Selftest hp error code

selftest hp error code

If the specified hardware isn't detected or operating properly, the firmware usually stops the boot process and issues an error message. The message might. POST Errors and Beep Codes ; Keyboard card error, 3 long beeps ; POST error, 2 short beeps ; Power supply, system board, or maybe RAM problem, keyboard problem. If You are using Windows, You should run a disk check then see if the message goes away and recheck with your HDD tests. The 301 error code.

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Selftest hp error code - are mistaken


BIOS Power-On Self-Test (POST) Codes

The system BIOS provides a basic power-on self-test (POST), during which the BIOS checks the basic devices required for the server to operate. The progress of the self-test is indicated by a series of POST codes. This chapter explains the BIOS POST testing, provides an alternate method for viewing the codes, describes how to change POST options, and lists the POST codes.

This chapter contains the following sections:

About POST

The POST is a systematic check of basic system devices. As the testing progresses, the BIOS displays codes that you can use to interpret the status of your server. The codes appear at the bottom right corner of the system’s VGA screen, after the self-test has progressed far enough to initialize the video monitor. Because the codes might scroll off of the screen too quickly to be read, an alternate method of displaying POST codes is to redirect the output of the console to a serial port (see Redirecting Console Output).

You can also see some of the post codes on LEDs inside the front panel of your server node (see POST Code LEDs).

How BIOS POST Memory Testing Works

The BIOS POST memory testing is performed as follows:

1. The first megabyte of DRAM is tested by the BIOS before the BIOS code is shadowed (that is, copied from ROM to DRAM).

2. Once executing out of DRAM, the BIOS performs a simple memory test (a write/read of every location with the pattern ).



Note - This memory test is performed only if Quick Boot is not enabled from the Boot Settings Configuration screen. Enabling Quick Boot causes the BIOS to skip the memory test. See Changing POST Options for more information.


3. The BIOS polls the memory controllers for both correctable and non-correctable memory errors and logs those errors into the SP.

4. The message appears at the end of POST.

Redirecting Console Output

You can access BIOS POST codes remotely using the web interface or the CLI.


procedure icon  To Access BIOS POST Codes Using the Web Interface

1. Open a browser and use the SP’s IP address as the URL.

Refer to the Sun Integrated Lights Out Manager 2.0 User’s Guide (820-1188) for information on how to obtain the IP address of the SP.

2. Type a user name and password as follows:

User name: Password:

3. The ILOM SP web interface screen appears.

4. Click the Remote Control tab.

5. Click the Redirection tab.

6. Click the Start Redirection button.

The javaRConsole window appears and prompts you for your user name and password again, then the current POST screen appears.


procedure icon  To Access BIOS POST Codes Using the CLI

1. Log in to the SP cli with the command SP IP address and use the command to start the serial console.

Changing POST Options

These instructions are optional, but you can use them to change the operations that the server performs during POST testing.


procedure icon  To Change the POST Options

1. Initialize the BIOS Setup Utility by pressing the F2 key while the system is performing the power-on self-test (POST).

The BIOS Main Menu screen appears.

2. Select the Boot menu.

The Boot Settings screen appears.

3. Select Boot Settings Configuration.

The Boot Settings Configuration screen appears.

4. On the Boot Settings Configuration screen, there are several options that you can enable or disable:

  • Retry Boot List: Automatically retries the boot list when all devices have failed. This option is enabled by default.
  • Quick Boot: This option is enabled by default. The BIOS skips certain tests while booting, such as the extensive memory test. This decreases the time it takes for the system to boot.
  • Quiet Boot: This option is disabled by default. If you enable this option, the Sun Microsystems logo appears instead of POST codes.
  • Wait for F1 if Error: This option is enabled by default. The system pauses if an error is found during POST and only resumes when you press the F1 key.
  • On-board IB gPXE Boot First: Sets the on-board infiniband gPXE to always boot first. This option is disabled by default.

POST Codes

TABLE 8-1 contains descriptions of each of the POST codes, listed in the same order in which they are generated. These POST codes appear at the bottom right of the BIOS screen as a four-digit string that is a combination of two-digit output from primary I/O port 80 and two-digit output from secondary I/O port 81. In the POST codes listed in TABLE 8-1, the first two digits are from port 81 and the last two digits are from port 80.

You can see some of the POST codes from primary I/O port 80 on LEDs inside the front panel of your server node (see POST Code LEDs).

The Response column describes the action taken by the system on encountering the corresponding error. The actions are:

  • Warning or Not an Error - The message appears on the screen. An error record is logged to the system event log (SEL). The system continues booting with a degraded state. The user might want to replace the unit.
  • Pause - The message appears on the screen, an error is logged to the SEL, and user input is required to continue. The user can take immediate corrective action or choose to continue booting.
  • Halt - The message appears on the screen, an error is logged to the SEL, and the system cannot boot unless the error is resolved. The user needs to replace the faulty part and restart the system.

  • Error Code

    Error Message

    Response

    0000

    Timer Error

    Pause

    0003

    CMOS Battery Low

    Pause

    0004

    CMOS Settings Wrong

    Pause

    0005

    CMOS Checksum Bad

    Pause

    000B

    CMOS Memory Size Wrong

    Pause

    000C

    RAM R/W Test Failed

    Pause

    000E

    A: Drive Error

    Pause

    000F

    B: Drive Error

    Pause

    0012

    CMOS Date/Time Not Set

    Pause

    0040

    Refresh Timer Test Failed

    Halt

    0041

    Display Memory Test Failed

    Pause

    0042

    CMOS Display Type Wrong

    Pause

    0043

    ~<INS> Pressed

    Pause

    0044

    DMA Controller Error

    Halt

    0045

    DMA-1 Error

    Halt

    0046

    DMA-2 Error

    Halt

    0047

    Unknown BIOS error. Error code = 0047

    Halt

    0048

    Password Check Failed

    Halt

    0049

    Unknown BIOS error. Error code = 0049

    Halt

    004A

    Unknown BIOS error. Error code = 004A

    Pause

    004B

    Unknown BIOS error. Error code = 004B

    Pause

    004C

    Keyboard/Interface Error

     

    005D

    S.M.A.R.T. Command Failed

     

    005E

    Password Check Failed

    Pause

    0101

    Warning! This system board does not support the power requirements of the installed processor. The processor will be run at a reduced frequency, which will impact system performance.

    Pause

    0102

    Error! The CPU Core to Bus ratio or VID configuration has failed! Please enter BIOS Setup and re-config it.

    Pause

    0103

    ERROR! CPU MTRRs configuration failed!

    Uncacheable memory hole or PCI space too complicated.

     

    0120

    Thermal Trip Failure

    Pause

    0121

    Thermal Trip Failure

    Pause

    0122

    Thermal Trip Failure

    Pause

    0123

    Thermal Trip Failure

    Pause

    0124

    Thermal Trip Failure

    Pause

    0125

    Thermal Trip Failure

    Pause

    0126

    Thermal Trip Failure

    Pause

    0127

    Thermal Trip Failure

    Pause

    0128

    Thermal Trip Failure

     

    0129

    Thermal Trip Failure

     

    012A

    Thermal Trip Failure

     

    012B

    Thermal Trip Failure

     

    012C

    Thermal Trip Failure

     

    012D

    Thermal Trip Failure

     

    012E

    Thermal Trip Failure

     

    012F

    Thermal Trip Failure

     

    0150

    Processor Failed BIST

    Pause

    0151

    Processor Failed BIST

    Pause

    0152

    Processor Failed BIST

    Pause

    0153

    Processor Failed BIST

    Pause

    0154

    Processor Failed BIST

    Pause

    0155

    Processor Failed BIST

    Pause

    0156

    Processor Failed BIST

    Pause

    0157

    Processor Failed BIST

    Pause

    0158

    Processor Failed BIST

     

    0159

    Processor Failed BIST

     

    015A

    Processor Failed BIST

     

    015B

    Processor Failed BIST

     

    015C

    Processor Failed BIST

     

    015D

    Processor Failed BIST

     

    015E

    Processor Failed BIST

     

    015F

    Processor Failed BIST

     

    0160

    Processor missing microcode

    Pause

    0161

    Processor missing microcode

    Pause

    0162

    Processor missing microcode

    Pause

    0163

    Processor missing microcode

    Pause

    0164

    Processor missing microcode

    Pause

    0165

    Processor missing microcode

    Pause

    0166

    Processor missing microcode

    Pause

    0167

    Processor missing microcode

    Pause

    0168

    Processor missing microcode

     

    0169

    Processor missing microcode

     

    016A

    Processor missing microcode

     

    016B

    Processor missing microcode

     

    016C

    Processor missing microcode

     

    016D

    Processor missing microcode

     

    016E

    Processor missing microcode

     

    016F

    Processor missing microcode

     

    0180

    BIOS does not support current stepping

    Pause

    0181

    BIOS does not support current stepping

    Pause

    0182

    BIOS does not support current stepping

    Pause

    0183

    BIOS does not support current stepping

    Pause

    0184

    BIOS does not support current stepping

    Pause

    0185

    BIOS does not support current stepping

    Pause

    0186

    BIOS does not support current stepping

    Pause

    0187

    BIOS does not support current stepping

    Pause

    0188

    BIOS does not support current stepping

     

    0189

    BIOS does not support current stepping

     

    018A

    BIOS does not support current stepping

     

    018B

    BIOS does not support current stepping

     

    018C

    BIOS does not support current stepping

     

    018D

    BIOS does not support current stepping

     

    018E

    BIOS does not support current stepping

     

    018F

    BIOS does not support current stepping

     

    0192

    L2 cache size mismatch.

     

    0193

    CPUID, Processor stepping are different.

     

    0194

    CPUID, Processor family are different.

    Pause

    0195

    Front side bus mismatch. System halted.

     

    0196

    CPUID, Processor Model are different.

    Pause

    0197

    Processor speeds mismatched.

    Pause

    5120

    CMOS cleared by jumper.

    Pause

    5121

    Password cleared by jumper.

