Seagete r/w status 2 r/w error 84150180

seagete r/w status 2 r/w error 84150180

Seagate Sata Hdd lerde Bir Sabah Pcnizi Açtığınızda Hdd gelen Garip sesler yada R/W Status 2 R/W Error 84150180. F3 2>U Error 1009 DETSEC 00006008. Hi, I have a Seagate Momentus 5400.6 ST9320325AS that suddenly Elapsed Time 12.227 secs. R/W Status 2 R/W Error 84150180. F3 2>. F3 2>U. Error 1009 DETSEC 00006008. Spin Error. Elapsed Time 31.324 secs. R/W Status 2 R/W Error 84150180.

Related Videos

Seagate Hard Drive Data Recovery by Swapping Boards and Firmware

Seagete r/w status 2 r/w error 84150180 - and shame!

Hard drive firmware is about the last place you want to find a bug. But that turned out to be the problem with [BBfoto’s] Seagate HDD which he was using in a RAID array. It stopped working completely, and he later found out the firmware has a bug that makes the drive think it’s permanently in a busy state. There’s a firmware upgrade available, but you have to apply it before the problem shows its face, otherwise you’re out of luck. Some searching led him to a hardware fix for the problem.

[Brad Garcia] put together the tutorial which illustrates the steps needed to unbrick the 7200.11 hard drive with the busy state bug. The image in the lower right shows the drive with a piece of paper between the PCB and the connectors which control the head. This is necessary to boot the drive without it hanging due to the bug. From there he issues serial commands to put it into Access Level 2, then removes the cardboard for the rest of the fix.

In the tutorial [Brad] uses a serial-TTL converter. [BBfoto] grabbed an Arduino instead, using it as a USB-ttl bridge.

FAQ

Looks like Solid-State drives will be keeping us busy. Got in a 160GB SSD with a blown diode and was able to recover. Same for a 64GB. Then, I just got in a 256GB one that is completely dead as well. It's a Crucial drive, and they apparently are having a ton of problems with these just dying out. I haven't found the dead link in this particular drive yet. Still working on it. Anyone else starting to get in SS drives? yep they are failing bigtime these new solid state drive infact they fail more then the normal hard drives. parts over heat and bang goes the diodes gtd4242 wrote: Got in a 160GB SSD with a blown diode and was able to recover. Same for a 64GB. Then, I just got in a 256GB one that is completely dead as well. It's a Crucial drive, and they apparently are having a ton of problems with these just dying out. I haven't found the dead link in this particular drive yet. Still working on it. Anyone else starting to get in SS drives? What symptoms do you have with the blown diodes? So far I have seen a 32GB SSD Expresscard, shows ID but no access to data, recovered this by removing NANDs - it has simple UT163 controller, 2 Samsung SSD drives, 64GB and 128GB, both fail to ID but customer requested these back before I could work with them, and a 128GB Kingston SSD. This shows ID but no access. Will work on this one today or tomorrow. This would be a good topic for closed discussion ________________ You don't have to backup all of your data, just the data you want to keep. hddguy wrote: What symptoms do you have with the blown diodes? So far I have seen a 32GB SSD Expresscard, shows ID but no access to data, recovered this by removing NANDs - it has simple UT163 controller, 2 Samsung SSD drives, 64GB and 128GB, both fail to ID but customer requested these back before I could work with them, and a 128GB Kingston SSD. This shows ID but no access. Will work on this one today or tomorrow. The diode issues seem to result in no access to the drive at all, and I mean no drive ID or anything. On the first couple of cases I got in, I just sat down with my multi-meter and tested each component. My customer on this Crucial 256GB drive is getting impatient, so I may not have time to figure out exactly what the problem is there. Same thing though, drive is not recognized. It will recognize when I flip the switch to flash the firmware, but even then it's not recognizing properly, just the raw id from the ROM. drc wrote: This would be a good topic for closed discussion Agreed :) ________________

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Seagate 7200.11 Bios error

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chuck kingery

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Sep 2, 2011, 10:56:27 PM9/2/11

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to DataRecoveryCertification

