Nis make error talking to unknown host

nis make error talking to unknown host

One or the other may need to be present to make short names usable; which one depends on vendor and version of the DNS resolver. Try adding domain your domain. ERROR: Failed to create post-restore action. Host name verification failed - unknown host. (1028). Click Chat with Support. The solution to this problem is to put these users into the local passwd file, but not into the master passwd file on the master server. The local password file.

Nis make error talking to unknown host - something also

Solaris / Unix error messages are very short and often we need some more information about the origin of an error and a possible steps to fix the issues.
Here is a list of Solaris / Unix error messages for your reference, most of the error messages are generic Unix error messages but many are specific Solaris Error Messages. Please comment if you can provide some more details about these errors.
For other parts please scroll down to related posts section.
This is a multi part document , this is last part covering error messages from T to Z

Please scroll down to related posts section for other parts of this document.
U
202. tar: /dev/rmt/0: No such file or directory
203. tar: directory checksum error
204. tar: tape write error
205. Text is lost because the maximum edit log size has been exceeded.
206. THE FOLLOWING FILE SYSTEM(S) HAD AN UNEXPECTED INCONSISTENCY:
207. The SCSI bus is hung. Perhaps an external device is turned off.
208. THE SYSTEM IS BEING SHUT DOWN NOW !!!
209. The system will be shut down in N minutes
210. This mail file has been changed by another mail reader.
211. Timeout waiting for ARP/RARP packet
212. timeout waiting for input during variable
213. Too many links
214. Too many open files
U
215. umount: warning: /variable not in mnttab
216. Unable to install/attach driver ‘variable’
217. undefined control
218. Unmatched `
219. UNREF FILE I=i OWNER=o MODE=m SIZE=s MTIME=t CLEAR?
220. Use “logout” to logout.
221. /usr/openwin/bin/xinit: connection to X server lost
V 222. Value too large for defined data type
223. variable… Host unknown
224. variable… User unknown
225. variable… Local configuration error
W 226. WARNING: Clock gained N days– CHECK AND RESET THE DATE!
227. WARNING: No network locking on variable: contactadminto install server change228. WARNING: processorlevel 4 interrupt not serviced
229. WARNING: /tmp: File system full, swap space limit exceeded
230. WARNING: TOD clock not initialized–CHECK AND RESET THE DATE!
231. WARNING:Unable to repair the / filesystem. Run fsck
232. Watchdog Reset
233. Watchdog Reset, Rebooting.
234. Who are you?
235. Window Underflow
X 236. X connection to variable:0.0 broken  (explicit kill or server shutdown).
237. xinit: not found
238. XIO: fatal IO error 32 (Broken pipe) on X server “variable:0.0”
239. Xlib: Client is not authorized to connect to Server
240. Xlib: connection to “variable:0.0” refused by server
241. xterm: fatal IO error 32 (Broken Pipe)or Kill Client on X server ” variable:0.0″
242. XView warning: Cannot load font set ‘variable'(Font Package)
Y 243. ypbind876: NIS server for domain “variable” OK
244. ypbind876: NIS server not responding for domain “variable”; still trying
245. ypwhich: can’t communicate with ypbind
Z 246. zsN: silo overflow
<a
tar: /dev/rmt/0: No such file or directory

The default tape device /dev/rmt/0, or possibly the device
specified by the TAPE environment variable, is not currently
connected to the system, is not configured, or its hardware
symbolic link is broken.
List the files in the /dev/rmt directory to see which tape
devices are currently configured. If none are configured,

ensure
that a tape device is correctly attached to the system, and
reboot with the -r option to reconfigure devices.
If tape devices other than /dev/rmt/0 are configured, you
could
specify one of them after the -f option of tar(1).

tar: directory checksum error

This error message from tar(1) indicates that the checksum of the
directory and the files it has read from tape does not match the
checksum advertised in the header block. Usually this indicates
the wrong blocking factor, although it could indicate corrupt
data on tape.
To resolve this problem, make certain that the blocking factor
you specify on the command line (after -b) matches the blocking
factor originally specified. If in doubt, leave out the block
size and let tar determine it automatically. If that doesn’t
help, tape data could be corrupted.

tar: tape write error

A physical write error has occurred on the tar(1) output file,
which is usually a tape, although it could be a diskette or disk
file. Look on the system console, where the device driver should
provide the actual error condition. This might be a write-
protected tape, a physical I/O error, an end-of-tape condition,
or a File too large limitation.
In the case of write-protectedtapes, enable the write switch.
For physical I/O errors, the best course of action is to replace
the tape with a new one. For end-of-tape conditions, try using a
higher density if the device supports one, or use cpio(1) or pax
(1) for their multi-volume support., When encountering File too
large limitations, use the parent shell’slimit(1) or ulimit
facility to increase the maximum file size.
For more information on tar tapes, see the section on copying UFS
files in the System Administration Guide,Volume I.

Text is lost because the maximum edit log size has been exceeded.

This message appears at the beginning of a cmdtool(1) session
after 100,000 characters have gone by in the scrolling window.
Clicking on the top rectangle of the scrollbar might display this
message. No data were lost, but the user cannot scroll back
before this wraparound point.
To increase the maximum size of the Command Tool log file, use
cmdtool with the-M option, specifying more than 100,000 bytes.

THE FOLLOWING FILE SYSTEM(S) HAD AN UNEXPECTED INCONSISTENCY:

At boot time the /etc/rcS script runs the fsck(1M) command to
check the integrity of filesystems marked “fsck” in /etc/vfstab.
If fsck cannot repair a filesystem automatically, it interrupts
the boot procedure and produces this message. When fsck gets into
this state, it cannot repair filesystems without losing one or
more files, so it wants to defer this responsibility to you, the
administrator. Data corruption has probably already occurred.
First run fsck -n on the filesystem, to see how many and what
type of problems exist.  Then run fsck again to repair the
filesystem. If you have a backup of the filesystem, you can
generally answer “y” to all the fsck questions. It’s a good idea
to keep a record of all problematic files and inode numbers for
later reference. To run fsck yourself, specify options as
recommended by the boot script. For example:
# fsck /dev/rdsk/c0t4d0s0
Usually, files lost during fsck repair were created just before a
crash or power outage, and cannot be recovered. If important
files are lost, you can recover them from backup tapes.
If you don’t havea backup, ask an expert to run fsck for you.
For more information, see the sectionon checking filesystem
integrity in the System Administration Guide, Volume I.

The SCSI bus is hung. Perhaps an external device is turned off.

This message appears near the beginning of rebooting, immediately
after a “Boot device: …” message, and then the system hangs.
The problem is conflicting SCSI targets for a non-boot device.
Having an external device turned off is unlikely to cause this
problem.
See the message “Boot device:
/iommu/sbus/variable/variable/[email protected],0” for a solution.
For more information, see the section on halting and booting in
the System Administration Guide, Volume I.

THE SYSTEM IS BEING SHUT DOWN NOW !!!

This message means the system is going down immediately and it’s
too late to save any changes.
This message is often preceded by messages telling you that the
system is going down in 15 minutes, 10 minutes, and so on. When
you see these initial broadcast shutdown messages, save all your
work, send any e-mail you’re working on, and close your files.
Fortunately vi sessions are automatically saved for later
recovery, but many otherapplications have no crash protection
mechanism. Data loss is likely.
For more information on shutting down the system, see the System
Administration Guide, Volume I. If you are using the AnswerBook,
“halting the system” is a good search string.

The system will be shut down in N minutes

Thismessage from the system shutdown(1M) script informs you that
the superuser is taking down the system.
Save all changes now or your work will be lost. Write out any
files you were changing, send any e-mail messages you were
composing, and close your files.
For more information on shutting down the system, see the System
Administration Guide, Volume I. If you are using the AnswerBook,
“halting the system” is a good search string.

This mail file has been changed by another mail reader.

This message appears in a pop-up dialog box whenever you start
mailtool(1) while another mail reader has the inbox locked. A
question follows: “Do you wish to ask that mail reader to save
the changes?” You are given three choices.
If you choose “Save Changes” mailtool will request the other mail
reader to relinquish its lock and write out any changes it has
made to your inbox. If you choose “Ignore” mailtool will read
your inbox without locking it. If you choose “Cancel” mailtool
will exit.

Timeout waiting for ARP/RARP packet

This problem can occur while booting from the net, and indicates
a network connection problem.
Make sure the Ethernet cable is connected to the network. Check
that this system has an entry in the NIS ethers map or locally on
the boot server. Then check the IP address of the server and the
client to make sure they are on the same subnet. Local /etc/hosts
files must agree with each other and withthe NIS hosts map.
If those are not causing the problem, go to the system’s PROM
monitor ok prompt and run test net to test the network
connection. (On older PROM monitors, use test-net instead.) If
the network test fails, check the Ethernet port, card, fuse, and
cable, replacing them if necessary. Also check the twisted pair
port to make sure it is patched to the correct subnet.
For more information on packets, see SPARC: Installing Solaris
Software. If you are using the AnswerBook, “ARP/RARP” isa good
search string.

Too many links

An attempt was made to create more than the maximum number of
hard links (LINK_MAX, by default 32767) to a file. Because each
subdirectory is a link to its parent directory, the same error
results from trying to create too many subdirectories.
Check to see why there are so many links to the same file. To get
more than the maximum number of hard links, use symbolic links
instead.
The symbolic name for this error is EMLINK, errno=31.

Too many open files

A process has too many files open at once. The system imposes a
per-process soft limit on open files, OPEN_MAX (usually 64),
which can be increased, and a per-process hard limit (usually
1024), which cannot be increased.
You can control the soft limit from the shell. In the C shell,
use the limit command to increase the number of descriptors. In
the Bourne or Korn shells, use the ulimit command with the -n
option to increase the number of file descriptors.
If the window system refuses to start new applications because of
this error, increase the open file limit in your login shell
before starting the window system.
The symbolic name for this error is EMFILE, errno=24.

umount: warning: /variable not in mnttab

This message results when the superuser attempts to unmount a
filesystem that is not mounted. Note that subdirectories of
filesystems,such as /var, cannot be unmounted.
Run the mount(1M) or df(1M) command to see what filesystems are
mounted. If you really want to unmount one of them, specify the
existing mount point.

Unable to install/attach driver ‘variable’

These messages appear in /var/adm/messages at boot time, when the
system tries to load drivers for devices the machine does not
have.
Despite the alarmist tone, this message is intended as purely
informational. You probably don’t want all these device drivers,
because they make your system kernel larger, requiring more
memory.

undefined control

This message, prefaced by the file name and line number involved,
is from the C preprocessor /usr/ccs/lib/cpp, and indicates a line
starting with a sharp (#) but not followed by a valid keyword
such as define or include.
A piece of software might be running the C preprocessor on an
initialization file that you thought was interpreted by a shell.
In most shells, the sharp (#) indicates a comment. The C
preprocessor considers comments to be anythingbetween /* and */
delimiters.

Unmatched `

This message from the C shell csh(1) indicates that a user typed
a command containing a backquote symbol (`) without a closeing
backquote. Similar messages result from an unmatched single quote
(‘) or an unmatched double quote (“). Other shells generally give
a continuation prompt when a command line contains an unmatched
quote symbol.
Correct the command line and try again. To continue typing on
another line, give the C shell a backslash right before the
newline.

UNREF FILE I=i OWNER=o MODE=m SIZE=s MTIME=t
= CLEAR?

During phase 4, fsck(1M) discovered that the specified file was
orphaned because the inode had no record of its pathname. In
other words, the file was not connected into any directory.
Answer yes to reconnect the file into the lost+found directory.
Then contact the file’s owner to ask whether they want it back,
and where they want you to place it.
For more information, see the chapter on checking filesystem
integrity in the System Administration Guide, Volume I.

Use “logout” to logout.

This C shell message might come as a surprise to Bourne or Korn
shell users accustomed to logging out with a Control-d.
When ignoreeof is set, the C shell requires users to logout by
typing logout or exit.  Write any modified files to disk before
exiting.

/usr/openwin/bin/xinit: connection to X server lost

This means that the xinit(1) program, which sets up X11 resources
and starts a window manager, failed to locate the X server
process. Perhaps the user interrupted window system startup, or
exited abnormally from OpenWindows (for example, by killing
processes or by rebooting). It is possible that the X server
crashed. Data loss is possible in some cases. Depending on
process timing, this message might be normal when OpenWindows
exits during a system reboot.
The only solution is to exit and restart OpenWindows. You do not
need to reboot the system unless it hangs and fails to give you a
console prompt. To exit OpenWindows, select Workspace->Exit. To
restart OpenWindows, type openwin at the system prompt.

Value too large for defined data type

The user ID or group ID of an IPC object or file system object
was too large to be stored in an appropriate member of the
caller-provided structure.
Run the application on a newer system, or ask the program’s
author to fix this condition.
This error occurs only on systems that support a larger range of
user or group ID values than a declared member structure can
support. This condition usually occurs because the IPC or file
system object resides on a remote machine with a larger value of
type uid_t, off_t, or gid_t than that of the local system.
The symbolic name for this error is EOVERFLOW, errno=79.

WARNING: Clock gained N days– CHECK AND RESET THE DATE!

Each workstation contains an internal clock powered by a
rechargeable battery. After the system is halted and turned off,
the internal clock continues to keep time. When the system is
powered on and reboots, the system notices that the internal
clock has gained time since the workstation was halted.
In most cases, especially if the power has been off for less than
a month, the internal clock keeps the correct time, and you do
not have to reset the date. Use the date(1) command to check the
date andtime on your system. If the date or time is wrong,
become superuser and use the date(1) command to reset them.

WARNING: No network locking on variable:

 contact adminto install server change

The Solaris 2.x mount(1M) command issues this message whenever it
mounts a filesystem that doesn’t have NFS locking, such as a
standard SunOS 4.1.x exported filesytem. Data loss is possible in
applications that depend on locking.
On the remote SunOS 4.1.x system, install the appropriate
rpc.lockd jumbo patch to implement NFS locking. For SunOS 4.1.4,
install patch #102264; for SunOS 4.1.3, install patch #100075;
for earlier 4.1 releases, install patch #101817.

WARNING: processorlevel 4 interrupt not serviced

This message is basically a diagnostic from the SCSI driver.
Especially on machineswith the sun4c architecture, it can appear
on the console every 10 minutes or so.
To reduce the frequency of this message, add this line near the
bottom of the /etc/system file and reboot:
set esp:esp_use_poll_loop=0
You might also see this message repeatedly after manually
removing a CD when it was busy. Don’t do this! To get the system
back to normal, reboot the system with the -r (reconfigure)
option.

WARNING: /tmp: File system full, swap space limit exceeded

The system swap area (virtual memory) has filled up. You needto
reduce swap space consumption by killing some processes or
possibly by rebooting the system.
See the message “Not enough space” for information about
increasingswap space.

WARNING: TOD clock not initialized– CHECK AND RESET THE DATE!


This message indicates that the Time Of Day (TOD) clock reads
zero, so its time is the beginning of the UNIX epoch: midnight 31
December 1969. On a brand-new system, the manufacturer might have
neglected to initialize the system clock. On older systems it is
more likely that the rechargeable battery has run out and
requires replacement.
First replace the batteryaccording to the manufacturer’s
instructions. Then become superuser and use the date(1) command
to set the time and date. On SPARC systems the clock is powered
by the same battery as the NVRAM, so a dead battery also causes
loss of the machine’s Ethernet address and host ID, which are
more serious problems for networked systems.

WARNING:Unable to repair the / filesystem. Run fsck

This message comes at boot time from the /etc/rcS script whenever
it gets a bad return code from fsck(1) after checking a
filesystem. The message recommends an fsck command line, and
instructs you to exit the shell when done to continue booting.
Then the script places the system in single-user mode so fsck can
be run effectively.
See “/dev/rdsk/variable: UNEXPECTED INCONSISTENCY” for
information about repairing UFS filesystems.
See “THE FOLLOWING FILE SYSTEM(S) HAD AN UNEXPECTED
INCONSISTENCY” for information about repairing non-UFS
filesystems.