    Pause

    5125

    Not enough conventional memory to copy PCI Option ROM.

     

    5180

    Unsupported Memory Vendor : DIMM_A0

    Warning

    5181

    Unsupported Memory Vendor : DIMM_A1

    Warning

    5182

    Unsupported Memory Vendor : DIMM_A2

    Warning

    5183

    Unsupported Memory Vendor : DIMM_A3

    Warning

    5184

    Unsupported Memory Vendor : DIMM_A4

     

    5185

    Unsupported Memory Vendor : DIMM_B0

    Warning

    5186

    Unsupported Memory Vendor : DIMM_B1

    Warning

    5187

    Unsupported Memory Vendor : DIMM_B2

    Warning

    5188

    Unsupported Memory Vendor : DIMM_B3

    Warning

    5189

    Unsupported Memory Vendor : DIMM_B4

    Warning

    518A

    Unsupported Memory Vendor : DIMM_B5

    Warning

    518B

    Unsupported Memory Vendor : DIMM_C0

    Warning

    518C

    Unsupported Memory Vendor : DIMM_C1

    Warning

    518D

    Unsupported Memory Vendor : DIMM_C2

    Warning

    518F

    Unsupported Memory Vendor : DIMM_C3

    Warning

    5190

    Unsupported Memory Vendor : DIMM_C4

    Warning

    5191

    Unsupported Memory Vendor : DIMM_C5

    Warning

    5192

    Unsupported Memory Vendor : DIMM_D0

    Warning

    5193

    Unsupported Memory Vendor : DIMM_D1

    Warning

    5194

    Unsupported Memory Vendor : DIMM_D2

    Warning

    5195

    Unsupported Memory Vendor : DIMM_D3

    Warning

    5196

    Unsupported Memory Vendor : DIMM_D4

    Warning

    5197

    Unsupported Memory Vendor : DIMM_D5

    Warning

    51A0

    Unsupported AMB Vendor : DIMM_A0

    Warning

    51A1

    Unsupported AMB Vendor : DIMM_A1

    Warning

    51A2

    Unsupported AMB Vendor : DIMM_A2

    Warning

    51A3

    Unsupported AMB Vendor : DIMM_A3

    Warning

    51A4

    Unsupported AMB Vendor : DIMM_A4

    Warning

    51A5

    Unsupported AMB Vendor : DIMM_A5

    Warning

    51A6

    Unsupported AMB Vendor : DIMM_B0

    Warning

    51A7

    Unsupported AMB Vendor : DIMM_B1

    Warning

    51A8

    Unsupported AMB Vendor : DIMM_B2

    Pause

    51A9

    Unsupported AMB Vendor : DIMM_B3

    Warning

    51AA

    Unsupported AMB Vendor : DIMM_B4

    Warning

    51AB

    Unsupported AMB Vendor : DIMM_B5

    Warning

    51AC

    Unsupported AMB Vendor : DIMM_C0

    Warning

    51AD

    Unsupported AMB Vendor : DIMM_C1

    Pause

    51AE

    Unsupported AMB Vendor : DIMM_C2

    Warning

    51AF

    Unsupported AMB Vendor : DIMM_C3

    Pause

    51B0

    Unsupported AMB Vendor : DIMM_C4

    Pause

    51B1

    Unsupported AMB Vendor : DIMM_C5

    Pause

    51B2

    Unsupported AMB Vendor : DIMM_D0

     

    51B3

    Unsupported AMB Vendor : DIMM_D1

     

    51B4

    Unsupported AMB Vendor : DIMM_D2

     

    51B5

    Unsupported AMB Vendor : DIMM_D3

     

    51B6

    Unsupported AMB Vendor : DIMM_D4

     

    51B7

    Unsupported AMB Vendor : DIMM_D5

     

    51C0

    Memory Configuration Error.

     

    8101

    Warning! USB Host Controller not found at the specified address!!!

     

    8102

    Error! USB device failed to initialize!!!

     

    8104

    Warning! Port 60h/64h emulation is not supported by this USB Host Controller!!!

     

    8105

    Warning! EHCI controller disabled. It requires 64bit data support in the BIOS.

     

    8301

    Not enough space in runtime area. SMBIOS data will not be available.

     

    8302

    Not enough space in runtime area. SMBIOS data will not be available.

     

    8601

    Error: BMC Not Responding

     

    8701

    Insufficient Runtime space for MPS data.!.

    System may operate in PIC or Non-MPS mode.

     


POST Code LEDs

Two LEDs inside the front cover of your server node display the same two-digit POST code output from primary I/O port 80 that is shown on the BIOS screen (the right-most two digits on the lower right of the BIOS screen are the POST code from primary I/O port 80).

In general, the POST codes change so rapidly that you cannot distinguish individual digits. Some POST tests take enough time (or pause or stop), however, so that they might be readable if you look at the LEDs through the front panel. Such codes are listed in TABLE 8-2.

 


Code

Meaning

4F

Initializing IPMI BT interface.

D4

Testing base memory; system might hang if test fails.

D5

Copying Boot Block to RAM and transferring control to RAM.

38

Initializing different devices through DIM (Device Initialization Manager). For example, USB controllers are initialized at this point.

75

Initializing Int-13 and preparing for IPL detection.

78

Initializing IPL devices controlled by BIOS and option ROMs.

85

Displaying errors to the user and getting the user response for error.

87

Executing BIOS setup if needed / requested. Checking boot password if installed.

00

Passing control to OS Loader (typically INT19h).

FF

The flash has been updated successfully. Making flash write disabled. Disabling ATAPI hardware. Restoring CPUID value back into register. Giving control to F000 ROM at F000:FFF0h.




Note - For each cold boot (such as when a blade is re-seated into the chassis), POST testing begins to run and detects system resources for a short while. After just a few POST codes, the node is turned off or restarted depending on the selected state in the BIOS for AC Power Loss (Always On, Always Off, or Last State).


Copyright © 2009 Sun Microsystems, Inc. All rights reserved.

Power-on self-test

Process performed by firmware or software routines

Typical POST screen. (AMI BIOS)
Summary screen after POST and before booting an operating system (AMI BIOS)

A power-on self-test (POST) is a process performed by firmware or software routines immediately after a computer or other digital electronic device is powered on.[1]

This article mainly deals with POSTs on personal computers, but many other embedded systems such as those in major appliances, avionics, communications, or medical equipment also have self-test routines which are automatically invoked at power-on.[2]

The results of the POST may be displayed on a panel that is part of the device, output to an external device, or stored for future retrieval by a diagnostic tool. Since a self-test might detect that the system's usual human-readable display is non-functional, an indicator lamp or a speaker may be provided to show error codes as a sequence of flashes or beeps. In addition to running tests, the POST process may also set the initial state of the device from firmware.

In the case of a computer, the POST routines are part of a device's pre-boot sequence; if they complete successfully, the bootstrap loader code is invoked to load an operating system.

IBM-compatible PC POST[edit]

See also: Booting § Boot sequence of IBM PC compatibles

In IBM PC compatible computers, the main duties of POST are handled by the BIOS/UEFI, which may hand some of these duties to other programs designed to initialize very specific peripheral devices, notably for video and SCSI initialization. These other duty-specific programs are generally known collectively as option ROMs or individually as the video BIOS, SCSI BIOS, etc.

The principal duties of the main BIOS during POST are as follows:

  • verify CPU registers
  • verify the integrity of the BIOS code itself
  • verify some basic components like DMA, timer, interrupt controller
  • initialize, size, and verify system main memory
  • initialize BIOS
  • pass control to other specialized extension BIOSes (if installed)
  • identify, organize, and select which devices are available for booting

The functions above are served by the POST in all BIOS versions back to the very first. In later BIOS versions, POST will also:

(In early BIOSes, POST did not organize or select boot devices, it simply identified floppy or hard disks, which the system would try to boot in that order, always.)

The BIOS begins its POST when the CPU is reset. The first memory location the CPU tries to execute is known as the reset vector. In the case of a hard reboot, the northbridge will direct this code fetch (request) to the BIOS located on the system flash memory. For a warm boot, the BIOS will be located in the proper place in RAM and the northbridge will direct the reset vector call to the RAM. (In earlier PC systems, before chipsets were standard, the BIOS ROM would be located at an address range that included the reset vector, and BIOS ran directly out of ROM. This is why the motherboard BIOS ROM is in segment F000 in the conventional memory map.)

During the POST flow of a contemporary BIOS, one of the first things a BIOS should do is determine the reason it is executing. For a cold boot, for example, it may need to execute all of its functionality. If, however, the system supports power saving or quick boot methods, the BIOS may be able to circumvent the standard POST device discovery, and simply program the devices from a preloaded system device table.

The POST flow for the PC has developed from a very simple, straightforward process to one that is complex and convoluted. During the POST, the BIOS must integrate a plethora of competing, evolving, and even mutually exclusive standards and initiatives for the matrix of hardware and OSes the PC is expected to support, although at most only simple memory tests and the setup screen are displayed.

In earlier BIOSes, up to around the turn of the millennium, the POST would perform a thorough test of all devices, including a complete memory test. This design by IBM was modeled after their larger (e.g. mainframe) systems, which would perform a complete hardware test as part of their cold-start process. As the PC platform evolved into more of a commodity consumer device, the mainframe- and minicomputer-inspired high-reliability features such as parity memory and the thorough memory test in every POST were dropped from most models. The exponential growth of PC memory sizes, driven by the equally exponential drop in memory prices, was also a factor in this, as the duration of a memory test using a given CPU is directly proportional to the memory size.

The original IBM PC could be equipped with as little as 16 KB of RAM and typically had between 64 and 640 KB; depending on the amount of equipped memory, the computer's 4.77 MHz 8088 required between five seconds and 1.5 minutes to complete the POST and there was no way to skip it. Beginning with the IBM XT, a memory count was displayed during POST instead of a blank screen.[3] A modern PC with a bus rate of around 1 GHz and a 32-bit bus might be 2000x or even 5000x faster, but it might have more than 3 GB of memory—5000x more. With people being more concerned with boot times now than in the 1980s, the 30 to 60 second memory test adds undesirable delay for a benefit of confidence that is not perceived to be worth that cost by most users. Most clone PC BIOSes allowed the user to skip the POST RAM check by pressing a key, and more modern machines often performed no RAM test at all unless it was enabled via the BIOS setup. In addition, modern DRAM is significantly more reliable than DRAM was in the 1980s.