I have what I believed to be the normal bios problem with a Seagate
OEM drive (ST3750630AS). It wasn't recognized by the system and
stayed BSY on Deepspar. I was running through the documented process
and received the following error:

F3 T>/2

F3 2>Z

Spin Down Complete
Elapsed Time 0.143 msecs
F3 2>U

Error 1009 DETSEC 00006008
Spin Error
Elapsed Time 31.530 secs
R/W Status 2 R/W Error 84150180


From here I ran a cross a trick from a google search where you wait
until the drive spins down before "Z" is entered which seemed to
work... I received the following:

F3 T>/2

F3 2>Z

Spin Down Complete
Elapsed Time 0.144 msecs
{Remove insulator card}
F3 2>U

Spin Up Complete
Elapsed Time 10.165 secs
F3 2>

So now I proceed with power down, wait, power on and I don't get the
chance to type (ctrl-z) before I start seeing:

LED:000000CC FAddr:00249F05
LED:000000CC FAddr:00249F05
LED:000000CC FAddr:00249F05

I did try and cheat a bit on the five second wait and can get a (ctrl-
z) in and the /1... even the N1 but the errors start again with the
same code. Any ideas on where I can go from here?... or more likely
what I missed :)

Any help would be greatly appreciated.
Chuck

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chuck kingery

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Sep 3, 2011, 2:11:32 AM9/3/11

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Question withdrawn... it would appear that the power down of the drive
after the U command was unnecessary. I went directly into /1 then N1,
then did the power off and on and everything worked fine. I executed
the m0,2,2,0,0,0,0,22 and I am copying data off the drive now :)
USBdeview tells me its connected but wont show a serial number.

USB device viewer doesn't tell me much but here is exactly what it says which is a lot less than other devices connected:

---===>Device Information<===---
*!*ERROR: no String Descriptor for index 11!

ConnectionStatus:
Current Config Value: 0x01 -> Device Bus Speed: High
Device Address: 0x01
Open Pipes: 2

===>Endpoint Descriptor<===
bLength: 0x07
bDescriptorType: 0x05
bEndpointAddress: 0x81 -> Direction: IN - EndpointID: 1
bmAttributes: 0x02 -> Bulk Transfer Type
wMaxPacketSize: 0x0200 = 0x200 max bytes
bInterval: 0x00

===>Endpoint Descriptor<===
bLength: 0x07
bDescriptorType: 0x05
bEndpointAddress: 0x02 -> Direction: OUT - EndpointID: 2
bmAttributes: 0x02 -> Bulk Transfer Type
wMaxPacketSize: 0x0200 = 0x200 max bytes
bInterval: 0x00

===>Device Descriptor<===
bLength: 0x12
bDescriptorType: 0x01
bcdUSB: 0x0200
bDeviceClass: 0x00 -> This is an Interface Class Defined Device
bDeviceSubClass: 0x00
bDeviceProtocol: 0x00
bMaxPacketSize0: 0x40 = (64) Bytes
idVendor: 0x059B = Iomega Corporation
idProduct: 0x0470
bcdDevice: 0x0000
iManufacturer: 0x01
*!*ERROR: no String Descriptor for index 1!
iProduct: 0x0B
*!*ERROR: no String Descriptor for index 11!
iSerialNumber: 0x03
*!*ERROR: no String Descriptor for index 3!
bNumConfigurations: 0x01



The actual SN on the front of the drive is 5SX1H5AK, PN: 9EV134-500, FW: SD03

I can take the drive out of the enclosure but I would need to buy separate sata power and data cables as I have none to test with.

Thanks for this info pal, it is much appreciated

fzabkar :

ISTM that the drive does in fact have internal problems, possibly a damaged firmware module.

What do UVCView or USBDeview tell you?

http://www.nirsoft.net/utils/usb_devices_view.html
http://download.microsoft.com/download/e/b/a/eba1050f-a31d-436b-9281- 92cdfeae4b45/UVCView.x64.exe
http://www.users.on.net/~fzabkar/USB_IDs/UVCView.x86.exe

The usual advice would be to remove the drive from its enclosure and retest it via a SATA port on your computer's motherboard. However, some USB powered drives integrate the USB electronics on the HDD PCB, in which case a SATA test would not be possible. UVCView should tell us if this is the case, though.

