e 28 55 00 ba 88 21 00 00 1e 00 00 00 00 00 00
kernel: [ 1002.378448] 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00
kernel: [ 1002.378450] 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00
kernel: [ 1002.378453] udl 2-3.1:1.0: DVI-I-2: EDID invalid.
kernel: [ 1002.379077] udl 2-3.1:1.0: fb2: udldrmfb frame buffer device

Without evdi:

[ 2617.838969] usb 2-2.1: new high-speed USB device number 19 using xhci_hcd
[ 2617.946762] usb 2-2.1: New USB device found, idVendor=17e9, idProduct=019d
[ 2617.946766] usb 2-2.1: New USB device strings: Mfr=1, Product=2, SerialNumber=3
[ 2617.946769] usb 2-2.1: Product: USB TO HDMI
[ 2617.946771] usb 2-2.1: Manufacturer: DisplayLink
[ 2617.946773] usb 2-2.1: SerialNumber: 003142
[ 2617.948083] [drm] vendor descriptor length:23 data:23 5f 01 00 21 00 04 04 07 00 01
[ 2617.986830] EDID block is all zeroes
[ 2617.986837] udl 2-2.1:1.0: DVI-I-1: EDID invalid.
[ 2617.987493] udl 2-2.1:1.0: fb1: udldrmfb frame buffer device
[ 2617.987497] [drm] Supports vblank timestamp caching Rev 2 (21.10.2013).
[ 2617.987498] [drm] No driver support for vblank timestamp query.
[ 2617.987500] [drm] Initialized udl on minor 1
[ 2618.074972] usb 2-2.2: new full-speed USB device number 20 using xhci_hcd
[ 2618.180003] usb 2-2.2: New USB device found, idVendor=0d8c, idProduct=000c
[ 2618.180008] usb 2-2.2: New USB device strings: Mfr=0, Product=1, SerialNumber=0
[ 2618.180010] usb 2-2.2: Product: C-Media USB Headphone Set
[ 2618.184149] input: C-Media USB Headphone Set as /devices/pci0000:00/0000:00:14.0/usb2/2-2/2-2.2/2-2.2:1.2/0003:0D8C:000C.0007/input/input25
[ 2618.239182] hid-generic 0003:0D8C:000C.0007: input,hidraw2: USB HID v1.00 Device [C-Media USB Headphone Set ] on usb-0000:00:14.0-2.2/input2
[ 2619.091410] EDID block is all zeroes
[ 2619.091431] udl 2-2.1:1.0: DVI-I-1: EDID invalid.
[ 2619.131242] EDID block is all zeroes
[ 2619.131247] udl 2-2.1:1.0: DVI-I-1: EDID invalid.
[ 2655.928327] [drm] write mode info 153
[ 2656.932604] [drm] wait for urb interrupted: ffffffc2 available: 0
...
[ 2870.401817] [drm] wait for urb interrupted: ffffffc2 available: 0
[ 2871.401847] [drm] wait for urb interrupted: ffffffc2 available: 0
[ 2872.401860] [drm] wait for urb interrupted: ffffffc2 available: 0
[ 2872.677582] [drm:udl_urb_completion [udl]] *ERROR* udl_urb_completion - nonzero write bulk status received: -71
[ 2872.678194] usb 2-2: USB disconnect, device number 18
[ 2872.678200] usb 2-2.1: USB disconnect, device number 19
[ 2872.681277] usb 2-2.2: USB disconnect, device number 20
[ 2873.307596] konsole[7540]: segfault at 7f8cffaa6608 ip 00007f8d0ec5c371 sp 00007ffed4c340b0 error 4 in libQt5Core.so.5.5.1[7f8d0e99b000+4c5000]
[ 2874.301959] [drm] wait for urb interrupted: ffffffc2 available: 4
[ 2875.201910] usb 1-1.6: reset full-speed USB device number 5 using ehci-pci

$ lsmod parse-edidget-edid [OPTIONS] > filenameparse-edid < filename

DESCRIPTION

The read-edid utility comprises two tools: get-edid and parse-edid. get-edid uses real mode calls to perform Data Display Channel (DDC) transfers, or Linux i2c calls to perform Enhanced DDC transfers to retrieve information from monitors, including identification strings, supported sync ranges, available video modes, and video mode parameters. Such information can be useful for configuring X Window System servers in certain cases. get-edid returns the raw Extended Display Identification Data (EDID) block directly from the monitor, so the parse-edid command is available to interpret it and generate a human- readable block of text information that can also be included in a X11 xorg.conf file. Generally the output of get-edid is piped directly to parse-edid. New in version 3.0.0, get-edid takes a few options. -bBUS, --busBUS only scan the i2c bus BUS (if built with i2c support) -c, --classiconly only use the older VBE interface (if built with i2c and VBE support) -h, --help display a basic help message -i, --i2conly only use the newer i2c interface (if built with i2c and VBE support) -mNUM, --monitorNUM try to return information about monitor number NUM (VBE only) -q, --quiet do not output messages over stderr parse-edid still does not take any options. --help will show you which options your build of read-edid supports.