As part of the starting sequence the POST routines may display a prompt to the user for a key press to access built-in setup functions of the BIOS. This allows the user to set various options particular to the mother board before the operating system is loaded. If no key is pressed, the POST will proceed on to the boot sequence required to load the installed operating system.

Many modern BIOS and UEFI implementations show a manufacturers logo during POST and hide the classic text screens unless an error occurs. The text screen can often be enabled in the BIOS settings by disabling the "Quiet Boot" option.

Progress and error reporting[edit]

BIOS POST card for PCI bus.
Professional BIOS POST card for PCI bus.
Two POST seven-segment displays integrated on a computer motherboard

The original IBM BIOS made POST diagnostic information available by outputting a number to I/O port 0x80 (a screen display was not possible with some failure modes). Both progress indication and error codes were generated; in the case of a failure which did not generate a code, the code of the last successful operation was available to aid in diagnosing the problem. Using a logic analyzer or a dedicated POST card‍—‌an interface card that shows port 0x80 output on a small display‍—‌a technician could determine the origin of the problem. Once an operating system is running on the computer the code displayed by such a board may become meaningless, since some OSes, e.g. Linux, use port 0x80 for I/O timing operations. The actual numeric codes for the possible stages and error conditions differ from one BIOS supplier to another. Codes for different BIOS versions from a single supplier may also vary, although many codes remain unchanged in different versions.

Later BIOSes used a sequence of beeps from the motherboard-attached PC speaker (if present and working) to signal error codes. Some vendors developed proprietary variants or enhancements, such as MSI's D-Bracket. POST beep codes vary from manufacturer to manufacturer.

Information on numeric and beep codes is available from manufacturers of BIOSes and motherboards. There are websites which collect codes for many BIOSes.[4]

Original IBM POST beep codes[edit]

BeepsMeaning
1 short beepNormal POST – system is OK
2 short beepsPOST error – error code shown on screen
No beepPower supply, system board problem, disconnected CPU, or disconnected speaker
Continuous beepPower supply, system board, RAM or keyboard problem
Repeating short beepsPower supply, system board or keyboard problem
1 long, 1 short beepSystem board problem
1 long, 2 short beepsDisplay adapter problem (MDA, CGA)
1 long, 3 short beepsEnhanced Graphics Adapter problem (EGA)
3 long beeps3270 keyboard card error

POST AMI BIOS beep codes[edit]

BeepsMeaning
1Memory refresh timer error
2Parity error in base memory (first 64 KiB block)
3Base memory read/write test error
4Motherboard timer not operational (check all PSU to MB connectors seated)
5Processor failure
68042 Gate A20 test error (cannot switch to protected mode)
7General exception error (processor exception interrupt error)
8Display memory error (system video adapter)
9AMI BIOS ROM checksum fix
10CMOS shutdown register read/write fix
11Cache memory test failed
continuous beepingMotherboard does not detect a RAM module (continuous beeping)

Reference: "AMIBIOS8 Check Point and Beep Code List Version 2.0 - June 10, 2008"(PDF). Archived from the original(PDF) on 2015-08-07.

POST beep codes on CompTIA A+ certification exam[edit]

These POST beep codes are covered specifically on the CompTIA A+ Exam:

Beeps Meaning
Steady, short beeps Power supply may be bad
Long continuous beep tone Memory failure
Steady, long beeps Power supply bad
No beep Power supply bad, system not plugged in, or power not turned on
No beep If everything seems to be functioning correctly there may be a problem with the 'beeper' itself. The system will normally beep one short beep.
One long, two short beeps Video card failure

IBM POST diagnostic code descriptions[edit]

CodeMeaning
100–199System boards
200–299Memory
300–399Keyboard
400–499Monochrome display
500–599Color/graphics display
600–699Floppy-disk drive or adapter
700–799Math coprocessor
900–999Parallel printer port
1000–1099Alternate printer adapter
1100–1299Asynchronous communication device, adapter, or port
1300–1399Game port
1400–1499Color/graphics printer
1500–1599Synchronous communication device, adapter, or port
1700–1799Hard drive or adapter (or both)
1800–1899Expansion unit (XT)
2000–2199Bisynchronous communication adapter
2400–2599EGA system-board video (MCA)
3000–3199LAN adapter
4800–4999Internal modem
7000–7099Phoenix BIOS chips
7300–73993.5-inch disk drive
8900–8999MIDI adapter
11200–11299SCSI adapter
21000–21099SCSI fixed disk and controller
21500–21599SCSI CD-ROM system

Macintosh POST[edit]

Main article: Macintosh startup

Apple's Macintosh computers also perform a POST after a cold boot. In the event of a fatal error, the Mac will not make its startup chime.

Old World Macs (until 1998)[edit]

Macs made after 1987 but prior to 1998, upon failing the POST, will immediately halt with a "death chime", which is a sound that varies by model; it can be a beep, a car crash sound, the sound of shattering glass, a short musical tone, or more. On the screen, if working, will be the Sad Mac icon, along with two hexadecimal strings, which can be used to identify the problem. Macs made prior to 1987 crashed silently with the hexadecimal string and a Sad Mac icon.

New World Macs (1998–1999)[edit]

When Apple introduced the iMac in 1998, it was a radical departure from other Macs of the time. The iMac began the production of New World Macs, as they are called; New World Macs, such as the iMac, Power Macintosh G3 (Blue & White), Power Mac G4 (PCI Graphics), PowerBook G3 (bronze keyboard), and PowerBook G3 (FireWire), load the Mac OS ROM from the hard drive. In the event of an error, but not a fatal hardware error, they display the same screen as seen when holding +++ at startup but with the error message instead of the "0 >" prompt. In the event of a fatal hardware error, they give these beeps:[5]

BeepsMeaning
1No RAM installed/detected
2Incompatible RAM type installed (for example, EDO)
3No RAM banks passed memory testing
4Bad checksum for the remainder of the boot ROM
5Bad checksum for the ROM boot block

New World Macs (1999 onward)[edit]

The beep codes were revised in October 1999.[6] In addition, on some models, the power LED would flash in cadence.

BeepsMeaning
1No RAM installed/detected
2Incompatible RAM types
3No good banks
4No good boot images in the boot ROM, bad sys config block, or both
5Processor is not usable

Intel-based Macs[edit]

With the introduction of Intel-based Macs with EFI-based firmware, the startup tones were changed again.[7]

TonesMeaning
One tone, repeating every five secondsNo RAM installed/detected
Three successive tones followed by a repeating five-second pauseIncompatible RAM types
One long tone while the power button is held downEFI ROM update in progress
Three long tones, three short tones, three long tonesEFI ROM corruption detected, ROM recovery in process

Macs with the T2 security chip don't have EFI ROM tones[7]

Amiga POST[edit]

Amiga historical line of computers, from A1000 to 4000 present an interesting POST sequence that prompts the user with a sequence of flashing screens of different colors (rather than audible beeps as in other systems) to show if various hardware POST tests were correct or else if they failed:

POST sequence of Amiga[edit]

The Amiga system performs the following steps at boot:

  1. Delays beginning the tests a fraction of a second to allow the hardware to stabilize.
  2. Jumps to ROM code in diagnostic card (if found)
  3. Disables and clears all DMA and interrupts.
  4. Turns on the screen.
  5. Checks the general hardware configuration. If the screen remains a light gray color and the tests continue, the hardware is OK. If an error occurs, the system halts.
  6. Performs checksum test on ROMs.

If the system fails the ROM test, the screen display turns red and the system halts.

Sequence for all main Amiga models[edit]

Almost all Amiga models present the same color sequence when turned on: black screen, dark gray, light gray color screens filling all monitor screen in a rapid sequence (Amigas taken up usually 2, or at least max 3 seconds to turn on and boot).[8]

Color screens scheme[edit]

ColorMeaning
RedBad ROM[8]
YellowCPU Exception Before Bootstrap Code is Loaded[8]
GreenBad Chip RAM or fail of Agnus Chip (check seating of Agnus)
BlackNo CPU
WhiteExpansion passed test successfully
GreyTurn on
Constant whiteFailure of CPU
PurpleReturn from InitCode()[8]

Sequence for A4000[edit]

Correct tests color sequence scheme[edit]

A4000 presents just a light gray screen during its boot time (it just occurs in 2 or max 3 seconds)

  • Light Gray
  • = Initial hardware configuration tests passed
  • = Initial system software tests passed
  • = Final initialization test passed

Failed tests color scheme[edit]

ColorMeaning
RedROM Error - Reset or replace
GreenCHIP RAM error (reset AGNUS and re-test)
BlueCustom Chip(s) Error
Yellow68000 detected error before software trapped it (GURU)

Amiga keyboard LED error signals[edit]

The keyboards of historical Amiga models are not proprietary as it happened in early computer ages, but more pragmatically it was based on international standard ANSI/ISO 8859-1. The keyboard itself was an intelligent device and had its own processor and 4 kilobytes of RAM for keeping a buffer of the sequence of keys that were being pressed, thus can communicate with the user if a fault is found by flashing its main LED in sequence:

BlinksMeaning
1ROM checksum failure
2RAM test failed
3Watchdog timer failed
4A shortcut exists between two row lines or one of the seven special keys (not implemented)

See also[edit]

References[edit]

External links[edit]

Your computer does a thousand-and-one things before you even start using it. One task that it does at startup is something called POST or (Power-On Self Test). Even though this is happening behind the curtains, it’s still an immensely important process. Here’s an explanation of what POST is and why it’s important.

What Does POST Mean?