What is the model number of your drive?



 

HDD crash - hard lesson to swallow....

I have an HP desktop with a 1TB Seagate drive that I installed a few years ago. Long story but here goes....

My laptop had contracted a virus so I took it to a local guy who works on computers. He found the virus, cleaned up the machine and installed a newer virus protection. I mentioned to him that my desktop machine which runs 24/7 sometimes takes a long time to boot up if you happen to shut it down or do a reboot from installing updates etc. He mentioned that it too may have a virus or trojan since both computers share the network blah blah blah....

So I took my machine to him. Several days and excuses go by and it's not done yet. Says there were a lot of trojans on the machine. So finally after a week without I told him I at least needed the data off the hard drive onto a portable drive. He said ok. So I go over to his place with the portable drive and he was going to show me what he had done so far. Well the machine wouldn't boot up. Acted very strange. He says "don't worry your data is safe and he'll get it off." Fast forward 4 more days. Doesn't return calls. Won't answer the phone. So I am figuring he is in over his head and we have trouble. I finally get a hold of him today and told him that I just want it all back. He of course agrees. All he could say was "Sorry". I wanted to wring his neck!

So now I take the hard drive to a computer store in town and ask if they could retrieve the data. They hook up the drive and all it does is go "click, click, click... click" then spins down. Computer won't recognize it. He says there is a fault with the drive most likely mechanical.

So now what? Data recovery service is very expensive (quoted $1200 - $1800 from Seagate) and there are no guarantees that they will get anything back.

So lesson learned the hard way- Yes I should have backed up the data prior to taking it over but I also blame him for not doing so as well. How he let it go from a working unit to junk torks me off. He tried various software and even putting in freezer to try and revive it.

I have been reading online about swapping the disk platter(s) to a working drive of the exact model. I know all the precautions about cleanliness etc. but wondered if anyone has ever tried that?

Or any other solution?

All those pictures etc that I don't have any other copies of....

:(

Seagate 7200.11 Bios error

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chuck kingery

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Sep 2, 2011, 10:56:27 PM9/2/11

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to DataRecoveryCertification

I have what I believed to be the normal bios problem with a Seagate
OEM drive (ST3750630AS). It wasn't recognized by the system and
stayed BSY on Deepspar. I was running through the documented process
and received the following error:

F3 T>/2

F3 2>Z

Spin Down Complete
Elapsed Time 0.143 msecs
F3 2>U

Error 1009 DETSEC 00006008
Spin Error
Elapsed Time 31.530 secs
R/W Status 2 R/W Error 84150180


From here I ran a cross a trick from a google search where you wait
until the drive spins down before "Z" is entered which seemed to
work. I received the following:

F3 T>/2

F3 2>Z

Spin Down Complete
Elapsed Time 0.144 msecs
{Remove insulator card}
F3 2>U

Spin Up Complete
Elapsed Time 10.165 secs
F3 2>

So now I proceed with power down, wait, power on and I don't get the
chance to type (ctrl-z) before I start seeing:

LED:000000CC FAddr:00249F05
LED:000000CC FAddr:00249F05
LED:000000CC FAddr:00249F05

I did try and seagete r/w status 2 r/w error 84150180 a bit on the five second wait and can get a (ctrl-
z) in and the /1. even the N1 but the errors start again with the
same code. Any ideas on where I can go from here?. or more likely
what I missed :)

Any help would be greatly appreciated.
Chuck

chuck kingery's profile photo

chuck kingery

unread,
Sep 3, 2011, 2:11:32 AM9/3/11

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to DataRecoveryCertification

Question withdrawn. it would appear that the power down of the drive
after the U command was unnecessary. I went directly into /1 then N1,
then did the power off and on and everything worked fine, seagete r/w status 2 r/w error 84150180. I executed
the m0,2,2,0,0,0,0,22 and I am copying data off the drive now :)

Hard drive firmware is about the last place you want to find a bug. But that turned out to be the problem with [BBfoto’s] Seagate HDD which he was using in a RAID array. It stopped working completely, and he later found out the firmware has a bug that makes the drive think it’s permanently in a busy state. There’s a firmware upgrade available, but you have to apply it before the problem shows its face, otherwise you’re out of luck. Some searching led him to a hardware fix for the problem.