Watchdog Reset

This fatal error usually indicates some kind of hardware problem.
Data corruption on the system is possible.
Look for some other message that might help diagnose the problem.
By itself, a watchdog reset doesn’t provide enough information;
because traps are disabled, all information has been lost. If all
that appears on the console is an ok prompt, issue the PROM
command below to view the final messages that occurred just
before system failure:
ok f8002010 wector p
Yes, that word iswector, not vector.
The result is a display of messages similar to those produced by
the dmesg(1M) command. These messages can be useful in finding
the cause of system failure.
This message doesn’t come from the kernel, but from the OpenBoot
PROM monitor, a piece of Forth software that gives you the ok
prompt before you boot UNIX. If the CPU detects a trap when traps
are disabled (an unrecoverable error), it signals a watchdog. The
OpenBoot PROM monitor detects the watchdog, issues this message,
and brings down the system.

Watchdog Reset, Rebooting.

See the message “Watchdog Reset” for details. This rebooting
message occurs under the same conditions, but when the EEPROM’s
watchdog-reboot? variable is set to true, causing the machine to
automatically reboot itself. Data corruption on the system is
possible.

Who are you?

Many networking programs can print this message, including
from(1B), lpr(1B), lprm(1B), mailx(1), rdist(1), sendmail(1M),
talk(1), and rsh(1). The command prints this message when it
cannot locate a password file entry for the current user.  This
might occur if a user logged in just before the superuser deleted
that user’s password entry, or if the network naming service
fails for a user who has no entry in the local password file.
If a user’s password file entry was accidentally deleted, restore
it from backups or from another password file. If a user’s login
name or user ID was changed, ask that user to logout and login
again. If the network naming service failed, check the NIS
server(s) and repair or reboot as necessary.
There is a known problem (bug 1138025) with starting hundreds of
rsh processes on another machine. This message appears because
rsh hangs while binding to a reserved port, and responds too
slowly to interact with the network naming service.

Window Underflow

This message often occurs at boot time, sometimes along with a
“Watchdog Reset” error. It comes from the OpenBoot PROM monitor,
which was passed a processor trap from the hardware. This error
indicates that some programtried to access a SPARC register
window that wasn’t accessible from the processor.
On some system architectures, specifically sun4c, the problem
could be that different capacity memory chips are mixed together.
Someone might have placed 1MB SIMMs in the same bank with 4MB
SIMMs. If this is so, rearrange the memory chips. Make sure to
put higher-capacity SIMMs in the first bank(s), and lower-
capacity SIMMs inthe remaining bank(s); never mix different
capacity SIMMs in the same bank.
The problem could also be that cache memory on the motherboard
has gone bad and needs replacement. If main memory is installed
correctly, try swapping the motherboard.
The best way to isolate the problem is to look at the %pc
register to see where it got its arguments from, and why the
arguments were bad. If you can reproduce the condition causing
this message, your system vendor might be able to help diagnose
the problem.

X connection to variable:0.0 broken (explicit kill or

 server shutdown).

This means that the client has lost its connection to the X
server. The “0.0” represents the display device, which is usually
the console. This message can appear when a user is running an X
application on a remote system with the DISPLAY set back to the
original system and the remote system’s X server disappears,
perhaps because someone exited X windows orrebooted the machine.
It sometimes appears locally when a user exits the window system.
Dataloss is possible if applications were killed before saving
files.
Try to run the application again in a few minutes after the
system has rebooted and the window system is running.

xinit: not found

OpenWindows was probably not installed properly, and the
openwin(1) program could not find xinit(1) to start up the X
windows system. If the user is running another version of X
windows, such as the MIT X11 distribution, the startx program
serves the same function as xinit.
Check the PATH environment variable to make sure it contains the
appropriate X windows install directory. Verify that xinit is in
this directory as an executable program.

XIO: fatal IO error 32 (Broken pipe) on X server “variable:0.0”

This means that I/O with the X server has been broken. The “0.0”
represents the display device, which is usually the console. This
message can appear when a user is running Display PostScript
applications and the X server disappears or the client is shut
down. Data loss is possible if applications disappeared before
saving files.
Try to run the application again in a few minutes after the
system has rebooted and the window system is running.

Xlib: Client is not authorized to connect to Server

See the message “Xlib: connection to … refused by server” for
details.

Xlib: connection to “variable:0.0” refused by server

This message is immediately followed by the “Xlib: Client is not
authorized to connect to Server” message. These messages indicate
that an X windows application tried to run on the X server
specified inside double quotes, which did not allow the request.
The “0.0” represents the display device, which is usually the
console. If no server name appears, the superuser probably tried
to run an X application on the current machine in an X session
that was owned by somebody else.
To allow this client to connect to the X server, run xhost
+clientname on the X server system. Only the owner of the current
X session (who is not necessarily the superuser) isallowed to
run the xhost command. If somebody else is running X windows on
the server, ask them to log out and then start your own X session
on that server; remote X connections are usually allowed for the
same user ID.

xterm: fatal IO error 32 (Broken Pipe) or KillClient on X server
variable:0.0″

This means that xterm(1) has lost its connection to the X server.
The “0.0” represents the display device, which is usually the
console. This message can appear when a user is running xterm and
the X server disappears or the client gets shut down. Data loss
is possible if applications were killed before saving files.
Try to run the terminal emulator again in a few minutes after the
system has rebooted and the window system is running.

XView warning: Cannot load font set ‘variable’ (Font Package)

This message from the XView library warns that a requested font
is not installed on the X server. Often multiple warnings appear
about the same font. The set of available fonts can vary from
release to release.
To see which fonts are available on the X server, run the
xlsfonts(1) program. Then specify another font name that you see
in the output of xlsfonts. Sometimes it is possible to locate a
similar font from a different vendor.
There are two packages of X windowsfonts: the common but not
required fonts (SUNWxwcft), and the optional fonts (SUNWxwoft).
Run pkginfo(1) to see if both these packages are installed, and
add them to the system as you wish.

ypbind876: NIS server for domain “variable” OK

This message appears after an “NIS server not responding” message
to indicate that ypbind(1M is able to communicate with an NIS
server again.
Proceed with your work. This message is purely informational.

ypbind876: NIS server not responding for domain

 “variable”; still trying

This means that the NIS client daemon ypbind(1M) cannot
communicate with an NIS server for the specified domain. This
message appears when a workstation running the NIS naming service
has become disconnected from the network, or when NIS servers are
down or extremely slow to respond.
If other NIS clients are behaving normally, check the Ethernet
cabling on the workstation that is getting this message. On SPARC
machines, disconnected network cabling also produces a series of
“no carrier” messages. On x86 machines, the above message might
be your only indication that network cabling is disconnected.
If many NIS clients on the network are giving this message, go to
the NIS server in question and reboot or repair as necessary. To
locate the NIS server for a domain, run the ypwhich(1) command.
When the server machine comes back in operation, NIS clients give
an “NIS server for domain OK” message.
For more information about ypbind, see the section on
administering secure NFS in the NFS Administration Guide.

ypwhich: can’t communicate with ypbind

This message from the ypwhich(1) command indicates that the NIS
binder process ypbind(1M) is not running on the local machine.
If the system is not configured to use NIS, this message is
normal and expected.  Configure the system to use NIS if
necessary.
If the system is configured to use NIS, but the ypbind process is
not running, invoke the following command to start it up:
# /usr/lib/netsvc/yp/ypbind -broadcast

zsN: silo overflow

This message means that the Zilog 8530 character input silo (or
serial portFIFO) overflowed before it could be serviced. The
zs(4S) driver, which talks to a Zilog Z8530 chip, is reporting
that the FIFO (holding about two characters) has been overrun.
The number after zs shows which serial port experienced an
overflow:
zs0 – tty serial port 0 (/dev/ttya) zs1 – tty serial port 1
(/dev/ttyb) zs2 – keyboard port (/dev/kbd) zs3 – mouse port
(/dev/mouse)
Silo overflows indicate that data in the respective serial port
FIFO has been lost.  However, consequences of silo overflows
might be negligible if the overflows occur infrequently, if data
loss is not catastrophic, or if data can be recovered or
reproduced.  For example, although a silo overflow on the mouse
driver (zs3) indicates that the system could not process mouse
events quickly enough, the user can perform mouse motions again.
Similarly, lost data from a silo overflow on a serial port with a
modem connection transferring data using uucp(1C) will be
recovered when uucp discovers the loss of data and requests
retransmission of the corrupted packet.
Frequent silo overflow messages can indicate a zs hardware FIFO
problem, a serial driver software problem, or abnormal data or
system activity. For example, the system ignores interrupts
during system panics, so mouse and keyboard activity result in
silo overflows.
If the serial ports experiencing silo overflows are not being
used, a silo overflow could indicate the onset of a hardware
problem.
Another type of silo overflow is one that occurs during reboot
when an HDLC line is connected to any of the terminal ports. For
example, an X.25 network could be sending frames before the
kernel has been told to expect them. Such overflow messages can
be ignored.

in Errors and tagged Errors, messages, solaris error messages, unix error messages.

The fault tree is for diagnosing and fixing problems that occur when you’re installing and reconfiguring Samba. It’s an expanded form of a trouble and diagnostic document that is part of the Samba distribution.

Before you set out to troubleshoot any part of the Samba suite, you should know the following information:

  • Your client IP address (we use 192.168.236.10)

  • Your server IP address (we use 192.168.236.86)

  • The netmask for your network (typically 255.255.255.0)

  • Whether the machines are all on the same subnet (ours are)

For clarity, we’ve renamed the server in the following examples to server.example.com, and the client machine to client.example.com.

How to use the fault tree

Start the tests here, without skipping forward; it won’t take long (about five minutes) and may actually save you time backtracking. Whenever a test succeeds, you will be given a section name and page number to which you can safely skip.

Troubleshooting Low-level IP

The first series of tests is that of the low-level services that Samba needs in order to run. The tests in this section will verify that:

  • The IP software works

  • The Ethernet hardware works

  • Basic name service is in place

Subsequent sections will add TCP software, the Samba daemons smbd and nmbd, host-based access control, authentication and per-user access control, file services, and browsing. The tests are described in considerable detail in order to make them understandable by both technically oriented end users and experienced systems and network administrators.

Testing the networking software with ping

The first command to enter on both the server and the client is . This is the loopbackaddress and testing it will indicate whether any networking support is functioning at all. On Unix, you can use with the statistics option and interrupt it after a few lines. On Sun workstations, the command is typically ; on Linux, just . On Windows clients, run in an MS-DOS window and it will stop by itself after four lines.

Here is an example on a Linux server:

server% ping 127.0.0.1 PING localhost: 56 data bytes 64 bytes from localhost (127.0.0.1): icmp-seq=0. time=1. ms 64 bytes from localhost (127.0.0.1): icmp-seq=1. time=0. ms 64 bytes from localhost (127.0.0.1): icmp-seq=2. time=1. ms ^C ----127.0.0.1 PING Statistics---- 3 packets transmitted, 3 packets received, 0% packet loss round-trip (ms) min/avg/max = 0/0/1

If you get “ping: no answer from...” or “100% packet loss,” you have no IP networking at all installed on the machine. The address is the internal loopback address and doesn’t depend on the computer being physically connected to a network. If this test fails, you have a serious local problem. TCP/IP either isn’t installed or is seriously misconfigured. See your operating system documentation if it is a Unix server. If it is a Windows client, follow the instructions in Chapter 3, to install networking support.

Tip

If you’re the network manager, some good references are Craig Hunt’s TCP/IP Network Administration, Chapter 11, and Craig Hunt & Robert Bruce Thompson’s new book, Windows NT TCP/IP Network Administration, both published by O’Reilly.

Testing local name services with ping

Next, try to ping on the Samba server. is the conventional hostname for the 127.0.0.1 loopback, and it should resolve to that address. After typing , you should see output similar to the following:

server% ping localhost PING localhost: 56 data bytes 64 bytes from localhost (127.0.0.1): icmp-seq=0. time=0. ms 64 bytes from localhost (127.0.0.1): icmp-seq=1. time=0. ms 64 bytes from localhost (127.0.0.1): icmp-seq=2. time=0. ms ^C

If this succeeds, try the same test on the client. Otherwise:

  • If you get “unknown host: localhost,” there is a problem resolving the host name localhost into a valid IP address. (This may be as simple as a missing entry in a local hosts file.) From here, skip down to Section 9.2.8.

  • If you get “ping: no answer,” or “100% packet loss,” but pinging 127.0.0.1 worked, then name services is resolving to an address, but it isn’t the correct one. Check the file or database (typically on a Unix system) that the name service is using to resolve addresses to ensure that the entry is corrected.

Testing the networking hardware with ping

Next, ping the server’s network IP address from itself. This should get you exactly the same results as pinging 127.0.0.1:

server% ping 192.168.236.86 PING 192.168.236.86: 56 data bytes 64 bytes from 192.168.236.86 (192.168.236.86): icmp-seq=0. time=1. ms 64 bytes from 192.168.236.86 (192.168.236.86): icmp-seq=1. time=0. ms 64 bytes from 192.168.236.86 (192.168.236.86): icmp-seq=2. time=1. ms ^C ----192.168.236.86 PING Statistics---- 3 packets transmitted, 3 packets received, 0% packet loss round-trip (ms) min/avg/max = 0/0/1

If this works on the server, repeat it for the client. Otherwise:

  • If fails on either the server or client, but ping 127.0.0.1 works on that machine, you have a TCP/IP problem that is specific to the Ethernet network interface card on the computer. Check with the documentation for the network card or the host operating system to determine how to correctly configure it. However, be aware that on some operating systems, the ping command appears to work even if the network is disconnected, so this test doesn’t always diagnose all hardware problems.

Testing connections with ping

Now, ping the server by name (instead of its IP address), once from the server and once from the client. This is the general test for working network hardware:

server% ping server PING server.example.com: 56 data bytes 64 bytes from server.example.com (192.168.236.86): icmp-seq=0. time=1. ms 64 bytes from server.example.com (192.168.236.86): icmp-seq=1. time=0. ms 64 bytes from server.example.com (192.168.236.86): icmp-seq=2. time=1. ms ^C ----server.example.com PING Statistics---- 3 packets transmitted, 3 packets received, 0% packet loss round-trip (ms) min/avg/max = 0/0/1

On Microsoft Windows, a ping of the server would look like Figure 9.1.

Figure 9-1. Pinging the Samba server from a Windows client

If successful, this test tells us five things:

  1. The hostname (e.g., “server”) is being found by your local nameserver.

  2. The hostname has been expanded to the full name (e.g., server.example.com).

  3. Its address is being returned (192.168.236.86).

  4. The client has sent the Samba server four 56-byte UDP/IP packets.

  5. The Samba server has replied to all four packets.

If this test isn’t successful, there can be one of several things wrong with the network:

  • First, if you get “ping: no answer,” or “100% packet loss,” you’re not connecting to the network, the other machine isn’t connecting, or one of the addresses is incorrect. Check the addresses that the command reports on each machine, and ensure that they match the ones you set up initially.

    If not, there is at least one mismatched address between the two machines. Try entering the command , and see if there is an entry for the other machine. The command stands for the Address Resolution Protocol. The command lists all the addresses known on the local machine. Here are some things to try:

    • If you receive a message like “192.168.236.86 at (incomplete),” the Ethernet address of 192.168.236.86 is unknown. This indicates a complete lack of connectivity, and you’re likely having a problem at the very bottom of the TCP/IP Network Administration protocol stack, at the Ethernet-interface layer. This is discussed in Chapters 5 and 6 of TCP/IP Network Administration (O’Reilly).

    • If you receive a response similar to “server (192.168.236.86) at 8:0:20:12:7c:94,” then the server has been reached at some time, or another machine is answering on its behalf. However, this means that ping should have worked: you may have an intermittent networking or ARP problem.

    • If the IP address from ARP doesn’t match the addresses you expected, investigate and correct the addresses manually.

  • If each machine can ping itself but not another, something is wrong on the network between them.

  • If you get “ping: network unreachable” or “ICMP Host Unreachable,” then you’re not receiving an answer and there is likely more than one network involved.

    In principle, you shouldn’t try to troubleshoot SMB clients and servers on different networks. Try to test a server and client on the same network. The three tests that follow assume you might be testing between two networks:

    1. First, perform the tests for no answer described earlier in this section. If this doesn’t identify the problem, the remaining possibilities are the following: an address is wrong, your netmask is wrong, a network is down, or just possibly you’ve been stopped by a firewall.

    2. Check both the address and the netmasks on source and destination machines to see if something is obviously wrong. Assuming both machines really are on the same network, they both should have the same netmasks and ping should report the correct addresses. If the addresses are wrong, you’ll need to correct them. If they’re right, the programs may be confused by an incorrect netmask. See Section 9.2.9.1, later in this chapter.

