Stdin error 0 backtrack 5

stdin error 0 backtrack 5

Ubuntu 10.10 & 10.04 gnome (Both gave same error "Backtrack 5 also" bcz it is kind of error i could note bcz it stays for few seconds) stdin:error0. github.com › stedolan › issues. However, on a bus error it usually means that you are trying to access memory that does not exist (e. g. you try to access an address at 12G but you only have.

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Présentation de BackTrack 5

Stdin error 0 backtrack 5 - seems me

Hack Like a Pro: Linux Basics for the Aspiring Hacker, Part 5 (Installing New Software)

Welcome back, my hacker wannabees!

Since nearly all hacker tools and platforms are developed in the Linux/Unix operating systems, this series of tutorials are for those of you who want to be hackers, but are unfamiliar with Linux.

Hack Like a Pro: Linux Basics for the Aspiring Hacker, Part 5 (Installing New Software)

We've looked at numerous basic commands in the first few tutorials, but here I want to focus on installing new software in Linux, and especially in BackTrack.

Hack Like a Pro: Linux Basics for the Aspiring Hacker, Part 5 (Installing New Software)

BackTrack v5r3 was built on Ubuntu, which is a type of Debian Linux. That's important because different Linux systems use different methods for package management (package management means downloading and installing new software packages).

Before we dive in, make sure to check out my previous guides on Linux basics to get current on our lessons.

Step 1: Using the GUI Package Manager

The simplest way to install software on BackTrack is to use the GUI package manager. In my KDE-based BackTrack 5, the GUI package manager is called KPackageKit (some of you may have Synaptic).

These package managers enable us find packages, download them, and install them on our system. We can open KPackageKit by navigating to System and then KPackageKit as shown in the screenshot below.

Hack Like a Pro: Linux Basics for the Aspiring Hacker, Part 5 (Installing New Software)

When open, you simply put the name into search field. It will then retrieve all the options fulfilling the criteria of your search, then just click on the icon next to the package you want to download.

In this example, we will be looking for the wireless hacking software, aircrack-ng.

Hack Like a Pro: Linux Basics for the Aspiring Hacker, Part 5 (Installing New Software)

Note that if the package is already installed, there will be an X next to it. If not, there will be a downward-pointing arrow. Click on the arrow and then click on the APPLY button below.

Step 2: Updating Your Repositories

Package managers search in specified repositories (websites housing packages) for the package you are seeking. If you get a message that the package was not found, it doesn't necessarily mean that it doesn't exist, but simply that it's not in the repositories your OS is searching.

BackTrack defaults to searching in backtrack-linux.org where many hacking tools are available. Unfortunately, if you are looking for something that is not a hacking tool or a new hacking tool that BackTrack hasn't yet placed in its repository, you may have to revise where your operating system searching for packages.

This can be done by editing the /etc/apt/sources.list file. Let's open it with KWrite and take a look.

Hack Like a Pro: Linux Basics for the Aspiring Hacker, Part 5 (Installing New Software)

As you can see, BackTrack has three default sources on its sources.list, all pointing to BackTrack repositories. We can add any repository with Linux software to this list, but since BackTrack is a Ubuntu distribution, we might want to add an Ubuntu repository to this list to download and install Ubuntu software. We can do this by adding a single line to this file:

Hack Like a Pro: Linux Basics for the Aspiring Hacker, Part 5 (Installing New Software)

Now when I use my package manager, it will search the three BackTrack repositories first, and if it fails to find the package in any of those places, it will then search for it in the Ubuntu repository.

Step 3: Command Line Package Management

Ubuntu also has a command line package manager called apt. The basic syntax for using apt to download packages is:

  • apt-get install aircrack-ng

So, let's open a terminal and type the above command to install aircrack-ng (of course, we just need to replace the name of the package to install other software).

Hack Like a Pro: Linux Basics for the Aspiring Hacker, Part 5 (Installing New Software)

If the package is in one of our repositories, it will download it and any of the necessary dependencies (files that the package need to run properly), and install it on your system automatically.

Step 4: Installing from Source

Finally, sometimes you will need to download software that is neither in a repository, nor in a package. Most often these are archived as tar or tarballs. These are files that are "tarred" together into a single file and often compressed (similar to zipping files with WinZip and then putting them together into a .zip file).

Let's say that aircrack-ng was not in our repository (some software never finds its way into a repository) and we had to download it from aircrack-ng.org website. We could download the file aircrack-ng-1.2-beta1.tar.