POST stands for Power-On Self Test. As the name suggests, it’s a process that occurs when the computer is powered on. When your computer first turns on, the first thing that actually initiates is the system’s BIOS. This stands for Basic Input/Output System. The BIOS is a bit of software that resides in a chip on the motherboard. It does a lot for your computer and can even be accessed by the user.

How Is the POST Performed?

When the computer is turned on, the BIOS performs the POST by checking if the hardware components are working properly. It will target the chips on the motherboard like the RAM, video card, CPU, etc. It also checks the mouse and keyboard, which is why these devices light up when the computer is turned on.

If everything is in order, the startup process will then begin as normal. Since the BIOS lives on its own chip, it doesn’t rely on the operating system to function. Indeed, the BIOS actually begins before the operating system is even loaded.

Why Is the POST Important?

When you turn on your computer, you want to make sure that all of the components are working properly before the operating system tries to load. That’s why the BIOS stops the startup process when there’s an error. This is important because a lot of crucial programs are being loaded when the computer starts up. Having faulty chips or a faulty power supply might poorly impact that process and lead to more issues. There could also be other reasons why your computer is not booting.

Related: Common Mistakes That’ll Damage or Ruin Your Motherboard

POST Errors and Beep Codes

Your computer will indicate the POST status with certain beeps. If the POST goes through without a hitch, you will typically get one beep followed by your operating system starting up. However, if the POST is not successful, your system will notify you in the form of a combination of beeps.

There are a handful of different beep combinations (beep codes) that occur during startup. These point to different errors during the POST process. Unfortunately, beep codes can differ from company to company, as there isn’t a standard for them. There are, however, a set of common beep codes that are on most systems.

CAUSEBEEP CODE
Normal POST, no error1 short beep
Display Adaptor error1 long beep, then 2 short beeps
Enhanced Graphics Adaptor error1 long beep, then 3 short beeps
Keyboard card error3 long beeps
POST error2 short beeps
Power supply, system board, or maybe RAM problem, keyboard problemContinuous beep
Power supply, system board problem, disconnected CPU, or disconnected speakerNo beep
Power supply or system board problem or keyboardRepeating short beeps
System Board Problem1 long beep, then 1 short beep

These beep codes aren’t going to be the same for every computer, so it’s important to look up the beep codes for your computer.

The Little Things are Always the Most Important

The POST process happens within the first couple of seconds during startup, but it’s one of the most important. It alerts you if there are any hardware issues you need to know about before the computer starts up. The POST process has probably saved you from computer errors, and you may not have even noticed. It’s been a saving grace for computers in the past and continues to this day.

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and sponsored partnerships, so we receive a share of the revenue from some of your purchases. This
won’t affect the price you pay and helps us offer the best product recommendations.

How to Enter the BIOS on Windows 10 (And Older Versions)

To get into the BIOS, you usually press a specific key at the right time. Learn how to enter the BIOS on Windows 10.

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Error code Smart self-test short HD521-2W

  • short Smart self-test in tools hardware every time diagonestic is down and display alert (s5398d)

    show and short smart as self-test in tools hardware diagonestic every time is not the attention that my pc is model pavilion s5398d

    Looks like you have a bad hard drive. You will need to have the hard drive replaced and reload the operating system using HP recovery support.

  • Error hard drive Self Test 303

    Hello

    I own a HP Pavilion dm4t-3000 CTO Entertainment Notebook PC (code QA702AV).

    I did the self test HP and got the message «Hard Disk 1 303» fast

    It seems that I need to replace the HD, but I was wondering what models are compatible with my laptop and if a bad hard drive could be the source of the LAG that I lived.

    The following illustration shows what is compatible with your laptop.

    Source: Maintenance and Service of Guide for the dm4 series

    Run the long test before considering to replace the hard drive.

  • Error message is "self test feature check."

    At the start there is a floating box with the message "Dell, self test feature check."  Cursor does not and can not go past this message.  Help, please! Thank you

    At the start there is a floating box with the message "Dell, self test feature check."  Cursor does not and can not go past this message.  Help, please! Thank you

    This is the verification of the Dell system. You have to look and see what errors detected.
    I do not vote for me I'm not here for points. If this post helps you, vote. Visit my forum @ http://repairbotsonline.com/

  • SHORT SMART SELF-TEST IS A FAILURE

    THE READ ELEMENT OF THE SMART TEST FAILED;   WHAT CAN I DO?

    When you request support, please provide the HP model name and/or product the full number of the computer in question.

    It is generally an indication that the hard disk has failed or is about to fail. Please see the HP document entitled 'Hard Drive failure errors' for useful information about SMART errors. I hope that you have already created your personal set of HP recovery disks. If you can, save all the personal data and you want to save the files.

  • SMART short self-test - on the second hard drive

    HP Pavilion Elite e9270t - 3 yrs old, Win7.

    Became the error SMART self-test short the original drive so I installed a replacement and transferred files.

    I get the same error on the second h/d. I have my doubts that the second disk is having the exact same error and wonder if the s/w test is actually the problem.

    It could very well be the connectors that gives you the question instead of the HARD drive itself. I would run the HARD drive test in BIOS instead of the short test.

    Try this:

    1. Plug the AC adapter into the computer if it is not already connected.
    2. Turn off the computer and wait five seconds.
    3. Press the power button to start the computer and repeatedly press the F10 key to enter the BIOS Setup menu.
    4. Use the right arrow or left arrow keys to navigate the menu selection to find the Auto test primary hard drive option. Depending on your BIOS, it is under diagnoses or tools.
    5. Select self-test primary hard drive, and then press the Enter key to start the test.

    Figure 1: Example of a primary hard disk self test screen


    The hard drive self test performs a Quick Test , followed by a complete Test. During each test, the window displays a status bar and a scheduled for completion

    Let me know the results of this test.

    THX

  • SMART short Self Test Failed - (error code: WHD16-8NR)

    Hi all

    I had my XPS L520X for 4 years and 2 months. I've never had a problem with its operation until last week. Randomly, it restarted and came with the PCI Realtek issue when it restarts.

    To cut a very long story short Fault find it which is going on, I reinstalled the entire operating system, including formatting of the hard drive.

    The problem of the laptop different freeze/crash and reboot with erros while doing normal tasks has not been resolved.

    I have run the Dell support center software and it shows the auto SMART test failed with the following code (error code: WHD16-8NR).

    Event log:

    Dell Support Center log file
    March 17, 2016 16:53:55
    Overall result: failed

    -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    ST9750420AS [ATA:0:0\\?\ide#diskst9750420as___0005dem1#4&34e0611c&0&0.0.0#{53f56307-b6bf-11d0-94f2-00a0c91efb8b]}
    -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Seller: Seagate
    Model number: ST9750420AS
    Serial number: 6WS100EG
    Firmware revision: 0005DEM1
    Size: 698,6 GB
    Rotation speed: 7200 RPM
    Cache size: 16 MB
    Temperature: 43 c
    Physical sector size: 4 KB
    Logical sector size: 512 B
    Count of logical sector: 1465149168
    Supported standards: ATA8-ACS, ATA/ATAPI-7, ATA/ATAPI-6, ATA/ATAPI-5
    Specification Version: Rev ATA8-ACS 4

    ----------------------------
    OS - C: [PARTITION:C\\.\C:\]
    ----------------------------

    File system: NTFS
    Volume serial number: 5087-8802
    Volume capacity: 679.00 GB
    Amount of free space: 568,63 GB
    Volume space used: 110,37 GB

    Test of the SMART State

    Test started - 17/03/2016 16:43:57

    Finished test:-17/03/2016 16:43:59
    Past

    Test of SMART thresholds

    Test started - 17/03/2016 16:43:59

    Finished test:-17/03/2016 16:44:01
    Past

    Targeted reading test

    Test started - 17/03/2016 16:44:01

    Finished test:-17/03/2016 16:44:05
    Past

    Try to search randomly

    Test started - 17/03/2016 16:44:05

    Finished test:-17/03/2016 16:44:54
    Past

    Funnel Seek Test

    Test started - 17/03/2016 16:44:54

    Finished test:-17/03/2016 16:46:14
    Past

    Short what SMART self-test

    Test started - 17/03/2016 16:46:14

    Error message:-17/03/2016 16:46:24
    The unit has reported the following State: the previous self-test completed having the read element of the test failed.
    Error message:-17/03/2016 16:46:25
    The first default LBA value is 121243744 and the failure occurred after that the device was working since 8792 hours under tension.
    Finished test:-17/03/2016 16:46:26
    Failed (error code: WHD16-8NR)

    Surface Scan Test

    Test started - 17/03/2016 16:46:26

    Finished test:-17/03/2016 16:47:25
    Past

    Surface Scan Test - 2

    Test started - 17/03/2016 16:47:25

    Finished test:-17/03/2016 16:48:58
    Past

    I also went in the BIOS BOOT MENU by pressing F12 at startup and ran diagnostics that seemed to have said everything going, however I saw a mistake, faliure in its process that was too fast for me to write the error.

    In a nutshell, my thought is that my hard drive has failed / is corrupted or is about to fail.

    My simple question is, do I need a new hard drive with the information I've provided?

    Thank you very much!

    To all those who read this topic:

    I rang Dell directly and they confirmed my hard drive needs to be replaced.

    8792 power over time, I think that its actually me good.

    Bravo and thanks for the reply ejn63

  • Targeted Test read and Smart short self-test failed!

    Help, please!

    Is there something to fix the underside of chess? Product: XPS 435 t/9000.  Western Digital: WDC WD5000AKS-75V0A0. The crash occurred after that my Tripp-lite didn't work properly in a power failure.

    Targeted reading test

    Test started17/09/2013-09:22:13
    Error message:Error reading sector 27214298.17/09/2013-09:22:34
    Error message:The test found errors in sector 1.17/09/2013-09:22:34
    Completion test:Failed (error code: WHD20-B3A)
    Short what SMART self-test
    Test started17/09/2013-09:25:03
    Error message:The unit has reported the following State: the previous self-test completed having the read element of the test failed.17/09/2013-09:26:15
    Error message:The first default LBA value is 27214298 and the failure occurred after that the device was working since 13979 hours under tension.17/09/2013-09:26:15
    Completion test:Failed (error code: WHD16-3DY)

    Jan

    It is likely that you will need to replace the hard drive.  To confirm, press F12 at startup, enter the Dell diagnostics.  Run an extended hard drive test.