    3. If the commands are still reporting that the network is unreachable and neither of the previous two conditions is in error, one network really may be unreachable from the other. This, too, is a network manager issue.

  • If you get “ICMP Administratively Prohibited,” you’ve struck a firewall of some sort or a misconfigured router. You will need to speak to your network security officer.

  • If you get “ICMP Host redirect,” and ping reports packets getting through, this is generally harmless: you’re simply being rerouted over the network.

  • If you get a host redirect and no ping responses, you are being redirected, but no one is responding. Treat this just like the “Network unreachable” response and check your addresses and netmasks.

  • If you get “ICMP Host Unreachable from gateway gateway_name,” ping packets are being routed to another network, but the other machine isn’t responding and the router is reporting the problem on its behalf. Again, treat this like a “Network unreachable” response and start checking addresses and netmasks.

  • If you get “ping: unknown host hostname,” your machine’s name is not known. This tends to indicate a name-service problem, which didn’t affect . Have a look at Section 9.2.8,” later in this chapter.

  • If you get a partial success, with some pings failing but others succeeding, you either have an intermittent problem between the machines or an overloaded network. Ping for longer, and see if more than about 3 percent of the packets fail. If so, check it with your network manager: a problem may just be starting. However, if only a few fail, or if you happen to know some massive network program is running, don’t worry unduly. Ping’s ICMP (and UDP) are designed to drop occasional packets.

  • If you get a response like “smtsvr.antares.net is alive” when you actually pinged client.example.com, you’re either using someone else’s address or the machine has multiple names and addresses. If the address is wrong, name service is clearly the culprit; you’ll need to change the address in the name service database to refer to the right machine. This is discussed in Section 9.2.8,” later in this chapter.

    Server machines are often multihomed : connected to more than one network, with different names on each net. If you are getting a response from an unexpected name on a multihomed server, look at the address and see if it’s on your network (see Section 9.2.9.1 later in this chapter). If so, you should use that address, rather than one on a different network, for both performance and reliability reasons.

    Servers may also have multiple names for a single Ethernet address, especially if they are web servers. This is harmless, if otherwise startling. You probably will want to use the official (and permanent) name, rather than an alias which may change.

  • If everything works, but the IP address reported is 127.0.0.1, you have a name service error. This typically occurs when a operating system installation program generates an line similar to hostnamedomainname. The localhost line should say or . Correct it, lest it cause failures to negotiate who is the master browse list holder and who is the master browser. It can, also cause (ambiguous) errors in later tests.

If this worked from the server, repeat it from the client.

Now that you’ve tested IP, UDP, and a name service with ping, it’s time to test TCP. ping and browsing use ICMP and UDP; file and print services (shares) use TCP. Both depend on IP as a lower layer and all four depend on name services. Testing TCP is most conveniently done using the FTP (file transfer protocol) program.

Try connecting via FTP, once from the server to itself, and once from the client to the server:

server% Connected to server.example.com. 220 server.example.com FTP server (Version 6.2/OpenBSD/Linux-0.10) ready. Name (server:davecb): 331 Password required for davecb. Password: 230 User davecb logged in. ftp> 221 Goodbye.

If this worked, skip to Section 9.2.4. Otherwise:

  • If you received the message “server: unknown host,” then nameservice has failed. Go back to the corresponding ping step, Section 9.2.2.2,” and rerun those tests to see why name lookup failed.

  • If you received “ftp: connect: Connection refused,” the machine isn’t running an FTP daemon. This is mildly unusual on Unix servers. Optionally, you might try this test by connecting to the machine using telnet instead of FTP; the messages are very similar and telnet uses TCP as well.

  • If there was a long pause, then “ftp: connect: Connection timed out,” the machine isn’t reachable. Return to Section 9.2.2.4.

  • If you received “530 Logon Incorrect,” you connected successfully, but you’ve just found a different problem. You likely provided an incorrect username or password. Try again, making sure you use your username from the Unix server and type your password correctly.

Troubleshooting Server Daemons

Once you’ve confirmed that TCP networking is working properly, the next step is to make sure the daemons are running on the server. This takes three separate tests because no single one of the following will decisively prove that they’re working correctly.

To be sure they’re running, you need to find out if:

  1. The daemon has started

  2. The daemons are registered or bound to a TCP/IP port by the operating system

  3. They’re actually paying attention

First, check the logs. If you’ve started the daemons, the message “smbd version some_number started” should appear. If it doesn’t, you will need to restart the Samba daemons.

If the daemon reports that it has indeed started, look out for “bind failed on port 139 socket_addr=0 (Address already in use)”. This means another daemon has been started on port 139 (smbd ). Also, nmbd will report a similar failure if it cannot bind to port 137. Either you’ve started them twice, or the inetd server has tried to provide a daemon for you. If it’s the latter, we’ll diagnose that in a moment.

Looking for daemon processes with ps

Next, you need to see if the daemons have been started. Use the command on the server with the option for your machine type (commonly or ), and see if you have either smbd and nmbd already running. This often looks like the following:

server% ps ax PID TTY STAT TIME COMMAND 1 ? S 0:03 init [2] 2 ? SW 0:00 (kflushd) (...many lines of processes...) 234 ? S 0:14 nmbd -D3 237 ? S 0:11 smbd -D3 (...more lines, possibly including more smbd lines...)

This example illustrates that smbd and nmbd have already started as stand-alone daemons (the option) at log level 3.

Looking for daemons bound to ports

Next, the daemons have to be registered with the operating system so they can get access to TCP/IP ports. The command will tell you if this has been done. Run the command on the server, and look for lines mentioning , or :

server% netstat -a Active Internet connections (including servers) Proto Recv-Q Send-Q Local Address Foreign Address (state) udp 0 0 *.netbios- *.* tcp 0 0 *.netbios- *.* LISTEN tcp 8370 8760 server.netbios- client.1439 ESTABLISHED

or:

server% netstat -a Active Internet connections (including servers) Proto Recv-Q Send-Q Local Address Foreign Address (state) udp 0 0 *.137 *.* tcp 0 0 *.139 *.* LISTEN tcp 8370 8760 server.139 client.1439 ESTABLISHED

Among many similar lines, there should be at least one UDP line for or . This indicates that the nmbd server is registered and (we hope) is waiting to answer requests. There should also be at least one TCP line mentioning or , and it will probably be in the LISTENING state. This means that smbd is up and listening for connections.

There may be other TCP lines indicating connections from smbd to clients, one for each client. These are usually in the ESTABLISHED state. If there are smbd lines in the ESTABLISHED state, smbd is definitely running. If there is only one line in the LISTENING state, we’re not sure yet. If both of the lines is missing, a daemon has not succeeded in starting, so it’s time to check the logs and then go back to Chapter 2.

If there is a line for each client, it may be coming either from a Samba daemon or from the master IP daemon, inetd. It’s quite possible that your inetd startup file contains lines that start Samba daemons without your realizing it; for instance, the lines may have been placed there if you installed Samba as part of a Linux distribution. The daemons started by inetd prevent ours from running. This problem typically produces log messages such as “bind failed on port 139 socket_addr=0 (Address already in use).”

Check your ; unless you’re intentionally starting the daemons from there, there must not be any (udp port 137) or (tcp port 139) servers mentioned there. inetd is a daemon that provides numerous services, controlled by entries in /etc/inetd.conf. If your system is providing an SMB daemon via inetd, there will be lines like the following in the file:

netbios-ssn stream tcp nowait root /usr/local/samba/bin/smbd smbd netbios-ns dgram udp wait root /usr/local/samba/bin/nmbd nmbd

Checking smbd with telnet

Ironically, the easiest way to test that the smbd server is actually working is to send it a meaningless message and see if it rejects it. Try something like the following:

This sends an erroneous but harmless message to smbd. The message is important. Don’t try telneting to the port and typing just anything; you’ll probably just hang your process. , however, is generally a harmless message.

server% echo "hello"

Getting message, "unknown host" when trying to get host properties of newly add client name into policy.

Problem

Getting message, "unknown host" when trying to get host properties of newly add client name into policy.

Error Message

unknown host hostname
ping: unknown host hostname
hostname: Unknown host

Solution

Environment:
In all examples, "clienthostname" is theshort hostname, "clienthostname.mycompany.com" is the full qualified domain name(FQDN), and 192.168.0.128 is the IP address.  Master server isSolaris.

Exact Error:
unknown hostclienthostname

Change:
Adding new client to NetBackuppolicies.  When new client names are added, they are automatically listedunder "Host Properties" > "Clients".  The short hostname of theclient is used.

Troubleshooting:




















Cause:
Master server (and media servers) cannotconnect to the client by it hostname.  The error message represent thehostname being referred to is not known to any name directories for nameresolutions.  This includes DNS, NIS, and hosts files.  In the aboveexample, the master server is configured to resolve only the FDQN,clienthostname.mycompany.com but not the short name clienthostname.

Note: You will have similar issues if you want to define clientof FQDN in NetBackup policies, but only configure resolution for short name.

Solution:

(There are 3 options)

A) Add the shot name as analias to /etc/hosts file.

Example:




B) If using DNS, configure local DNS configuration toappend the domain name as a suffix.  Refer to your Network/SystemAdministrator for more assistance on this.

Example: For Solaris (andcompatible UNIX) you can add the domainname to /etc/resolv.conf:






Note: Configuration andtroubleshooting DNS, NIS, LDAP, and other directory services are outside thescope of NetBackup configuration.  Please refer to your SystemAdministrator, Network Administrator, Operating System support vendor, and/orNetwork hardware support vendor for assistance.


C) If you cannot make any changes with options A, or B,AND you are required to add the client to a NetBackup policy for backup, use theworking hostname instead.  In this example it is the FQDN name,clienthostname.mycompany.com, that you will use for the policy clientlist.







Solaris Common Messages and Troubleshooting Guide - Oracle

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Part Number 806-1075–10

February 2000

SolarisCommonMessagesand

TroubleshootingGuide


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Please

Recycle


Contents

Preface

1. About Error Messages 27

Searching for Messages 27

Choosing What to Look For 27

In the Printed Book 28

In the AnswerBook Navigator 28

Combining Search Techniques 30

Understanding the Message Explanations 30

2. Alphabetical Message Listing 33

Numbers and Symbols 33

***** FILE SYSTEM WAS MODIFIED ***** 33

** Phase 1– Check Blocks and Sizes 34

** Phase 1b– Rescan For More DUPS 34

** Phase 2– Check Pathnames 35

** Phase 3– Check Connectivity 35

** Phase 4– Check Reference Counts 36

** Phase 5– Check Cyl groups 36

@@ 37

29a00 illegal instruction 38

3


"A" 43

"B" 50

451 timeout waiting for input during source 38

501 MAIL FROM: unrecognized address: @@hostname 39

550 hostname... Host unknown 40

550 Security server failed to perform requested command 41

550 username... User unknown 42

554 hostname... Local configuration error 42

A command window has exited because its child exited. 43

access violation unknown host IP address 43

Accessing a corrupted shared library 44

Address already in use 44

Address family not supported by protocol family 44

admintool: Received communication service error 4 45

Advertise error 45

answerbook: XView error: NULL pointer passed to xv_set 46

apdb: Resource temporarily unavailable 46

Arg list too long 47

Argument out of domain 48

Arguments too long 48

assertion failed: string, file name, line int 49

Attempting to link in more shared libraries than system limit 49

automount[int]: name: Not a directory 49

automountd[int]: server hostname responding 50

Bad address 50

BAD/DUP FILE I=i OWNER=o MODE=m SIZE=s MTIME=t CLEAR?

51

Bad file number 51

4 SolarisCommonMessagesandTroubleshootingGuide ♦ February 2000


"C" 58

block no. BAD I=inode no. 52

BAD_MESSAGE (error code 100) from X.400 52

bad module/chip at: position 53

Bad request descriptor 53

BAD SUPER BLOCK: string 53

BAD TRAP 55

/bin/sh: file: too big 55

Block device required 56

Boot device: /iommu/sbus/directory/directory/[email protected],0 56

Broadcast Message from root (pts/int) on server [date] 57

Broken pipe 57

Bus Error 58

Cannot access a needed shared library 58

Cannot allocate colormap entry for "string" 59

Cannot assign requested address 59

Cannot bind to domain domainname: can’t communicate with ypbind 59

Cannot boot after install, error that points to an .rc file 60

cannot change passwd, not correct passwd 61

cannot establish nfs service over /dev/tcp: transport setup problem 61

Cannot exec a shared library directly 62

Cannot find SERVER hostname in network database 62

cannot install bootblock 63

Cannot open FCC file 64

Cannot send after transport endpoint shutdown 64

can’t communicate with ypbind 65

Can’t create public message device (Device busy) 65

Can’t invoke /etc/init, error int 66

Contents 5


can’t open /dev/rdsk/string: (null): UNEXPECTED

INCONSISTENCY 67

can’t synchronize with hayes 67

cd: Too many arguments 68

Channel number out of range 68

chmod: ERROR: invalid mode 68

Command not found 69

Communication error on send 70

config error: mail loops back to myself. 70

connect from hostIP to callit(ypserv): request from non-local host 71

connect from hostIP to callit(ypserv): request from unauthorized host 71

connect from hostIP to callit(ypserv): request from unprivileged port 72

connect from hostIP to callit(ypserv): request not forwarded 72

Connection closed. 72

Connection closed by foreign host. 73

[Connection closed. Exiting] 73

Connection refused 73

Connection reset by peer 74

Connection timed out 74

console login: ^J^M^Q^K^K^P 75

core dumped 76

corrupt label - wrong magic number or corrupt label or corrupt label -

label checksum failed 77

could not grant slave pty 78

Could not initialize tooltalk (tt_open): TT_ERR_NOMP 78

Could not open ToolTalk Channel 79

Could not start new viewer 80

Could not start NFS service for any protocol. Exiting 80

cpio: Bad magic number/header. 81

6 SolarisCommonMessagesandTroubleshootingGuide ♦ February 2000


"D" 82

cpio : can’t read input : end of file encountered prior to expected end of

archive. 81

Cross-device link 82

data access exception 82

Data fault 83

Deadlock situation detected/avoided 83

Destination address required 84

destination component full 84

/dev/fd/int: /dev/fd/int: cannot open 84

/dev/rdsk/c0t6d0s2: No such file or directory 85

Device busy 86

device busy 86

/dev/rdsk/string: CAN’T CHECK FILE SYSTEM. 88

/dev/rdsk/string: UNEXPECTED INCONSISTENCY; RUN fsck

MANUALLY. 88

Directory not empty 89

Disc quota exceeded 89

disk does not appear to be prepared for encapsulation 90

diskN not unique 90

dlopen (libxfn.so) failed 91

driver is already installed 91

dtmail: cannot open mailfile on 2.5.1 /var/mail server 92

DUMP: Cannot open dump device ‘/dev/rdsk/c2t0d0s1’: Permission

denied 93

dumptm: Cannot open ‘/dev/rmt/string’: Device busy 93

DUP/BAD I=i OWNER=o MODE=m SIZE=s MTIME=t FILE=f

REMOVE? 94

int DUP I=int 94

Contents 7


"E" 95

Encapsulation of root disk is not supported on systems with old PROM

versions 95

ENOMEM The available data space is not large enough to accommodate

the shared memory segment 96

"F" 106

error 15 initializing 97

Error 76 97

Error 88 97

error code 2: access violation 98

error: DPS has not initialized or server connection failed 98

Error: Error adding OS service Solaris 2.6 sparc sun4u: 99

Error Host Unknown: 100

ERROR: missing file arg (cm3) 101

ERROR [SCCS/s.string]: ‘SCCS/p.string’ nonexistent (ut4) 101

ERROR [SCCS/s.string]: writable ‘string’ exists (ge4) 101

Error: you don’t have a license to run this program 102

esp0: data transfer overrun 102

ether_hostton errors from cb_reset 102

Event not found 103

EXCESSIVE BAD BLKS I=int CONTINUE? 104

EXCESSIVE DUP BLKS I=int CONTINUE? 104

Exec format error 105

failed to initialize adapter 106

Failed to Load Security Policy: Invalid argument 106

fast access mmu error 107

fbconsole: ioctl SRIOCSREDIR: Device Busy. 108

fd0: unformatted diskette or no diskette in the drive 109

File descriptor in bad state 109

8 SolarisCommonMessagesandTroubleshootingGuide ♦ February 2000


File exists 109

"G" 119

File locking deadlock 110

File name too long 110

file system full 111

FILE SYSTEM STATE IN SUPERBLOCK IS WRONG; FIX? 111

File table overflow 112

File too large 112

filemgr: mknod: Permission denied 113

FREE BLK COUNT(S) WRONG IN SUPERBLK SALVAGE? 113

fsck & ufsdump - cannot read block/sector errors 114

fsck: Can’t open /dev/dsk/string 115

fsck: Can’t stat /dev/dsk/string 115

ftp: ftp/tcp: unknown service 116

fw_ipinput: q fc5fddc0:illegal interface 116

FW1: log message queue is full 117

fwm: no license 118

fwskip_parse_headers: invalid peer n 118

giving up 119

Graphics Adapter device /dev/fb is of unknown type 120

group.org_dir: NIS+ servers unreachable 120

"H" 121

"I" 124

hang console 121

/home/string: No such file or directory 121

Host is down 122

host name configuration error 123

hosts.org_dir: NIS+ servers unreachable 123

Contents 9


I can’t read your attachments. What mailer are you using? 124

Identifier removed 124

ie0: Ethernet jammed 125

ie0: no carrier 125

If pipe/FIFO, don’t sleep in stream head 126

ifconfig: bad address 126

ifconfig bad address le0 127

ifconfig: host name bad space address 127

ifconfig: SIOCGIFFLAGS: hme0: no such interface 128

Illegal Instruction 128

Illegal instruction "0xhex" was encountered at PC 0xhex 129

Illegal seek 129

Image Tool: Unable to open XIL Library. 130

Inappropriate ioctl for device 130

INCORRECT BLOCK COUNT I=int (should be int) CORRECT? 131

index failed:full:index preceded by saveset name 131

inetd[int]: execv /usr/sbin/in.uucpd: No such file or directory 132

inetd[int]: string/tcp: unknown service 132

inetd[int]: string/udp: unknown service 133

inetd: Too many open files 133

INIT: Cannot create /var/adm/utmpx 133

InitOutput: Error loading module for /dev/fb 134

insertion failed: a problem with the filesystem has been detected:

filesystem is probably full 135

Interrupted system call 135

Invalid argument 136

Invalid null command 136

Invalid_SS_JWS_HOME:no C:\\lib\basicframe.properties 137

10 SolarisCommonMessagesandTroubleshootingGuide ♦ February 2000


"J" 140

I/O error 137

IP: Hardware address ’08:00:20:xx:xx:xx’ trying to be our address

xxx.xxx.xxx.xxx! 138

"K" 141

"L" 143

Is a directory 140

java.lang.UnsatisfiedLinkError: 140

kernel read error 141

killed 141

Killed 142

kmem_free block already free 142

last message repeated int times 143

late initialization error 143

ld.so.1 fatal: can’t set protection on segment 144

ld.so.1: string: fatal: string: can’t open file: errno=2 144

ld.so.1: string: fatal: string: open failed: No such file or directory 145

ld.so.1: string: fatal: relocation error: string: string: referenced symbol not

found 146

ld.so.1: string: fatal: relocation error: symbol not found: string 146

le0: Memory error! 147

le0: No carrier– cable disconnected or hub link test disabled? 148

le0: No carrier– transceiver cable problem? 148

level 15 interrupt 149

.lib section in a.out corrupted 149

LINK COUNT FILE I=i OWNER=o MODE=m SIZE=s MTIME=t

COUNT... ADJUST? 149

Link has been severed 150

LL105W: Protocol error detected. 150

Contents 11


ln: cannot create /dev/fb: Read-only filesystem 151

lockd[int]: create_client: no name for inet address 0xhex 151

log_get: len is not a multiple of 4 from FW-1 152

Login incorrect 152

lp hang 153

"M" 154

Machine is not on the network 154

Mail Tool is confused about the state of your Mail File. 154

mail: Your mailfile was found to be corrupted (Content-length

mismatch). 155

mailtool: Can’t create dead letter: Permission denied 155

mailtool: Could not initialize the Classing Engine 156

Management Server is VPN while client is NON-VPN 156

file name may contain holes - can’t swap on it. 157

mbuf map full 157

Memory address alignment 157

memory leaks 158

Message too long 158

mount: /dev/dsk/string is already mounted, /string is busy, or... 159

mount: giving up on: /string 159

mount: mount-point /string does not exist. 160

mount: the state of /dev/dsk/string is not okay 160

Multihop attempted 160

"N" 161

Name not unique on network 161

named [pid]: hostname.domainname has CNAME and other data

(illegal) 161

/net/string: No such file or directory 162

Network dropped connection because of reset 163

12 SolarisCommonMessagesandTroubleshootingGuide ♦ February 2000


Network is down 163

Network is unreachable 163

NFS getattr failed for server string: RPC: Timed out 164

nfs mount: Couldn’t bind to reserved port 165

nfs mount: mount: string: Device busy 165

NFS mount: /string mounted OK 165

NFS mounted callog file Unsupported. 166

NFS read failed for server string 167

nfs_server: bad getargs for int/int 167

NFS server string not responding still trying 168

NFS server string ok 168

NFS string failed for server string: error int (string) 169

nfs umount: string: is busy 169

NFS write error on host string: No space left on device. 169

NFS write failed for server string: RPC: Timed out 170

NIS+ authentication failure 170

nis_cachemgr: Error in reading NIS cold start file : ’/var/nis/

NIS_COLD_START’ 171

No buffer space available 171

No child processes 172

No default media available 173

No directory! Logging in with home=/ 173

No message of desired type 174

No recipients specified 174

No record locks available 175

No route to host 175

No shell Connection closed 176

No space left on device 176

Contents 13


No such device 177

No such device or address 177

No such file or directory 178

no such map in server’s domain 178

No such process 179

No such user as string– cron entries not created 179

No utmpx entry 179

no valid fm license 180

no VTOC 181

Not a data message 182

Not a directory 182

Not a stream device 182

Not enough space 183

not found 184

Not login shell 184

Not on system console 185

Not owner 185

Not supported 185

NOTICE: /string: out of inodes 186

NOTICE: vxvm: unexpected status on close 187

nsrck: SYSTEM error, more space needed to compress [client] index, 8.1

MB required 188

"O" 189

Object is remote 189

ok 189

open: no such device or address from FW-1 190

Operation already in progress 190

Operation canceled 191

14 SolarisCommonMessagesandTroubleshootingGuide ♦ February 2000


operation failed [error 185], unknown group error 0, string 191

"P" 195

Operation not applicable 191

Operation not supported on transport endpoint 192

Operation now in progress 192

/opt/bin/jws: /solaris/bin/locate_dirs: not found 193

Option not supported by protocol 193

out of memory 193

Out of stream resources 194

overlapping swap volume 194

Package not installed 195

page_create: invalid flag 195

Panic 195

panic -boot: Could not mount filesystem 196

Panic on cpu 0: valloc’d past tmpptes 198

PARTIALLY ALLOCATED INODE I=int CLEAR? 199

passwd: Changing password for string 199

passwd (SYSTEM): System error: repository out of range 200

passwd.org_dir: NIS+ servers unreachable 201

Password does not decrypt secret key for [email protected] 201

password file busy - try again later. 201

pdbadmin start node fails cluster_establish join not allowed 202

Permission denied 203

Please specify a recipient. 203

Protocol error 203

protocol error, string closed connection 204

Protocol family not supported 204

Protocol not supported 205

Contents 15


Protocol wrong type for socket 205

"Q" 206

"R" 206

"S" 214

quotactl: open Is a directory 206

Read error from network: Connection reset by peer 206

Reading configuration data 207

Read-only file system 207

rebooting... 208

Recipient names must be specified 208

refused connect from hostIP to callit(ypserv) 209

Reset tty pgrp from int to int 209

Resource temporarily unavailable 209

Restartable system call 210

Result too large 210

rlogin: no directory! connection closed 211

rmdir: string: Directory not empty 211

ROOT LOGIN /dev/console 212

ROOT LOGIN /dev/pts/int FROM string 212

route: socket: Protocol not supported 212

RPC: Program not registered 213

rx framing error 213

save: SYSTEM error, Arg list too long 214

SCSI bus DATA IN phase parity error 214

SCSI transport failed: reason ’reset’ 215

Security exception on host string. USER ACCESS DENIED. 216

Segmentation Fault 216

16 SolarisCommonMessagesandTroubleshootingGuide ♦ February 2000


sendmail[]: can’t lookup data via name server "dns" or sendmail[]: can’t

lookup data via name server "nis" 217

sendmail[init]: NOQUEUE: SYSERR(root): Cannot bind to domain

: no such map in server’s domain: Bad file number 218

sendmail[int]: NOQUEUE: SYSERR: net hang reading from string 218

Service wouldn’t let us acquire selection 219

setmnt: Cannot open /etc/mnttab for writing 219

share_nfs: /home: Operation not applicable 219

Signal 8 error 220

SIMS license error: licenses invalid 220

Slice c0t1d0s0 is too small to contain 1 replicas 221

snmpdx: bind() failed on udp on 161 [errno: address already in use] 125

snmpdx dmid: unable to connect to snmpdx 222

Socket type not supported 222

Soft error rate (int%) during writing was too high 222

Software caused connection abort 223

Srmount error 223

Stale NFS file handle 224

start up failure no such file or directory 224

statd: cannot talk to statd at string 224

stty: TCGETS: Operation not supported on socket 225

su: No shell 225

su: ’su root’ failed for login on /dev/pts/int 226

su: ’su root’ succeeded for login on /dev/pts/int 227

SunPC may NOT run correctly as root 227

syncing file systems... 228

syslog service starting. 228

System booting after fatal error FATAL 229

SYSTEM error, Arg list too long 229

Contents 17


system hang 230

"T" 230

SYSTEM HANGS DURING BOOT 230

system will not connect to port 80 230

tar: /dev/rmt/0: No such file or directory 230

tar: directory checksum error 231

tar: tape write error 231

Text file busy 232

Text is lost because the maximum edit log size has been exceeded. 232

tftpd: nak: Transport endpoint is already connected 233

THE FOLLOWING FILE SYSTEM(S) HAD AN UNEXPECTED

INCONSISTENCY: 235

"U" 242

The SCSI bus is hung. Perhaps an external device is turned off. 235

THE SYSTEM IS BEING SHUT DOWN NOW !!! 236

The system will be shut down in int minutes 237

This gateway does not support Unix Password. 237

This mail file has been changed by another mail reader. 238

Timeout waiting for ARP/RARP packet 238

Timer expired 239

token ring hangs 239

Too many links 239

Too many open files 240

Transport endpoint is already connected 240

Transport endpoint is not connected 241

TRAP 3E 241

ufsdump 4mm commands 242

umount: warning: /string not in mnttab 243

18 SolarisCommonMessagesandTroubleshootingGuide ♦ February 2000


Unable to connect to license server. Inconsistent encryption code. 243

unable to get pty! 243

Unable to install/attach driver ’string’ 244

Unable to open nwrecover, Error: nwrecover: NSR: please start a server

on client_name 244

uname: error writing name when booting 245

undefined control 245

unknown host exception: unknown host 245

Unmatched ‘ 246

UNREF FILE I=i OWNER=o MODE=m SIZE=s MTIME=t CLEAR? 246

UnsatisfiedLinkError 247

Use "logout" to logout. 247

user unknown 248

/usr/dt/bin/rpc.ttdbserverd:Child Status’ changed 248

/usr/openwin/bin/xinit: connection to X server lost 249

/usr/ucb/cc: language optional software package not installed 249

UX: userdel: error: Cannot update system files login cannot be

deleted 251

"V" 251

Value too large for defined data type 251

Volume Manager reports error: Configuration daemon can’t speak

protocol version 252

Volume too large for defined data type 253

vxconfigd error: segmentation fault 253

vxfs filesystems not mounting 254

vxvm:vxslicer:ERROR unsupported disk layout 254

"W" 255

WARNING: add_spec: No major number for sf 255

warning:cachefs:invalid cache version 256

Contents 19


WARNING: Clock gained int days– CHECK AND RESET THE

DATE! 256

Warning: Could not find matching rule in rules.ok 257

WARNING: FAN FAILURE check if fans are still spinning 257

WARNING: FAN FAILURE still sensed 258

WARNING: No network locking on string: contact admin to install

server change 258

WARNING: processor level 4 interrupt not serviced 259

WARNING: /tmp: File system full, swap space limit exceeded 259

WARNING: TOD clock not initialized– CHECK AND RESET THE

DATE! 260

"X" 264

WARNING: Unable to repair the / filesystem. Run fsck 260

WARNING: vxvm:vxio: Illegal vminor encountered 261

Watchdog Reset 262

Who are you? 262

Window Underflow 263

X connection to string:0.0 broken (explicit kill or server shutdown). 264

xinit: not found 264

XIO: fatal IO error 32 (Broken pipe) on X server "string:0.0" 265

Xlib: connection to "string:0.0" refused by server 265

Xlib: extension "GLX" missing on display "0.0" 266

xntpd: clnt_dg_create: out of memory 267

xterm: fatal IO error 32 (Broken Pipe) or KillClient on X server

"string:0.0" 267

"Y" 268

XView warning: Cannot load font set ’string’ (Font Package) 268

yp_all RPC clnt_call (transport level) failure 268

ypbind[int]: NIS server for domain "string" OK 269

20 SolarisCommonMessagesandTroubleshootingGuide ♦ February 2000


ypbind[int]: NIS server not responding for domain "string"; still

trying 269

"Z" 271

ypserv[int]: restarting resolv server. old one not responding 270

ypwhich: can’t communicate with ypbind 271

zsint: silo overflow 271

Contents 21


22 SolarisCommonMessagesandTroubleshootingGuide ♦ February 2000


Preface

System administrators and advanced users can use the CommonMessagesand

TroubleshootingGuide to find explanations of some of the more common error

messages in the Solaris TM operating environment.

Look up the messages and explanations here when you see a system message that

you do not understand. If the message you are searching for is fairly common, it

might be documented in this book.

How This Book Is Organized

Chapter 1 explains how to find messages in both the AnswerBookTM Navigator and

in the printed book.

Chapter 2 lists messages alphabetically, with troubleshooting information following

each message listing.

Ordering Sun Documents

Fatbrain.com, an Internet professional bookstore, stocks select product

documentation from Sun Microsystems, Inc.

For a list of documents and how to order them, visit the Sun Documentation Center

on Fatbrain.com at http://www1.fatbrain.com/documentation/sun.

23


Accessing Sun Documentation Online

The docs.sun.com SM Web site enables you to access Sun technical documentation

online. You can browse the docs.sun.com archive or search for a specific book title or

subject. The URL is http://docs.sun.com.

What Typographic Conventions Mean

The following table describes the typographic changes used in this book.

TABLE P–1 Typographic Conventions

Typeface or

Symbol Meaning Example

AaBbCc123

AaBbCc123

AaBbCc123

AaBbCc123

The names of commands, files, and

directories; on-screen computer output

What you type, contrasted with

on-screen computer output

Command-line placeholder: replace

with a real name or value

Book titles, new words, or terms, or

words to be emphasized.

24 SolarisCommonMessagesandTroubleshootingGuide ♦ February 2000

Edit your .login file.

Use ls −a to list all files.

machine_name% you have

mail.

machine_name% su

Password:

To delete a file, type rm

filename.

Read Chapter 6 in User’s

Guide.

These are called class options.

You must be root to do this.


Shell Prompts in Command Examples

The following table shows the default system prompt and superuser prompt for the

C shell, Bourne shell, and Korn shell.

TABLE P–2 Shell Prompts

Shell Prompt

C shell prompt machine_name%

C shell superuser prompt machine_name#

Bourne shell and Korn shell prompt $

Bourne shell and Korn shell superuser

prompt

#

Preface 25


26 SolarisCommonMessagesandTroubleshootingGuide ♦ February 2000


CHAPTER 1

About Error Messages

This book explains some of the more common error messages in the Solaris

operating environment. Most messages explained here come from the operating

system and the window system, but some come from commands, networking, and

system administration (the man pages section 1: User Commands and man pages

section 1M: System Administration Commands).