[Brad Garcia] put together terrorist takedown war in colombia.iso tutorial which illustrates the steps needed to unbrick the 7200.11 hard drive with the busy state bug. The image in the lower right shows the drive with a piece of paper between the PCB and the connectors which control the head. This is necessary to boot the drive without it hanging due to the bug. From there he issues serial commands to put it into Access Level 2, then removes the cardboard for the rest of the fix.

In the tutorial [Brad] uses a serial-TTL converter. [BBfoto] grabbed an Arduino instead, using it as a USB-ttl bridge.

HDD crash - hard lesson to swallow.

I have an HP desktop with a 1TB Seagate drive that I installed a few years ago. Long story but seagete r/w status 2 r/w error 84150180 goes.

My laptop had contracted a virus so I took it to a local guy who works on computers. He found the virus, cleaned up the machine and installed a newer virus protection. I mentioned to him that my desktop machine which runs 24/7 sometimes takes a long time to boot up if you happen to shut it down or do a reboot from installing updates etc. He mentioned that it too may have a virus or trojan since both computers share the network blah blah blah.

So I took my machine to him. Several days and excuses go by and it's not done yet. Says there were a lot of trojans on the access overflow error. So finally after a week without I told him I at least needed the data off the hard drive onto a portable drive. He said ok. So I go over to his place with the portable drive and he was going to show me what he had done so far. Well the machine wouldn't boot up. Acted very strange. He says "don't worry your data is safe and he'll get it off." Fast forward 4 more org.freedesktop.dbus.error.noreply did not receive a reply. Doesn't return calls. Won't answer the phone. So I am figuring he is in over his head and we have trouble. I finally get a hold of him today seagete r/w status 2 r/w error 84150180 told him that I just want it all back. He of course agrees. All he could say was "Sorry". I wanted to wring his neck!

So now I take the hard drive to a computer store in town and ask if they could retrieve the data, seagete r/w status 2 r/w error 84150180. They hook up the drive and all it does is go "click, click, click. click" then spins down. Computer won't recognize it. He says there is a fault with the drive most likely mechanical.

So now what? Data recovery service is very expensive (quoted $1200 - $1800 from Seagate) and there are no guarantees that they will get anything back.

So lesson learned the hard way- Yes I should have backed up the data prior to taking it over but I also blame him for not doing so as well. How he seagete r/w status 2 r/w error 84150180 it go from a working unit to junk torks me off. He tried various software and even putting in freezer to try and revive it.

I have been reading online about swapping the disk platter(s) to a working drive of the exact model. I know all the precautions about cleanliness etc. but wondered if anyone has ever tried that?

Or any other solution?

All those pictures etc that I don't have any other copies of.

:(

FAQ

Looks like Solid-State drives will be keeping us busy. Got in a 160GB SSD with a blown diode and was able to recover. Same for a 64GB. Then, I just got in a 256GB one that is completely dead as well. It's a Crucial drive, and they apparently are having a ton of problems with these just dying out. I haven't found the dead link in this particular drive yet. Still working on it. Anyone else starting to get in SS drives? yep they are failing bigtime these new solid state drive infact they fail more then the normal hard drives. parts over heat and bang goes the diodes gtd4242 wrote: Got in a 160GB SSD with a blown diode and was able to recover. Same for a 64GB. Then, I just got in a 256GB one that is completely dead as well. It's a Crucial drive, and they apparently are having a ton of problems with these seagete r/w status 2 r/w error 84150180 dying out. I haven't found the dead link in this particular drive yet. Still working on it. Anyone else starting to get in SS drives? What symptoms do you have with the blown diodes? So far I have seen a 32GB SSD Expresscard, shows ID but no access to data, recovered this by removing NANDs - seagete r/w status 2 r/w error 84150180 has simple UT163 controller, 2 Samsung SSD drives, 64GB and 128GB, both fail to ID but customer requested these back before I could work with them, and a 128GB Kingston SSD. This shows ID but no access. Will work on this one today or tomorrow. This would be a good topic for closed discussion ________________ You don't have to backup all of your data, just the data you want to dma error system halted. hddguy wrote: What symptoms do you have with the blown diodes? So far I have seen a 32GB SSD Expresscard, shows ID but no access to data, recovered this by removing NANDs - it has simple UT163 controller, 2 Samsung SSD drives, 64GB and 128GB, both fail to ID but customer requested these back before I could work with them, and a 128GB Kingston SSD. This shows ID but no access. Will work on this one today or tomorrow. The diode issues seem to result in no access to the drive at all, and I mean no drive ID or anything. On the first couple of cases I got in, I just sat down with my multi-meter and tested each component. My customer on this Crucial 256GB drive is getting impatient, so I may not have time to figure out exactly what the problem is there, seagete r/w status 2 r/w error 84150180. Same thing though, drive is not recognized. It will recognize when I flip the switch to flash the firmware, but even then it's not recognizing properly, just the raw id from the ROM. drc wrote: This would be a good topic for closed discussion Agreed :) ________________