    If the system is under warranty, logs the error and contact Dell for a replacement drive.

    If the system is out of warranty, any standard 3.5 "SATA drive will work as a replacement.

  • SMART short self-test has expired

    I got a warning when I ran the Dell Media Center PC Auditor on my 1720 running Windows Vista Home Premium SP2 indicating the short SMART Self Test Timed Out.  I don't know what is SMART or what is talking about this warning.  Can I fix?  It is important and why?  Thanks, Chuck

    No, if it times out. If you want to check your hard disk, run the diagnostics Dell drivers and Utilities disc.

  • I have a G62-355DX laptop and is 11 months old. and it won't start. It has error codes

    I have a G62-355DX laptop and is 11 months old. and it won't start. There error codes when I do a test of the system. DST short: failure failure ID: RTX6T9-5B75S5-XD003F - S 60, 903.

    Product ID: XH068UA #ABA

    Hello

    As the error code relates to a short drive Self Test failure - the only real solution to this is to replace the hard drive.

    As your laptop is still under warranty, contact HP to make arrangements for the replaced disk.

    If you live in the United States, contact HP here.

    If you are in another part of the world, begin here.

    Kind regards

    DP - K

  • LENOVO Thinkpad x 201 result code projection hardware test: WHD01V002-WK5CCH

    Hello. I scanned mysystem using LSC and iut gave me the following result

    Storage devices

    Display nameSAMSUNG HM160HI - 149,05 GB
    ManufacturerSamsung
    ModelSAMSUNG HM160HI
    SerialS18PJDNS104726
    FirmwareHH100-12
    Size149.05 GB
    Cache8,00 MBs
    Temperature42 C
    Physical sector size512
    Logical sector size512
    Logical sectors312581808
    Supported standardsATA8-ACS, ATA7-ATAPI ATAPI ATA6, ATA5-ATAPI ATA4-ATAPI
    Spec versionATA-ATAPI-7 T13 1532D version 0
    Partition schemeMBR
    Index 1
    Partition typePrimary
    File systemIFS, HPFS, NTFS, exFAT
    LabelSystem reserved
    Mount pointG:\
    Serial264D 6489
    Size100.00 MBs
    Used28.33 MBs
    Free71,66 MBs
    Index 2
    Partition typePrimary
    File systemIFS, HPFS, NTFS, exFAT
    Mount pointC:\
    SerialCC638811
    Size38,96 GBs
    Used34,45 GBs
    Free4.51 GBs
    Index 3
    Partition typePrimary
    File systemIFS, HPFS, NTFS, exFAT
    LabelNew Volume
    Mount pointD:\
    Serial7E3BE8F9
    Size109,98 GBs
    Used15.77 GBs
    Free94.21 GBs
    Diagnosis
    Test of the SMART StatePast
    Targeted reading testFailed
    Try to search randomlyPast
    Funnel Seek TestPast
    Short what SMART self-testWarning
    Drive SMART what self-test

    Warning

    can someone please guide me what should I do?

    First of all, it's a good idea to remove your serial number of the position. Points to a failure perhaps diagnostics hard drive. (the part that stores data on the pc). Make sure that you keep good backups of your data in case it failed completely. Then, you must contact lenovo and do a warranty claim so that they can watch or advise you in consequence or may contact an authorized service center.

  • Error code 2000-0146 and 0F00:065 D and B 0F00:137

    I have a Dell Studio 1735 laptop.  Today it froze on me.  I could only make a hard stop.  I tried to log in again and got on the desktop with icons, but couldn't go further.  Don't have hard stop yet and I tried to go back to the top.  I made a kind of diagnostic tests and received the error code 2000-0146 following.  Also received the 0F00:065 D error reading DISK_0-self-test and 0F00:137 B DVDRW_1-disk is missing Virgin insert the data disc (example of the RCD).  I don't know what all these means.  Can someone direct me if it can be repaired and how I can fix it.  Or do I need a new hard drive.  Your help is greatly appreciated.  I use another laptop to write this message.

    The first two messages mean that the hard drive has failed. The third says there is no disc in the DVD drive, so it could not be tested.

  • PC Doctor has no error codes

    Help!

    2006 HPc1487c w/2 x 1 GB + 2 x 500 memory abandons geezer year old ghosts and this78 soon to follow.  But made a full recovery and was able to run PC-Doctor, who advised: on the system memory:

    Has no auxiliary fault model Test ME516-3W code

    Checkerboard Test ME516-15W error code

    Market the error code a test of law ME516-18W

    Error code bit low test ME516-14W

    Waling error code a try on the left ME516-17W

    then prompty died again.  Logic tells me that a module of memory went bye bye.  Can someone tell me precisely on these error codes.  Thank you

    rmorrp

    Matched pair means; same manufacturer, same chip type, same size, same CASE, etc.   Would you buy a pair as two memory DIMMs together.  You might have the same 512 MB DIMM in blue locations and the two dimms of 1 GB in black locations.  I balanced in blue locations and matched pairs slots black and they are different manufacturers in my m9200t system. However, I took care to ensure that both ca and tension were the same (Samsung and Kingston DIMM).

    I have Roxio EMC 9, creator of 2009 and 2010 of creator.  EMC 9 went unsupported 2.5 years ago.  EMC 9 has written for 32-bit operating systems, and it will not more than 3 GB even recognize on an operating system to 64-bit with more than 3 GB.

  • How to copy Step.Result.Error.Code in the local Variable

    How can I copy Step.Result.Error.Code to a stage in particulat to a local variable.

    I want to print the value of Step.Result.Error.Code in my test report.

    Help, please. Thanks in advance.

    Kind regards

    Sagar Joshi

    Yes of course!

    This is better handled by the recall of SequenceFilePostStepRuntimeError:

    (1) StepResultCode (number) is added FileGlobals

    (2) add SequenceFilePostStepRuntimeError callback to your movie file

    (3) the next stage of the declaration adds the recall of SequenceFilePostStepRuntimeError :

    FileGlobals.StepErrorCode = Parameters.Step.Result.Error.Code

    Here is an overview of the sequence:

    I hope this helps.

  • Error code 643 update (Microsoft Silverlight KB979202)

    Update for Microsoft Silverlight (KB979202) fails with the error code 643; several test update.

    You can...

    1 post in this forum instead: http://forums.silverlight.net/forums/13.aspx

    2 'hide' the update; or...

    3 uninstall Silverlight, reboot, and then install the current version via this page: http://www.microsoft.com/silverlight/ ~ Robear Dyer (PA Bear) ~ MS MVP (that is to say, mail, security, Windows & Update Services) since 2002 ~ WARNING: MS MVPs represent or work for Microsoft

  • Did a Primary Hard Disk Self Test on my HP Pavilion dm4; what do these results mean?

    If You are using Windows, You should run a disk check then see if the message goes away and recheck with your HDD tests.

    The 301 error code will be a Smart or Disk Self Test failure - in either case, it would indicate that the Hard Drive is failing and needs to be replaced. It's impossible to estimate the remaining lifespan of the drive - it could carry on for a few months or fail tomorrow.

    I would recommend replacing the Hard Drive yourself - it's a pretty straight forward procedure and will save the expense of paying someone else to do this.

    You can check the manual how to remove the Hard Drive on page 57.

    answered Jul 13, 2015 at 17:54

    user avatar
    Divin3Divin3

    1,75511 gold badge1313 silver badges2929 bronze badges

    selftest hp error code

    Author Topic: HP 3456a Self-Test Failure ("-4.00000")  (Read 3076 times)

    0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.


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    Power-On-Self-Test

    Before you can use a server, selftest hp error code, all devices must be tested and initialized, and the operating system must

    be bootstrapped to the memory. This is referred to as Power-On-Self-Test or POST. POST is a series of

    diagnostic tests that checks firmware and hardware components to ensure that the server is properly

    functioning. This diagnostic function automatically runs each time the server is powered on.

    These diagnostics, which reside in the BIOS ROM, isolate server-related logic failures and indicate the

    board or component that needs to be replaced, as indicated by the error messages. Most server

    hardware failures will be accurately isolated during POST. The number of tests displayed depends on

    the configuration of the server.

    POST error indicators

    When POST detects a system failure, selftest hp error code, it either displays a POST error message, or emits a series of

    beep codes.

    POST errors messages

    Whenever a non-critical error occurs during POST, an error message describing the problem appears

    onscreen. These text messages are displayed in normal video (white text on black background). It

    shows the details of the error. The following is an example of a POST error message:

    ERROR

    0251: System CMOS checksum bad – Default configuration used

    In some cases an error message may include recommendations for troubleshooting or require that you

    press the Enter key to display recommendations. Follow selftest hp error code instructions on the screen.

    The next table lists the most common POST error messages with their corresponding troubleshooting

    recommendation. It is recommended that you correct the error before proceeding, even if the server

    appears to boot successfully.

    If your system displays one of the messages marked below with an asterisk (*), write down the code

    and message and contact your HP Customer Support provider.

    When no POST error message is displayed but the server stops during POST, listen for beep codes.

    Error code

    0200

    0210

    0211

    0212

    Error message

    Failure Fixed Disk

    Stuck key

    Keyboard error

    Keyboard Controller Failed

    Corrective action/description

    Fixed disk is not working or not configured properly.

    1

    Run Setup and check if the fixed-disk type is correctly identified.

    2

    Check to see if the fixed disk is attached properly.

    Stuck key on keyboard.

    1

    Locate the stuck key on your keyboard and release it.

    2

    Reboot the server.

    Keyboard not working.

    Verify that the keyboard cable is mini netbook dns error connected to the

    keyboard port (not the mouse port) on the rear panel of the

    server.

