Post errors occurs

post errors occurs

That post error appears and you have to re-apply the OC's FSB each time on a cold restart: My OC: 3.536Ghz ran 8 hours of prime95 blend test. How to Identify a POST Error · There is a constant or irregular beeping sound whenever you power on your computer. Some motherboards also have. An off-by-one error or off-by-one bug is a logic error involving the discrete equivalent of a boundary condition. It often occurs in computer programming. post errors occurs

Post errors occurs - what

Good Morning, before I start I want to apologise for repeating this topic, I am fully aware it is present on other threads, all of which I have read.

Around three weeks ago, I installed an Asus Xonar DSX 7.1 Surround Sound Card, onto my motherboard. Upon boot up, I see my motherboard splash screen, and then a blue screen. The following message occurs:

Post Error Occurs!
CMOS Checksum Error
Defaults Loaded
Press F1 to Continue

I am then given a choice of profiles which I can load, by selecting them with my arrow keys and hitting enter. I am also given the choice to load 'Last Known Good'.

Now, I know how this sounds, you will typically say CMOS Battery. Below is a list of the things I have tried:

Resetting and Reseating the CMOS Battery ( I have to remove the Sound Card to do this then replace it when I am finished)

Changing the CMOS Battery

Leaving my PC on for 12 hours

Removing the soundcard and booting without it.

Now, just to be clear, this issue happens on every boot, and a small 'click' can be heard, it sounds electrical, like something is discharging.

I am forced to manually reset the date and time every time I get to my desktop, and some of my icons do not show in the notification area, and my default programs (EVGA Precision X, Corsair Link) do not load.

If I try to reboot, even two or three times to get my default programs back, the date and time stays the same, but my PC Hangs terribly (task manager fails) on desktop, forcing me to reboot several times.

Now, I have been told that this could either be a motherboard or PSU Issue. I will list my specs below:

CPU: AMD FX 8320 - Black Edition Octo Core Processor (Vishera)
GPU: NVidia GeForce EVGA GTX 780ti SC (w/o ACX cooler) 3GB
Cooler: Corsair H100i Hydro Liquid Cooler
RAM: 16GH Corsair Vengeance 1333Mhz (2x8)
PSU: OCZ Vertex ZS Series 750W (Non Modular)
Motherboard: Gigabyte 970A-DS3
Boot Drive: OCZ Vertex 128GB SSD
Main Drive: Seagate Barracuda1TB 7200rpm HDD

This issue is driving me insane, and I refuse to believe that a CMOS battery could cause this because I have tried everything apart from jumping it (something which I am neither willing or confident enough to do) and even changing it didn't work, and yes I did use a 3V 2032.

Any help would be massively appreciated!

Thanks

Volta13

 

PC Won't POST? 4 Ways to Fix It

When you power on your computer, one major thing happens even before you see anything on the screen. It is called the power-on self-test (POST). Essentially, POST checks if all the components in your computer are working as they should. This includes input devices, RAM, CPU, motherboard, and graphics card. Your OS loads after all components pass the POST.

However, sometimes you can encounter a POST error, and it's always good to know how to deal with it.

How to Identify a POST Error

A power-on self-test error is usually easily identified. There are two primary symptoms of a POST failure:

  1. There is a constant or irregular beeping sound whenever you power on your computer. Some motherboards also have LED lights that flash if there is a POST error. Refer to the motherboard's manual to know for sure.
  2. Your computer turns on but doesn't load into the OS.

If you have any of these symptoms, the POST process has likely failed. The next step you should take is to figure out what component may be causing the issue. Luckily, motherboards have beep codes that can help you narrow down the problem. You can then deal with the issue effectively.

Related: What Is POST (Power-on Self Test)?

While beep codes differ across manufacturers, you can find them in the motherboard's manual or the official website. However, some beep codes are common across most manufacturers.

BEEP (FLASH) CODECAUSE
A single short beepPOST complete, no errors
A long beep followed by two short beepsDisplay adaptor issue
A long beep followed by three short beepsEnhanced graphics adaptor error
Three long beepsKeyboard card error
Two short beepsPOST error
Continuous beepPower supply unit (PSU), system board, RAM, or keyboard problem
A long beep followed by a short beepSystem board error

After determining the cause of the POST failure, refer to the fixes listed below to resolve the problem.

1. Double Check if All the Components Are Compatible

Incompatible components are one of the major reasons behind POST errors. Check if parts such as the RAM, motherboard, CPU, and graphics card are compatible with each other. In some cases, a motherboard firmware update may be required before installing a CPU.

It's always a good idea to run your build through a website such as PCPartPicker to check for incompatibilities.

2. Disconnect Newly Installed Hardware

One of the first things you should do to diagnose a POST error is disconnect newly installed hardware. Many a time, the hardware may not be compatible with your computer, resulting in a POST error. Disconnect any new peripherals and devices such as scanners or keyboards. After disconnecting them, start your computer again to see if the error persists.

Additionally, ensure that devices such as printers are plug and play (PnP) enabled before connecting them and starting your computer. Most new devices should be PnP enabled. If they're not, first boot your computer, then connect these devices. Finally, ensure you download and install the latest drivers for a hassle-free experience.

If you're sure that the hardware is compatible with your computer, it may be faulty, resulting in a POST failure.

2. Remove USB Drives, Discs, and Input Devices

If you have multiple USB drives or discs inserted in your computer, remove them and reboot your computer. Additionally, disconnect all input and output devices such as keyboards, mice, projectors, and printers. See if your computer boots up properly after doing this.

If your PC boots up as usual after doing this, check each peripheral individually. Just connect your mouse, and start your computer. If it does startup, do the same with your keyboard and so on. This way, you can figure out what device is causing the issue. There is also a chance that your computer boots up when each device is connected individually. This usually indicates a compatibility issue among the peripherals connected to your computer.

It is also a good idea to disconnect any LAN cables and external Wi-Fi and Bluetooth adaptors.

3. Swap RAM Slots Or Reinstall the RAM

Random access memory (RAM) errors are one of the primary reasons for a POST failure. Usually, they're quite easy to fix, provided you know your way around the innards of a computer. If you're using two RAM sticks, try swapping the slots and see if your computer boots up. Additionally, try starting your computer with only one RAM module slotted in.

Related: A Quick and Dirty Guide to RAM: What You Need to Know

If your PC boots up as it usually does, it may be worth checking the BIOS to see if it's properly configured to use dual-channel memory. If your RAM is more than five years old, a malfunction could also be in the picture.

4. Re-slot the Power Cables and Check the PSU

A POST failure could also occur due to a faulty power supply unit (PSU) or loose power cables. To resolve this, first disconnect all other cables from your motherboard, including peripherals such as the mouse and keyboard. Keep the power cable connected. Look for the CPU, and motherboard power connectors. Disconnect, and then reconnect the power connectors until they're snugly fit. It may take a little force from your side.

Ensure that the PSU has enough wattage to power your computer. If you have a mid-range computer, it's a good idea to have a 550 Watt PSU, at the minimum. If you have an adequate PSU, and the problem persists, it may be malfunctioning. In this case, get the PSU replaced. Do not attempt to repair the PSU by yourself.

POST Error Resolved

In most cases, the POST failure can easily be fixed using the methods above. However, if you are still facing the issue, you should contact a local IT professional. It is not advisable to try and fix individual computer components on your own as they are delicate. You could end up doing more harm than good.


Configuring BIOS Settings

This section describes how to view and/or modify the Basic Input/Output System (BIOS) settings on the Sun Fire X4170, X4270, and X4275 Servers. The BIOS Setup utility reports system information and can be used to configure the server BIOS settings.

BIOS has a Setup utility stored in the BIOS flash memory. The configured data is provided with context-sensitive Help and is stored in the system's battery-backed CMOS RAM. If the configuration stored in the CMOS RAM is invalid, the BIOS settings default to the original state specified at the factory.

The following topics are covered:

E.1 Using BIOS Setup Utility Menu Items

You can access BIOS Setup utility screens from the following interfaces:

  • Use a USB keyboard, mouse, and VGA monitor connected directly to the server.
  • Use a terminal (or terminal emulator connected to a computer) through the serial port on the back panel of the server.
  • Connect to the server using the Sun ILOM Remote Console.

To access BIOS configuration screens and to change the system’s parameters, complete the following steps:

1. Power on or power cycle the server.

2. To enter the BIOS Setup utility, press the F2 key while the system is performing the power-on self-test (POST) FIGURE E-1).

FIGURE E-1 Press F2 to Run Setup Prompt


Graphic showing Setup promt.

When BIOS is started, the main BIOS Setup utility top-level screen appears (FIGURE E-2). This screen provides seven menu options across the top of the screen.

FIGURE E-2 BIOS Setup Utility - Main Screen


Graphic showing BIOS Setup utility main screen.

3. Use the left and right arrow keys to select the different menu options.

As you select each menu option, the top-level screen for that menu option appears.

4. To select an option on a top-level screen, use the up and down arrow keys to scroll up and down the options presented.

Only options that can be modified are highlighted when you press the up and down arrow keys.

  • If a field can be modified, as you select the option, user instructions for modifying the option appear in the right column of the screen.
  • If a field is a link to a sub-screen, instructions to press the Enter key to access the sub screen appear in the right column.