Once we've downlaoded it, then we need to untar it using the tar command:

  • tar xvf aircrack-ng-1.2-beta1.tar

This will untar and uncompress it, if it's compressed. Next we need to compile it with the GNU compiler. Compiling from source code will give us binaries (the program files) that are optimized for our hardware and operating system, meaning they will often run faster and more efficiently. We can compile this source code by typing:

Finally, we can now run this file from within the directory where we unzipped it:

Note that to run the file, we preceded it with the ./, which tells Linux to execute this file from the directory we are presently in, so make certain you run this command in the same directory that you compiled the source code in.

That should cover all the major ways of installing software and I hope it wasn't too confusing. In most cases, we can simply use the GUI based package manager to install software, but like all things in life, there are exceptions.

In my next tutorial, we'll be looking at networking Linux using BackTrack. If you haven't already, make sure to check out the first four parts of this series, and if you have any questions, ask away in the comments below or hit up the Null Byte forum for more help.

Blue penguin photo by Joe Shlabotnik

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What is a bus error? Is it different from a segmentation fault?

minimal POSIX 7 example

"Bus error" happens when the kernel sends to a process.

A minimal example that produces it because was forgotten:

Run with:

Tested in Ubuntu 14.04.

POSIX describes as:

Access to an undefined portion of a memory object.

The mmap spec says that:

References within the address range starting at pa and continuing for len bytes to whole pages following the end of an object shall result in delivery of a SIGBUS signal.

And says that it generates objects of size 0:

The shared memory object has a size of zero.

So at we are touching past the end of the allocated object.

Unaligned stack memory accesses in ARMv8 aarch64

This was mentioned at: What is a bus error? for SPARC, but here I will provide a more reproducible example.

All you need is a freestanding aarch64 program:

That program then raises SIGBUS on Ubuntu 18.04 aarch64, Linux kernel 4.15.0 in a ThunderX2 server machine.

Unfortunately, I can't reproduce it on QEMU v4.0.0 user mode, I'm not sure why.

The fault appears to be optional and controlled by the and fields, I have summarized the related docs a bit further here.

Error when installing: "unable to find a medium containing a live file system"

Here is what I found looking around for this error message:

Check that the hash of the ISO you downloaded matches the official one. Also try different USB sticks or DVD burners, there may be data corruption on the stick or wear on the drive mechanics you want to rule out.

Related:

To rule out hardware issues you can try a different computer, if available. Remember that you can usually install Ubuntu by installing the target harddrive in another computer and complete the installation there, which may be the quickest workaround in such a situation.

Cause analysis and general advice

The cause of the issue seems to be that the USB or SATA device isn't available or detection is too slow at the time the kernel takes over during the boot process, so that it can't find the image of the live OS to load. Similar to the recommendation in the data integrity section above, try burning optical installation media when you are unable to boot from USB and vice versa. If that's not possible because your computer only has USB 3.0 ports and no internal optical drive, try booting from an integrated SD card reader. Also look out for available firmware updates for your computer that may fix the issue. If you are trying to install from an ISO of an older release, then please try the latest ISO.

As a last resort you can try to use the minimal ISO, which doesn't seem to load another filesystem except initrd but requires a working Internet connection for installation. I would recommend this for Intel Macs from Apple that have this issue.

Hardware issues on laptops and desktops

There seem to be issues on laptops from Dell, Lenovo, Toshiba, Sony and may be other manufacturers. Non-custom built desktops may also be affected and as far as I am aware this is specific to modern AMD processors.

Try changing the firmware settings (BIOS/UEFI) for SATA (set to AHCI mode) when using optical media or use another (non 3.0) USB port when using USB, this seems to work in most cases.

Hardware issues on Gigabyte mainboards

There apparently was or still is an issue on some Gigabyte mainboards with the IOMMU on AMD platforms (Intel calls this VT-d).

I found the following post on the forums (1, 2):

Turns out the IOMMU needs to be enabled in the BIOS. This problems seems to be exclusive to Gigabyte boards.

As well as this answer here on AU:

Gigabyte UEFI boot issues - The partition size of the created USB Installer device needs to be under that of 4GB. Others found UEFI/BIOS update solved issue of 4GB FAT limit.