AUTHOR

read-edid is originally the work of John Fremlin and others. Since 1.4.2, the new maintainer and programmer has been Matthew Kern. Nearly all of the code for this project, as well as this manual page, has been rewritten for 3.0.0 by Matthew Kern. See AUTHORS for more details.

SEEALSO

Matthew Kern's read-edid website at <http://polypux.org/projects/read-edid> 2013-08-29 get-edid(1)

How to eliminate EDID checksum errors?

From an answer at linuxforums:

Set the video settings for kernel boot options via grub:

Add this line, or change it to this, or add this to the current line (if you know what you're doing). You can adjust the mode_options, the most import magic is and , minimally you can try just adding the :

This turns off KMS mode switching in the kernel; Use the uvesafb frame buffer; Set it to a resolution of 1024x768, with a depth of 16 at 60 Hz sync rate (other options can be , or , depends on your hardware) ; disable the memory type range registers (mtrr) for the framebuffer; enable display panning in a wrap-around mode, using VESA protected mode; do not probe the display to check for edid data. When you switch over to it or connect it to a monitor, then it should be set to that mode (already).

To make the grub settings get written to your /boot. Reboot and check it's working, with noedid you won't necessarily get a working display if you plug a different monitor in, possibly it could break (eg if the frequency is set higher than the display can handle; though I think modern displays avoid this).

If it still doesn't work try:

and uncomment (remove the #)

Which makes everything work in text only mode. Update grub, reboot.

answered Mar 10, 2018 at 21:42

user avatar
pbhjpbhj

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Provided by: edid-decode_0.1~git20201230.95d81c9-2_amd64bug

NAME

edid-decode - Decode EDID data in human-readable format

SYNOPSIS

edid-decode<options>[in[out]]

DESCRIPTION

edid-decode decodes EDID monitor description data in human-readable format. If [in] is not given, or [in] is '-', then the EDID will be read from standard input. If [out] is given then the EDID that was read from [in] is written to [out] or to standard output if [out] is '-'. By default the output is written as a hex dump when writing to standard output or a raw EDID if written to a file. If [out] is given then edid-decode only does the conversion, it will skip the decoding step. Input files may be raw binaries or ASCII text. ASCII input is scanned for hex dumps; heuristics are included to search for hexdumps in edid-decode(1) output (as long as the initial hex dump was included), xrandr(1) property output and Xorg(1) log file formats, otherwise the data is treated as a raw hexdump. EDID blocks for connected monitors can be found in /sys/class/drm/*/edid on modern Linux systems with kernel modesetting support. All timings are shown in a short format, for example: VIC 16: 1920x1080 60.000 Hz 16:9 67.500 kHz 148.500 MHz (native) VIC 5: 1920x1080i 60.000 Hz 16:9 33.750 kHz 74.250 MHz VIC 39: 1920x1080i 50.000 Hz 16:9 31.250 kHz 72.000 MHz Each format starts with a timings type prefix, the resolution, an optional interlaced indicator ('i'), the frame rate (field rate for interlaced formats), the picture aspect ratio, the horizontal frequency, the pixelclock frequency and optionally additional flags between parenthesis. Note that for interlaced formats the frame height is given, not the field height. So each field in a 1920x1080i format has 540 lines. Detailed timings have another 2-3 lines of data: VIC 16: 1920x1080 60.000 Hz 16:9 67.500 kHz 148.500 MHz (native) Hfront 88 Hsync 44 Hback 148 Hpol P Vfront 4 Vsync 5 Vback 36 Vpol P VIC 5: 1920x1080i 60.000 Hz 16:9 33.750 kHz 74.250 MHz Hfront 88 Hsync 44 Hback 148 Hpol P Vfront 2 Vsync 5 Vback 15 Vpol P Vfront +0.5 Odd Field Vfront 2 Vsync 5 Vback 15 Vpol P Vback +0.5 Even Field VIC 39: 1920x1080i 50.000 Hz 16:9 31.250 kHz 72.000 MHz Hfront 32 Hsync 168 Hback 184 Hpol P Vfront 23 Vsync 5 Vback 57 Vpol N Both Fields These describe the horizontal and vertical front porch, sync, backporch and sync polarity values. For interlaced formats there are two lines for the vertical information: one for the Odd Field (aka Field 1) and one for the Even Field (aka Field 2). The vertical front porch of the Odd Field is actually 2.5 (hence the 'Vfront +0.5' at the end of the line), and the back porch of the Even Field is actually 15.5 (hence the 'Vback +0.5' at the end of the line). There is a special 'VIC 39' interlaced format where both fields have the same vertical timings, in that case this is marked with 'Both Fields'. The following timing types can be shown: DMT #: Discrete Monitor Timing (see DMT 1.3 standard). The number is the DMT ID in hexadecimal. CVT: Coordinated Video Timings (formula-based, see CVT 1.2 standard) GTF: Generalized Timing Formula (formula-based, see GTF 1.1 standard) IBM: Old IBM Timings Apple: Old Apple Timings VIC #: Video Identification Code (see CTA-861 standard). The number is the actual VIC code. HDMI VIC #: HDMI-specific Video Identification Code (see HDMI 2.1 standard). The number is the actual HDMI VIC code. DTD #: Detailed Timings Descriptor (see EDID standard). Also used for DisplayID Video Timing Modes Types I, II, VI and VII. The number denotes that this is the Nth DTD in the EDID. By default DTDs are shown in the long format while others are just shown in the short format. With the option --short-timings all timings are shown in short format only. With the option --long-timings all timings are shown in long format. Alternate formats for long timings can be chosen via the --xmodeline or --fbmode options.