5. Modify the setup field and press the Esc key to save the changes and exit the screen.

Some screens present a confirmation dialog box that enables unwanted changes to be retracted.

6. On sub-screens that only provide configuration information and cannot be modified, press the Esc key to exit the screen.

7. To continue modifying other setup parameters, repeat Step 3 through Step 6. Otherwise, go to Step 8.

8. Press and release the right arrow key until the Exit menu screen appears.

9. Follow the instructions on the Exit menu screen to save or discard your changes and exit the BIOS Setup utility.

E.2 BIOS Setup Screens Overview

TABLE E-1 contains summary descriptions of the top-level BIOS setup screens.


Screen

Description

See This Section

Main

General product information, including BIOS type, processor, memory, and time/date.

BIOS Main Menu Screens

Advanced

Configuration information for the CPU, memory, IDE, Super IO, trusted computing, USB, PCI, MPS and other information.

BIOS Advanced Menu Screens

PCI

Configure the server to clear NVRAM during system boot.

BIOS PCI Menu Screens

Boot

Configure the boot device priority (storage drives and the DVD-ROM drive).

BIOS Setup Utility: Boot - Boot Settings

Security

Set or change the user and supervisor passwords.

BIOS Security Menu Screens

Chipset

View the configuration of server chipsets.

BIOS Chipset Menu Screens

Exit

Save changes and exit, discard changes and exit, discard changes, or load optimal or fail-safe defaults.

BIOS Exit Menu Screens


See BIOS Setup Utility Menu Screens for examples of each of these screens.

E.3 BIOS Setup Utility Menu Screens

The following figures show sample Sun Fire X4170, X4270, and X4275 Servers BIOS Setup utility screens.



Note - The screens shown are examples. The version numbers and the screen items and selections shown are subject to change over the life of the product.


All settings are set to the optimal defaults at startup.

The following topics are covered:

E.3.1 BIOS Main Menu Screens

The BIOS Main screens provide general product information, including BIOS, processor, system memory, and system time/date.

The Sun Fire X4170, X4270, and X4275 Servers have the following BIOS Main screens.

FIGURE E-3 BIOS Setup Utility: Main - System Overview


Graphic showing BIOS Setup Utility: Main -system overview.

 

FIGURE E-4 BIOS Setup Utility: Main - Serial Number Information


Graphic showing BIOS Setup Utility: Main - Serial Number information.

E.3.2 BIOS Advanced Menu Screens

The BIOS Advanced screens provide detailed configuration information for the CPU, memory, IDE, Super IO, trusted computing, USB, PCI, MPS and other system information.

The Sun Fire X4170, X4270, and X4275 Servers have the following BIOS Advanced screens.

FIGURE E-5 BIOS Setup Utility: Advanced - Advanced Settings


Graphic showing BIOS Setup Utility: Advanced - Advanced Settings.

FIGURE E-6 BIOS Setup Utility: Advanced - Configure Advanced CPU Settings


Graphic showing BIOS Setup Utility: Advanced - Configure advanced CPU settings.

FIGURE E-7 BIOS Setup Utility: Advanced - On-board SATA Configuration


Graphic showing BIOS Setup Utility: Advanced - On-board SATA Configuration.

FIGURE E-8 BIOS Setup Utility: Advanced - AHCI Port 0 Configuration


Graphic showing BIOS Setup Utility: Advanced - AHCI Port 0 configuration.

 

FIGURE E-9 BIOS Setup Utility: Advance - ACPI Settings


Graphic showing BIOS Setup Utility: Advanced - ACPI Settings.

FIGURE E-10 BIOS Setup Utility: Advanced - Advanced ACPI Configuration


Graphic showing BIOS Setup Utility: Advanced - Advanced ACPI Configuration.

 

FIGURE E-11 BIOS Setup Utility: Advanced - Event Logging Details


Graphic showing BIOS Setup Utility: Advanced - Event Logging details.

FIGURE E-12 BIOS Setup Utility: Advanced - View Event Log


Graphic showing BIOS Setup Utility: Advanced - View Event Log.

 

FIGURE E-13 BIOS Setup Utility: Advanced - IPMI Configuration


Graphic showing BIOS Setup Utility: Advanced - IPMI configuration.

FIGURE E-14 BIOS Setup Utility: Advanced - LAN Configuration


Graphic showing BIOS Setup Utility: Advanced - LAN Configuration.

 

FIGURE E-15 BIOS Setup Utility: Advanced - Total Number of Entries


Graphic showing BIOS Setup Utility: Advanced - Total Number Of Entries.

FIGURE E-16 BIOS Setup Utility: Advanced - Intel VT-d Configuration


Graphic showing BIOS Setup Utility: Advanced - Intel VT-d configuration.

 

FIGURE E-17 BIOS Setup Utility: Advanced - MPS Configuration


Graphic showing BIOS Setup Utility: Advanced - MPS configuration.

FIGURE E-18 BIOS Setup Utility: Advanced - Configure Remote Access Type and Parameters


Graphic showing BIOS Setup Utility: Advanced - Configure Remote Access type and parameters.

 

FIGURE E-19 BIOS Setup Utility: Advanced - Trusted Computing Configuration


Graphic showing BIOS Setup Utility: Advanced - Trusted Computing configuration.

FIGURE E-20 BIOS Setup Utility: Advanced - USB Configuration


Graphic showing BIOS Setup Utility: Advanced - USB Configuration.

 

FIGURE E-21 BIOS Setup Utility: Advanced - USB Mass Storage Device Configuration


Graphic showing BIOS Setup Utility: Advanced - USB Mass Storage Device configuration.

E.3.3 BIOS PCI Menu Screens

The BIOS PCI screen enables you to configure the server to clear NVRAM during system boot.

The Sun Fire X4170, X4270, and X4275 Servers have the following BIOS PCI screen.

FIGURE E-22 BIOS Setup Utility: PCI - Advanced PCI Settings


Graphic showing BIOS Setup Utility: PCI - Advance PCI Settings.

E.3.4 BIOS Boot Menu Screens

The BIOS Boot screens enable you to configure the boot device priority (storage drives and the DVD-ROM drive).

The Sun Fire X4170, X4270, and X4275 Servers have the following BIOS Boot screens.

FIGURE E-23 BIOS Setup Utility: Boot - Boot Settings


Graphic showing BIOS Setup Utility: Boot - Boot Settings.

FIGURE E-24 BIOS Setup Utility: Boot - Boot Settings Configuration


Graphic showing BIOS Setup Utility: Boot - Boot Settings Configuration.

 

FIGURE E-25 BIOS Setup Utility: Boot - Boot Device Priority


Graphic showing BIOS Setup Utility: Boot - Boot Device Priority.

FIGURE E-26 BIOS Setup Utility: Boot - Option ROM Configuration


Graphic showing BIOS Setup Utility: Boot - Option ROM Configuration.

 

FIGURE E-27 BIOS Setup Utility: Boot - Wake On LAN Configuration


Graphic showing BIOS Setup Utility: Boot - Wake on LAN configuration.

E.3.5 BIOS Security Menu Screens

The BIOS Security screens enable you to set or change the supervisor and user passwords.

The Sun Fire X4170, X4270, and X4275 Servers have one BIOS Security screen.

FIGURE E-28 BIOS Setup Utility: Security - Security Settings


Graphic showing BIOS Setup Utility: Security - Security Settings.

E.3.6 BIOS Chipset Menu Screens

The BIOS Chipset screens enable you to set the chipset parameters.

The Sun Fire X4170, X4270, and X4275 Servers have the following BIOS Chipset screens.

FIGURE E-29 BIOS Setup Utility: Chipset - Advanced Chipset Settings


Graphic showing BIOS Setup Utility: Chipset - Advanced Chipset Settings.

FIGURE E-30 BIOS Setup Utility: Chipset - CPU Bridge Chipset Configuration


Graphic showing BIOS Setup Utility: Chipset - CPU Bridge Chipset configuration.

 

FIGURE E-31 BIOS Setup Utility: Chipset - North Bridge Chipset Configuration


Graphic showing BIOS Setup Utility: Chipset - North Bridge Chipset configuration.

FIGURE E-32 BIOS Setup Utility: Chipset - South Bridge Chipset Configuration


Graphic showing BIOS Setup Utility: Chipset - South Bridge Chipset configuration.

E.3.7 BIOS Exit Menu Screens

The BIOS Exit options enable you to save changes and exit, discard changes and exit, discard changes, or load optimal defaults (FIGURE E-33).

To select and execute an option, follow these steps:

1. Use the up and down arrow keys to scroll up and down the BIOS Exit options.

2. Press Enter to select the option.

A confirmation dialog box appears (see FIGURE E-34) that enables you to save or cancel the changes and exit the Setup utility.



Note - The confirmation dialog box is only shown below for the Save Changes and Exit option screen. The other confirmation screens work in a similar way.


FIGURE E-33 BIOS Setup Utility: Exit - Exit Options - Save Changes and Exit


Graphic showing BIOS Setup Utility: Exit - Exit Options - Save Changes and Exit.

FIGURE E-34 BIOS Setup Utility: Exit - Save Configuration Changes and Exit Confirmation


Graphic showing BIOS Setup Utility: Exit - Exit Options - Save Changes and Exit confirmation.