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Recent Posts

A few weeks back, my 1TB Seagate Barracuda 7200.11 disk bricked suddenly.  It happened after a reboot.  The computer stuck on POST trying to detect the disk, and the disk activity LED was on steady, but it just would not recognize the disk.  With SATA power cable connected I could feel the disk spinning inside, which told me it was not a mechanical problem, but the computer just would not recognize it no matter what I did (including putting it into an enclosure and plugging into another computer).  It looked very disturbing at first but after some research it turned out to be a common problem with a bug in the firmware and there is a fix for it.  The bug manifests in 2 symtoms: the LBA=0 problem and the BSY problem.  For the former, the disk is recognized by the computer but it shows the capacity as 0, and for the latter, the computer doesn’t detect the disk at all, which is the case I encountered.

The general steps for fixing the BSY problem are roughly the following:

1. Rig a cable, typically with USB on one end to plug into a computer, and 3 wires on the other end to plug into jumper pins (TX, RX, and GND) on the disk.

2. Loosen the PCB (Printed Circuit Board) of the disk with a Torx 6 screw driver.

3. Insert a non-conductive layer between the PCB and the chip on the disk so they no longer contact.

4. Power on the disk.

5. Use a terminal program on the computer to send a couple of  low level commands to the disk to spin it down

6. While the power is still on, remove the non-conductive layer so the PCB and the chip make contact.

7. Use the terminal program to send a few more commands to the disk to spin it up, and erase the S.M.A.R.T. data.

8. power cycle the disk

9. Use the terminal program to re-create the partition data.

HDD-Parts sells a repair kit for $49.99, but I was hoping for some more affordable methods.  There are several Youtube videos showing how it can be done.  Quite a few of them suggest to modify a Nokia CA-42 award bios power error by cutting off the phone connector end and crimping 3 RS232 connector pins to the wires.  I spent $13 for the cable, $9 for a crimper, and $5 for a RS232 DB9 female connector. While it looked easy on the videos, it didn’t work too well for me.   One problem was all these instructions out there used HyperTerminal as the terminal program, seagete r/w status 2 r/w error 84150180, but Microsoft stopped bundling it for Windows Vista and later.  This was not a big deal because puTTY works just equally well.  Another problem was that the RS232 DB9 pins I got were way too big for the jumper pins on the disks to fit snuggly and they easily fell off.  What I really need were “jumper headers” as I found out later, but the local Radio Shack was disappointing (the guy worked there swore they didn’t carry any DB9 crimpers until I grabbed one off the shelf and asked him what it was).  But the bigger problem was that Windows (vista and 7) kept using the Prolific USB-to-Serial driver for the cable.  The name of the driver sounded convincing but I just could not get the communication going.  Worse, the videos also instructed to crack open the USB connector so people could tell which wire is which (TX, RX, GND), but the wires were apache php http 500 error thin that after a few moves they broke off from the solder, and I had to toss it into the trash since I didn’t feel like buying a soldering set.