STANDARDS

The following EDID standards are supported by edid-decode: EDID 1.3: VESA Enhanced Extended Display Identication Data Standard, Release A, Revision 1 EDID 1.4: VESA Enhanced Extended Display Identication Data Standard, Release A, Revision 2 DisplayID 1.3: VESA Display Identification Data (DisplayID) Standard, Version 1.3 DisplayID 2.0: VESA DisplayID Standard, Version 2.0 DI-EXT: VESA Display Information Extension Block Standard, Release A LS-EXT: VESA Enhanced EDID Localized String Extension Standard, Release A VTB-EXT: VESA Video Timing Block Extension Data Standard, Release A DTCDB: VESA Display Transfer Characteristics Data Block Standard, Version 1.0 DDDB: VESA Display Device Data Block (DDDB) Standard, Version 1 HDMI 1.4b: High-Definition Multimedia Interface, Version 1.4b HDMI 2.1: High-Definition Multimedia Interface, Version 2.1 HDMI 2.1: Amendment A1 to HDMI Specification Version 2.1 CTA-861-H: A DTV Profile for Uncompressed High Speed Digital Interfaces SPWG Notebook Panel Specification, Version 3.5 EPI Embedded Panel Interface, Revision 1.0 The following related standards are also used by edid-decode: DMT 1.3: VESA and Industry Standards and Guidelines for Computer Display Monitor Timing (DMT), Version 1.0, Rev. 13 CVT 1.2: VESA Coordinated Video Timings (CVT) Standard, Version 1.2 GTF 1.1: VESA Generalized Timing Formula Standard, Version: 1.1