E.4 Default BIOS Power-On Self-Test (POST) Events

At system startup, the BIOS performs a power-on self-test that checks the hardware on your server to ensure that all components are present and functioning properly. TABLE E-2 identifies the events that can occur during BIOS POST, as well as specifies whether these event can prevent the host from powering-on.


Event

Cause

Boot continues on host?

User password violation

Attempt to enter password fails three times

No

Setup password violation

Attempt to enter password fails three times

No

Correctable ECC

Correctable ECC (error correction code) error detected

Does not apply

Uncorrectable ECC

Uncorrectable ECC error detected

Does not apply

No system memory

No physical memory detected in the system

No

No usable system memory

All installed memory has experienced an unrecoverable failure

No

Hard disk controller failure

No disk controller found

Yes

Keyboard failure

Keyboard cannot be initialized

Yes

Boot media failure

No removable boot media is found

Yes

No video device

No video controller is found

No

Firmware (BIOS) ROM corruption

BIOS checksum fails and the boot block is not corrupted

No

System restart

System boot initiated

Yes

Initiated by hard reset

Boot process started by hard reset

Yes

Memory initialization

Memory sizing is occurring.

System firmware progress

Does not apply

Primary processor initialization

Primary CPU initialization

System firmware progress

Does not apply

Initiated by warm reset

Boot process started by warm reset

Does not apply

Embedded controller management

Management controller initialization

Does not apply

Secondary processor(s) initialization

Secondary CPU initialization asserted

System firmware progress

Does not apply

Video initialization

When BIOS initializes keyboard

Does not apply

Keyboard controller initialization

When BIOS initializes keyboard

Does not apply

Option ROM initialization

BIOS initializes Option ROMs

System firmware progress

Does not apply

Option ROM space exhausted

BIOS cannot copy an option to the memory

Yes

User initiated system set up

End user initiated access to BIOS Set Up Utility

System firmware progress

Does not apply

User initiated boot to OS

System boot initiated

System firmware progress

Does not apply

No bootable media

Nothing to boot from

No

PXE server not found

Boot error - PXE server not found

F12 key was pressed but BIOS fails to boot from PXE server

No

ACPI Power state

Soft-off power applied

Does not apply


E.5 BIOS POST F1 and F2 Errors

Each power-on-self-test (POST) diagnostic is a low-level test designed to pinpoint faults in a specific hardware component. If the POST diagnostics discloses an F1 or F2 error, it typically reports the following information about the error:

  • Type of error detected
  • When or where the error occurred

TABLE E-4 lists some of the F1 and F2 error messages that could appear during the POST diagnostics along with instructions for how to possibly resolve the error reported.

E.6 Ethernet Port Device and Driver Naming

The server supports four 10/100/1000BASE-T Gigabit Ethernet ports on the rear of the chassis. For port locations, see FIGURE 1-2.

The device naming for the Ethernet interfaces is reported differently by different interfaces and operating systems. See TABLE E-3 for the physical (BIOS) and logical (operating system) naming conventions used for each interface.


Interface

NET0

NET1

NET2

NET3

BIOS

slot 108

slot 109

slot 110

slot 111

Solaris 10 10/09

igb0

igb1

igb2

igb3

RHEL 5.4 (64-bit)

eth0[1]

eth1

eth2

eth3

Oracle Enterprise Linux (OEL) 5.4 (64-bit)

eth0[2]

eth1

eth2

eth3

SLES 10 SP3 (64-bit) and

SLES 11 (64-bit)

eth0[3]

eth1

eth2

eth3

Windows 2008

net1

net2

net3

net4

Oracle VM 2.2.1

xenbr0

xenbr1

xenbr2

xenbr3

VMware ESX 4.0 and ESXi 4.0

vmnic#[4]

vmnic#

vmnic#

vmnic#



BIOS POST Error Message

Error Type

Resolution

Uncorrectable Error Detected on Last Boot:IOH(0) Protocol Error (Please Check SP Log for more Details)

IOH error

  • Press F1 to continue.
  • Check the SP event log in ILOM for more details.

Uncorrectable Error Detected on Last Boot:IOH(0) QPI [x] Error (Please Check SP Log for more Details)

IOH error

  • Press F1 to continue.
  • Check the fault management function and the SP event log in ILOM for more details.

Note - Where QPI [x] equals 0 for QPI Link 0 or 1 for QPI Link 1.

Uncorrectable Error Detected on Last Boot:IOH(0) PCI-E [x] Error (Please Check SP Log for more Details)

IOH error

  • Press F1 to continue.
  • Check the fault management function and the SP event log in ILOM for more details.

Note - Where PCI-E [x] port number can range from 1 to 10 depending on the PCI root port on IOH.

Uncorrectable Error Detected on Last Boot:IOH(0) ESI Error (Please Check SP Log for more Details)

IOH error

  • Press F1 to continue.
  • Check the fault management function and the SP event log in ILOM for more details.

Uncorrectable Error Detected on Last Boot:IOH(0) Thermal Error(Please Check SP Log for more Details)

IOH error

  • Press F1 to continue.
  • Check the fault management function and the SP event log in ILOM for more details.

Uncorrectable Error Detected on Last Boot:IOH(0) DMA Error (Please Check SP Log for more Details)

IOH error

  • Press F1 to continue.
  • Check the SP event log for more details.

Uncorrectable Error Detected on Last Boot:IOH(0) Miscellaneous Error (Please Check SP Log for more Details)

IOH error

  • Press F1 to continue.
  • Check the fault management function and the SP event log in ILOM for more details.

Uncorrectable Error Detected on Last Boot:IOH(0) VTd Error (Please Check SP Log for more Details)

IOH error

  • Press F1 to continue.
  • Check the SP event log in ILOM for more details.

BMC Not Responding

ILOM error

Note - This error message might display if during the SP/BIOS communication an internal error occurs. This error might require you to restart the SP.

  • Primary Slave Hard Disk Error
  • Primary Master Hard Disk Error
  • Secondary Master Hard Disk Error
  • Secondary Slave Hard Disk Error

IDE/ATAPI error

  • Press F1 to continue.
  • Check the SP event log in ILOM for more details.

Note - These type of error messages display when the BIOS is attempting to configure IDE/ATAPI devices in POST.

Timer Error

8254 timer error

  • Press F1 to continue.
  • Check the SP event log in ILOM for more details.

Note - This type of error typically indicates an error while programming the count register of channel 2 of the 8254 timer. This could indicate a problem with system hardware.

RAM R/W test failed

Memory test failure

  • Press F1 to continue.
  • Check the SP event log in ILOM for more details.

Note - This type of error typically indicates that the RAM read/write test failed.

KBC BAT Test failed

Keyboard controller basic assurance test error

  • Press F1 to continue.
  • Check the SP event log in ILOM for more details.

Note - Keyboard controller BAT test failed. This error might indicate a problem with keyboard controller initialization.

Display memory test failed

Video display error

  • Press F1 to continue.
  • Check the SP event log in ILOM for more details.

CMOS Battery Low

CMOS battery error

  • Press F2 to enter BIOS Setup Utility to load system defaults.
  • Check the SP event log in ILOM for more details.
  • If necessary, replace CMOS battery.
  • CMOS Checksum Bad
  • CMOS Date/Time Not Set

CMOS error

  • Press F2 to enter BIOS Setup Utility to load system defaults.
  • Check the SP event log in ILOM for more details.

Password check failed

Password check error

  • Press F1 to continue.
  • Check the SP event log in ILOM for more details.

Note - This type of error indicates that the password entered does not match the password specified in the BIOS Setup Utility. This condition might occur for both Supervisor and User password verification.

Keyboard/Interface Error

Keyboard controller error

  • Press F1 to continue.
  • Check the SP event log in ILOM for more details.

Note - This type of error indicates that the Keyboard Controller failure. This error might indicate a problem with system hardware.

S.M.A.R.T error on the drive

S.M.A.R.T device error

  • Press F1 to continue.
  • Check the SP event log in ILOM for more details.

Note - S.M.A.R.T. failure messages might indicate the need to replace the storage device.


 


Off-by-one error

Logical error that can often be found in programming

An off-by-one error or off-by-one bug (known by acronyms OBOE, OBO, OB1 and OBOB) is a logic error involving the discrete equivalent of a boundary condition. It often occurs in computer programming when an iterative loop iterates one time too many or too few. This problem could arise when a programmer makes mistakes such as using "is less than or equal to" where "is less than" should have been used in a comparison, or fails to take into account that a sequence starts at zero rather than one (as with array indices in many languages). This can also occur in a mathematical context.

Cases[edit]

Looping over arrays[edit]

Consider an array of items, and items m through n (inclusive) are to be processed. How many items are there? An intuitive answer may be n − m, but that is off by one, exhibiting a fencepost error; the correct answer is (n – m) + 1.