    If the problem persists, replace the keyboard or contact your HP

    Customer Support provider.

    Keyboard controller failed test.

    Diagnostics tools 97

    Did a Primary Hard Disk Self Test on my HP Pavilion dm4; what do these results mean?

    If You are using Windows, You should run a disk check then see if the message goes away and recheck with your HDD tests.

    The 301 error code will be a Smart or Disk Self Test failure - in either case, it would indicate that the Hard Selftest hp error code is failing and needs to be replaced. It's impossible to estimate the remaining lifespan of the drive - it could carry on for a few months or fail tomorrow.

    I would recommend replacing the Hard Drive yourself - it's a pretty straight forward procedure and will save the expense of paying someone else to do this.

    You can check the manual how to remove the Hard Drive on page 57.

    answered Jul 13, 2015 at 17:54

    user avatar
    Divin3Divin3

    1,75511 gold badge1313 silver badges2929 bronze badges

    Power-on self-test

    Process performed by firmware or software routines

    Typical POST screen. (AMI BIOS)
    Summary screen after POST and before booting an operating system (AMI BIOS)

    A power-on self-test (POST) is a process performed by firmware or software routines immediately after a computer or other digital electronic device is powered on.[1]

    This article mainly deals with POSTs on personal computers, but many other embedded systems such as those in major appliances, avionics, communications, or medical equipment also have self-test routines which are automatically invoked at power-on.[2]

    The results of the POST may be displayed on a panel that is part of the device, output to an external device, or stored for future retrieval by a diagnostic tool. Since a self-test might detect that the system's usual human-readable display is non-functional, an indicator lamp or a speaker may be provided to show error codes as a sequence of flashes or beeps, selftest hp error code. In addition to running tests, the POST process may also set the initial state of the device from firmware.

    In selftest hp error code case of a computer, the POST routines are part selftest hp error code a device's pre-boot sequence; if they complete successfully, the bootstrap loader code is invoked to load an operating system.

    IBM-compatible PC POST[edit]

    See also: Booting § Boot sequence of IBM PC compatibles

    In IBM PC compatible computers, the main duties of POST are handled by the BIOS/UEFI, which may hand some of these duties to other programs designed to initialize very specific peripheral devices, notably for video and SCSI initialization. These other duty-specific programs are generally known collectively as option ROMs or individually as the video BIOS, SCSI BIOS, etc.

    The principal duties of the main BIOS during POST are as follows:

    • verify CPU registers
    • verify the integrity of the BIOS code itself
    • verify some basic components like DMA, timer, interrupt controller
    • initialize, size, and verify system main memory
    • initialize BIOS
    • pass control to other specialized extension BIOSes (if installed)
    • identify, organize, and select which devices are available for booting

    The functions above are served by the POST in all BIOS versions back to the very first. In later BIOS versions, POST will also:

    (In early BIOSes, POST did not organize or select boot devices, it simply identified floppy or hard 17187 sql server error, which the system would try to boot in that order, always.)

    The BIOS begins its POST when the CPU is reset. The first memory location the CPU tries to execute is known as the reset vector, selftest hp error code. In the case of a hard reboot, the northbridge will direct this code fetch (request) to the BIOS located on the system flash memory. For a warm boot, the BIOS will be located in the proper place in RAM and the northbridge will direct the reset vector call to the RAM. (In earlier PC systems, before chipsets were standard, the BIOS ROM would be located at an address range that included the reset vector, and BIOS ran directly out of ROM. This is why the motherboard BIOS ROM is in segment F000 in the conventional memory map.)

    During the POST flow of a contemporary BIOS, one of the first things a BIOS should selftest hp error code is determine the reason it is executing. For a cold boot, for example, selftest hp error code, it may need to execute all of its functionality. If, however, the system supports power saving or quick boot methods, selftest hp error code, the BIOS may be able to circumvent the standard POST device discovery, and simply program the devices from a preloaded system device table.

    The POST flow for the PC has developed from a very simple, straightforward process typeerror error #1009 one that is complex and convoluted. During the POST, the BIOS must integrate a plethora of competing, selftest hp error code, evolving, and even mutually exclusive standards and initiatives for the matrix of hardware and OSes the PC is expected to support, although at most only simple memory tests and the setup screen are displayed.

    In earlier BIOSes, up to around the turn of the millennium, the POST would perform a thorough test of all devices, including a complete memory test. This design by IBM was modeled after their larger (e.g. mainframe) systems, which would perform a complete hardware test as part of their cold-start process. As the PC platform evolved into more of a commodity consumer device, the mainframe- and minicomputer-inspired high-reliability features such as parity memory and the thorough memory test in every POST were dropped from most models. The exponential growth of PC memory sizes, driven by the equally exponential drop in memory prices, was also a factor in this, selftest hp error code, as the duration of a memory test using a given CPU is directly proportional to the memory size.

    The original IBM PC could be equipped with as little as 16 KB of RAM and typically had between 64 and 640 KB; depending on the amount of equipped memory, the computer's 4.77 MHz 8088 required between five seconds and 1.5 minutes to complete the POST and there was no way to skip it. Beginning with the IBM XT, a memory count was displayed during POST instead nokia x3 error 006 a blank screen.[3] A modern PC with a bus rate of around 1 GHz and a 32-bit bus might be 2000x or even 5000x faster, but it might have more than 3 GB of memory—5000x more. With people being more concerned with boot times now than in the 1980s, the 30 to 60 second memory test adds undesirable delay for a benefit of confidence that is not perceived to be worth that cost by most users. Most clone PC BIOSes allowed the user to skip the POST RAM check by pressing a key, and more modern machines often performed no RAM test at all unless it was enabled via the BIOS setup. In addition, modern DRAM is significantly more reliable than DRAM was in the 1980s.

    As part of the starting sequence the POST routines may display a prompt to the user for a key press to access built-in setup functions of the BIOS. This allows the user to set various options particular to the mother board before the operating selftest hp error code is loaded. If no key is pressed, the POST will proceed on to the boot sequence required to load the installed operating system.

    Many modern BIOS and UEFI implementations show a manufacturers logo during POST and hide the classic text screens unless an error occurs. The text screen can often be enabled in the BIOS settings by disabling the "Quiet Boot" option, selftest hp error code.

    Progress and error reporting[edit]

    BIOS POST card for PCI bus.
    Professional BIOS POST card for PCI bus.
    Two POST seven-segment displays integrated on a computer motherboard

    The original IBM BIOS made POST diagnostic selftest hp error code available by outputting a number to I/O port 0x80 (a screen display was not possible with some failure modes). Both progress indication and error codes were generated; in the case of a failure which did not generate a code, the code of the last successful operation was available to aid in diagnosing the problem. Using a logic analyzer or a dedicated POST card‍—‌an interface card that shows port 0x80 output on a small display‍—‌a technician could determine the origin of the problem. Once an operating system is running on the computer the code displayed by such a board may become meaningless, since some OSes, e.g, selftest hp error code. Linux, use port 0x80 for I/O timing operations. The actual numeric codes for the possible stages and error conditions differ from one BIOS supplier to another. Codes for different BIOS versions from a single supplier may also vary, although many codes remain unchanged in different versions.

    Later BIOSes used a sequence of beeps from the motherboard-attached PC speaker (if present and working) to signal error codes. Some vendors developed proprietary variants or enhancements, such as MSI's D-Bracket. POST beep codes vary from manufacturer to manufacturer.

    Information on numeric and beep codes is available from manufacturers of BIOSes and motherboards. Gentoo pptpd error 629 are websites which collect codes for many BIOSes.[4]

    Original IBM POST beep codes[edit]

    BeepsMeaning
    1 short beepNormal POST – system is OK
    2 short beepsPOST error – error code shown on screen
    No beepPower supply, selftest hp error code board problem, disconnected CPU, or disconnected speaker
    Continuous beepPower supply, system board, RAM or keyboard problem
    Repeating short beepsPower supply, system board or keyboard problem
    1 long, selftest hp error code, 1 short beepSystem board problem
    1 long, 2 short beepsDisplay adapter problem (MDA, CGA)
    1 long, 3 short beepsEnhanced Graphics Adapter problem (EGA)
    3 long beeps3270 keyboard card error

    POST AMI BIOS beep codes[edit]

    BeepsMeaning
    1Memory refresh timer error
    2Parity error in base memory (first 64 KiB block)
    3Base memory read/write test error
    4Motherboard timer not operational (check all PSU to MB connectors seated)
    5Processor failure
    68042 Gate A20 test error (cannot switch to protected mode)
    7General exception error (processor exception interrupt error)
    8Display memory error (system video adapter)
    9AMI BIOS ROM checksum fix
    10CMOS shutdown register read/write fix
    11Cache memory test failed
    continuous beepingMotherboard does not detect a RAM module (continuous beeping)

    Reference: "AMIBIOS8 Check Point and Beep Code List Version 2.0 - June 10, 2008"(PDF). Archived from the original(PDF) on 2015-08-07.

    POST beep codes on CompTIA A+ certification exam[edit]

    These POST beep codes are covered specifically on the CompTIA A+ Exam:

    Beeps Meaning
    Steady, short beeps Power supply may be bad
    Long continuous beep tone Memory failure
    Steady, long beeps Power supply bad
    No beep Power supply bad, system not plugged in, or power not turned on
    No beep If everything seems to be functioning correctly there may be a problem with the 'beeper' war on terror crack. The system will normally beep one short beep.
    One long, two short beeps Video card failure

    IBM POST diagnostic code descriptions[edit]

    CodeMeaning
    100–199System boards
    200–299Memory
    300–399Keyboard
    400–499Monochrome display
    500–599Color/graphics display
    600–699Floppy-disk drive or adapter
    700–799Math coprocessor
    900–999Parallel printer port
    1000–1099Alternate printer adapter
    1100–1299Asynchronous communication device, adapter, or port
    1300–1399Game port
    1400–1499Color/graphics printer
    1500–1599Synchronous communication device, adapter, or port
    1700–1799Hard drive or adapter (or both)
    1800–1899Expansion unit (XT)
    2000–2199Bisynchronous communication adapter
    2400–2599EGA system-board video (MCA)
    3000–3199LAN adapter
    4800–4999Internal modem
    7000–7099Phoenix BIOS chips
    7300–73993.5-inch disk drive
    8900–8999MIDI adapter
    11200–11299SCSI adapter
    21000–21099SCSI fixed disk and controller
    21500–21599SCSI CD-ROM system

    Macintosh POST[edit]

    Main article: Macintosh startup

    Apple's Macintosh computers also perform a POST after a cold boot. In the selftest hp error code of a fatal error, the Mac will not make its startup chime.