OPTIONS

-h, --help Prints the help message. -o, --output-format=<fmt> If [out] is specified, then write the EDID in format <fmt>. The output format can be one of: hex: hex numbers in ascii text (default for stdout) raw: binary data (default unless writing to stdout) carray: c-program struct xml: XML data -c, --check Check if the EDID conforms to the standards. Warnings and failures are reported at the end. -C, --check-inline Check if the EDID conforms to the standards. Warnings and failures are reported as they happen. -n, --native-timings Report the native timings at the end. There may be multiple native timing reports depending on whether the Source only parses Block 0 (e.g. DVI outputs) or Block 0 and the CTA-861 Extension Blocks (HDMI). -p, --preferred-timings Report the preferred timings at the end. There may be multiple native timing reports depending on whether the Source only parses Block 0 (e.g. DVI outputs), or Block 0 and the CTA-861 Extension Blocks (HDMI), or Block 0 and the DisplayID Extension Blocks (typical for DisplayPort). -P, --physical-address Just report the HDMI Source Physical Address and nothing else. Reports f.f.f.f if the EDID could not be parsed, or if there was no CTA-861 Vendor-Specific Data Block with OUI 00-0C-03. Otherwise it reports the Source Physical Address as provided in that Data Block. This can be used as input to HDMI CEC utilities such as the linux cec-ctl(1) utility. -S, --short-timings Report all video timings in a short format. -L, --long-timings Report all video timings in a long format. -X, --xmodeline Report all long video timings in the ModeLine format as defined in xorg.conf(5). This ModeLine can be used in the xorg.conf file or passed to xrandr(1) with the xrandr --newmode option. -F, --fbmode Report all long video timings in the video mode format as defined in fb.modes(5). -V, --v4l2-timings Report all long video timings in the video mode format as defined in the linux header v4l2-dv-timings.h for use with the V4L2 VIDIOC_S_DV_TIMINGS ioctl. -s, --skip-hex-dump Skip the initial hex dump of the EDID. --skip-sha Don't show the SHA hash. Normally edid-decode will show the SHA, i.e. the hash of the git commit used to compile edid-decode. This uniquely identifies the version of edid-decode that is used to generate the warnings and failures. But it will also change the output of edid-decode for every new commit in the git repository, even if nothing else changed in the edid-decode output. Use this option to avoid including the SHA in the edid-decode output. --hide-serial-numbers Replace any serial numbers in the human readable output by '...'. Note that they are still easily extracted from the EDID hex dump at the start. --version Show the SHA hash and the last commit date.

NOTES

Not all fields are decoded, or decoded completely. Some fields' decoding may appear to corrupt the output (for example, detailed string sections have their contents printed literally). edid-decode does attempt to validate its input against the relevant standards, but its opinions have not been double-checked with the relevant standards bodies, so they may be wrong. Do not rely on the output format, as it will likely change in future versions of the tool as additional fields and extensions are added.

SEEALSO

Xorg(1), xrandr(1), cec-ctl(1), xorg.conf(5), fb.modes(5)

AUTHORS

edid-decode was written by Adam Jackson, with contributions from Eric Anholt, Damien Lespiau, Hans Verkuil and others. For complete history and the latest version, see http://git.linuxtv.org/cgit.cgi/edid-decode.gitedid-decode(1)

Nowadays Xorg is doing a great job automatically recognizing and configuring available hardware. In case of monitors this procedure relies on the so called EDID record which monitors provide on demand over standard interfaces. Thus, if the information provided by the monitor is corrupted (parity check), it is simply disregarded to prevent damage to your equipment and a set of very conservative modes is probed to find a working one. Luckily the resolution can be fixed even for the already running X session.

I have LMDE 17 with Mate later enriched with xfce. At some point I thought the resolution and/or dead DIV-D ports on my docking station are caused by the open source radeon driver, so I tried to use the proprietary fglrx driver first from the LMDEdistro. And as it turned out that my new card was not supported by the driver, I uploaded and brut force installed the driver provided by AMD (https://help.ubuntu.com/community/BinaryDriverHowto/AMD) (bad idea, but it works even this way).

If automatic hardware detection did not work to your satisfaction, it means you need to configure your X session manually. This page here http://wiki.cchtml.com/index.php/Main_Page has plenty of useful instructions how to get a basic setup.

At this moment you should have your X session up and running, but your monitor has a poor resolution and you can not change it to the expected one.

$ gtf 1920 1200 60

  # 1920x1200 @ 60.00 Hz (GTF) hsync: 74.52 kHz; pclk: 193.16 MHz
  Modeline "1920x1200_60.00"  193.16  1920 2048 2256 2592  1200 1201 1204 1242  -HSync +Vsync

$ xrandr--newmode "1920x1200_60.00"  193.16  1920 2048 2256 2592  1200 1201 1204 1242  -HSync +Vsync
$ xrandr--addmodeVGA1 1920x1200_60.00
$ xrandr --output VGA1 --mode 1920x1200_60.00

results in an error message, and does not make your monitor resolution and life better. Note here "VGA1" is the name of my output, you should figure out the proper name for your case examining the output of

$ xrandr -q

The reader should provide his desired horizontal, vertical resolutions and the refresh rate to gtf command.