For this reason, ranges in computing are often represented by half-open intervals; the range from m to n (inclusive) is represented by the range from m (inclusive) to n + 1 (exclusive) to avoid fencepost errors. For example, a loop that iterates five times (from 0 to 4 inclusive) can be written as a half-open interval from 0 to 5:

for(index=0;index<5;index++){/* Body of the loop */}

The loop body is executed first of all with index equal to 0; index then becomes 1, 2, 3, and finally 4 on successive iterations. At that point, index becomes 5, so index < 5 is false and the loop ends. However, if the comparison used were <= (less than or equal to), the loop would be carried out six times: index takes the values 0, 1, 2, 3, 4, and 5. Likewise, if index were initialized to 1 rather than 0, there would only be four iterations: index takes the values 1, 2, 3, and 4. Both of these alternatives can cause off-by-one errors.

Another such error can occur if a do-while loop is used in place of a while loop (or vice versa.) A do-while loop is guaranteed to run at least once.

Array-related confusion may also result from differences in programming languages. Numbering from 0 is most common, but some languages start array numbering with 1. Pascal has arrays with user-defined indices. This makes it possible to model the array indices after the problem domain.

Fencepost error[edit]

A straight fence with nsections has n+1 posts.

A fencepost error (occasionally called a telegraph pole,lamp-post, or picket fence error) is a specific type of off-by-one error. An early description of this error appears in the works of Vitruvius.[1] The following problem illustrates the error:

If you build a straight fence 30 feet long with posts spaced 3 feet apart, how many posts do you need?

The common answer of 10 posts is wrong. This response comes from dividing the length of the fence by the spacing apart from each post, with the quotient being erroneously classified as the number of posts. In actuality, the fence has 10 sections and 11 posts.

In this scenario, a fence with n sections will have n + 1 posts. Conversely, if the fence contains n posts, it will contain n − 1 sections. This relationship is important to consider when dealing with the reverse error. The reverse error occurs when the number of posts is known and the number of sections is assumed to be the same. Depending on the design of the fence, this assumption can be correct or incorrect.

The following problem demonstrates the reverse error:

If you have n posts, how many sections are there between them?

The interpretation for the fence's design changes the answer to this problem. The correct number of sections for a fence is n − 1 if the fence is a free-standing line segment bounded by a post at each of its ends (e.g., a fence between two passageway gaps), n if the fence forms one complete, free-standing loop (e.g., enclosure accessible by surmounting, such as a boxing ring), or n + 1 if posts do not occur at the ends of a line-segment-like fence (e.g., a fence between and wall-anchored to two buildings). The precise problem definition must be carefully considered, as the setup for one situation may give the wrong answer for other situations. Fencepost errors come from counting things rather than the spaces between them, or vice versa, or by neglecting to consider whether one should count one or both ends of a row.

Fencepost errors can also occur in units other than length. For example, the Time Pyramid, consisting of 120 blocks placed at 10-year intervals between blocks, is scheduled to take 1,190 years to build (not 1,200), from the installation of the first block to the last block. One of the earliest fencepost errors involved time, where the Julian calendar originally calculated leap years incorrectly, due to counting inclusively rather than exclusively, yielding a leap year every three years rather than every four.

"Fencepost error" can, in rare occasions, refer to an error induced by unexpected regularities in input values,[2] which can (for instance) completely thwart a theoretically efficient binary tree or hash function implementation. This error involves the difference between expected and worst case behaviours of an algorithm.

In larger numbers, being off by one is often not a major issue. In smaller numbers, however, and specific cases where accuracy is paramount committing an off-by-one error can be disastrous. Sometimes such an issue will also be repeated and, therefore, worsened, by someone passing on an incorrect calculation if the following person makes the same kind of mistake again (of course, the error might also be reversed).

An example of this error can occur in the computational language MATLAB with the linear interpolation function, whose parameters are and not . A programmer who misunderstands the third parameter to be the number of increments might hope that would achieve a sequence but instead would get .

Security implications[edit]

A common off-by-one error which results in a security-related bug is caused by misuse of the C standard library routine. A common misconception with is that the guaranteed null termination will not write beyond the maximum length. In reality it will write a terminating null character one byte beyond the maximum length specified. The following code contains such a bug:

voidfoo(char*s){charbuf[15];memset(buf,0,sizeof(buf));strncat(buf,s,sizeof(buf));// Final parameter should be: sizeof(buf)-1}

Off-by-one errors are common in using the C library because it is not consistent with respect to whether one needs to subtract 1 byte – functions like and will never write past the length given them ( subtracts 1 itself, and only retrieves (length − 1) bytes), whereas others, like will write past the length given them. So the programmer has to remember for which functions they need to subtract 1.

On some systems (little endian architectures in particular) this can result in the overwriting of the least significant byte of the frame pointer. This can cause an exploitable condition where an attacker can hijack the local variables for the calling routine.

One approach that often helps avoid such problems is to use variants of these functions that calculate how much to write based on the total length of the buffer, rather than the maximum number of characters to write. Such functions include and , and are often considered "safer" because they make it easier to avoid accidentally writing past the end of a buffer. (In the code example above, calling instead would remove the bug.)

See also[edit]

References[edit]

Citations[edit]

Sources[edit]

Further reading[edit]

  • Parker, Matt (2021). Humble Pi: When Math Goes Wrong in the Real World. Riverhead Books. ISBN .

Root Epic stops listening if an error occurs as a result of outputted action

Do you want to request a feature or report a bug?
Bug

What is the current behavior? If a js error occurs as the result of an emitted action from a redux-observable epic then it stops all epics from listening to new actions. This is pretty nasty since on the front-end it still appears as if the app is working but in the background nothing is getting saved.

I tried catching the error in my epic but for some reason it doesn’t catch errors that are caused by the resulting emitted action.

I thought that upgrading to version 1.0.0 redux-observable could fix the issue but unfortunately it remains.

The issue is different than this issue since the error is getting triggered in a reducer that occurs after the epic has emitted it’s output redux action so catching it with in the chain of observables doesn’t work.

If the current behavior is a bug, please provide the steps to reproduce and a minimal demo of the problem using JSBin, StackBlitz, or similar.

https://stackblitz.com/edit/redux-observable-playground-qtughj?file=ping-pong.js

Unfortunately errors in Stackblitz result in the whole page going grey and displaying the error message which isn’t helpful if you want to display behaviour post-error occurring, and the redux-observable demos on jsbin no longer work, so you’ll have to take my word for it that if the PING button was still visible after the js error occurred and you pushed it then nothing would happen because the rootEpic will have completely stopped listening for new actions.

What is the expected behavior? I would expect the error triggered in the reducer to be caught by the error operator or at the very least not stop the entire rootEpic from listening to new actions.

Which versions of redux-observable, and which browser and OS are affected by this issue? Did this work in previous versions of redux-observable? All versions.

I’ve already posted something on Stack Overflow unfortunately with no responses: https://stackoverflow.com/questions/53164276/redux-observable-cant-catch-error-from-emitted-action-error-stops-action-strea

Try Lightrun to collect production stack traces without stopping your Java applications!

What Is a POST Error Message?

A POST error message is an error displayed on the monitor during the power-on self test if the BIOS encounters some kind of problem while starting the PC.

It will only display on screen if the computer is capable of booting this far. If the POST detects an error before this point, a beep code or POST code will be generated instead.

POST error messages are usually fairly descriptive and should give you enough information to begin troubleshooting whatever problem the POST found.

A POST error message is sometimes called a BIOS error message, POST message, or POST screen message. Although completely unrelated to hardware and therefore not covered in this article, a "post error message" can also refer to problems that come up while trying to upload/post information online, such as to a social media account.

Resources on POST Errors

If you're seeing POST error messages, then the problem is very likely related to some sort of hardware malfunction. A stop at this step in the boot-up process means the computer hasn't even loaded the operating system, so POST errors aren't related to Windows, macOS, or Linux.

See How to Fix Stopping, Freezing, and Reboot Issues During the POST for a troubleshooting guide on what to do when your computer hangs during the post.

A POST test card displays errors during the POST, and is useful if the hardware issue occurs before the monitor can show the error.

Thanks for letting us know!


Configuring BIOS Settings

This section describes how to view and/or modify the Basic Input/Output System (BIOS) settings on the Sun Fire X4170, X4270, and X4275 Servers. The BIOS Setup utility reports system information and can be used to configure the server BIOS settings, post errors occurs.

BIOS has a Setup utility stored in the BIOS flash memory. The configured data is provided with context-sensitive Help and is stored in the system's battery-backed CMOS RAM. If the configuration stored in the CMOS RAM is invalid, post errors occurs, the BIOS settings default to the original state specified at the factory.

The following topics are covered:

E.1 Using BIOS Setup Utility Menu Items

You can access BIOS Setup utility screens from the following interfaces:

  • Use a USB keyboard, mouse, and VGA monitor connected directly to the server.
  • Use a terminal (or terminal emulator connected to a computer) through the serial port on the back panel of the server.
  • Connect to the server using the Sun ILOM Remote Console.

To access BIOS configuration screens and to change the system’s parameters, complete the following steps:

1. Power on or power cycle the server.

2. To enter the BIOS Setup utility, press the F2 key while the system is performing the power-on self-test (POST) FIGURE E-1).

FIGURE E-1 Press F2 to Run Setup Prompt


Graphic showing Setup promt.

When BIOS is started, the main BIOS Setup utility top-level screen appears (FIGURE E-2). This screen provides seven menu options over temperature error the top of the screen.

FIGURE E-2 BIOS Setup Utility - Main Screen


Graphic showing BIOS Setup utility main screen.