Later someone told me to check out the driver on the mini-CD that came with the Nokia CA-42 cable.  Honestly I didn’t even notice the mini-CD until the cable was in the trash can, so I couldn’t verify that driver worked any better.

Luckily, googling a bit more pointed me to the MSFN forum on how to fix the problem, and since it is a forum, it is interactive, which means there are people who could help when we run into weird situations (many many thanks to jaclaz!!).  The forum also pointed me to a fix kit on eBay for $19.99.  The item listing on eBay recommends to use the VCP (Virtual COM port) driver for the kit, but it was buried under a ton of pictures and I literally missed it until jaclaz pointed it out to me (thanks again!!).

The instructions on the forum are great except for one part.  Instead of steps 3 ~ 6 listed above, it suggests readers to practice how to remove and re-attach the PCB board while the power is on.  It runs a high risk of short-circuiting the PCB because it is very easy to drop these tiny metal screws, and socket error 10013 windows they fell on the wrong spot, the PCB would become an FCB, fried circuit board.  So DON’T do that.  Take steps 3 ~ 6 instead which is much safer.  The instructions also uses HyperTerminal as the example terminal program, but I will show you how to use puTTY instead.

Disconnect the bricked disk from any power source.  Use the Torx 6 screw driver to remove the PCB board from the disk.  You will see a small chip on the disk.  Cut a strip of anti-static bag, or as the videos suggest, cut a strip of some plastic card (don’t use any paper-based cards because they can be torn easily when you try to pull them out later), and cover the chip, and leave enough leads to the right side of the disk for you to grab and pull later.  Re-attach the PCB board, but don’t tighten these screws too much, especially not on the right side where the non-conductive strip is jammed in between so you can pull out the strip.  You will have 1 extra screw left out because it should go into the middle of the chip and the chip is now covered — don’t lose the screw.

The repair kit was easy to use — I plugged the USB connector to my computer, the 3 wires to the disk jumper pins (make sure you connect GND to GND, TX to RX, and RX to TX).  Windows seagete r/w status 2 r/w error 84150180 trouble finding the driver on its own, but I only needed to point it to the VCP driver I downloaded.  Once the driver is properly installed, log into Windows as an administrative user, go to control panel, Device Manager, and locate the serial port device.  Right click on it, go into properties, and change its baud rate from the default 9600 to 38400.  Also note the COM port it is using.  On mine, it is COM4.

I found it easy to do this with a desktop computer.  An eSATA cable from a laptop doesn’t seem to provide enough current to even power on the disk.  Remove the side panel from the tower case so you have direct access to its SATA power cable.  Plug the SATA power to the bricked disk.  You should be able to feel the disk spinning by slightly lifting it with seagete r/w status 2 r/w error 84150180 hands — there is a certain vibration, and also if you try to turn the disk you can feel a drag due to gyroscopic resistance.

Run puTTY.  On the configuration dialog box, make sure to select the radio button that says “Serial”  [1].  Enter the correct COM port number noted earlier in “Serial line” [2], and 38400 in “Speed” [3].  I highly recommend saving this session by providing seagete r/w status 2 r/w error 84150180 meaningful name in “Saved Sessions” [4] and click the “Save” button [5].  After you have done all that, click on “Serial” under “Connection” in the Category tree on the left side [6].  It shows some options for the serial connection.  Change “Flow control” to “None” [7], seagete r/w status 2 r/w error 84150180, and click on “Session” on the left side again [8].  Then click on “Save” button one more time to save the session for later use [5].

Click the “Open” button to open the connection.  You will see a blank window.  If everything was done correctly, pressing “Ctrl-Z”  will show you the prompt.

F3 T>

Type the command below followed by <Enter> to go to level 2

F3 T>/2 <Enter>

And your prompt should now change to

F3 2>

Now you need to spin down the disk by typing the command below, but wait for several seconds before hitting <Enter>

F3 2>Z <wait for several seconds before hitting Enter>

And seagete r/w status 2 r/w error 84150180 should see

F3 2>Z <wait for several seconds before hitting Enter> Spin Down Complete Elapsed Time 0.135 msecs <the time may vary here> F3 2>

People have reported (including me) that if you hit <Enter> too soon after the Z command, you may see some error codes such as:

F3 2>Z <Enter immediately after typing Z> LED:000000CE FAddr:00280569 LED:000000CE FAddr:00280569

One guy has even reported that it is enough to just type Z without even hitting <Enter>, and he just back spaced and erased Z after feeling that the disk spinned down. I didn’t try that.