At this point you should check your monitor's EDID information. The easiest way to do this is to install the read-edid package, use your favorite way to do it, I myself prefer Synaptic package manager. If you can get a clean EDID record as for example the one reported here http://hotcashew.com/2013/08/fixing-invalid-edid-in-linux-wit-fglrx/, you should stop reading this tutorial and look what is wrong with your system elsewhere. Otherwise, we need a correct version of EDID record for your monitor. There are several methods to get it, starting from "ack monitor vendor" ending with "getting a hand on a same model monitor" as in the example above. I had to boot into Windows, install Phoenix EDID tool (together with 3-5 other creepy software packages), almost as described at the end of the page here: http://ubuntuforums.org/showthread.php?t=1938447&page=4&p=11938884#post11938884. Phoenix allows you to save EDID information into a edid_file.raw, which you should put somewhere, you know how to get to when you are booted into your linux. When you are rebooted into linux you can check the integrity of your new EDID file like this:

$ sudoparse-edid edid_file.raw
parse-edid: parse-edid version 2.0.0
parse-edid: EDID checksum passed.

    # EDID version 1 revision 3
Section "Monitor"
    # Block type: 2:0 3:fd
    # Block type: 2:0 3:fc
    Identifier "EA241WM"
    VendorName "NEC"
    ModelName "EA241WM"
    # Block type: 2:0 3:fd
    HorizSync 26-82
    VertRefresh 50-76
    # Max dot clock (video bandwidth) 170 MHz
    # Block type: 2:0 3:fc
    # Block type: 2:0 3:ff
    # DPMS capabilities: Active off:yes  Suspend:yes  Standby:yes

    Mode     "1920x1200"    # vfreq 59.950Hz, hfreq 74.038kHz
        DotClock    154.000000
        HTimings    1920 1968 2000 2080
        VTimings    1200 1203 1209 1235
        Flags    "-HSync" "+VSync"
    EndMode
    # Block type: 2:0 3:fd
    # Block type: 2:0 3:fc
    # Block type: 2:0 3:ff
EndSection
 

Now you can construct a new "Modeline" from the Mode section of EDID:

Modeline "1920x1200" 154.00 1920 1968 2000 2080 1200 1203 1209 1235 -hsync +vsync

in my case, and use this line in the Monitor section of your xorg.conf file, as described here https://delightlylinux.wordpress.com/2014/01/13/edid-revisted/.

But before you do it, check everything manually
$ xrandr--newmode "1920x1200"  154.00 1920 1968 2000 2080 1200 1203 1209 1235 -hsync +vsync
$ xrandr--addmodeVGA11920x1200
$ xrandr --output VGA1 --mode 1920x1200

I hope it helped. I do not want to go into details on how to make the changes permanent. :-)

The *new* homepage of read-edid


read-edid is a pair of tools (originally by John Fremlin) for reading the EDID from a monitor. It should work with most monitors made since 1996, assuming the video card supports the standard read commands (most do). read-edid is a set of two tools - get-edid, which gets the raw edid information from the monitor, and parse-edid, ubuntu error raw edid, which turns the raw binary information into a xorg.conf-compatible monitor section (Modelines also compatible with xrandr).

As of read-edid version 2.0.0, the lrmi code has been replaced by libx86 code - same syntax, but allows for use on many more architectures, ubuntu error raw edid. For powerpc, there is a /proc interface, /proc/device-tree/pci/{video-card}/EDID, which you can pipe to parse-edid. Some architectures, AFAIK, may be stuck with only parse-edid.

As of read-edid version 3.0.0, there have been significant code rewrites, including a new I²C-based interface ubuntu error raw edid tends to work much better and in many more cases than the old interface (still included). If you had problems before, this will likely fix them.

read-edid 3.0.1 cleans up the source tree (I left a binary in there), gives the correct INSTALL intructions for the new CMake build system, fixes the install directives to FHS-approved locations, and includes two extra headers, in case they are necessary on your system.

read-edid 3.0.2 fixes a bug in parse-edid that caused "you have data blocks, but not video ones." in certain situations where that error should not occur. The classic (VBE) module now strongly suggests use of the I2C method when it errors out, as VBE hardly ever works anymore.

Issues:

By nature, certain cards/monitors do not work or work very badly. If this is the case, email me with an attachment that is the output of get-edid (preferribly seperate files for what stdout and stderr say), as well as your monitor and video card types.

To get your settings to override those provided by XFree86 or X.org, ubuntu error raw edid, add "Option "NoDDC"" to the device section of your XF86Config or xorg.conf.

It is possible, according to VBE standards newer than 3 (IIRC) to access as many monitors and video cards as you'd like. This is now an option in get-edid, but it doesn't work very well. If the I²C interface works for you, you can generally find all of your monitors on the different busses uncovered by get-edid.



To contact me, throw an email to [email protected] This is for any bugs, support requests, patch submissions, etc.