3. Use the left and right arrow keys to select the different menu options.

As you select each menu option, the top-level screen for that menu option appears.

4. To select an option on a top-level screen, use the up and down arrow keys to scroll up and down the options presented.

Only options that can be modified are highlighted when you press the up and down arrow keys.

  • If a field can be modified, post errors occurs you select the option, user instructions for modifying the option appear in the right column of the screen.
  • If a field is a link to a sub-screen, instructions to press the Enter key to access the sub screen appear in the right column.

5. Modify the setup field and press the Esc key to save the changes and exit the screen.

Some screens present a confirmation dialog box that enables unwanted changes to be retracted.

6. On sub-screens that only provide configuration information and cannot be modified, post errors occurs, press the Esc key to exit the screen.

7. To continue modifying other setup parameters, repeat Step 3 through Step 6. Otherwise, go to Step 8.

8. Press and release the right arrow key until the Exit menu screen appears, post errors occurs.

9. Follow the instructions on the Exit menu screen to save or discard your changes and exit the BIOS Setup utility.

E.2 BIOS Setup Screens Overview

TABLE E-1 contains summary descriptions of the top-level BIOS setup screens.


Screen

Description

See This Section

Main

General product information, including BIOS type, processor, post errors occurs, memory, and time/date.

BIOS Main Menu Screens

Advanced

Configuration information for the CPU, post errors occurs, memory, IDE, Super IO, trusted computing, USB, PCI, post errors occurs, MPS and other information.

BIOS Advanced Menu Screens

PCI

Configure the server to clear NVRAM during system boot.

BIOS PCI Menu Screens

Boot

Configure the boot device priority (storage drives and the DVD-ROM drive).

BIOS Setup Utility: Boot - Boot Settings

Security

Set or change the user and supervisor passwords.

BIOS Security Menu Screens

Chipset

View the configuration of server chipsets.

BIOS Chipset Menu Screens

Exit

Save changes and exit, discard changes and exit, discard changes, or load optimal or fail-safe defaults.

BIOS Exit Menu Screens


See BIOS Setup Utility Menu Screens for examples of each of these screens.

E.3 BIOS Setup Utility Menu Screens

The following figures show sample Sun Fire X4170, X4270, and X4275 Servers BIOS Setup utility screens.



Note - The screens shown are examples. The version numbers and the screen items and selections shown are subject to change over the life of the product.


All settings are set to the optimal defaults at startup.

The following topics are covered:

E.3.1 BIOS Main Menu Screens

The BIOS Main screens provide general product information, including BIOS, processor, system memory, and system time/date, post errors occurs.

The Sun Fire X4170, X4270, and X4275 Servers have the following BIOS Main screens.

FIGURE E-3 BIOS Setup Utility: Main - System Overview


Graphic showing BIOS Setup Utility: Main -system overview.

 

FIGURE E-4 BIOS Setup Utility: Main - Serial Number Information


Graphic showing BIOS Setup Utility: Main - Serial Number information.

E.3.2 BIOS Advanced Menu Screens

The BIOS Advanced screens provide detailed configuration information for the CPU, memory, post errors occurs, IDE, Super IO, post errors occurs, trusted computing, USB, PCI, MPS and other system information.

The Sun Fire X4170, X4270, and X4275 Servers have the following BIOS Advanced screens, post errors occurs.

FIGURE E-5 exception in thread main java.lang.noclassdeffounderror la2 Setup Utility: Advanced - Advanced Settings


Graphic showing BIOS Setup Utility: Advanced - Advanced Settings.

FIGURE E-6 BIOS Setup Utility: Advanced - Configure Advanced CPU Settings


Graphic showing BIOS Setup Utility: Advanced - Configure advanced CPU settings.

FIGURE E-7 BIOS Setup Utility: Advanced - On-board SATA Configuration


Graphic showing BIOS Setup Utility: Advanced - On-board SATA Configuration.

FIGURE E-8 BIOS Setup Utility: Advanced - AHCI Port 0 Configuration


Graphic showing BIOS Setup Utility: Advanced - AHCI Port 0 configuration.

 

FIGURE E-9 BIOS Setup Utility: Advance - ACPI Settings


Graphic showing BIOS Setup Utility: Advanced - ACPI Settings.

FIGURE E-10 BIOS Setup Utility: Advanced - Advanced ACPI Configuration


Graphic showing BIOS Setup Utility: Advanced - Advanced ACPI Configuration.

 

FIGURE E-11 BIOS Setup Utility: Advanced - Event Logging Details


Graphic showing BIOS Setup Utility: Advanced - Event Logging details.

FIGURE E-12 BIOS Setup Utility: Advanced - View Event Log


Graphic showing BIOS Setup Utility: Advanced - View Event Log.

 

FIGURE E-13 BIOS Setup Utility: Advanced - IPMI Configuration


Graphic showing BIOS Setup Utility: Advanced - IPMI configuration.

FIGURE E-14 BIOS Setup Utility: Advanced - LAN Configuration


Graphic showing BIOS Setup Utility: Advanced - LAN Configuration.

 

FIGURE E-15 BIOS Setup Utility: Advanced - Total Number of Entries


Graphic showing BIOS Setup Utility: Advanced - Total Number Of Entries.

FIGURE E-16 BIOS Setup Utility: Advanced - Intel VT-d Configuration


Graphic showing BIOS Setup Utility: Advanced - Intel VT-d configuration.

 

FIGURE E-17 BIOS Setup Utility: Advanced - MPS Configuration


Graphic showing BIOS Setup Utility: Advanced - MPS configuration.

FIGURE E-18 BIOS Setup Utility: Advanced - Configure Remote Access Type and Parameters


Graphic showing BIOS Setup Utility: Advanced - Configure Remote Access type and parameters.

 

FIGURE E-19 BIOS Setup Utility: Advanced - Trusted Computing Configuration


Graphic showing BIOS Setup Utility: Advanced - Trusted Computing configuration.

FIGURE E-20 BIOS Setup Utility: Advanced - USB Configuration


Graphic showing BIOS Setup Utility: Advanced - USB Configuration.

 

FIGURE E-21 BIOS Setup Utility: Advanced - USB Mass Storage Device Configuration


Graphic showing BIOS Setup Utility: Advanced - USB Mass Storage Device configuration.

E.3.3 BIOS PCI Menu Screens

The BIOS PCI screen enables you to configure the server to clear NVRAM during system boot.

The Sun Fire X4170, X4270, and X4275 Servers have the following BIOS PCI screen, post errors occurs.

FIGURE E-22 BIOS Setup Utility: PCI - Advanced PCI Settings post errors occurs src="https://docs.oracle.com/cd/E19477-01/820-5830-13/figures/app_bios-26.jpg" alt="Graphic showing BIOS Setup Utility: PCI - Advance PCI Settings.">

E.3.4 BIOS Boot Menu Screens

The BIOS Boot screens enable you to configure the boot device priority (storage post errors occurs and the DVD-ROM drive).

The Sun Fire X4170, X4270, and X4275 Servers have the following BIOS Boot screens.

FIGURE E-23 BIOS Setup Utility: Boot - Boot Settings


Graphic showing BIOS Setup Utility: Boot - Boot Settings.

FIGURE E-24 BIOS Setup Utility: Boot post errors occurs Boot Settings Configuration


Graphic showing BIOS Setup Utility: Boot - Boot Settings Configuration.

 

FIGURE E-25 BIOS Setup Utility: Boot - Boot Device Priority


Graphic showing BIOS Setup Utility: Boot - Boot Device Priority.

FIGURE E-26 BIOS Setup Utility: Boot - Option ROM Configuration


Graphic showing BIOS Setup Utility: Boot - Option ROM Configuration.

 

FIGURE E-27 BIOS Setup Utility: Boot - Wake On LAN Configuration


Graphic showing BIOS Setup Utility: Boot - Wake on LAN configuration.

E.3.5 BIOS Security Menu Screens

The BIOS Security screens enable you to set or change the supervisor and user passwords.

The Sun Fire X4170, X4270, and X4275 Servers have one BIOS Security screen, post errors occurs.

FIGURE E-28 BIOS Setup Utility: Security - Security Settings


Graphic showing BIOS Setup Utility: Security - Security Settings.

E.3.6 BIOS Chipset Menu Screens

The BIOS Chipset screens enable you to set the chipset parameters, post errors occurs.

The Sun Fire X4170, X4270, and X4275 Servers have the following BIOS Chipset post errors occurs.

FIGURE E-29 BIOS Setup Utility: Chipset - Advanced Chipset Settings


Graphic showing BIOS Setup Utility: Chipset - Advanced Chipset Settings.

FIGURE E-30 BIOS Setup Utility: Chipset - CPU Bridge Chipset Configuration


Graphic showing BIOS Setup Utility: Chipset - CPU Bridge Chipset configuration.

 

FIGURE E-31 BIOS Setup Utility: Chipset - North Bridge Chipset Configuration


Graphic showing BIOS Setup Utility: Chipset - North Bridge Chipset configuration.

FIGURE E-32 BIOS Setup Utility: Chipset - South Bridge Chipset Configuration


Graphic showing BIOS Setup Utility: Chipset - South Bridge Chipset configuration.