If you successfully spinned down the disk, you are ready for the most important part: keep the power on to the disk and pull out the non-conductive strip you sandwiched between the PCB and the chip earlier. And tighten all the screws that are already in (so you still have the 1 laying around. Don’t worry about this screw for now), seagete r/w status 2 r/w error 84150180. Still be careful at this step because you don’t want to accidentally skid the tip of your screw driver on the PCB to fry it. This ensures the PCB provides enough current to the disk motor so it will spin up correctly.

Use the following command to spin up the disk

F3 2>U <Enter>

and if everything was correct, you should see something like

F3 2>U <Enter> Spin Up Complete Elapsed Time 7.093 secs <the time may vary here> F3 2>

I was lucky enough to have encountered a problem at this stage because I didn’t tighten the screws at the first attempt, and the motor wasn’t able to draw enough current.  It gave me the following output:

F3 2>U <Enter> Error 1009 DETSEC 00006008 Spin Error Elapsed Time 31.324 secs R/W Status 2 R/W Error 84150180

If you encountered that, make sure you have tightened the screws and try again.

Once the disk has been spinned up successfully, change to level 1 using the following command:

F3 2>/1 <Enter>

and your prompt should change to

F3 1>

Now reset the S.M.A.R.T. data using the following command:

F3 1>N1 <Enter>

If everyone was correctly done, it would not output anything and only show you another prompt.  However, because of the loose screws, the motor wasn’t spinned up correctly for me during my first attempt, yet I failed to notice the error messages from the U command.  So when I continued on with the N1 command, I got the following output:

F3 1>N1 <Enter> Unable to load Diag Overlay

If you see this, STOP.  Power off the disk, re-sandwich the non-conductive strip and START FROM THE BEGINNING.  I was bald enough to go on even after seeing the error message and I will tell you what happened in just a bit.

If erasing S.M.A.R.T. was successful, power off the disk also.  Wait for the disk to completely stop (several seconds), and power it back on.  You need to reconnect a terminal session to the disk, press Ctrl-Z.  Now do the last command to re-create partition data (there are 5 commas between the second “2” and the last “22”):

F3 T>m0,2,2,,,22 (enter)

This command takes a while to execute. If everything was right, you will eventually see some output like the following:

Max Wr Retries = 00, Max Rd Retries = 00, Max ECC T-Level = 14, Max Certify Rewrite Retries = 00C8 User Partition Format 5% complete, Zone 00, Pass 00, LBA 00004339, ErrCode 00000080, Elapsed Time 0 mins 05 secs User Partition Format Successful - Elapsed Time 0 mins 05 secs

Now you have your disk back. Power off the disk. Disconnect the COM cable. Put the last screw back in, make sure all screws are tightened, copy all the data from this disk to another disk, and apply the latest firmware from Seagate (perform this as the last step because updating firmware is risky too, you only want to do this after you have copied the data to another disk).
Because I wasn’t paying attention during my first attempt, seagete r/w status 2 r/w error 84150180, I tried to re-create the partition data even when the motor spin-up wasn’t successful, and the disk started to give out a horrible “click click click” noise and I thought my disk was doomed for sure. It turned out to be okay, but I wouldn’t recommend such risks.

In any case, if a step fails, you are more than likely need to power off the disk and start from the beginning. If you are uncertain about something, don’t rush head-on first. Go to MSFN and ask jaclaz and all the good folks there first. We want you to be a happy bunny in the basket.

Looking back, I was debating with myself if I should’ve bought the $49.99 repair kit from HDD-parts.com.  Because I ended up paying something close to that price anyways ($13 + $9 + $5 + $19.99).  But I decided it was a good thing I didn’t because the $49.99 repair kit is only half the story — I may not have found the MSFN forum had it not been the failed attempt with the CA-42 cable, and I would still run into the problems I encountered later and there would be no one helping me in these situations and might have mistakenly thought the disk was not rescueable and give up on it.  Again, many many thanks to jaclaz and other folks!!