Download:
read-edid-3.0.2.tar.gz: C source tarball.
read-edid-2.0.0.tar.gz: C source tarball. Older version, around for historical purposes.
read-edid-1.4.2.tar.gz: C source tarball. No libx86 requirement, but ubuntu error raw edid work on amd64.
get-edid-dos.zip: A dos version of get-edid, in case the linux version gives you problems (sometimes, this works where the linux version doesn't).

poly-p-ux main site

HDMI Resolutions testing

Ok, I’ve tested it with VIM3_Ubuntu-gnome-focal_Linux-4.9_arm64_SD-USB_V0.9-20200530 and display is working! :slight_smile: Without touchscreen, but same display shows image properly.
You need to change env.txt as @tedal said:
line 62 to hdmi=1024x600p60hz
and also
code - 20 kernel error - 20 19 to hdmi_autodetect=no

It is quite suprising, because
On EMMC image we have: Linux Khadas 4.9.224 #29 SMP PREEMPT Sat May 30 14:20:51 CST 2020 aarch64 aarch64 aarch64 GNU/Linux
On SD/USB image we have: Linux Khadas 4.9.224 #29 SMP PREEMPT Sat May 30 14:20:51 CST 2020 aarch64 aarch64 aarch64 GNU/Linux

It seems to be the same build. Why SD/USB is working while EMMC not?

Quite suprising is that dmesg also says:

Any ideas what to do to make now Android working with display? :slight_smile:

So, summary:
Android:
None of tested working (Vims-Pie-V200103, V200320, V200617, either installed by USB-burn-installer and Krescue)

Ubuntu:
VIMx.Ubuntu.mainline.5.5.xfce.bionic.test.emmc installed from Krescue - works display and touchscreen
VIM3_Ubuntu-gnome-focal_Linux-5.7-rc7_arm64_SD-USB_V0.9-20200530.img - works display and touchscreen
Ubuntu Focal with kernel 5.7 and xfce build from sources using Fenix works - works display and touchscreen
VIM3_Ubuntu-gnome-focal_Linux-4.9_arm64_SD-USB_V0.9-20200530 - works display, but not touchscreen
VIM3_Ubuntu-gnome-focal_Linux-4.9_arm64_EMMC_V0.9-20200530.img - none of display and ts working
VIM3_Ubuntu-xfce-bionic_Linux-4.9_arm64_EMMC_V20191231.img - none of display and ts working

Most reliable way to get monitor EDID

keybreak:

because it’s IGZO monitor?

I don't know what that means.

keybreak:

Here’s my monitor’s data and pdf:

Not a Dell hardware? Since it's a laptop, isn't there any info in the manual about monitor characteristics?

keybreak:

manually setting all the EDID is insane

I don't think so. There is not so much info as you would expect (I think). Here is an example of my monitor EDID (extracted and converted by get-edid, ubuntu error raw edid, slightly edited for small changes I needed)

You may try extract EDID from Windows with another utility. Interesting info on this article. It's about another monitor model, but has instructions on how to get and use custom EDID on Nvidia.

About your other issues, you may explicitly set Depth in Xorg file. Use options "DefaultDepth" and "Subsection Display/Depth".
This is an example from Archwiki/Nvidia

For your power issues (sorry for OffTopic), ubuntu error raw edid, if you are still using TLP, check if you have masked andas it is advised in Archwiki and a reported error in one of your provided outputs.

1 Like

Provided by: edid-decode_0.1~git20201230.95d81c9-2_amd64ubuntu error raw edid alt="bug">

NAME

edid-decode - Decode EDID data in human-readable format

SYNOPSIS

edid-decode<options>[in[out]]