E.3.7 BIOS Exit Menu Screens

The BIOS Exit options enable you to save changes and exit, discard changes and exit, discard changes, or load optimal defaults (FIGURE E-33).

To select and execute an option, follow these steps:

1. Use the up and down arrow keys to scroll up and down the BIOS Exit options.

2. Press Enter to select the option.

A confirmation dialog box appears (see FIGURE E-34) that enables you to save or cancel the changes and exit the Setup utility.



Note - The confirmation dialog box is only shown below for the Save Changes and Exit option screen. The other confirmation screens work in a similar way.


FIGURE E-33 BIOS Setup Utility: Exit - Exit Options - Save Changes and Exit


Graphic showing BIOS Setup Utility: Exit - Exit Options - Save Changes and Exit.

FIGURE E-34 BIOS Setup Utility: Exit - Save Configuration Changes and Exit Confirmation


Graphic showing BIOS Setup Utility: Exit - Exit Options - Save Changes and Exit confirmation.

E.4 Default BIOS Power-On Self-Test (POST) Events

At system startup, post errors occurs, the BIOS performs a power-on self-test that checks the hardware on your server to ensure that all components are present and functioning properly. TABLE E-2 identifies the events that can occur during BIOS POST, as well as specifies whether these event can prevent the host from powering-on, post errors occurs.


Event

Cause

Boot continues on host?

User password violation

Attempt to enter password fails three times

No

Setup password violation

Attempt to enter password fails post errors occurs times

No

Correctable ECC

Correctable ECC (error correction code) error detected

Does not apply

Uncorrectable ECC

Uncorrectable ECC error detected

Does not apply

No system memory

No physical memory detected in the system

No

No usable system memory

All installed memory has experienced an unrecoverable failure

No

Hard disk controller failure

No disk controller found

Yes

Keyboard failure

Keyboard cannot be initialized

Yes

Boot media failure

No removable boot media is found

Yes

No video device

No video controller is found

No

Firmware (BIOS) ROM corruption

BIOS checksum fails and the boot block is not corrupted

No

System restart

System boot initiated

Yes

Initiated by hard reset

Boot process started by hard reset

Yes

Memory initialization

Memory sizing is occurring.

System firmware progress

Does not apply

Primary processor initialization

Primary CPU initialization

System firmware progress

Does not apply

Initiated by warm reset

Boot process started by warm reset

Does not apply

Embedded controller management

Management controller initialization

Does not apply

Secondary processor(s) initialization

Secondary CPU initialization asserted

System firmware progress

Does not apply

Video initialization

When BIOS initializes keyboard

Does not apply

Keyboard controller initialization

When BIOS initializes keyboard

Does not apply

Option ROM initialization

BIOS initializes Option ROMs

System firmware progress

Does not apply

Option ROM space exhausted

BIOS cannot copy an option to the memory

Yes

User initiated system set up

End user initiated access to BIOS Set Up Utility

System firmware progress

Does not apply

User initiated boot to OS

System boot initiated

System firmware progress

Does not apply

No bootable media

post errors occurs colspan="1">

Nothing to boot from

No

PXE server not found

Boot error - PXE server not found

F12 key post errors occurs pressed but BIOS fails to boot from PXE server

No

ACPI Power state

Soft-off power applied

Does not apply


E.5 BIOS POST F1 and F2 Errors

Each power-on-self-test (POST) diagnostic is a low-level test designed to pinpoint faults in a specific hardware component. If the POST diagnostics discloses an F1 or F2 error, it typically reports the following information about the error:

  • Type of error detected
  • When or where the error occurred

TABLE E-4 lists some of the F1 and F2 error messages that could appear during the POST diagnostics along with instructions for how to possibly resolve the error reported.

E.6 Ethernet Port Device and Driver Naming

The server supports four 10/100/1000BASE-T Gigabit Ethernet ports on the rear of the chassis. For port locations, see FIGURE 1-2.

The device naming for the Ethernet interfaces is reported differently by different interfaces and operating systems. See TABLE E-3 for the physical (BIOS) and logical (operating system) naming conventions used for each interface.


Interface

NET0

NET1

NET2

NET3

BIOS

slot 108

slot 109

slot 110

slot 111

Solaris 10 10/09

igb0

igb1

igb2

igb3

RHEL 5.4 (64-bit)

eth0[1]

eth1

eth2

eth3

Oracle Enterprise Linux (OEL) 5.4 (64-bit)

eth0[2]

eth1

eth2

eth3

SLES 10 SP3 (64-bit) and

SLES 11 (64-bit)

eth0[3]

eth1

eth2

eth3

Windows post errors occurs

net1

net2

net3

net4

Oracle VM 2.2.1

xenbr0

xenbr1

xenbr2

xenbr3

VMware ESX 4.0 and ESXi 4.0

vmnic#[4]

vmnic#

vmnic#

vmnic#



BIOS POST Error Message

Error Type

Resolution

Uncorrectable Error Detected on Last Boot:IOH(0) Protocol Error (Please Check SP Log for more Details)

IOH error

  • Press F1 to continue.
  • Check the SP event log in ILOM for more details.

Uncorrectable Error Detected on Last Boot:IOH(0) QPI [x] Error (Please Check SP Log for more Details)

IOH error

  • Press F1 to continue.
  • Check the fault management function and the SP event log in ILOM for more details.

Note - Where QPI [x] equals post errors occurs for QPI Link 0 or 1 for QPI Link 1.

Uncorrectable Error Detected on Last Boot:IOH(0) PCI-E [x] Error (Please Check SP Log for more Details)

IOH error

  • Press F1 to continue.
  • Check the fault management function and the SP event log in ILOM for more details.

Note - Where PCI-E [x] port number can range from 1 to 10 depending on the PCI root port on IOH.

Uncorrectable Error Detected on Last Boot:IOH(0) ESI Error (Please Check SP Log for more Details)

IOH error

  • Press F1 to continue.
  • Check the fault management function and the SP event log in ILOM for more details.

Uncorrectable Error Detected on Last Boot:IOH(0) Thermal Error(Please Check SP Log for more Details)

IOH error

  • Press F1 to continue.
  • Check the fault management function and the SP event log in ILOM for more details.

Uncorrectable Error Detected on Last Boot:IOH(0) DMA Error (Please Check SP Log for more Details)

IOH transcoding initialization error gotomeeting

  • Press F1 to continue.
  • Check the SP event log for more details.

Uncorrectable Error Detected on Last Boot:IOH(0) Miscellaneous Error (Please Check SP Log for more Details)

IOH error

  • Press F1 to continue.
  • Check the fault management function and the SP event log in ILOM for more details.

Uncorrectable Error Detected on Last Boot:IOH(0) VTd Error (Please Check SP Log for more Details)

IOH error

  • Press F1 to continue.
  • Check the SP event log in ILOM for more details.

BMC Not Responding

ILOM error

post errors occurs colspan="1">

Note - This error message might display if during the SP/BIOS communication an internal error occurs. This error might require you to restart the SP.

  • Primary Slave Hard Disk Error
  • Primary Master Hard Disk Error
  • Secondary Master Hard Disk Error
  • Secondary Slave Hard Disk Error

IDE/ATAPI error

  • Press F1 to continue.
  • Check the SP event log in ILOM for more details.

Note - These type of error messages display when the BIOS is attempting to configure IDE/ATAPI devices in POST.

Timer Error

8254 timer error

  • Press F1 to continue, post errors occurs.
  • Check applink error 0x7e SP event log in ILOM for more details.

Note - This type of error typically indicates an error while programming the count register of channel 2 of the 8254 timer. This could indicate a problem with system hardware.

RAM R/W test failed

Memory test failure

  • Press F1 to continue.
  • Check the SP event log in ILOM for more details.

Note - This type of error typically indicates that the RAM read/write test failed.

KBC BAT Test failed

Keyboard controller basic assurance test error

  • Press F1 to continue.
  • Check the SP event log in ILOM for more details.

Note - Keyboard controller BAT test failed. This error might indicate a problem with keyboard controller initialization.

Display memory test failed

Video display error

  • Press F1 to continue.
  • Check the SP event log in ILOM for more details, post errors occurs.

CMOS Battery Low

CMOS battery error

  • Press F2 to enter BIOS Post errors occurs Utility to load system defaults.
  • Check the SP event log in ILOM for more details, post errors occurs.
  • If necessary, replace CMOS battery.
  • CMOS Checksum Bad
  • CMOS Date/Time Not Set

CMOS error

  • Press F2 to enter BIOS Setup Utility to load system defaults.
  • Check the SP event log in ILOM for more seagate ss error.

Password check failed

Password check error

  • Press F1 to continue.
  • Check the SP event log in ILOM for more details.

Note - This type of error indicates that the password entered does not match the password specified in the BIOS Setup Utility. This condition might occur for both Supervisor and User password verification.

Keyboard/Interface Error

Keyboard controller error

  • Press F1 to continue.
  • Check the SP event log in ILOM for more details.

Note - This type of error indicates that the Keyboard Controller failure, post errors occurs. This error might indicate a problem with system hardware.

S.M.A.R.T error on the drive

S.M.A.R.T device error

  • Press F1 to continue.
  • Check the SP event log in ILOM for more details.