  1. #include <iostream>

  2. #include <cstdio>

  3. #include<list>

  4. #include<iomanip>

  5. #include<cmath>

  6. #include<queue>

  7. #include <functional>

  8. #include<stdio.h>

  9. #include<assert.h>

  10. #include<stack>

  11. #include<sstream>

  12. #include <cstdlib>

  13. #include<map>

  14. #include<algorithm>

  15. #include<iostream>

  16. #include<set>

  17. #include<utility>

  18. #include<memory.h>

  19. #include<string>

  20. #include<vector>

  21. #include<numeric>

  22. using namespace std;

  23. #define ios std::ios_base::sync_with_stdio(false);

  24. #define ll longlong

  25. #define pb push_back

  26. #define fi(ss) freopen (ss,"r",stdin)

  27. #define fo(ss) freopen (ss,"w",stdout)

  28. #define sz(v)((int)((v).size()))

  29. #define all(x)(x).begin(),(x).end()

  30. #define REP(i, v)for(int i=0;i<sz(v);i++)

  31. #define lp(i,n)for(int i =0; i < n ;++i)

  32. #define hash ___hash

  33. #define next ___next

  34. #define prev ___prev

  35. #define left ___left

  36. #define time __time

  37. typedef pair<int,int> pii;

  38. #define F first

  39. #define S second

  40. #define MP make_pair

  41. constint maxn =4*100005;

  42. int arr[5];

  43. int found =0;

  44. bool vis[5];

  45. void backtrack(int len,int value,int first){

  46.  

  47. if(found)

  48. return;

  49. if(len ==5){

  50. found

    Need Support For Hardware & Live Usb Issue + Bugs version 0.1

    Navdeep Singh Sidhunavdeepsingh.sidhu95 at gmail.com
    Fri Jul 8 22:19:06 UTC 2011
    I have Dell Xps 15 with config:- 8 Gb RAM 2nd generation i7 processor 2.2 GHz Boost 2.0 upto 3.30 GHz Dual Graphics Card Intel HD 3000 & nvidia geforce GT 540M with Optimus Techonology 720 GB hardisk Motherboard Dell XPS system L502X Intel centrino 6230 Network Card with BT 3.0 I have installed 2 linux distro on my External USB portable seagate 500 GB hardisk fedora 15 & Ubuntu 11.04. i have installed these distro by using HP pavilion dv 2762 tx with config:- Core2duo 1.83Ghz 2Gb ram nvidia geforce 9600m graphics card Both these distro works with all other older laptops Like HP, Dell studio 1 yr old config , Compaq 5 yr old, but not on my Dell XPS 15. To check my laptops hardware compatibility i used a Ubuntu 10.10 live Cd. it works fine . i use this cd as a live media but when i tried same Ubuntu 10.10 on live usb it gives blank screen or error which i mentioned below. To check that my iso file damaged or my download has been corrupted or not, i tried different distros with different desktop enviornment like Gnome,KDE,Xcfe & Lxde. i tried fedora 15, ubuntu 10.10, ubuntu 10.04, ubuntu 11.04. slackware,eduboss each with avail flavors. But all i have tried gives almost same error with each distro. i don't know what is this some kind of bug or lack of support with dell chipset (hardware). if live cd boots well then i think there is nohardware compatibility issue with linux. I think this is lack of usb support because may be Linux has no support until now for latest motherboards or hardware architects. These are the errors i got with different distros. i am not able to figure out what's going on bcz i'm rookie in Linux programming. But if anyone can do it, plz help me i haven't run my linux from previous 1 and half month and i'm a linux addicted. starting from Fedora 15 gnome(almost same for kde except starting numbers) error:- [ 2.571729] [drm:intel_drm_platform_mux_info] *ERROR* MUX INFO CALL FAILED [ 2.571847] [drm:intel_drm_platform_mux_info] *ERROR* MUX INFO CALL FAILED Dropping to debug shell. sh.can't acess tty:job control off dracut:/# Fedora 15 LXDE [ 2.514402] nonveau 0000:01:00.0:invalid ROM contents [ 2.614971] [drm] nonveau 0000:01:00.0:POINTER to BIT load vol table invalid [ 2.639331] [drm] nonveau 0000:01:00.0:0xd518:12cwr fail: -6 [ 2.75332] [drm] nonveau 0000:01:00.0:PGRAPH:unsupported chipset,please report! [ 2.753646] [drm] nonveau 0000:01:00.0:PGRAPH:unknown config:2/0/0/0,1 [ 2.755342] [drm] nonveau 0000:01:00.0: failed to load fuc 409 d [ 2.919340] [drm:intel_drm_platform_mux_info] *ERROR* MUX INFO CALL FAILED [ 2.919447] [drm:intel_drm_platform_mux_info] *ERROR* MUX INFO CALL FAILED Dropping to debug shell. sh.can't acess tty:job control off dracut:/# Fedora 15 XCFE [ 2.563563] [drm:intel_drm_platform_mux_info] *ERROR* MUX INFO CALL FAILED [ 2.563680] [drm:intel_drm_platform_mux_info] *ERROR* MUX INFO CALL FAILED Dropping to debug shell. sh.can't acess tty:job control off dracut:/# EDUBOSS (Debian derivative) (I apologize but i have write the full error i got bcz may be it helps somebody to find what's going on) BOOT FAILED ! The debian live image failed to boot. Please file a bug against the 'live-initramfs' package or email the debian Live mailing list at < debian-live at lists.debian.org> make sure to note the exact version, name and distribution of the image you were attempt to boot. The file /live.log contains same debugging information but booting with debug command line parameter will greatly increase it's verbosity which is extremely useful when diagnosing issues. live-initramfs will start a shell. The error message was: Unable to find a medium containing a live file system. Busy Box v.1.10.2 (Debian 1:1.10.2-2) built in shell (ash) Enter 'help' for a list of built in commands. <bin/sh:can't access tty:job control turned off (initramfs)- Ubuntu 11.04 Gnome Black screen nothing. Ubuntu 10.10 & 10.04 gnome (Both gave same error "Backtrack 5 also" bcz it is ubuntu 10.04 based distro) GLIB_________________________(some kind of error i could note bcz it stays for few seconds) stdin:error0 /init:line7:can't open /dev/sr0:no medium found /init:line7:can't open /dev/sr0:no medium found same error repeating I also tried to check disc for error option but same error as above . Slackware Bcz it's command line it has direct option of installation no live media. I have created live usb using unetbootin latest version. if i get any update regarding problem soon i'll release it's second version. lolz!!! [?][?] [?][?][?][?] Regards Navdeep Singh -------------- next part -------------- An HTML attachment was scrubbed... URL: http://lists.fedoraproject.org/pipermail/devel/attachments/20110709/11963807/attachment.html -------------- next part -------------- A non-text attachment was scrubbed... Name: not available Type: image/png Size: 645 bytes Desc: not available Url : http://lists.fedoraproject.org/pipermail/devel/attachments/20110709/11963807/attachment.png -------------- next part -------------- A non-text attachment was scrubbed... Name: not available Type: image/gif Size: 453 bytes Desc: not available Url : http://lists.fedoraproject.org/pipermail/devel/attachments/20110709/11963807/attachment.gif