    Old World Macs (until 1998)[edit]

    Macs made after 1987 but prior to 1998, upon failing the POST, will immediately halt with a "death chime", selftest hp error code, which is a sound that varies by model; it can be a beep, a car crash sound, the sound of shattering glass, a short musical tone, or more. On the screen, if working, will be the Sad Mac icon, along with two hexadecimal strings, which can be used to identify the problem. Macs made prior to 1987 crashed silently with the hexadecimal string and a Sad Mac icon.

    New World Macs (1998–1999)[edit]

    When Apple introduced the iMac in 1998, it was a radical departure from other Macs of the time. The iMac began the production of New World Macs, as they are called; New World Macs, such as the iMac, Power Macintosh G3 (Blue & White), selftest hp error code, Power Mac G4 (PCI Graphics), PowerBook G3 (bronze keyboard), and PowerBook G3 (FireWire), load the Mac OS ROM from the hard drive. In the event of an error, but not a fatal hardware error, they display the same screen as seen when holding +++ at startup but with the error message instead of the "0 >" prompt. In the event of a fatal hardware error, they give these beeps:[5]

    BeepsMeaning
    1No RAM installed/detected
    2Incompatible RAM type installed (for example, EDO)
    3No RAM banks passed memory testing
    4Bad checksum for the remainder of the boot ROM
    5Bad checksum for the ROM boot block

    New World Macs (1999 onward)[edit]

    The beep codes were revised in October 1999.[6] In addition, on some models, the power LED would flash in cadence.

    BeepsMeaning
    1No RAM installed/detected
    2Incompatible RAM types
    3No good banks
    4No good boot images in the boot ROM, selftest hp error code, bad sys config block, or both
    5Processor is not usable

    Intel-based Macs[edit]

    With the introduction of Intel-based Macs with EFI-based firmware, the startup tones were changed again.[7]

    TonesMeaning
    One tone, repeating every five secondsNo RAM installed/detected
    Three successive tones followed by a repeating five-second pauseIncompatible RAM types
    One long tone while the power button is held downEFI ROM update in progress
    Three long tones, three short tones, three long tonesEFI ROM corruption detected, ROM recovery selftest hp error code process

    Macs with the T2 security chip don't have EFI ROM tones[7]

    Amiga POST[edit]

    Amiga historical line of computers, from A1000 to 4000 present an interesting POST sequence that prompts the user with a sequence of flashing screens of different colors (rather than audible beeps as in other systems) to show if various hardware POST tests were correct or else if they failed:

    POST sequence of Amiga[edit]

    The Amiga system performs the following steps at boot:

    1. Delays beginning the post 500 error a fraction of a second to allow the hardware to stabilize.
    2. Jumps to ROM code in diagnostic card (if found)
    3. Disables and clears all DMA and interrupts.
    4. Turns on the screen.
    5. Checks the general hardware configuration. If the screen remains a light gray color and selftest hp error code tests continue, the hardware is OK. If an error occurs, the system halts.
    6. Performs checksum test on ROMs.

    If the system fails the ROM test, the screen display turns red and the system halts.

    Sequence for all main Amiga models[edit]

    Almost all Amiga models selftest hp error code the same color sequence when turned on: black screen, dark gray, light gray color screens filling all monitor screen in a rapid sequence (Amigas taken up usually 2, or at least max 3 seconds to turn on and boot).[8]

    Color screens scheme[edit]

    ColorMeaning
    RedBad ROM[8]
    YellowCPU Exception Before Bootstrap Code is Loaded[8]
    GreenBad Chip RAM or fail of Agnus Chip (check seating of Agnus)
    BlackNo CPU
    WhiteExpansion passed test successfully
    GreyTurn on
    Constant whiteFailure of CPU
    PurpleReturn from InitCode()[8]

    Sequence for A4000[edit]

    Correct tests color sequence scheme[edit]

    A4000 presents just a light gray screen during its boot time (it just occurs in 2 or max 3 seconds)

    • Light Gray
    • = Initial hardware configuration tests passed
    • = Initial system software tests passed
    • = Final initialization test passed

    Failed tests color scheme[edit]

    ColorMeaning
    RedROM Error - Reset or replace
    GreenCHIP RAM error (reset AGNUS and re-test)
    BlueCustom Chip(s) Error
    Yellow68000 detected error before software trapped selftest hp error code (GURU)

    Amiga keyboard LED error signals[edit]

    The keyboards of historical Amiga models are not proprietary as it happened in early computer ages, but more pragmatically it was based on international standard ANSI/ISO 8859-1. The keyboard itself was an intelligent device and had its own processor and 4 kilobytes of RAM for keeping a buffer of the sequence of keys that were being pressed, thus can communicate with the user if a fault is found by flashing its main LED in sequence:

    BlinksMeaning
    1ROM checksum failure
    2RAM test failed
    3Watchdog timer failed
    4A shortcut exists between two row lines or one of the seven special keys (not implemented)

    See also[edit]

    References[edit]

    External links[edit]

    Error code Smart self-test short HD521-2W

  • short Smart self-test in tools hardware every time diagonestic is down and display alert (s5398d)

    show and short smart as self-test in tools hardware diagonestic every time is not the attention that my pc is model pavilion s5398d

    Looks like you have a bad hard drive. You will need to have the hard drive replaced and reload the operating system using HP recovery support.

  • Error hard drive Self Test 303

    Hello

    I own a HP Pavilion dm4t-3000 CTO Entertainment Notebook PC (code QA702AV).

    I did selftest hp error code self test HP and got the message «Hard Disk 1 303» selftest hp error code seems that Selftest hp error code need to replace the HD, but I was wondering what models are compatible with my laptop and if a bad hard drive could be the source of the LAG that I lived.

    The following illustration shows what is compatible with your laptop.

    Source: Maintenance and Service of Guide for the dm4 series

    Run the long test before considering to replace the hard drive.

  • Error message is "self test feature check."

    At the start there is a floating box with the message "Dell, self test feature check."  Cursor does not and can not go past this message.  Help, please! Thank you

    At the start there is a floating box with the message "Dell, self test feature check."  Cursor does not and can not go past this message.  Help, please! Thank you

    This is the verification of the Dell system, selftest hp error code. You have to look and see what errors detected.
    I do not vote for me I'm not here for points. If this post helps you, vote. Visit my forum @ http://repairbotsonline.com/

  • SHORT SMART SELF-TEST IS A FAILURE

    THE READ ELEMENT OF THE SMART TEST FAILED;   WHAT CAN I DO?

    When you request support, please provide the HP model name and/or product the full number of the computer in question.

    It is generally an indication that the hard disk has failed or is about to fail. Please see the HP document entitled 'Hard Drive failure errors' for useful information about SMART errors. I hope that you have already created your personal set of HP recovery disks. If you can, selftest hp error code, save all the personal data and you want to save the files.

  • SMART short self-test - on the second hard drive

    HP Pavilion Elite e9270t - 3 yrs old, Win7.

    Became the error SMART self-test short the original drive so I installed a replacement and transferred files.

    I get the same error on the second h/d. I have my doubts that the second disk is having the exact same error and wonder if the s/w test is actually the problem.

    It could very well be the connectors that gives you the question instead of the HARD drive itself. I would run the HARD drive test in BIOS instead of the short test.

    Try this:

    1. Plug the AC adapter into the computer if it is not already connected.
    2. Turn off the computer and wait five seconds.
    3. Press the power button to selftest hp error code the computer and repeatedly press the F10 key to enter the BIOS Setup menu.
    4. Use the right arrow or left arrow keys to navigate the menu selection to find the Auto test primary hard drive option. Depending on your BIOS, it is under diagnoses or tools.
    5. Select self-test primary hard drive, and then press the Enter key to start the test.

    Figure 1: Example of a primary hard disk self test screen


    The hard drive self test performs a Quick Testfollowed by a complete Test. During each test, the window displays a status bar and a scheduled for completion

    Let me know the results of this test.

    THX

  • SMART short Self Test Failed - (error code: WHD16-8NR)

    Hi all

    I had my XPS L520X for 4 years and 2 months. I've never had a problem with its operation until last week. Randomly, lancelot error freebsd restarted and came with the PCI Realtek issue when it restarts.

    To cut a very long story short Fault find it which is going on, I reinstalled the entire operating system, including formatting of the hard drive.

    The problem of the laptop different freeze/crash and reboot with erros while doing normal tasks has not been resolved.

    I have run the Dell support center software and it shows the auto SMART test failed with the following code (error code: WHD16-8NR).