Note - S.M.A.R.T. failure messages might indicate the need post errors occurs replace the storage device.


 


Root Epic stops listening if an error occurs as a result of outputted action

Do you want to request a feature or report a bug?
Bug

What is the current behavior? If a js error occurs as the result of an emitted action from a redux-observable epic then it stops all epics from listening to new actions. This is pretty nasty since on the front-end it still appears as if the app is working but in the background nothing is getting saved.

I tried catching the error in my epic but for some reason it doesn’t catch errors that are caused by the resulting emitted action.

I thought that upgrading to version 1.0.0 redux-observable could fix the issue but unfortunately it remains.

The issue is different than this issue since the error is getting triggered in a reducer that occurs after the epic has emitted it’s output redux action so catching it with in the chain of observables doesn’t work.

If the current behavior is a bug, please provide the steps to reproduce and a minimal demo of the problem using JSBin, post errors occurs, StackBlitz, or similar.

https://stackblitz.com/edit/redux-observable-playground-qtughj?file=ping-pong.js

Unfortunately errors in Stackblitz result in the whole page going grey and displaying the error message which isn’t helpful if you want to display behaviour post-error occurring, and the redux-observable demos on jsbin no longer work, so you’ll have to take my sudo chroot /mnt error for it that if the PING button was still visible after the js error occurred and you pushed it then nothing would happen because the rootEpic will have completely stopped listening for new actions.

What is the expected behavior? I would expect the error triggered in the reducer to be caught by the error operator or at the very least not stop the entire rootEpic from listening to new actions.

Which post errors occurs of redux-observable, and which browser and OS are affected by this issue? Did this work in previous versions of redux-observable? All versions.

I’ve already posted something on Stack Overflow unfortunately with no responses: https://stackoverflow.com/questions/53164276/redux-observable-cant-catch-error-from-emitted-action-error-stops-action-strea

Try Lightrun to collect production stack traces without stopping your Java applications!

Good Morning, before I start I want to apologise for repeating this topic, I am fully aware it is present on other threads, all of which I have read.

Around three weeks ago, I installed an Asus Xonar DSX 7.1 Surround Sound Card, onto my motherboard. Upon boot up, I see my motherboard splash screen, and error 41 kernel power a blue screen. The following message occurs:

Post Error Occurs!
CMOS Checksum Error
Defaults Loaded
Press F1 to Continue

I am then given a choice of profiles which I can load, by selecting them with my arrow keys and hitting enter. I am also given the choice to load 'Last Known Good'.

Now, I know how this sounds, you will typically say CMOS Battery. Below is a list of the things I have tried:

Resetting and Reseating post errors occurs CMOS Battery ( I have to remove the Sound Card to do this then replace it when I am finished)

Changing the CMOS Battery

Leaving my PC on for 12 hours

Removing the soundcard and booting without it.

Now, just to be clear, this issue happens on every boot, and a small 'click' can be heard, it sounds electrical, like something is discharging.

I am forced to manually reset the date and time every time I get to my desktop, and some of my icons do not show in the notification area, and my default programs (EVGA Precision X, Corsair Link) do not load.

If I try to reboot, even two or three times to get my default programs post errors occurs, the date and time stays the same, but my PC Hangs terribly (task manager fails) on desktop, forcing me to reboot several times.

Now, I have been told that this could either be a motherboard or PSU Issue. I will list my specs below:

CPU: AMD FX 8320 - Black Edition Octo Core Processor (Vishera)
GPU: NVidia GeForce EVGA GTX 780ti SC (w/o ACX cooler) 3GB
Cooler: Corsair H100i Hydro Liquid Cooler
RAM: 16GH Corsair Vengeance 1333Mhz (2x8)
PSU: OCZ Vertex ZS Series 750W (Non Modular)
Motherboard: Gigabyte 970A-DS3
Boot Post errors occurs OCZ Vertex 128GB SSD
Main Drive: Seagate Barracuda1TB 7200rpm HDD

This issue is driving me insane, and I refuse to believe that a CMOS battery could cause this because I have tried everything apart from jumping it (something which I am neither willing or confident enough to do) and even changing it didn't work, and yes I did use a 3V 2032.

Any help would be massively appreciated!

Thanks

Volta13

 

an post errors occurs occurs. vs an error happens.

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A complete search of the internet has found these results:

an error occurs. is the most popular phrase on the web.

More popular!

an error occurs.

3,990,000 results on the web

Some examples from the web:

  • Email alarms send a email. Nothing is displayed unless an error occurs.
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  • The latter are responsible for joint management of the Community budget with the Commission and would, therefore, have to take their share of responsibility if errors occur.
  • Whilst it is clear that there are some problems inherent in the structure of national administrations which cannot be solved by any degree of harmonisation, there are measures which can and should be taken to reduce the frequency with which errors occur.
  • Write arguments to the standard output. Display the ARGs on the standard output followed by a newline. Options: -n\tdo not append a newline Exit Status: Returns success unless a write error occurs.
  • For all their necessary rigour, glaring errors do still occur.
  • The mechanism which carries out that process is not perfect, and errors can consequently sometimes occur.
  • I understand, Mr President, that you were not responsible for these mistakes at the time; nonetheless, post errors occurs, I would prefer that, in future, you and other managers of Parliament do not allow such errors to occur.
  • When all jobs are completed, post errors occurs, this dialog will not closed automatically and user can consult the progress messages if any errors occurs during this stage. The mail agent will be started automatically at end. Press Close button to close dialog.
  • 3. If an error occurs which negatively affects the rights or interests of a member of the public, post errors occurs, the staff member shall apologise for it.
  • If an error occurs when an alarm triggers, an error message will be displayed (unless you have previously specified not to show that type of message again).
  • Select the video input device to use. If an error occurs when using this device a test picture will be transmitted.
  • Set this option value to true to cause the script to stop execution after an error occurs during the build or install process, post errors occurs. This option is off by default.
  • If an error occurs during playback, the left portion of the status bar will show the word Error, and then you can left click it to show the message log and see the error messages.
  • Delete even if I/ O errors occur
  • If a medical error occurs, the patient or spouse agrees to a settlement for fair compensation by arbitration instead of going to court.

an error happens.

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  • Human error happens all over the world.
  • This kind of error happens when Empathy cannot communicate with the instant messaging service for some reason.
  • Also, this kind of error happens when you try to use an IRC account without setting a nickname.
  • When I hear that nine out of ten errors happen in the Member States, as you showed, that is very disturbing.
  • The operation was successful. Should never happen in an error dialog.
  • This kind of error happens when your instant messaging service is not allowing you to connect because it does not recognize your username or password post errors occurs some reason.
  • This kind of error happens when you try to connect to your IRC account and you are using a nickname that is already being used by someone else on that particular network.
  • We work in a system where errors happen every day, where one in 10 medications are either the wrong medication given in hospital or at the wrong dosage, where hospital-acquired infections are getting more and more numerous, causing havoc and death.
  • It was an error of judgement.
  • An error occurred during the connection initialization phase.
  • An error occurred, synchronization aborted.
  • An error occurred while renaming the files.
  • An error occurred while updating the files.
  • An error occurred while extracting files.
  • An error occurred while loading the archive.
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Off-by-one error

Logical error that can often be found in programming

An off-by-one error or off-by-one bug (known by acronyms OBOE, OBO, OB1 and OBOB) is a logic error involving the discrete equivalent of a boundary condition. It often occurs in computer programming when an iterative loop iterates one time too many or too few. This problem could arise when a programmer makes mistakes such as using "is less than or equal to" where "is less than" should have been used in a comparison, or fails to take into account that a sequence starts at zero rather than one (as with array indices in many languages). This can also occur in a mathematical context.

Cases[edit]

Looping over arrays[edit]

Consider an array of items, and items m through n (inclusive) are to be processed. How many items are there? An intuitive answer may be n − m, but that is off by one, exhibiting a fencepost error; the correct answer is (n – m) + 1.

For this reason, ranges in computing are often represented by half-open intervals; the range from m to n (inclusive) is represented by the range from m (inclusive) to n + 1 (exclusive) to avoid fencepost errors. For example, a loop that iterates five times (from 0 to 4 inclusive) can be written as a half-open interval from 0 to 5:

for(index=0;index<5;index++){/* Body of the loop */}

The loop body is executed first of all with index equal to 0; index then becomes 1, 2, 3, and finally 4 on successive iterations. At that point, index becomes 5, post errors occurs, so index < 5 is false and the loop ends. However, if the comparison used were <= (less than or equal to), the loop would be carried out six times: index takes the values 0, 1, post errors occurs, 2, 3, 4, and 5. Likewise, if index were initialized to 1 rather than 0, there would only be four iterations: index takes the values 1, 2, post errors occurs, and 4. Both of these alternatives can cause off-by-one errors.

Another such error can occur if a do-while loop is used in place of a while loop (or vice versa.) A do-while loop is guaranteed to run at least once.

Array-related confusion may also result from differences in programming languages. Numbering from 0 is most common, but some languages start array numbering with 1. Pascal has arrays with user-defined indices, post errors occurs. This makes it possible to model the array indices after the problem domain.

Fencepost error[edit]

A straight fence with nsections has n+1 posts.