Searching for Messages

Choosing What to Look For

How you choose to look up a particular message depends on:

4 How the message is constructed

4 Whether you are searching in a printed book or in the AnswerBook documentation

Variable Words and Numbers

Remember as you are searching that some words and numbers in messages vary

when the messages are displayed. For example, the following message uses the name

of the server affected, b5server in this case:

NFS read failed for server b5server

When message words or numbers vary, this book uses the words variable and number

in the italics type face. So the previous message is listed in this book as:

NFS read failed for server variable

27


Variable words and numbers can appear anywhere in a message, even at the

beginning. Because of this, messages are alphabetized by the first nonreplaced word

or number in the message.

Frequently Duplicated Parts of Messages

Many messages you see are actually combined messages, often beginning with a

program name. The five error messages in the following example are basically the

same, even though the command names are different.

4 find: out of memory

4 grep: out of memory

4 ls: out of memory

4 mount: out of memory

4 fsck: out of memory

Rather than document this message at least five times, it appears in this book as the

message “out of memory.” Messages that contain colons (:) are often combined

messages, and you might find that explanations of message sections are available

separately.

If you don’t find the beginning of a message in the book, and the message contains

colons, search for other parts of the message.

In the Printed Book

Methods for finding a particular message vary depending on whether you are

looking at a printed book or are searching online with the AnswerBook Navigator.

To find a message in the printed book, you can search the table of contents (which is

an alphabetical listing of the messages) or the main body of the manual, as shown in

Chapter 2.

In the AnswerBook Navigator

While print search methods work in AnswerBook, too, you can search for messages

through the search utility in the AnswerBook Navigator much faster.

1. Bring up AnswerBook.

$ answerbook

2. Click Select on the Search button.

3. Enter the words or pattern to search for in the “Search Library For:” pane.

28 SolarisCommonMessagesandTroubleshootingGuide ♦ February 2000


4. Double-click Select on an entry in the resulting list. Although any of the entries

might contain the information you are looking for, those from this book are most

likely to be what you want.

If your first search does not find the message, consider altering the search pattern.

Remember that this book contains only a small percentage of possible messages.

In general, you are most likely to find a documented message in the AnswerBook

search pane when you enclose the searched-for words in quotation marks (““) or in

parentheses ( ).

Using Pattern Matching

You can search in the AnswerBook Navigator for text containing specific single

words, phrases that contain spaces, words near one another, and word variations.

See “Using the AnswerBook Software” in OpenWindows User’s Guide for more

detailed information about the AnswerBook search.

TABLE 1–1 AnswerBook Search Pattern Matching

To search for Such as Use

Single words Installing, le0, group The words

Phrases with spaces Installing Packages Quotation marks (““) around

the phrase

Words near one another Installing...Server Parentheses ( ( ))

Word variations Delete, deleting, deletion Asterisks (*) and hyphens (-)

Table 1–2 shows some of the possible matches for specific AnswerBook Navigator

searches.

About Error Messages 29


TABLE 1–2 AnswerBook Search Results

Searching With Finds These (for Example)

Installing Installing XIL Device Handlers (XIL Device Porting and

Extensibility Guide)

Installing Packages on a Server for... (Application Packaging

Developer’s Guide)

“Installing Packages” Installing Packages on a Server for... (Application Packaging

Developer’s Guide)

Installing Packages for Clients on a Server (Software and

AnswerBook Packages...)

(Installing Server) Installing Packages on a Server for... (Application Packaging

Developer’s Guide)

Creating an Install Server (SPARC Installing Solaris Software)

Delet* Delete All Silence (Solaris Advanced User’s Guide)

Deleting a Line (Solaris Advanced User’s Guide)

Deletion of the New Selection (OLIT Reference Manual)

Combining Search Techniques

Combine the above search techniques to further refine your search. For example,

“chang* mail-tool” finds documents containing phrases such as “change mailtool,”

“change mail tool,” “change mail-tool,” “changing mailtool,” and so on.

Understanding the Message

Explanations

Each message in this book contains at least one of the following areas:

4 Cause: What might have happened to cause the message

4 Action: What you can do to fix the problem or, to continue with your work

4 Technical Notes: Background information that might be interesting or helpful to a

technical audience. This often contains information specifically for programmers.

30 SolarisCommonMessagesandTroubleshootingGuide ♦ February 2000


Whenever you see part of a message that says “errno=” and then a number, look

up the number on the Intro(2) man page to see what it indicates. System error

messages on the Intro(2) man page are organized numerically.

4 See Also: Suggests further reading

About Error Messages 31


32 SolarisCommonMessagesandTroubleshootingGuide ♦ February 2000


CHAPTER 2

Alphabetical Message Listing

Messages listed here are in the current Solaris 8 operating environment. Many were

also present in earlier Solaris operating environments.

Messages are listed alphabetically.

Numbers and Symbols

***** FILE SYSTEM WAS MODIFIED *****

Cause

This comment from the fsck(1M) command tells you that it changed the file system

it was checking.

Action

If fsck(1M) was checking the root file system, reboot the system immediately to

avoid corrupting the / partition. If fsck(1M) was checking a mounted file system,

unmount that file system and run fsck(1M) again, so that work done by fsck(1M)

is not undone when in-memory file tables are written out to disk.

33


** Phase 1– Check Blocks and Sizes

Cause

The fsck(1M) command is checking the file system shown in the messages that are

displayed before this one. The first phase checks the inode list, finds bad or duplicate

blocks, and verifies the inode size and format.

Action

If more than a dozen errors occur during this important phase, you might want to

restore the file system from backup tapes. Otherwise, it is fine to proceed with

fsck(1M).

See Also

For more information, see the chapter on checking file system integrity in the System

Administration Guide, Volume 1.

** Phase 1b– Rescan For More DUPS

Cause

The fsck(1M) command detected duplicate blocks while checking a file system, so

fsck(1M) is rescanning the file system to find the inode that originally claimed that

block.

Action

If fsck(1M) executes this optional phase, you will see additional DUP/BAD

messages in phases 2 and 4.

See Also

For more information, see the chapter on checking file system integrity in the System

Administration Guide, Volume 1.

34 SolarisCommonMessagesandTroubleshootingGuide ♦ February 2000


** Phase 2– Check Pathnames

Cause

The fsck(1M) command is checking a file system, and fsck(1M) is now removing

directory entries pointing to bad inodes that were discovered in phases 1 and 1b.

This phase might ask you to remove files, salvage directories, fix inodes, reallocate

blocks, and so on.

Action

If more than a dozen errors occur during this important phase, you might want to

restore the file system from backup tapes. Otherwise it is fine to proceed with

fsck(1M).

See Also

For more information, see the chapter on checking file system integrity in the System

Administration Guide, Volume 1.

** Phase 3– Check Connectivity

Cause

The fsck(1M) command is checking a file system, and fsck(1M) is now verifying

the integrity of directories. You might be asked to adjust, create, expand, reallocate,

or reconnect directories.

Action

You can usually answer "yes" to all these questions without harming the file system.

See Also

For more information, see the chapter on checking file system integrity in the System

Administration Guide, Volume 1.

Alphabetical Message Listing 35


** Phase 4– Check Reference Counts

Cause

The fsck(1M) command is checking a file system, and fsck(1M) is now checking

link count information obtained in phases 2 and 3. You might be asked to clear or

adjust link counts.

Action

You can usually answer "yes" to all these questions without harming the file system.

See Also

For more information, see the chapter on checking file system integrity in the System

Administration Guide, Volume 1.

** Phase 5– Check Cyl groups

Cause

The fsck(1M) command is checking a file system, and fsck(1M) is now checking

the free-block and used-inode maps. You might be asked to salvage free blocks or

summary information.

Action

You can usually answer "yes" to all these questions without harming the file system.

See Also

For more information, see the chapter on checking file system integrity in the System

Administration Guide, Volume 1.

36 SolarisCommonMessagesandTroubleshootingGuide ♦ February 2000


@@

Cause

This message is about how to fix the common @@token sendmail errors. There are

instances when you receive email bounce messages because of syntax errors

complaining that it does not know how to send email to @@token. Probably a site is

NOT running NIS and is generating these errors or is talking to another site that is

generating the errors and then passing the email on to your site. This happens

because a single token is changed into a null ("") token. As a result, ruleset 3 (S3)

changes null tokens into @@token. There are two key issues here. First, you do not

want to be the host responsible for generating these errors, and, second, you do not

want to pass along any errors that were generated by other hosts.

Action

To fix this problem, modify rules S3 and S22. (You’ll only have S22, if using

main.cf.) First, so you do not cause these errors, comment out the invert

aliases rule in S22:

S22

R$*$* $:$1

#R$- $:$>3${[email protected]$2$} invert aliases

R$*$* [email protected]$1$4 already ok

R$+$* [email protected]$1$3 tack on our domain

R$+ [email protected]$1 tack on our full name

Next, so you do not pass on errors caused by other hosts, modify ruleset S3 from:

S3

# handle "from:" special case

R$*$* [email protected]@ turn into magic token

To:

S3

# handle "from:" special case

R$*$* [email protected]$n turn into magic token

Alphabetical Message Listing 37


29a00 illegal instruction

Cause

When trying to boot a client from a boot/jumpstart server to install or upgrade a

workstation, it fails with the following message:

boot net - install

Rebooting with command: net - install

Boot device: /iommu/sbus/[email protected], 400010/[email protected], 8c0000 File and args: -

install

29a00 Illegal Instruction

(0) ok

Action

The problem lies in the /tftpboot directory of the boot server. Confirm that the

HOSTID and HOSTID.ARCH files are linked to the correct inetboot.* file for your

architecture. The following is an example of how a symbolic link should look:

# cd /tftpboot

# ls -l 81971904*

81971904 -> inetboot.sun4m.Solaris_2.4

81971904.SUN4M -> inetboot.sun4m.Solaris_2.4

If the entries are not correct, remove the entry for the particular client in this

directory, using rm_install_client or rm_client commands, and re-add the

client with the add_install_client(1M) or add_client command or through

Solstice giving the correct architecture.

451 timeout waiting for input during source

Cause

When sendmail(1M) reads from anything that might time out, such as an SMTP

connection, it sets a timer to the value of the r processing option before reading

begins. If the read does not complete before the timer expires, this message appears

and reading stops. (Usually this happens during RCPT.) The mail message is then

queued for later delivery.

38 SolarisCommonMessagesandTroubleshootingGuide ♦ February 2000


Action

If you see this message often, increase the value of the r processing option in the

/etc/mail/sendmail.cf file. If the timer is already set to a large number, look for

hardware problems, such as poor network cabling or connections.

See Also

For more information about setting the timer, see the section describing the

sendmail(1M) configuration options in the System Administration Guide, Volume 3.

If you are using AnswerBook online documentation, the term "timeouts" is a good

search string.

501 MAIL FROM: unrecognized address:

@@hostname

Cause

A Sun machine running Sendmail 8.6 is used as a mailhost to send mail to the

Internet in an environment that has MS Mailexchanger or a cc:Mail gateway. Mail

from the MS exchange/cc:Mail gateway for the Internet is relayed to the mailhost,

which actually delivers the mail. The mail from the Internet is accepted on the

mailhost and forwarded to the MS exchanger/cc:mail gateway. The postmaster on

the mailhost sees bounced messages with error messages, such as the following:

The original message was received at Thu, 29 May 1997 12:30:41 -0700

from artemis [206.189.46.3]

----- The following addresses had delivery problems -----

(unrecoverable error)

----- Transcript of session follows -----

... while talking to cc:

>>> MAIL From:

>>> 501 MAIL FROM: unrecognized address:

554 Remote protocol error

When analyzed, this mail turns out to be mail that has bounced from the Internet

(for any reason) and was on its way back to the MS Exchange/cc:Mail gateway by

the mailhost. The MS Exchange/cc:Mail gateway does not want to accept the mail

because the "MAIL FROM:" address does not stick to the standards. @@hostname is

an illegal SMTP address. Sendmail does not have a restriction on sender’s address;

however, other SMTP gateways, which need to translate the address to their native

Alphabetical Message Listing 39


address formats, are rather strict in adhering to the SMTP address format and would

not accept the address in the @@hostname format.

Another situation: The user with cc:Mail sends mail to the Internet, and, due to one

of many possible errors (user not found, host not found, and so forth), the message is

sent back to the sender (bounces back). When a message is sent back, its recipient‘s

address is replaced by the sender’s address and the sender’s address is erased

(contains only ""). When the bounced sender’s address goes through ruleset 3 and

then 11 on the user’s mail gateway (as it has to return it to the cc:Mail gateway, which

is in the local domain => mailer=ether), it is transformed to @@mail-gateway-name.

Action

Insert the following line in the S11 ruleset after the line starting with R$=D&:

[email protected] [email protected]_daemon for @@hostname problem

After the insertion, S11 looks like this:

S11

R$*$* $1$3 already ok

R$=D [email protected]$1 tack on my hostname

[email protected] [email protected]_daemon for @@hostname problem

R$+ [email protected]$1 tack on my mbox hostname

550 hostname... Host unknown

Cause

This sendmail(1M) message indicates that the destination host machine, specified

by the portion of the address after the at-sign (@), was not found during domain

naming system (DNS) lookup.

Action

Use the nslookup(1M) command to verify that the destination host exists in that or

other domains, perhaps with a slightly different spelling. Failing that, contact the

intended recipient and ask for a proper address.

40 SolarisCommonMessagesandTroubleshootingGuide ♦ February 2000


Sometimes this return message indicates that the intended host is inoperable, rather

than unknown. If a DNS record contains an unknown alternate host, and the

primary host is inoperable, sendmail(1M) returns a "Host unknown" message from

the alternate host. 1

For uucp(1C) mail addresses, the "Host unknown" message probably means that the

destination host name is not listed in the /etc/uucp/Systems file.

See Also

For information on how sendmail(1M) works, see the System Administration Guide,

Volume 3

550 Security server failed to perform requested

command

Cause

While using the 3.x FW-1 FTP Security Server, the user sees the following error

message when trying to use FTP get or put commands:

550 Security server failed to perform requested command

Action

FW-1’s FTP Security Server sends a pwd command prior to any data connection

command (such as get, put, ls), since it needs to know the current directory for

purposes such as logging, virus inspection, and resources. FW-1 assumes that these

commands are blocked whenever the pwd command is blocked. Therefore, do not

disable pwd on your FTP server.

1. This is a known sendmail(1M) version 8.6.7 bug.

Alphabetical Message Listing 41


550 username... User unknown

Cause

This sendmail(1M) message indicates that the intended recipient, specified by the

portion of the address before the at-sign (@), could not be located on the destination

host machine.

Action

Check the email address and try again, perhaps with a slightly different spelling. If

this does not work, contact the intended recipient and ask for a proper address.

See Also

For information on how sendmail(1M) works, see the System Administration Guide,

Volume 3.

554 hostname... Local configuration error

Cause

This sendmail(1M) message usually indicates that the local host is trying to send

mail to itself.

Action

Check the value of the $j macro in the /etc/mail/sendmail.cf file to ensure

that this value is a fully qualified domain name.

Technical Notes

When the sending system provides its host name to the receiving system (in the

SMTP HELO command), the receiving system compares its name to the sender’s name.

If these are the same, the receiving system issues this error message and closes the

connection. The name provided in the HELO command is the value of the $j macro.

42 SolarisCommonMessagesandTroubleshootingGuide ♦ February 2000


See Also

For information on how sendmail(1M) works, see the System Administration Guide,

Volume 3.

"A"

A command window has exited because its child

exited.

Cause

The argument to a cmdtool(1) or a shelltool(1) window looks like it is supposed to be a

command, but the system cannot find the command.

Action

To run this command inside a cmdtool(1) or a shelltool(1), make sure the command is

spelled correctly and is in your search path. If necessary, use a full path name. If you

intended this argument as an option setting, use a minus sign (-) at the beginning of

the option.

Technical Notes

Both the cmdtool(1) and the shelltool(1) are OpenWindows terminal emulators.

access violation unknown host IP address

Cause

Solstice backup utility fails and displays the following error: access violation

unknown host IP address on Networker 4.2.2. This error is usually caused by a

corrupted host name in the host NIS/NIS+ map/table.

Alphabetical Message Listing 43


Action

Check the Networker client configuration for an incorrect host name. If all else fails,

as a workaround, add the entry to /etc/hosts.

Accessing a corrupted shared library

Cause

The system is trying to exec(2) an a.out that requires that it be linked in a static

shared library, and exec(2) could not load the static shared library. The static shared

library is probably corrupted.