Posted in Computers and InternetTagged barracuda, bsy, bug, firmware, hardware, hdd, seagate

I received a Seagate 7200.11 hard disk in a BSY (busy) state. The hard disk drive spins, but it’s completely invisible to the BIOS. Apparently all these models are affected by a bug in the drive’s firmware: ST31000340AS, ST3500320AS, ST3750330AS and others too.

I found this very well written guide on how to fix the BSY state on Seagate 7200.11 drive. I needed some sort of serial TTL adapter to hook up to the drive’s serial port, but didn’t have one at hand. Then I remembered that I have an Arduino clone Freeduino lying around and I knew that it already has a FTDI chip that does the USB to serial conversion for the Atmega chip. Ok, so it’s not technically Arduino AVR chip used to fix the drive, just the board.

I removed the Atmega IC from the Freeduino board, hooked it up to an oscilloscope and tada! USB to serial rx errors count 958, but it’s 5V. No worries, just need a basic voltage divider for the RX line on the drive to drop aapt android error down to roughly 3.3V. There is no need for the voltage divider on the TX line from the drive, because FTDI chip understands 3.3V as HIGH input.

A quick schematic to hook everything up seagete r/w status 2 r/w error 84150180 below. Please note, that PIN0 is used for TX and PIN1 is used for RX!

A quick check on the oscilloscope to make sure that voltage is in accepted range:

I didn’t have proper connector for the drives serial pins, so made my own:

The metal plates were taken out of another connector that I had lying around, I soldered pins to make it easier to plug the wires into the breadboard.

Then I simply used the COM port registered by the Arduino/Freeduino board’s FTDI chip to communicate with the hard drive and recover it from BSY state with the guide mentioned at the beginning of the post to fix the drive.

I also got into one road block. When I was trying to spin up the drive I got the following error:

F3 2>U Error 1009 DETSEC 00006008 Spin Error Elapsed Time 22.207 secs R/W Status 2 R/W Error 84150180

This happened because the HDD connectors did not properly hook up to the logic board when I removed the piece of paper.  They seemed to be very oxidized. I had to shut everything down, take out the board and scrape the contacts with a very sharp knife and start over.

Once the data is recovered, seagete r/w status 2 r/w error 84150180, I don’t recommend using the drive and suggest properly disposing of it.

A few more links about fixing this issue using alternative hardware:

Look Like Bad Heads To You Guys?

I'm pretty sure this drive has bad heads, but just looking for some confirmation. It spins up, I hear repeated SA accessing in a rhythmic repeating pattern (almost like clicking but softer). Then it comes ready and allows terminal. Here's what I get in terminal though:

Rst 0x08M
RW cmd 002F req = 18 F0 9F E5 18 F0 9F E5 18 F0 9F E5 18 F0 9F E5 18 F0 9F E5 00 00 A0 E1
opts = 00000000

RW Err = 84150180

ASCII Diag mode

F3 T>/7

F3 7>X

LED:000000CC FAddr:0025B437
LED:000000CC FAddr:0025B437

Click to expand.


Then it locks and needs power cycle. After power cycle when attempting to spin down/up and read any defect lists I get this:

Rst 0x08M
ASCII Diag mode

F3 T>
RW cmd 002F req = 18 F0 9F E5 18 F0 9F E5 18 F0 9F E5 18 F0 9F E5 18 F0 9F E5 00 00 A0 E1
opts = 00000000

RW Err = 84150180

ASCII Diag mode

F3 T>/2

F3 2>Z

Spin Down Complete
Elapsed Time 0.129 msecs
F3 2>U

DiagError 00006008
Spin Error
Elapsed Time 17.257 secs
R/W Status 2 R/W Error 84150180
F3 2>/T

F3 T>V40

LED:000000CC FAddr:0027206F
LED:000000CC FAddr:0027206F

Click to expand.


I'm pretty sure R/W Error 84150180 is a servo error, anyone know that for sure?

 

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