DESCRIPTION

edid-decode decodes EDID monitor description data in human-readable format. If [in] is not given, or [in] is '-', then the EDID will be read from standard input. If [out] is given then the EDID that was read from [in] is written to [out] or to standard output if [out] is '-'. By default the output is written as a hex dump when writing to standard output or a raw EDID if written to a file. If [out] is given then edid-decode only does the conversion, it will skip the decoding step. Input files may be raw binaries or ASCII text. ASCII input is scanned for hex dumps; heuristics are included to search for hexdumps in edid-decode(1) output (as long as the initial hex dump was included), xrandr(1) property output and Xorg(1) log file formats, otherwise the data is treated as a raw hexdump. EDID blocks for connected monitors can be found in /sys/class/drm/*/edid on modern Linux systems with kernel modesetting support. All timings are catch database error message in a short format, ubuntu error raw edid, for example: VIC 16: 1920x1080 60.000 Hz 16:9 67.500 kHz 148.500 MHz (native) VIC 5: 1920x1080i 60.000 Hz 16:9 33.750 kHz 74.250 MHz VIC 39: 1920x1080i 50.000 Hz 16:9 31.250 kHz 72.000 MHz Each format starts with a timings type prefix, the resolution, ubuntu error raw edid, an optional interlaced indicator ('i'), the frame rate (field rate for interlaced formats), the picture aspect ratio, the horizontal frequency, the pixelclock frequency and optionally additional flags between parenthesis. Note that for interlaced formats the frame height is given, not the field height. So each ubuntu error raw edid in a 1920x1080i format has 540 lines. Detailed timings have another 2-3 lines of data: VIC 16: 1920x1080 60.000 Hz 16:9 67.500 kHz 148.500 MHz (native) Hfront 88 Hsync 44 Hback 148 Hpol P Vfront 4 Vsync 5 Vback 36 Vpol P VIC 5: 1920x1080i 60.000 Hz 16:9 33.750 kHz 74.250 MHz ubuntu error raw edid Hfront 88 Hsync 44 Hback 148 Hpol P Vfront 2 Vsync 5 Vback 15 Vpol P Vfront +0.5 Odd Field Vfront 2 Vsync 5 Vback 15 Vpol P Vback +0.5 Even Field VIC 39: 1920x1080i 50.000 Hz 16:9 31.250 kHz 72.000 MHz Hfront 32 Hsync 168 Hback 184 Hpol P Vfront 23 Vsync 5 Vback 57 Vpol N Both Fields These describe the horizontal and vertical front porch, sync, backporch and sync polarity ubuntu error raw edid values. For ubuntu error raw edid interlaced formats there are two lines for the vertical information: one for the Odd Field (aka Field 1) and one for the Even Field (aka Field 2). The vertical front porch of the Odd Field is actually 2.5 (hence the 'Vfront +0.5' at the end of the line), and the back porch of the Even Field is actually 15.5 (hence the 'Vback +0.5' at the end of the line). There is a special 'VIC 39' interlaced format where both fields have the same vertical timings, ubuntu error raw edid that case this is marked with 'Both Fields'. The following timing types can be shown: DMT #: Discrete Monitor Timing (see DMT 1.3 standard). The number is the DMT ID in hexadecimal. tv player classic error CVT: Coordinated Video Timings (formula-based, see CVT 1.2 standard) GTF: Generalized Timing Formula (formula-based, see GTF 1.1 standard) IBM: Old IBM Timings ubuntu error raw edid Apple: Old Apple Timings ubuntu error raw edid VIC #: Video Identification Code (see CTA-861 standard). The number is the actual VIC code. HDMI VIC #: HDMI-specific Video Identification Code (see HDMI 2.1 standard). The number is the actual HDMI VIC code. DTD #: Detailed Timings Descriptor (see EDID standard). Also used for DisplayID Video Timing Modes Types I, ubuntu error raw edid, II, VI and VII, ubuntu error raw edid. The number 500 internal server error monkeys denotes that this is the Nth DTD in the EDID. By default DTDs are shown in the long format while others are just shown in the short format. With the option --short-timings all timings are shown in short format only. With the option --long-timings all timings are shown in long format. ubuntu error raw edid Alternate formats for long timings can be chosen via the --xmodeline or --fbmode options.

STANDARDS

The following EDID standards are supported by edid-decode: EDID 1.3: VESA Enhanced Extended Display Identication Data Standard, Release A, Revision 1 EDID 1.4: VESA Enhanced Extended Display Identication Data Standard, Release A, Revision 2 DisplayID 1.3: VESA Display Identification Data (DisplayID) Standard, Version 1.3 DisplayID 2.0: VESA DisplayID Standard, Version 2.0 DI-EXT: VESA Display Information Extension Ubuntu error raw edid Standard, Release A ubuntu error raw edid LS-EXT: VESA Enhanced EDID Localized String Extension Standard, Release A VTB-EXT: VESA Video Timing Block Extension Data Standard, Release A DTCDB: VESA Display Transfer Characteristics Data Block Standard, ubuntu error raw edid, Version 1.0 DDDB: VESA Display Device Data Block (DDDB) Standard, Version 1 ubuntu error raw edid HDMI 1.4b: High-Definition Multimedia Interface, Version 1.4b HDMI 2.1: High-Definition Multimedia Interface, Version 2.1 HDMI 2.1: Amendment A1 to HDMI Specification Version 2.1 CTA-861-H: A DTV Profile for Uncompressed High Speed Digital Interfaces SPWG Notebook Panel Specification, ubuntu error raw edid, Version 3.5 EPI Embedded Panel Interface, Revision 1.0 Ubuntu error raw edid following related standards are also used by edid-decode: DMT 1.3: VESA and Industry Standards and Guidelines for Computer Display Monitor Timing (DMT), ubuntu error raw edid, Version 1.0, Rev. 13 ubuntu error raw edid CVT 1.2: VESA Coordinated Video Timings (CVT) Standard, Version 1.2 GTF 1.1: VESA Generalized Timing Formula Standard, Version: 1.1