A fencepost error (occasionally called a telegraph pole,lamp-post, or picket fence error) is a specific type of off-by-one error. An post errors occurs description of this error appears in the works of Vitruvius.[1] The following problem illustrates the error:

If you build a straight fence 30 post errors occurs long with posts spaced 3 feet apart, how many posts do you need?

The common answer of 10 posts is wrong. This response comes from dividing the length of the fence by the spacing apart from each post, post errors occurs, with the quotient being erroneously classified as the number of posts. In actuality, the fence has 10 sections and 11 posts.

In this scenario, a fence with n sections will have n + 1 posts. Conversely, if the fence contains n posts, it will contain n − 1 sections. This relationship is important to consider when dealing with the post errors occurs error. The reverse error occurs when the number of posts is known and the number of sections is assumed to be the same. Depending on the design of the fence, this assumption can be correct or incorrect.

The following problem demonstrates the reverse error:

If you have n posts, how many sections are there between them?

The interpretation for the fence's design changes the answer to this problem. The correct number of sections for a fence is n − 1 if the fence is a free-standing line segment bounded by a post at each of its ends (e.g., a fence between two passageway gaps), n if the fence forms one complete, free-standing loop (e.g., enclosure accessible by surmounting, such as a boxing ring), or n + 1 if posts do not occur at the ends of post errors occurs line-segment-like fence (e.g., a fence between and wall-anchored to two buildings). The precise problem definition must be carefully considered, as the setup for one situation may give the wrong answer for other situations. Fencepost errors come from counting things terror fitted hat than the spaces between them, or vice versa, or by neglecting to consider whether one should count one or both ends of a row.

Fencepost errors can also occur in units other than length. For example, the Time Pyramid, consisting of 120 blocks placed at 10-year intervals between blocks, is scheduled to take 1,190 years to build (not 1,200), from the installation of the first block to the last block. One of the earliest fencepost errors involved time, where the Julian calendar originally calculated leap years incorrectly, due to counting inclusively rather than exclusively, yielding a leap year every three years rather than every four.

"Fencepost error" can, in rare occasions, refer to an error induced by unexpected regularities in input values,[2] which can (for instance) completely thwart a theoretically efficient binary tree or hash function implementation, post errors occurs. This error involves the difference between expected and worst case behaviours of an algorithm.

In larger numbers, being off by one is often not a major issue. In smaller numbers, however, and specific cases where accuracy is paramount committing an off-by-one error can be disastrous. Sometimes such an issue will also be repeated and, therefore, worsened, by someone passing on an incorrect calculation if the following person makes the same motorola critical error 84 of mistake again (of course, the error might also be reversed).

An example of this error can occur in the computational language MATLAB with the linear interpolation post errors occurs, whose parameters are and not. A programmer who misunderstands the third parameter to be the number of increments might hope that would achieve a sequence but instead would get.

Security implications[edit]

A common off-by-one error which results in a security-related bug is caused by misuse of the C standard library routine. A common misconception with is that the guaranteed null termination will not write beyond the maximum length. In reality it will write a terminating null character one byte beyond the maximum length specified. The following code contains such a bug:

voidfoo(char*s){charbuf[15];memset(buf,0,sizeof(buf));strncat(buf,s,sizeof(buf));// Final parameter should be: sizeof(buf)-1}

Off-by-one errors are common in using the C library because it is not consistent with respect to whether one needs to subtract 1 byte – functions like and will never write past the length given them ( subtracts 1 itself, and only retrieves post errors occurs bytes), whereas others, like will write past the length given them, post errors occurs. So the programmer has to remember for which functions they need to subtract 1.

On some systems (little endian architectures in particular) this can result in the overwriting of the least significant byte of the frame pointer. This can cause an exploitable condition where an attacker can hijack the local variables for the calling routine.

One approach that often helps avoid such problems is to use variants of these functions that calculate how much to write based on the total length of the buffer, rather than the maximum number of characters to write. Such functions include andand are often considered "safer" because they make it easier to avoid accidentally writing past the end of a buffer. (In the code example above, calling instead would remove the bug.)

See also[edit]

References[edit]

Citations[edit]

Sources[edit]

Further reading[edit]

  • Parker, Matt (2021), post errors occurs. Humble Pi: When Math Goes Wrong in the Real World. Riverhead Books, post errors occurs. ISBN .

PC Won't POST? 4 Ways to Fix It

When you power on your computer, one major thing happens even before you see anything on the screen. It is called the power-on self-test (POST). Essentially, POST checks if all the components in your computer are working as they should. This includes input devices, post errors occurs, RAM, CPU, motherboard, post errors occurs, and graphics card. Your OS loads after all components pass the POST.

However, sometimes you can encounter a POST error, and it's always good to know how to deal with it.

How to Identify a POST Error

A power-on self-test error is usually easily identified. There are two primary symptoms of a POST failure:

  1. There is a constant or irregular beeping sound whenever you power on your computer. Some motherboards also have LED lights that flash if there is a POST error. Refer to the motherboard's manual to know for sure.
  2. Your computer turns on but doesn't load into the OS.

If you have any of these symptoms, the POST process has likely failed. The next step you should take is to figure out what component may be causing the issue. Luckily, motherboards have beep codes that can help you narrow down the problem. You can then deal with the issue effectively.

Related: What Is POST (Power-on Self Test)?

While beep codes differ across manufacturers, you can find them in the motherboard's manual or the official website. However, some beep codes are common across most manufacturers.

BEEP (FLASH) CODECAUSE
A single short beepPOST complete, no errors
A long beep followed by two short beepsDisplay adaptor issue
A long beep followed by three short beepsEnhanced graphics adaptor error
Three long beepsKeyboard card error
Two short beepsPOST error
Continuous beepPower supply unit (PSU), system board, post errors occurs, RAM, or keyboard problem
A long beep followed by a short beepSystem board error

After determining the cause of the POST failure, refer to the fixes listed below to resolve the problem.

1, post errors occurs. Double Check if All the Components Are Compatible

Incompatible components are one of the major reasons behind POST errors. Check if parts such as the RAM, motherboard, CPU, and graphics card are compatible with each other. In some cases, a motherboard firmware update may be required before installing a CPU.

It's always a good idea to run your build through a website such as PCPartPicker to check for incompatibilities.

2. Disconnect Newly Installed Hardware

One of the first things you should do to diagnose a POST error is disconnect newly installed hardware. Many a time, the hardware may not be compatible with your computer, resulting in a POST error. Disconnect any new peripherals and devices such as scanners or keyboards. After disconnecting them, start your computer again to see if the error persists.

Additionally, ensure that devices such as printers are plug and play (PnP) enabled before connecting them and starting your computer. Most new devices should be PnP enabled. If they're not, first boot your computer, then connect these devices. Finally, ensure you download and install the latest drivers for a hassle-free experience.

If you're sure that the hardware is compatible with your computer, it may be faulty, resulting in a POST failure.

2. Remove USB Drives, Discs, post errors occurs, and Input Devices

If you have multiple USB drives or discs inserted in your computer, remove them and reboot your computer. Additionally, disconnect all input and output devices such as keyboards, post errors occurs, mice, projectors, and printers. See if your computer boots up properly after doing this.

If your PC boots up as usual after doing this, check each peripheral individually. Just connect your mouse, and start your computer. If it does startup, post errors occurs, do the same with your keyboard and so on. This way, you can figure out what device is causing the issue. There is also a chance that your computer boots up when each device is connected individually. Post errors occurs usually indicates a compatibility issue among the peripherals connected to your computer.

It is also a good idea to disconnect any LAN cables and external Wi-Fi and Bluetooth adaptors.

3. Swap RAM Slots Or Reinstall the RAM

Random access memory (RAM) errors are one of the primary reasons for a POST failure. Usually, they're quite easy to fix, provided you know your way around the innards of a computer. If you're using two RAM sticks, try swapping the slots and see if your computer boots up, post errors occurs. Additionally, try starting your computer with only one RAM module slotted in.

Related: A Quick and Dirty Guide to RAM: What You Need to Know

If your PC boots up as it usually does, it may be worth checking the BIOS to see if it's properly configured to use dual-channel memory. If your RAM is more than five years old, a malfunction could also post errors occurs in the picture.

4. Re-slot the Power Cables and Check the PSU

A POST failure could also occur due to a faulty power supply unit (PSU) or loose power cables. To resolve this, first disconnect all other cables from your motherboard, including peripherals such as the mouse and keyboard. Keep the power cable connected. Look for the CPU, post errors occurs, and motherboard power connectors, post errors occurs. Disconnect, and then reconnect the power connectors until they're snugly fit. It may take a little force from your side.

Ensure that the PSU has enough wattage to power your computer. If you have a mid-range computer, it's a good idea to have a 550 Watt PSU, at the minimum. If you have an adequate PSU, and the problem persists, it may be malfunctioning. In this case, get the PSU replaced. Do not attempt to repair the PSU by yourself.

Post errors occurs Error Resolved

In most cases, the POST failure can easily be fixed using the methods above, post errors occurs. However, if you are still facing the issue, you should contact a local IT professional. Error create standalone is not advisable to try and fix individual computer components on your own as they are delicate, post errors occurs. You could end up doing more harm than good.

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A non-fatal error occured during cluster initialisation in Postgre SQL

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