Technical Notes

The symbolic name for this error is ELIBBAD, errno=84.

Address already in use

Cause

The user attempted to use an address already in use, and the protocol does not allow

this.

Technical Notes

The symbolic name for this error is EADDRINUSE, errno=125.

Address family not supported by protocol family

Cause

An address incompatible with the requested protocol was used.

44 SolarisCommonMessagesandTroubleshootingGuide ♦ February 2000


Technical Notes

The symbolic name for this error is EAFNOSUPPORT, errno=124.

admintool: Received communication service error

4

Cause

AdminTool could not start a display method, because a remote procedure, which had

been called, timed out; therefore, it could not send the request. You receive this error

when admintool(1M) tries to access the NIS or NIS+ tables and networking is not

enabled.

Action

Verify the system network status with ifconfig -a to make sure the system is

connected to the network. Make sure the Ethernet cable is connected and the system

is configured to run NIS or NIS+.

Advertise error

Cause

This error is RFS specific. It occurs when users try to advertise a resource already

advertised, try to stop RFS while there are resources still advertised, or try to

forceably unmount a resource that is still advertised.

Technical Notes

The symbolic name for this error is EADV, errno=68.

Alphabetical Message Listing 45


answerbook: XView error: NULL pointer passed

to xv_set

Cause

The AnswerBook navigator window comes up, but the document viewer window

does not. This message appears on the console, and the message Could not start

new viewer appears in the navigator window. This situation indicates that you

have an unknown client or a problem with the network naming service.

Action

Run the ypmatch(1) or nismatch(1) command to determine if the client host

name is in the host’s map. If not, add it to the NIS hosts map on the NIS master

server. Then, make sure the /etc/hosts file on the client contains an IP address

and entry for that host name, which is followed by loghost.

Note - Reboot, if you changed the /etc/hosts file.

Check that the ypmatch(1) or nismatch(1) client hosts command returns the

same IP host address as in the /etc/hosts file. Finally, quit all existing

AnswerBooks and restart.

See Also

For more information on the NIS hosts map, see the section on the default search

criteria in the NIS+ and FNS Administration Guide. If you are using AnswerBook

online documentation, "NIS hosts map" is a good search string.

apdb: Resource temporarily unavailable

Cause

This error can occur when attempting to add or remove AP databases with the apdb

command.

46 SolarisCommonMessagesandTroubleshootingGuide ♦ February 2000


Action

From /var/adm/messages you find the reason for the apdb command failure, as

shown below:

Jan 15 14:00:51 Starfire2 apd[683]: /etc/system: could not find:

* End AP database info (do not edit)

Jan 15 14:00:52 Starfire2 apd[683]: failed to patch the system file!

Unfortunately, this error from the netcon session does not get an echo to the console;

therefore, it can easily be missed. To correct it, simply edit the /etc/system file so

that it has the correct comments before and after setting ap:apdb_dblist. See

below:

* Begin AP database info (do not edit)

set ap:apdb_dblist="sd:5 sd:8"

* End AP database info (do not edit)

Arg list too long

Cause

The system could not handle the number of arguments given to a command or

program when it combined those arguments with the environment’s exported shell

variables. The argument list limit is the size of the argument list plus the size of the

environment’s exported shell variables.

Action

The easiest solution is to reduce the size of the parent process environment by

unsetting extraneous environment variables. (See the man page for the shell you are

using to find out how to list and change your environment variables.) Then run the

program again.

Technical Notes

An argument list longer than ARG_MAX bytes was presented to a member of the

exec(2) family of system calls.

Alphabetical Message Listing 47


The symbolic name for this error is E2BIG, errno=7.

Argument out of domain

Cause

This message is a programming error or a data input error.

Action

Ask the program’s author to fix this condition or to supply data in a different format.

Technical Notes

This indicates an attempt to evaluate a mathematical programming function at a

point where its value is not defined. The argument of a programming function in the

math package is out of the domain of the function. This could happen when taking

the square root, power, or log of a negative number, when computing a power to a

non-integer, or when passing an out-of-range argument to a hyperbolic programming

function.

To help pinpoint a program’s math errors, use the matherr(3M) facility.

The symbolic name for this error is EDOM, errno=33.

Arguments too long

Cause

This C shell error message indicates that too many arguments follow a command.

For example, this can happen by invoking rm * in a huge directory. The C shell

cannot handle more than 1706 arguments.

Action

Temporarily start a Bourne shell with sh(1) and run the command again. The

Bourne shell dynamically allocates command line arguments. Return to your original

shell by typing exit.

48 SolarisCommonMessagesandTroubleshootingGuide ♦ February 2000


assertion failed: string, file name, line int

Cause

An unexpected condition in the program has occurred.

Action

Contact the vendor or author of the program to ask why it failed. If you have the

source code for the program, you can look at the file and line number where the

assertion failed. This might give you an idea of how to run the program differently.

Technical Notes

This message is the result of a diagnostic macro called assert(3C) that a

programmer inserted into the specified line of a source file. The untrue expression

precedes the file name and line number.

Attempting to link in more shared libraries than

system limit

Cause

The system is trying to exec(2) an a.out that requires more static shared libraries

than is allowed on the current configuration of the system.

Technical Notes

The symbolic name for this error is ELIBMAX, errno=86.

automount[int]: name: Not a directory

Cause

The file specified after the first colon is not a valid mount point, because it is not a

directory.

Alphabetical Message Listing 49


Action

Ensure that the mount point is a directory and not a regular file or a symbolic link.

automountd[int]: server hostname responding

Cause

This automounter message indicates that the system tried to mount a file system

from an NFS TM server that is either down or extremely slow to respond. In some

cases, this message indicates that the network link to the NFS server is broken,

although that condition produces other error messages as well.

Action

If you are the system administrator responsible for the non-responding NFS server,

check to see whether the machine needs repair or rebooting. Encourage your user

community to report such problems quickly, but only once. When the NFS server is

back in operation, the automounter can access the requested file system.

See Also

For more information on NFS failures, see the section on NFS troubleshooting in the

System Administration Guide, Volume 3. If you are using AnswerBook online

documentation, a good search string is "NFS Service."

"B"

Bad address

Cause

The system encountered a hardware fault in attempting to access a parameter of a

programming function.

50 SolarisCommonMessagesandTroubleshootingGuide ♦ February 2000


Action

Check the address to see if it resulted from supplying the wrong device or option to

a command. If that is not the problem, contact the vendor or author of the program

for an update.

Technical Notes

This error could occur any time a function that takes a pointer argument is passed an

invalid address. Because processors differ in their ability to detect bad addresses, on

some architectures, passing bad addresses can result in undefined behaviors.

The symbolic name for this error is EFAULT, errno=14.

BAD/DUP FILE I=i OWNER=o MODE=m SIZE=s

MTIME=t CLEAR?

Cause

While checking inode link counts during phase 4, fsck(1M) found a file (or

directory) that either does not exist or exists somewhere else.

Action

To clear the inode of its reference to this file or directory, answer "yes." With the −p

(preen) option, fsck(1M) automatically clears bad or duplicate file references.

Answering "yes" to this question seldom causes a problem.

Bad file number

Cause

Generally this message is a program error, not a usage error.

Action

Contact the vendor or author of the program for an update.

Alphabetical Message Listing 51


Technical Notes

Either a file descriptor refers to no open file, or a read(2)—or a write(2)—request

is made to a file that is open only for writing or reading.

The symbolic name for this error is EBADF, errno=9.

block no. BAD I=inode no.

Cause

Upon detecting an out-of-range block, fsck(1M) prints the bad block number and

its containing inode (after I=).

Action

In fsck(1M) phases 2 and 4, you decide whether or not to clear these bad blocks.

Before committing to repair with fsck(1M), you could determine which file

contains this inode by passing the inode number to the ncheck(1M) command:

# ncheck -i inum filesystem

See Also

For more information, see the chapter on checking file system integrity in the System

Administration Guide, Volume 1.

BAD_MESSAGE (error code 100) from X.400

Cause

In this situation, X.400 software had been working without problems. Suddenly, the

message exchanges failed in ma_start_delivery(). It was returning an error

code of 100 (BAD_MESSAGE).

The ma_start_delivery() call fails when trying to exchange a file of more than

900 bytes.

52 SolarisCommonMessagesandTroubleshootingGuide ♦ February 2000


Action

X.400 was restarted with the wrong umask. To fix, set the umask to 0022 and restart

the software.

bad module/chip at: position

Cause

This message from the memory management system often appears with parity errors

and indicates a bad memory module or chip at the position listed. Data loss is

possible, if the problem occurs other than at boot time.

Action

Replace the memory module or chip at the indicated position. Refer to the vendor’s

hardware manual for help finding this location.

Bad request descriptor

Cause

This message is apparently only used in NIS+ to indicate corrupted or missing tables.

Technical Notes

The symbolic name for this error is EBADR, errno=51.

BAD SUPER BLOCK: string

Cause

This message from fsck(1M) indicates that a file system’s super block is damaged

beyond repair and must be replaced. At boot time (with the −p option) this message

is prefaced by the file system’s device name. After this message comes the actual

damage recognized (see Action). Unfortunately, fsck(1M) does not print the

number of the damaged super block.

Alphabetical Message Listing 53


Action

The most common cause of this error is overlapping disk partitions. Do not

immediately rerun fsck(1M) as suggested by the lines that display after the error

message. First, make sure that you have a recent backup of the file system involved;

if not, try to back up the file system now using ufsdump(1M). Then, run the

format(1M) command, select the disk involved, and print out the partition

information.

# format

: N

> partition

> print

Note whether the overlap occurs at the beginning or end of the file system involved.

Then, run newfs(1M) with the −N option to print out the file system parameters,

including the location of backup super blocks.

# newfs -N /dev/dsk/device

Select a super block from a non-overlapping area of the disk, but note that in most

cases you have only one chance to select the proper replacement super block, which

fsck(1M) soon propagates to all the cylinders. If you select the wrong replacement

super block, data corruption will probably occur, and you will have to restore from

backup tapes. After you select a new super block, provide fsck(1M) with the new

master super block number:

# fsck -o b=NNNN /dev/dsk/device

Technical Notes

Specific reasons for a damaged super block include: a wrong magic number, an

out-of-range number of cylinder groups (NCG) or cylinders per group (CPG), the

wrong number of cylinders, a preposterously large super block size, and trashed

values in super block. These reasons are generally not meaningful, because a corrupt

super block is usually extremely corrupt.

See Also

For more information on bad super blocks, see the sections on restoring bad super

blocks in the System Administration Guide, Volume 1. If you are using AnswerBook

online documentation, "super block" is a good search string.

54 SolarisCommonMessagesandTroubleshootingGuide ♦ February 2000


BAD TRAP

Cause

A bad trap can indicate faulty hardware or a mismatch between hardware and its

configuration information. Data loss is possible if the problem occurs other than at

boot time.

Action

If you recently installed new hardware, verify that the software was correctly

configured. Check the kernel traceback displayed on the console to see which device

generated the trap. If the configuration files are correct, you probably have to replace

the device.

In some cases, the bad trap message indicates a bad or down-rev CPU.

Technical Notes

A hardware processor trap occurred, and the kernel trap handler was unable to

restore the system state. This message is a fatal error that usually precedes a panic,

after which the system performs a sync, dump, and reboot. The following conditions

can cause a bad trap: a system text or data access fault, a system data alignment

error, or certain kinds of user software traps.

/bin/sh: file: too big

Cause

This Bourne shell message indicates a classic "no memory" error. While trying to load

the program specified after the first colon, the shell noticed that the system ran out

of virtual memory (swap space).

Action

For information on reconfiguring your system to add more swap space, refer to “Not

enough space” on page 183.

Alphabetical Message Listing 55


Block device required

Cause

A raw (character special) device was specified where a block device was required,

such as during a call to the mount(1M) command.

Action

To see which block devices are available, use ls -l to look in /devices. Then

specify a block device instead of a character device. Block device modes start with a

b, whereas raw character device modes start with a c.

Technical Notes

The symbolic name of this error is ENOTBLK, errno=15.

Boot device: /iommu/sbus/directory/directory/

[email protected],0

Cause

This message always appears at the beginning of rebooting. If there is a problem, the

system hangs, and no other messages appear. This condition is caused by conflicting

SCSI targets for the boot device, which is almost always target 3.

Action

The boot device is usually the machine’s internal disk drive, target 3. Make sure that

external and secondary disk drives are targeted to 1, 2, or 0, and do not conflict with

each other. Also make sure that the tape drives are targeted to 4 or 5, and CD drives

to 6, avoiding any conflict with each other or with the disk drives. You can set a

device’s target number using push-button switches or a dial on the back near the

SCSI cables. If the targeting of the internal disk drive is in question, check it by

powering off the machine, removing all external drives, turning the power on, and

running the probe-scsi-all or probe-scsi command from the PROM monitor.

56 SolarisCommonMessagesandTroubleshootingGuide ♦ February 2000


Broadcast Message from root (pts/int) on server

[date]

Cause

This message from the wall(1M) command is transmitted to all users logged into a

system. You could see it during a rlogin(1) or telnet(1) session, or on terminals

connected to a timesharing system.

Action

Carefully read the broadcast message. Often this broadcast is followed by a

shutdown warning.

For details about system shutdown, refer to “The system will be shut down in int

minutes” on page 237.

See Also

For more information on bringing down the system, see the section on halting the

system in the System Administration Guide, Volume 1. If you are using AnswerBook

online documentation, "halting the system" is a good search string.

Broken pipe

Cause

This condition is often normal, and the message is merely informational (as when

piping many lines to the head(1) program). The condition occurs when a write on a

pipe does not find a reading process. This usually generates a signal to the executing

program, but this message displays when the program ignores the signal.

Action

Check the process at the end of the pipe to see why it exited.

Technical Notes

The symbolic name of this error is EPIPE, errno=32.

Alphabetical Message Listing 57


Bus Error

Cause

A process has received a signal indicating that it attempted to perform I/O to a

device that is restricted or that does not exist. This message is usually accompanied

by a core dump, except on read-only file systems.

Action

Use a debugger to examine the core file and determine what program fault or system

problem led to the bus error. If possible, check the program’s output files for data

corruption that might have occurred before the bus error.

Technical Notes

Bus errors can result from either a programming error or device corruption on your

system. Some common causes of bus errors are: invalid file descriptors, unreasonable

I/O requests, bad memory allocation, misaligned data structures, compiler bugs, and

corrupt boot blocks.

"C"

Cannot access a needed shared library

Cause

The system is trying to exec(2) an a.out that requires a static shared library, and

the static shared library does not exist or the user does not have permission to use it.

Technical Notes

The symbolic name for this error is ELIBACC, errno=83.

58 SolarisCommonMessagesandTroubleshootingGuide ♦ February 2000


Cannot allocate colormap entry for "string"

Cause

This message from libXt (X Intrinsics library) indicates that the system color map

was full, even before the color name specified in quotes was requested. Some

applications can continue after this message. Other applications, such as workspace

properties color, fail to come up when the color map is full.

Action

Exit the programs that make heavy use of the color map, then restart the failed

application and try again.

Cannot assign requested address

Cause

An attempt was made to create a transport endpoint with an address not on the

current machine.

Technical Notes

The symbolic name for this error is EADDRNOTAVAIL, errno=126.