    More information about the devel mailing list
    =(value ==23);

  51. return;

  52. }

  53. for(int j =0; j <5;++j){

  54. if(vis[j])

  55. continue;

  56. // do

  57. vis[j]=1;

  58.  

  59. if(first){

  60. backtrack(len +1,value + arr[j],1);

  61. backtrack(len +1,value - arr[j],1);

  62. backtrack(len +1,value * arr[j],1);

  63. }else{

  64. backtrack(len +1,arr[j],1);

  65. }

  66. // undo

  67. vis[j]=0;

  68. }

  69.  

  70. }

  71. // Bijetive

  72. /*

  73.  * f(1) = 2, f(2) = 1 ----> OK

  74.  *

  75.  * f(1) = 1, f(2) = 1 ---> NOT OK

  76.  *

  77.  */

  78. // 5 * 3 * 5 * 3 * 5 * 3 * 5 * 3 * 5 = 84735!

  79. int main(){

  80. while(1){

  81. found =0;

  82. int sum =0;

  83. for(int i =0; i <5;++i){

  84. scanf("%d",&arr[i]);

  85. sum += arr[i];

  86. }

  87. if(!sum)return0;

  88. backtrack(0,0,0);

  89. if(found) puts("Possible");

  90. else puts("Impossible");

  91. }

  92.  

  93. }

  94.  