OPTIONS

-h, --help Prints the help message, ubuntu error raw edid. -o, --output-format=<fmt> If [out] is specified, then write the EDID in format <fmt>. The output format can be one of: hex: hex numbers in ascii text (default for stdout) raw: binary data (default unless writing to stdout) carray: c-program struct xml: XML data -c, --check Check if the EDID conforms to the standards. Warnings and failures are reported at the end. -C, --check-inline Check if the EDID conforms to the standards. Warnings and failures are reported as they happen. -n, --native-timings Report the native timings at the end. There may be multiple native timing reports depending on whether the Source only parses Block 0 (e.g. DVI outputs) or Ubuntu error raw edid 0 and the CTA-861 Extension Blocks (HDMI). -p, --preferred-timings Report the preferred timings at the end. There may be multiple native timing reports depending on whether the Source only parses Block 0 (e.g. DVI outputs), or Block 0 and the CTA-861 Extension Blocks (HDMI), or Block 0 and the DisplayID Extension Blocks (typical for DisplayPort). script error expected statement -P, ubuntu error raw edid, --physical-address Just report the HDMI Source Physical Address and nothing else. Reports f.f.f.f if the EDID could not be parsed, or if there was no CTA-861 Vendor-Specific Data Block runtime error 203 explorer with OUI 00-0C-03. Otherwise it reports the Source Physical Address as provided in that Data Block. This can be ubuntu error raw edid as input to HDMI CEC utilities such as the linux cec-ctl(1) utility. -S, --short-timings Report all video timings in a short format. -L, --long-timings ubuntu error raw edid Report all video timings in a long format. -X, --xmodeline ubuntu error raw edid Report all long video timings in the ModeLine format as defined in xorg.conf(5). This ModeLine can be used in the xorg.conf file or passed to xrandr(1) with the xrandr --newmode option. -F, --fbmode Report all long video timings in the video mode format as defined in fb.modes(5). -V, --v4l2-timings Report all long video timings in the video mode format as defined in the linux header v4l2-dv-timings.h for use with the V4L2 VIDIOC_S_DV_TIMINGS ioctl. -s, --skip-hex-dump Skip the initial hex dump of the EDID. --skip-sha Don't show the SHA hash. Normally edid-decode will show the SHA, i.e. the hash of the git commit used to compile edid-decode. This uniquely identifies the version of edid-decode that is used to generate the warnings and failures. But it will also change the output of edid-decode for every new commit in the git repository, even ubuntu error raw edid if nothing else changed in the edid-decode output. Use this option to avoid including the SHA in the edid-decode output. --hide-serial-numbers Replace any serial numbers in the human readable output by '.'. Note that they are still easily extracted from the EDID hex dump at the start. --version Show the SHA hash and the last commit date.

NOTES

Not all fields are decoded, or decoded completely. Some fields' decoding may appear to corrupt the output (for example, detailed string sections have their contents printed literally). edid-decode does attempt to validate its input against the relevant standards, but its opinions have not been double-checked with the relevant standards bodies, so they may be wrong. Do not rely on the output format, as it will likely change in future versions of the tool as additional fields and extensions are added.

SEEALSO

Xorg(1), xrandr(1), cec-ctl(1), xorg.conf(5), fb.modes(5)

AUTHORS

edid-decode was written by Adam Jackson, with contributions from Eric Anholt, Damien Lespiau, Hans Verkuil and others, ubuntu error raw edid. For complete history and the latest version, see http://git.linuxtv.org/cgit.cgi/edid-decode.gitedid-decode(1)
Provided by: read-edid_3.0.2-1.1_amd64bug

NAME

get-edid, parse-edid - read-edid tools to retrieve and interpret monitor specifications using the VESA VBE DDC protocol

SYNOPSIS

get-edid [OPTIONS]

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