Cannot bind to domain domainname: can’t

communicate with ypbind

Cause

While running the ypinit -m script for the setup of an NIS Master Server, you get

hosts_access.5   [plain text]


.TH HOSTS_ACCESS 5 .SH NAME hosts_access \- format of host access control files .SH DESCRIPTION This manual page describes a simple access control language that is based on client (host name/address, user name), and server (process name, host name/address) patterns. Examples are given at the end. The impatient reader is encouraged to skip to the EXAMPLES section for a quick introduction. .PP An extended version of the access control language is described in the \fIhosts_options\fR(5) document. The extensions are turned on at program build time by building with -DPROCESS_OPTIONS. .PP In the following text, \fIdaemon\fR is the the process name of a network daemon process, and \fIclient\fR is the name and/or address of a host requesting service. Network daemon process names are specified in the inetd configuration file. .SH ACCESS CONTROL FILES The access control software consults two files. The search stops at the first match: .IP \(bu Access will be granted when a (daemon,client) pair matches an entry in the \fI/etc/hosts.allow\fR file. .IP \(bu Otherwise, access will be denied when a (daemon,client) pair matches an entry in the \fI/etc/hosts.deny\fR file. .IP \(bu Otherwise, access will be granted. .PP A non-existing access control file is treated as if it were an empty file. Thus, access control can be turned off by providing no access control files. .SH ACCESS CONTROL RULES Each access control file consists of zero or more lines of text. These lines are processed in order of appearance. The search terminates when a match is found. .IP \(bu A newline character is ignored when it is preceded by a backslash character. This permits you to break up long lines so that they are easier to edit. .IP \(bu Blank lines or lines that begin with a `#\' character are ignored. This permits you to insert comments and whitespace so that the tables are easier to read. .IP \(bu All other lines should satisfy the following format, things between [] being optional: .sp .ti +3 daemon_list : client_list [ : shell_command ] .PP \fIdaemon_list\fR is a list of one or more daemon process names (argv[0] values) or wildcards (see below). .PP \fIclient_list\fR is a list of one or more host names, host addresses, patterns or wildcards (see below) that will be matched against the client host name or address. .PP The more complex forms \[email protected]\fR and \[email protected]\fR are explained in the sections on server endpoint patterns and on client username lookups, respectively. .PP List elements should be separated by blanks and/or commas. .PP With the exception of NIS (YP) netgroup lookups, all access control checks are case insensitive. .ne 4 .SH PATTERNS The access control language implements the following patterns: .IP \(bu A string that begins with a `.\' character. A host name is matched if the last components of its name match the specified pattern. For example, the pattern `.tue.nl\' matches the host name `wzv.win.tue.nl\'. .IP \(bu A string that ends with a `.\' character. A host address is matched if its first numeric fields match the given string. For example, the pattern `131.155.\' matches the address of (almost) every host on the Eind\%hoven University network (131.155.x.x). .IP \(bu A string that begins with an `@\' character is treated as an NIS (formerly YP) netgroup name. A host name is matched if it is a host member of the specified netgroup. Netgroup matches are not supported for daemon process names or for client user names. .IP \(bu An expression of the form `n.n.n.n/m.m.m.m\' is interpreted as a `net/mask\' pair. A host address is matched if `net\' is equal to the bitwise AND of the address and the `mask\'. For example, the net/mask pattern `131.155.72.0/255.255.254.0\' matches every address in the range `131.155.72.0\' through `131.155.73.255\'. .SH WILDCARDS The access control language supports explicit wildcards: .IP ALL The universal wildcard, always matches. .IP LOCAL Matches any host whose name does not contain a dot character. .IP UNKNOWN Matches any user whose name is unknown, and matches any host whose name \fIor\fR address are unknown. This pattern should be used with care: host names may be unavailable due to temporary name server problems. A network address will be unavailable when the software cannot figure out what type of network it is talking to. .IP KNOWN Matches any user whose name is known, and matches any host whose name \fIand\fR address are known. This pattern should be used with care: host names may be unavailable due to temporary name server problems. A network address will be unavailable when the software cannot figure out what type of network it is talking to. .IP PARANOID Matches any host whose name does not match its address. When tcpd is built with -DPARANOID (default mode), it drops requests from such clients even before looking at the access control tables. Build without -DPARANOID when you want more control over such requests. .ne 6 .SH OPERATORS .IP EXCEPT Intended use is of the form: `list_1 EXCEPT list_2\'; this construct matches anything that matches \fIlist_1\fR unless it matches \fIlist_2\fR. The EXCEPT operator can be used in daemon_lists and in client_lists. The EXCEPT operator can be nested: if the control language would permit the use of parentheses, `a EXCEPT b EXCEPT c\' would parse as `(a EXCEPT (b EXCEPT c))\'. .br .ne 6 .SH SHELL COMMANDS If the first-matched access control rule contains a shell command, that command is subjected to %<letter> substitutions (see next section). The result is executed by a \fI/bin/sh\fR child process with standard input, output and error connected to \fI/dev/null\fR. Specify an `&\' at the end of the command if you do not want to wait until it has completed. .PP Shell commands should not rely on the PATH setting of the inetd. Instead, they should use absolute path names, or they should begin with an explicit PATH=whatever statement. .PP The \fIhosts_options\fR(5) document describes an alternative language that uses the shell command field in a different and incompatible way. .SH % EXPANSIONS The following expansions are available within shell commands: .IP "%a (%A)" The client (server) host address. .IP %c Client information: [email protected], [email protected], a host name, or just an address, depending on how much information is available. .IP %d The daemon process name (argv[0] value). .IP "%h (%H)" The client (server) host name or address, if the host name is unavailable. .IP "%n (%N)" The client (server) host name (or "unknown" or "paranoid"). .IP %p The daemon process id. .IP %s Server information: [email protected], [email protected], or just a daemon name, depending on how much information is available. .IP %u The client user name (or "unknown"). .IP %% Expands to a single `%\' character. .PP Characters in % expansions that may confuse the shell are replaced by underscores. .SH SERVER ENDPOINT PATTERNS In order to distinguish clients by the network address that they connect to, use patterns of the form: .sp .ti +3 [email protected]_pattern : client_list ... .sp Patterns like these can be used when the machine has different internet addresses with different internet hostnames. Service providers can use this facility to offer FTP, GOPHER or WWW archives with internet names that may even belong to different organizations. See also the `twist' option in the hosts_options(5) document. Some systems (Solaris, FreeBSD) can have more than one internet address on one physical interface; with other systems you may have to resort to SLIP or PPP pseudo interfaces that live in a dedicated network address space. .sp The host_pattern obeys the same syntax rules as host names and addresses in client_list context. Usually, server endpoint information is available only with connection-oriented services. .SH CLIENT USERNAME LOOKUP When the client host supports the RFC 931 protocol or one of its descendants (TAP, IDENT, RFC 1413) the wrapper programs can retrieve additional information about the owner of a connection. Client username information, when available, is logged together with the client host name, and can be used to match patterns like: .PP .ti +3 daemon_list : ... [email protected]_pattern ... .PP The daemon wrappers can be configured at compile time to perform rule-driven username lookups (default) or to always interrogate the client host. In the case of rule-driven username lookups, the above rule would cause username lookup only when both the \fIdaemon_list\fR and the \fIhost_pattern\fR match. .PP A user pattern has the same syntax as a daemon process pattern, so the same wildcards apply (netgroup membership is not supported). One should not get carried away with username lookups, though. .IP \(bu The client username information cannot be trusted when it is needed most, i.e. when the client system has been compromised. In general, ALL and (UN)KNOWN are the only user name patterns that make sense. .IP \(bu Username lookups are possible only with TCP-based services, and only when the client host runs a suitable daemon; in all other cases the result is "unknown". .IP \(bu A well-known UNIX kernel bug may cause loss of service when username lookups are blocked by a firewall. The wrapper README document describes a procedure to find out if your kernel has this bug. .IP \(bu Username lookups may cause noticeable delays for non-UNIX users. The default timeout for username lookups is 10 seconds: too short to cope with slow networks, but long enough to irritate PC users. .PP Selective username lookups can alleviate the last problem. For example, a rule like: .PP .ti +3 daemon_list : @pcnetgroup [email protected] .PP would match members of the pc netgroup without doing username lookups, but would perform username lookups with all other systems. .SH DETECTING ADDRESS SPOOFING ATTACKS A flaw in the sequence number generator of many TCP/IP implementations allows intruders to easily impersonate trusted hosts and to break in via, for example, the remote shell service. The IDENT (RFC931 etc.) service can be used to detect such and other host address spoofing attacks. .PP Before accepting a client request, the wrappers can use the IDENT service to find out that the client did not send the request at all. When the client host provides IDENT service, a negative IDENT lookup result (the client matches `[email protected]') is strong evidence of a host spoofing attack. .PP A positive IDENT lookup result (the client matches `[email protected]') is less trustworthy. It is possible for an intruder to spoof both the client connection and the IDENT lookup, although doing so is much harder than spoofing just a client connection. It may also be that the client\'s IDENT server is lying. .PP Note: IDENT lookups don\'t work with UDP services. .SH EXAMPLES The language is flexible enough that different types of access control policy can be expressed with a minimum of fuss. Although the language uses two access control tables, the most common policies can be implemented with one of the tables being trivial or even empty. .PP When reading the examples below it is important to realize that the allow table is scanned before the deny table, that the search terminates when a match is found, and that access is granted when no match is found at all. .PP The examples use host and domain names. They can be improved by including address and/or network/netmask information, to reduce the impact of temporary name server lookup failures. .SH MOSTLY CLOSED In this case, access is denied by default. Only explicitly authorized hosts are permitted access. .PP The default policy (no access) is implemented with a trivial deny file: .PP .ne 2 /etc/hosts.deny: .in +3 ALL: ALL .PP This denies all service to all hosts, unless they are permitted access by entries in the allow file. .PP The explicitly authorized hosts are listed in the allow file. For example: .PP .ne 2 /etc/hosts.allow: .in +3 ALL: LOCAL @some_netgroup .br ALL: .foobar.edu EXCEPT terminalserver.foobar.edu .PP The first rule permits access from hosts in the local domain (no `.\' in the host name) and from members of the \fIsome_netgroup\fP netgroup. The second rule permits access from all hosts in the \fIfoobar.edu\fP domain (notice the leading dot), with the exception of \fIterminalserver.foobar.edu\fP. .SH MOSTLY OPEN Here, access is granted by default; only explicitly specified hosts are refused service. .PP The default policy (access granted) makes the allow file redundant so that it can be omitted. The explicitly non-authorized hosts are listed in the deny file. For example: .PP /etc/hosts.deny: .in +3 ALL: some.host.name, .some.domain .br ALL EXCEPT in.fingerd: other.host.name, .other.domain .PP The first rule denies some hosts and domains all services; the second rule still permits finger requests from other hosts and domains. .SH BOOBY TRAPS The next example permits tftp requests from hosts in the local domain (notice the leading dot). Requests from any other hosts are denied. Instead of the requested file, a finger probe is sent to the offending host. The result is mailed to the superuser. .PP .ne 2 /etc/hosts.allow: .in +3 .nf in.tftpd: LOCAL, .my.domain .PP .ne 2 /etc/hosts.deny: .in +3 .nf in.tftpd: ALL: (/some/where/safe_finger -l @%h

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WHY MINECRAFT CHUNK ERRORS HAPPEN!!

nis make error talking to unknown host Solaris Common Messages and Troubleshooting Guide - Oracle

Sun Microsystems, Inc.

901 San Antonio Road

Palo Alto, CA 94303-4900

U.S.A.

Part Number 806-1075–10

February 2000

SolarisCommonMessagesand

TroubleshootingGuide


Copyright 2000 Sun Microsystems, Inc, nis make error talking to unknown host. 901 San Antonio Road, Palo Alto, nis make error talking to unknown host, California 94303-4900 U.S.A. All rights reserved.

This product or document is protected by copyright and distributed under licenses restricting its use, copying, distribution, and

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Parts of the product may be derived from Berkeley BSD systems, licensed from the University of California. UNIX is a registered

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are used under license and are trademarks or registered trademarks of SPARC International, Inc. in the U.S. and other countries. Products

bearing SPARC trademarks are based upon an architecture developed by Sun Microsystems, Inc. OpenGL is a registered trademark cmaterial precachevars error loading Graphics, Inc.

The OPEN LOOK and Sun TM Graphical User Interface was developed by Sun Microsystems, Inc, nis make error talking to unknown host. for its users and licensees. Sun

acknowledges the pioneering efforts of Xerox in researching and developing the concept of visual or graphical user interfaces for the

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qui comprend la technologie relative aux polices de caractères, est protégé par un copyright et licencié par des fournisseurs de Sun.

Des parties de ce produit pourront être dérivées du système Berkeley BSD licenciés par l’Université de Californie, nis make error talking to unknown host. UNIX est une marque

déposée aux Etats-Unis et dans d’autres pays et licenciée exclusivement par X/Open Company, Ltd.

Sun, Sun Microsystems, le logo Sun, docs.sun.com, AnswerBook, AnswerBook2, SunOS, SunPC, Java, Java Workshop, NFS, et Solaris sont

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développée par Sun Microsystems, Inc.OpenGL est une marque dpose de Silicon Graphics, Inc.

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graphique pour l’industrie de l’informatique. Sun détient une licence non exclusive de Xerox sur l’interface d’utilisation graphique Xerox,

cette licence couvrant également les licenciés de Sun qui mettent en place l’interface d’utilisation graphique OPEN LOOK et qui en outre

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COMPRIS DES GARANTIES CONCERNANT LA VALEUR MARCHANDE, L’APTITUDE DE LA PUBLICATION A REPONDRE A UNE

UTILISATION PARTICULIERE, nis make error talking to unknown host, OU LE FAIT QU’ELLE NE SOIT PAS CONTREFAISANTE DE PRODUIT DE TIERS. CE DENI DE

GARANTIE NE S’APPLIQUERAIT PAS, DANS LA MESURE OU IL SERAIT TENU JURIDIQUEMENT NUL ET NON AVENU.

Please

Recycle


Contents

Preface

1. About Error Messages 27

Searching for Messages 27

Choosing What to Look For 27

In the Printed Book 28

In the AnswerBook Navigator 28

Combining Search Techniques 30

Understanding the Message Explanations 30

2. Alphabetical Message Listing error bad request and Symbols 33

***** FILE SYSTEM WAS MODIFIED ***** 33

** Phase 1– Check Blocks and Sizes 34

** Phase 1b– Rescan For More DUPS 34

** Phase 2– Check Pathnames 35

** Phase 3– Nis make error talking to unknown host Connectivity 35

** Phase 4– Check Reference Counts 36

** Phase 5– Check Cyl groups 36

@@ 37

29a00 illegal instruction 38

3


"A" 43

"B" 50

451 timeout waiting for input during source 38

501 MAIL FROM: unrecognized address: @@hostname 39

550 hostname. Host unknown 40

550 Security server failed to perform requested command 41

550 username. User unknown 42

554 hostname. Local configuration error 42

A command window has exited because its child exited. 43

access violation unknown host IP address 43

Accessing a corrupted shared library 44

Address already in use 44

Address family not supported by protocol family 44

admintool: Received communication service error 4 45

Advertise error 45

answerbook: XView error: NULL pointer passed to xv_set 46

apdb: Resource temporarily unavailable 46

Arg list too long 47

Argument out of domain 48

Arguments too long 48

assertion failed: string, file name, line int 49

Attempting to link in more shared libraries than system limit 49

automount[int]: name: Not a directory 49

automountd[int]: server hostname responding 50

Bad address 50

BAD/DUP FILE I=i OWNER=o MODE=m SIZE=s MTIME=t CLEAR?