Main.java:1: error: illegal character: '#' #include <iostream> ^ Main.java:1: error: class, interface, or enum expected #include <iostream> ^ Main.java:2: error: illegal character: '#' #include <cstdio> ^ Main.java:3: error: illegal character: '#' #include<list> ^ Main.java:4: error: illegal character: '#' #include<iomanip> ^ Main.java:5: error: illegal character: '#' #include<cmath> ^ Main.java:6: error: illegal character: '#' #include<queue> ^ Main.java:7: error: illegal character: '#' #include <functional> ^ Main.java:8: error: illegal character: '#' #include<stdio.h> ^ Main.java:9: error: illegal character: '#' #include<assert.h> ^ Main.java:10: error: illegal character: '#' #include<stack> ^ Main.java:11: error: illegal character: '#' #include<sstream> ^ Main.java:12: error: illegal character: '#' #include <cstdlib> ^ Main.java:13: error: illegal character: '#' #include<map> ^ Main.java:14: error: illegal character: '#' #include<algorithm> ^ Main.java:15: error: illegal character: '#' #include<iostream> ^ Main.java:16: error: illegal character: '#' #include<set> ^ Main.java:17: error: illegal character: '#' #include<utility> ^ Main.java:18: error: illegal character: '#' #include<memory.h> ^ Main.java:19: error: illegal character: '#' #include<string> ^ Main.java:20: error: illegal character: '#' #include<vector> ^ Main.java:21: error: illegal character: '#' #include<numeric> ^ Main.java:23: error: illegal character: '#' #define ios std::ios_base::sync_with_stdio(false); ^ Main.java:23: error: class, interface, or enum expected #define ios std::ios_base::sync_with_stdio(false); ^ Main.java:24: error: illegal character: '#' #define ll long long ^ Main.java:24: error: class, interface, or enum expected #define ll long long ^ Main.java:25: error: illegal character: '#' #define pb push_back ^ Main.java:26: error: illegal character: '#' #define fi(ss) freopen (ss,"r",stdin) ^ Main.java:27: error: illegal character: '#' #define fo(ss) freopen (ss,"w",stdout) ^ Main.java:28: error: illegal character: '#' #define sz(v) ((int)((v).size())) ^ Main.java:29: error: illegal character: '#' #define all(x) (x).begin(),(x).end() ^ Main.java:30: error: illegal character: '#' #define REP(i, v) for(int i=0;i<sz(v);i++) ^ Main.java:30: error: class, interface, or enum expected #define REP(i, v) for(int i=0;i<sz(v);i++) ^ Main.java:30: error: class, interface, or enum expected #define REP(i, v) for(int i=0;i<sz(v);i++) ^ Main.java:31: error: illegal character: '#' #define lp(i,n) for(int i = 0 ; i < n ; ++i) ^ Main.java:31: error: class, interface, or enum expected #define lp(i,n) for(int i = 0 ; i < n ; ++i) ^ Main.java:31: error: class, interface, or enum expected #define lp(i,n) for(int i = 0 ; i < n ; ++i) ^ Main.java:32: error: illegal character: '#' #define hash ___hash ^ Main.java:33: error: illegal character: '#' #define next ___next ^ Main.java:34: error: illegal character: '#' #define prev ___prev ^ Main.java:35: error: illegal character: '#' #define left ___left ^ Main.java:36: error: illegal character: '#' #define time __time ^ Main.java:38: error: illegal character: '#' #define F first ^ Main.java:38: error: class, interface, or enum expected #define F first ^ Main.java:39: error: illegal character: '#' #define S second ^ Main.java:40: error: illegal character: '#' #define MP make_pair ^ Main.java:42: error: class, interface, or enum expected int arr[5]; ^ Main.java:43: error: class, interface, or enum expected int found = 0; ^ Main.java:44: error: class, interface, or enum expected bool vis[5]; ^ Main.java:45: error: class, interface, or enum expected void backtrack(int len,int value,int first) { ^ Main.java:49: error: class, interface, or enum expected if(len == 5) { ^ Main.java:51: error: class, interface, or enum expected return; ^ Main.java:52: error: class, interface, or enum expected } ^ Main.java:53: error: class, interface, or enum expected for (int j = 0 ; j < 5 ; ++j) { ^ Main.java:53: error: class, interface, or enum expected for (int j = 0 ; j < 5 ; ++j) { ^ Main.java:57: error: class, interface, or enum expected vis[j] = 1; ^ Main.java:59: error: class, interface, or enum expected if(first) { ^ Main.java:61: error: class, interface, or enum expected backtrack(len + 1,value - arr[j],1); ^ Main.java:62: error: class, interface, or enum expected backtrack(len + 1,value * arr[j],1); ^ Main.java:63: error: class, interface, or enum expected } else { ^ Main.java:65: error: class, interface, or enum expected } ^ Main.java:68: error: class, interface, or enum expected } ^ Main.java:82: error: class, interface, or enum expected int sum = 0; ^ Main.java:83: error: class, interface, or enum expected for (int i = 0 ; i < 5 ; ++i) { ^ Main.java:83: error: class, interface, or enum expected for (int i = 0 ; i < 5 ; ++i) { ^ Main.java:83: error: class, interface, or enum expected for (int i = 0 ; i < 5 ; ++i) { ^ Main.java:85: error: class, interface, or enum expected sum += arr[i]; ^ Main.java:86: error: class, interface, or enum expected } ^ Main.java:88: error: class, interface, or enum expected backtrack(0,0,0); ^ Main.java:89: error: class, interface, or enum expected if(found) puts("Possible"); ^ Main.java:90: error: class, interface, or enum expected else puts("Impossible"); ^ Main.java:91: error: class, interface, or enum expected } ^ 72 errors
stdin error 0 backtrack 5

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