    Event log:

    Dell Support Center log file
    March 17, selftest hp error code, 2016 16:53:55
    Overall result: failed

    -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    ST9750420AS [ATA:0:0\\?\ide#diskst9750420as___0005dem1#4&34e0611c&0&0.0.0#{53f56307-b6bf-11d0-94f2-00a0c91efb8b]}
    -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Seller: Seagate
    Model number: ST9750420AS
    Serial number: 6WS100EG
    Firmware revision: 0005DEM1
    Size: 698,6 GB
    Rotation speed: 7200 RPM
    Cache size: 16 MB
    Temperature: 43 c
    Physical sector size: 4 KB
    Logical sector size: 512 B
    Count of logical sector: 1465149168
    Supported standards: ATA8-ACS, ATA/ATAPI-7, selftest hp error code, ATA/ATAPI-6, ATA/ATAPI-5
    Specification Version: Rev ATA8-ACS 4

    ----------------------------
    OS - C: [PARTITION:C\\.\C:\]
    ----------------------------

    File system: NTFS
    Volume serial number: 5087-8802
    Volume capacity: 679.00 GB
    Amount of free space: 568,63 GB
    Volume space used: 110,37 GB

    Test of the SMART State

    Test started - 17/03/2016 16:43:57

    Finished test:-17/03/2016 16:43:59
    Past

    Test of SMART thresholds

    Test started - 17/03/2016 16:43:59

    Finished test:-17/03/2016 16:44:01
    Past

    Targeted reading test

    Test started - 17/03/2016 16:44:01

    Finished test:-17/03/2016 16:44:05
    Past

    Try to search randomly

    Test started - 17/03/2016 16:44:05

    Finished test:-17/03/2016 16:44:54
    Past

    Funnel Seek Test

    Test started - 17/03/2016 16:44:54

    Finished test:-17/03/2016 16:46:14
    Past

    Short what SMART self-test

    Test started - 17/03/2016 16:46:14

    Error message:-17/03/2016 16:46:24
    The unit has reported the following State: the previous self-test completed having the read element of the test failed.
    Error message:-17/03/2016 16:46:25
    The first default LBA value is 121243744 and the failure occurred after that the device was working since 8792 hours under tension.
    Finished test:-17/03/2016 16:46:26
    Failed (error code: WHD16-8NR)

    Surface Scan Test

    Test started - 17/03/2016 16:46:26

    Finished test:-17/03/2016 16:47:25
    Past

    Surface Scan Test - 2

    Test started - 17/03/2016 16:47:25

    Finished test:-17/03/2016 16:48:58
    Past

    I also went in the BIOS BOOT MENU by pressing F12 at startup and ran diagnostics that seemed to have said everything going, however I saw a mistake, faliure in its process that was too fast for me to write the error.

    In a nutshell, my thought is that my hard drive has failed / is corrupted or is about to fail.

    My simple question is, do I need a new hard drive with the information I've provided?

    Thank you very much!

    To all those who read this topic:

    I rang Dell directly and they confirmed my hard drive needs to be replaced.

    8792 power over time, selftest hp error code, I think that its actually me good.

    Bravo and thanks for the reply ejn63

  • Targeted Test read and Smart short self-test failed!

    Help, please!

    Is there something to fix the underside of chess? Product: XPS 435 t/9000.  Western Digital: WDC WD5000AKS-75V0A0. The crash occurred after that my Tripp-lite didn't work properly in a power failure.

    Targeted reading test

    Test started17/09/2013-09:22:13
    Error message:Error reading sector 27214298.17/09/2013-09:22:34
    Error message:The test found errors in sector 1.17/09/2013-09:22:34
    Completion test:Failed (error code: WHD20-B3A)
    Short what SMART self-test
    Test started17/09/2013-09:25:03
    Error message:The unit has reported the following State: the previous self-test completed having the read element of the test failed.17/09/2013-09:26:15
    Error message:The first default LBA value is 27214298 and the failure occurred after that the device was working since 13979 hours under tension.17/09/2013-09:26:15
    Completion test:Failed (error code: WHD16-3DY)

    Jan

    It is likely that you will need to replace the hard drive.  To confirm, press F12 at startup, enter the Dell diagnostics.  Run an extended hard drive test.

    If the system is under warranty, logs the error and contact Dell for a replacement drive.

    If the system is out of warranty, any standard 3.5 "SATA drive will work as a replacement.

  • SMART short self-test has expired

    I got a warning when I ran the Dell Media Center PC Auditor on my 1720 running Windows Vista Home Premium SP2 indicating the short SMART Self Snac4.1 error x04 Timed Out.  I don't know what is SMART or what is talking about this warning.  Can I fix?  It is important and why?  Thanks, Chuck

    No, selftest hp error code, if it times out. If you want to check your hard disk, ml 1640 internal error false the diagnostics Dell drivers and Utilities disc.

  • I have a G62-355DX laptop and is 11 months old. and it won't start. It has error codes

    I have a G62-355DX laptop and is 11 months old. and it won't start. There error codes when I do a test of the system. DST short: failure failure ID: RTX6T9-5B75S5-XD003F - S 60, 903.

    Product ID: XH068UA #ABA

    Hello

    As the error code relates to a short drive Self Test failure - the only real solution to this is to replace the hard drive.

    As your laptop is still under warranty, contact HP to make arrangements for the replaced disk.

    If you live in the United States, contact HP here.

    If you are in another part of the world, begin here.

    Kind regards

    DP - K

  • LENOVO Thinkpad x 201 result code projection hardware test: WHD01V002-WK5CCH

    Hello. I scanned mysystem using LSC and iut gave me the following result

    Storage devices

    Display nameSAMSUNG HM160HI - 149,05 GB
    ManufacturerSamsung
    ModelSAMSUNG HM160HI
    SerialS18PJDNS104726
    FirmwareHH100-12
    Size149.05 GB
    Cache8,00 MBs
    Temperature42 C
    Physical sector size512
    Logical sector size512
    Logical sectors312581808
    Supported standardsATA8-ACS, ATA7-ATAPI ATAPI ATA6, ATA5-ATAPI ATA4-ATAPI
    Spec versionATA-ATAPI-7 T13 1532D version 0
    Partition schemeMBR
    Index 1
    Partition typePrimary
    File systemIFS, HPFS, NTFS, exFAT
    LabelSystem reserved
    Mount pointG:\
    Serial264D 6489
    Size100.00 MBs
    Used28.33 MBs
    Free71,66 MBs
    Index 2
    Partition typePrimary
    File systemIFS, HPFS, NTFS, exFAT
    Mount pointC:\
    SerialCC638811
    Size38,96 GBs
    Used34,45 GBs
    Free4.51 GBs
    Index 3
    Partition typePrimary
    File systemIFS, HPFS, NTFS, exFAT
    LabelNew Volume
    Mount pointD:\
    Serial7E3BE8F9
    Size109,98 GBs
    Used15.77 GBs
    Free94.21 GBs
    Diagnosis
    Test of the SMART StatePast
    Targeted reading testFailed
    Try to search randomlyPast
    Funnel Seek TestPast
    Short what SMART self-testWarning
    Drive SMART what self-test

    Warning

    can someone please guide me selftest hp error code should I do?

    First of all, it's a good idea to remove your serial number of the position. Points to a failure perhaps diagnostics hard drive. (the part that stores data on the pc). Make sure that you keep good backups of your data in case it failed completely. Then, you must contact lenovo and do a warranty claim so that they can watch or advise you in consequence or may contact an authorized service center.

  • Error code 2000-0146 and 0F00:065 D and B 0F00:137

    I have a Dell Studio 1735 laptop.  Today it froze on me.  I could only make a hard stop.  I tried to log in again and got on the desktop with icons, but couldn't go further.  Don't have hard stop yet and I tried to go back to the top.  I made a kind of diagnostic tests and received the error code 2000-0146 following.  Also received the 0F00:065 D error reading DISK_0-self-test and 0F00:137 B DVDRW_1-disk is missing Virgin insert the data disc (example of the RCD).  I don't know what all these means.  Can someone direct me if selftest hp error code can be repaired and how I can fix it.  Or do I need a new hard drive.  Your help is greatly appreciated.  I use another laptop to write this message.

    The first two messages mean that the hard drive has failed. The third says there is no disc in the DVD drive, so it could not be tested.

  • PC Doctor has no error codes

    Help!

    2006 HPc1487c w/2 x 1 GB + 2 x 500 memory abandons geezer year old ghosts and this78 soon to follow.  But made a full recovery and was able to run PC-Doctor, who advised: on the system memory:

    Has no auxiliary fault model Test ME516-3W code

    Checkerboard Test ME516-15W error code

    Market the error code a test of law ME516-18W

    Error code bit low test ME516-14W

    Waling error code a try on the left ME516-17W

    then prompty died again.  Logic tells me that a module of memory went bye bye.  Can someone tell me precisely on these error codes.  Thank you

    rmorrp

    Matched pair means; same manufacturer, same chip type, same size, same CASE, etc.   Would you buy a pair as two memory DIMMs together.  You might have the same 512 MB DIMM in blue locations and the two dimms of 1 GB in black locations.  I balanced in blue locations and matched pairs slots black and they are different manufacturers in my m9200t system. However, I took care to ensure that both ca and tension were the same (Samsung and Kingston DIMM).

    I have Roxio EMC 9, creator of 2009 and 2010 of creator.  EMC 9 went sqlite error code 19 2.5 years ago.  EMC 9 has written for 32-bit operating systems, and it will not more than 3 GB even recognize on an operating system to 64-bit with more than 3 GB.

  • How to copy Step.Result.Error.Code in the local Variable

    How can I copy Step.Result.Error.Code to a stage in particulat to a local variable.

    I want to print the value of Step.Result.Error.Code in my test report.

    Help, selftest hp error code, please. Thanks in advance.

    Kind regards

    Sagar Joshi

    Yes of course!

    This is better handled by the recall of SequenceFilePostStepRuntimeError:

    (1) StepResultCode (number) is added FileGlobals

    (2) add SequenceFilePostStepRuntimeError callback to your movie file

    (3) the next stage of the declaration adds the recall of SequenceFilePostStepRuntimeError :

    FileGlobals.StepErrorCode = Parameters.Step.Result.Error.Code

    Here is an overview of the sequence:

    I hope this helps.

  • Error code 643 update (Microsoft Silverlight KB979202)

    Update for Microsoft Silverlight (KB979202) fails with the error code 643; several test update.

    You can.

    1 post in this forum instead: http://forums.silverlight.net/forums/13.aspx

    2 'hide' the update; or.

    3 uninstall Silverlight, reboot, and then install the current version via this page: http://www.microsoft.com/silverlight/ ~ Robear Dyer (PA Bear) ~ MS MVP (that is to say, mail, security, Windows & Update Services) since 2002 ~ WARNING: MS MVPs represent or work for Microsoft

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