51

Bad file number 51

4 SolarisCommonMessagesandTroubleshootingGuide ♦ February 2000


"C" 58

block no. BAD I=inode no. 52

BAD_MESSAGE (error code 100) from X.400 52

bad module/chip at: position 53

Bad request descriptor 53

BAD SUPER BLOCK: string 53

BAD TRAP 55

/bin/sh: file: too big 55

Block device required 56

Boot device: /iommu/sbus/directory/directory/[email protected],0 56

Broadcast Message from root (pts/int) on server [date] 57

Broken pipe 57

Bus Error 58

Cannot access a needed shared library 58

Cannot allocate colormap entry for "string" 59

Cannot assign requested address 59

Cannot bind to domain domainname: can’t communicate with ypbind 59

Cannot boot after install, error that points to an .rc file 60

cannot change passwd, not correct passwd 61

cannot establish nfs service over /dev/tcp: transport setup problem 61

Cannot exec a shared library directly 62

Cannot find SERVER hostname in network database 62

cannot install bootblock 63

Cannot open FCC file 64

Cannot send after transport endpoint shutdown 64

can’t communicate with ypbind 65

Can’t create public message device (Device busy) 65

Can’t invoke /etc/init, error int 66

Contents 5


can’t open /dev/rdsk/string: (null): UNEXPECTED

INCONSISTENCY 67

can’t synchronize with hayes 67

cd: Too many arguments 68

Channel number out of range 68

chmod: ERROR: invalid mode 68

Command not found 69

Communication error on send 70

config error: mail loops back to myself. 70

connect from hostIP to callit(ypserv): request from non-local host 71

connect from hostIP to callit(ypserv): request from unauthorized host 71

connect from hostIP to callit(ypserv): request from unprivileged port 72

connect from hostIP to callit(ypserv): request not forwarded 72

Connection closed. 72

Connection closed by foreign host. 73

[Connection closed. Exiting] 73

Connection refused 73

Connection reset by peer 74

Connection timed out 74

console login: ^J^M^Q^K^K^P 75

core dumped 76

corrupt label - wrong magic number or corrupt label or corrupt label -

label checksum failed 77

could not grant slave pty 78

Could not initialize tooltalk (tt_open): TT_ERR_NOMP 78

Could not open ToolTalk Channel 79

Could not start new viewer 80

Could not start NFS service for any protocol. Exiting 80

cpio: Bad magic number/header. 81

6 SolarisCommonMessagesandTroubleshootingGuide ♦ February 2000


"D" 82

cpio : can’t read input : end of file encountered prior to expected end of

archive. 81

Cross-device link 82

data access exception 82

Data fault 83

Deadlock situation detected/avoided 83

Destination address required 84

destination component full 84

/dev/fd/int: /dev/fd/int: cannot open 84

/dev/rdsk/c0t6d0s2: No such file or directory 85

Device busy 86

device busy 86

/dev/rdsk/string: CAN’T CHECK FILE SYSTEM. 88

/dev/rdsk/string: UNEXPECTED INCONSISTENCY; RUN fsck

MANUALLY, nis make error talking to unknown host. 88

Directory not empty 89

Disc quota exceeded 89

disk does not appear to be prepared for encapsulation 90

diskN not unique 90

dlopen (libxfn.so) failed 91

driver is already installed 91

dtmail: cannot open mailfile on 2.5.1 /var/mail server 92

DUMP: Cannot open dump device ‘/dev/rdsk/c2t0d0s1’: Permission

denied 93

dumptm: Cannot open ‘/dev/rmt/string’: Device busy 93

DUP/BAD I=i OWNER=o MODE=m SIZE=s MTIME=t FILE=f

REMOVE? 94

int DUP I=int dns error bad referral 7


"E" 95

Encapsulation of root disk is not supported on systems with old PROM

versions 95

ENOMEM The available data space is not large enough to accommodate

the shared memory segment 96

"F" 106

error 15 initializing 97

Error 76 97

Error 88 97

error code 2: access violation 98

error: DPS has not initialized or server connection failed 98

Error: Error adding OS service Solaris 2.6 sparc sun4u: 99

Error Host Unknown: 100

ERROR: missing file arg (cm3) 101

ERROR [SCCS/s.string]: ‘SCCS/p.string’ nonexistent (ut4) 101

ERROR [SCCS/s.string]: writable ‘string’ exists (ge4) 101

Error: you don’t have a license to run this program 102

esp0: data transfer overrun 102

ether_hostton errors from cb_reset 102

Event not found 103

EXCESSIVE BAD BLKS I=int CONTINUE? 104

EXCESSIVE DUP BLKS I=int CONTINUE? 104

Exec format error 105

failed to initialize adapter 106

Failed to Load Security Policy: Invalid argument 106

fast access mmu error 107

fbconsole: ioctl SRIOCSREDIR: Device Busy. 108

fd0: unformatted diskette or no diskette gpg error could not grab keyboard the drive 109

File descriptor in bad state 109

8 SolarisCommonMessagesandTroubleshootingGuide ♦ February 2000


File exists 109

"G" 119

File locking deadlock 110

File name too long 110

file system full 111

FILE SYSTEM STATE IN SUPERBLOCK Nis make error talking to unknown host WRONG; FIX? 111

File table overflow 112

File too large 112

filemgr: mknod: Permission denied 113

FREE BLK COUNT(S) WRONG IN SUPERBLK SALVAGE? 113

fsck & ufsdump - cannot read block/sector errors 114

fsck: Can’t open /dev/dsk/string 115

fsck: Can’t stat /dev/dsk/string 115

ftp: ftp/tcp: unknown service 116

fw_ipinput: q fc5fddc0:illegal interface 116

FW1: log message queue is full 117

fwm: no license 118

fwskip_parse_headers: invalid peer n 118

giving up 119

Graphics Adapter device /dev/fb is of unknown type 120

group.org_dir: NIS+ servers unreachable 120

"H" 121

"I" 124

hang console 121

/home/string: No such file or directory 121

Host is down 122

host name configuration error 123

hosts.org_dir: NIS+ servers unreachable 123

Contents 9


I can’t read your attachments. What mailer are you using? 124

Identifier removed 124

ie0: Ethernet jammed 125

ie0: no carrier 125

If pipe/FIFO, don’t sleep in stream head 126

ifconfig: bad address 126

ifconfig bad address le0 127

ifconfig: host name bad space address 127

ifconfig: SIOCGIFFLAGS: hme0: no such interface 128

Illegal Instruction 128

Illegal nis make error talking to unknown host "0xhex" was encountered at PC 0xhex 129

Illegal seek 129

Image Tool: Unable to open XIL Library. 130

Inappropriate ioctl for device 130

INCORRECT BLOCK COUNT I=int (should be int) CORRECT? 131

index failed:full:index preceded by saveset name 131

inetd[int]: execv /usr/sbin/in.uucpd: No such file or directory 132

inetd[int]: string/tcp: unknown service 132

inetd[int]: string/udp: unknown service 133

inetd: Too many open files 133

INIT: Cannot create /var/adm/utmpx 133

InitOutput: Error loading module for /dev/fb 134

insertion failed: a problem with the filesystem has been detected:

filesystem is probably full 135

Interrupted system call 135

Invalid argument 136

Invalid null command 136

Invalid_SS_JWS_HOME:no C:\\lib\basicframe.properties 137

10 SolarisCommonMessagesandTroubleshootingGuide ♦ February 2000


"J" 140

I/O error 137

IP: Hardware address error crosses initialization trying to be our address

xxx.xxx.xxx.xxx! 138

"K" 141

"L" 143

Is a directory 140

java.lang.UnsatisfiedLinkError: 140

kernel read error 141

killed 141

Killed 142

kmem_free block already free 142

last message repeated int times 143

late initialization error 143

ld.so.1 fatal: can’t set protection on segment 144

ld.so.1: string: fatal: string: can’t open file: errno=2 144

ld.so.1: string: fatal: string: open failed: No such file or directory 145

ld.so.1: string: fatal: relocation error: string: string: referenced symbol not

found 146

ld.so.1: string: fatal: relocation error: symbol not found: string 146

le0: Memory error! 147

le0: No carrier– cable disconnected or hub link test disabled? 148

le0: No carrier– transceiver cable problem? 148

level 15 interrupt 149

.lib section in a.out corrupted 149

LINK COUNT FILE I=i OWNER=o MODE=m SIZE=s MTIME=t

COUNT. ADJUST? 149

Link has been severed 150

LL105W: Protocol error detected. 150

Contents 11


ln: cannot create /dev/fb: Read-only filesystem 151

lockd[int]: create_client: no name for inet address 0xhex 151

log_get: len is not a multiple of 4 from FW-1 152

Login incorrect 152

lp hang 153

"M" 154

Machine is not on the network 154

Mail Tool is confused about the state of your Mail File. 154

mail: Your mailfile was found to be corrupted (Content-length

mismatch). 155

mailtool: Can’t create dead letter: Permission denied 155

mailtool: Could not initialize the Classing Engine 156

Management Server is VPN while client is NON-VPN 156

file name may contain holes - can’t swap on it. 157

mbuf map full 157

Memory address alignment 157

memory leaks 158

Message too long 158

mount: /dev/dsk/string is already mounted, /string is busy, or. 159

mount: giving up on: /string 159

mount: mount-point /string does not exist. 160

mount: the state of /dev/dsk/string is not okay 160

Multihop attempted 160

"N" 161

Name not unique on network 161

named [pid]: hostname.domainname has CNAME and other data

(illegal) 161

/net/string: No such file or directory 162

Network dropped connection because of reset 163

12 SolarisCommonMessagesandTroubleshootingGuide ♦ February 2000


Network is down 163

Network is unreachable 163

NFS getattr failed for server string: RPC: Timed out 164

nfs mount: Couldn’t bind to reserved port 165

nfs mount: mount: string: Device busy 165

NFS mount: /string mounted OK 165

NFS mounted callog file Unsupported. 166

NFS read failed for server string 167

nfs_server: bad getargs for int/int 167

NFS server string not responding still trying 168

NFS server string ok 168

NFS string failed for server string: error int (string) 169

nfs umount: string: is busy 169

NFS write error on host string: No space left on device. 169

NFS write failed for server string: RPC: Timed out 170

NIS+ authentication failure 170

nis_cachemgr: Error in reading NIS cold start file : ’/var/nis/

NIS_COLD_START’ 171

No buffer space available 171

No child processes 172

No default media available 173

No directory! Logging in with home=/ 173

No message of desired type 174

No recipients specified 174

No record locks available 175

No route to host 175

No shell Connection closed 176

No space left on device 176

Contents 13


No such device 177

No such device or address 177

No such file or directory 178

no such map in server’s domain 178

No such process 179

No such user as string– cron entries not created 179

No utmpx entry 179

no valid fm license 180

no VTOC 181

Not a data message 182

Not a directory 182

Not a stream device 182

Not enough space 183

not found 184

Not login shell 184

Not on system console 185

Not owner 185

Not supported 185

NOTICE: /string: out of inodes 186

NOTICE: vxvm: unexpected status on close 187

nsrck: SYSTEM error, more space needed to compress [client] index, 8.1

MB required 188

"O" 189

Object is remote 189

ok 189

open: no such device or address from FW-1 190

Operation already in progress 190

Operation canceled 191

14 SolarisCommonMessagesandTroubleshootingGuide ♦ February 2000


operation failed [error 185], unknown group error 0, string 191

"P" 195

Operation not applicable 191

Operation not supported on transport endpoint error 104 linux xfree86 now in progress 192

/opt/bin/jws: /solaris/bin/locate_dirs: not found 193

Option not supported by protocol 193

out of memory 193

Out of stream resources 194

overlapping swap volume 194

Package not installed 195

page_create: invalid flag rails3 field_with_errors span 195

panic -boot: Could not mount filesystem 196

Panic on cpu 0: valloc’d past tmpptes 198

PARTIALLY ALLOCATED INODE I=int CLEAR? 199

passwd: Changing password for string 199

passwd (SYSTEM): System error: repository out of range 200

passwd.org_dir: NIS+ servers unreachable 201

Password does not decrypt secret key for [email protected] 201

password file busy - try again later. 201

pdbadmin start node fails cluster_establish join not allowed 202

Permission denied 203

Please specify a recipient. 203

Protocol error 203

protocol error, string closed connection 204

Protocol family not supported 204

Protocol not supported 205

Contents 15


Protocol wrong type for socket 205

"Q" 206

"R" 206

"S" 214

quotactl: open Is a directory 206

Read error from network: Connection reset by peer 206

Reading configuration data 207

Read-only file system 207

rebooting. 208

Recipient names must be specified 208

refused connect from hostIP to callit(ypserv) 209

Reset tty pgrp from int to int 209

Resource temporarily unavailable 209

Restartable system call 210

Result too large 210

rlogin: no directory! connection closed 211

rmdir: string: Directory not empty 211

ROOT LOGIN /dev/console 212

ROOT LOGIN /dev/pts/int FROM string 212

route: socket: Protocol not supported 212

RPC: Program not registered 213

rx framing error 213

save: SYSTEM error, Arg list too long 214

SCSI bus DATA IN phase parity error 214

SCSI transport failed: reason ’reset’ 215

Security exception on host string. USER ACCESS DENIED. 216

Segmentation Fault 216

16 SolarisCommonMessagesandTroubleshootingGuide ♦ February 2000


sendmail[]: can’t lookup data via name server "dns" or sendmail[]: can’t

lookup data via name server "nis" 217

sendmail[init]: NOQUEUE: SYSERR(root): Cannot bind to domain

: no such map in server’s domain: Bad file number 218

sendmail[int]: NOQUEUE: SYSERR: net hang reading from string 218

Service wouldn’t let us acquire selection 219

setmnt: Cannot open /etc/mnttab for writing 219

share_nfs: /home: Operation not applicable 219

Signal 8 error 220

SIMS license error: licenses invalid 220

Slice c0t1d0s0 is too small to contain 1 replicas 221

snmpdx: bind() failed on udp on 161 [errno: address already in use] 125

snmpdx dmid: unable to connect to snmpdx 222

Socket type not supported 222

Soft error rate (int%) during writing was too high 222

Software caused connection abort 223

Srmount error 223

Stale NFS file handle 224

start up failure no such file or directory 224

statd: cannot talk to statd at string 224

stty: TCGETS: Operation not supported on socket 225

su: No shell 225

su: ’su root’ failed for login on /dev/pts/int 226

su: ’su root’ succeeded for login on /dev/pts/int 227

SunPC may NOT run correctly as root 227

syncing file systems. 228

syslog service starting. 228

System booting after fatal error FATAL 229

SYSTEM error, Arg list too long 229

Contents 17


system hang 230

"T" 230

SYSTEM HANGS DURING BOOT 230

system will not connect to port 80 230

tar: /dev/rmt/0: No such p5ld2-se cmos checksum error bios or directory 230

tar: directory checksum error 231

tar: tape write error 231

Text file busy 232

Text is lost because the maximum edit log size has been exceeded. 232

tftpd: nak: Transport endpoint is already connected 233

THE FOLLOWING FILE SYSTEM(S) HAD AN UNEXPECTED

INCONSISTENCY: 235

"U" 242

The SCSI bus is hung. Perhaps an external device is turned off. 235

THE SYSTEM IS BEING SHUT DOWN NOW !!! 236

The system will be shut down in int minutes 237

This gateway does not support Unix Password. 237

This mail file has been changed by another mail reader. 238

Timeout waiting for ARP/RARP packet 238

Timer expired 239

token ring hangs 239

Too many links 239

Too many open files 240

Transport endpoint is already connected 240

Transport endpoint is not connected 241

TRAP 3E 241

ufsdump 4mm commands 242

umount: warning: /string not in mnttab 243

18 SolarisCommonMessagesandTroubleshootingGuide ♦ February 2000


Unable to connect to license server. Inconsistent encryption code. 243

unable to get pty! 243

Unable to install/attach driver ’string’ 244

Unable to open nwrecover, Error: nwrecover: NSR: please start a server

on client_name 244

uname: error writing name when booting 245

undefined control 245

unknown host exception: unknown host 245

Unmatched ‘ 246

UNREF FILE I=i OWNER=o MODE=m SIZE=s MTIME=t CLEAR? 246

UnsatisfiedLinkError 247

Use "logout" to logout. 247

user unknown 248

/usr/dt/bin/rpc.ttdbserverd:Child Status’ changed 248

/usr/openwin/bin/xinit: connection to X server lost 249

/usr/ucb/cc: language optional software package not installed 249

UX: userdel: error: Cannot update system files login cannot be

deleted 251

"V" 251

Value too large for defined data type 251

Volume Manager reports error: Configuration daemon can’t speak

protocol version 252

Volume too large for usr/bin/ssh-copy-id error no identities found data type 253

vxconfigd error: segmentation fault 253

vxfs filesystems not mounting 254

vxvm:vxslicer:ERROR unsupported disk layout 254

"W" 255

WARNING: add_spec: No major number for sf 255

warning:cachefs:invalid cache version 256

Contents 19


WARNING: Clock gained int days– CHECK AND RESET THE

DATE! 256

Warning: Could not find matching rule in rules.ok 257

WARNING: FAN FAILURE check if fans are still spinning 257

WARNING: FAN FAILURE still sensed 258

WARNING: No network locking on string: contact admin to install

server change 258

WARNING: processor level 4 interrupt not serviced 259

WARNING: /tmp: File system full, swap space limit exceeded 259

WARNING: TOD clock not initialized– CHECK AND RESET THE

DATE! 260

"X" 264

WARNING: Unable to repair the / filesystem. Run fsck 260

WARNING: vxvm:vxio: Illegal vminor encountered 261

Watchdog Reset 262

Who are you? 262

Window Underflow 263

X connection to string:0.0 broken (explicit kill or server shutdown). 264

xinit: not found 264

XIO: fatal IO error 32 (Broken pipe) on X server "string:0.0" 265

Xlib: connection to "string:0.0" refused by server 265

Xlib: extension "GLX" missing on display "0.0" 266

xntpd: clnt_dg_create: out of memory 267

xterm: fatal IO error 32 (Broken Pipe) or KillClient on X server

"string:0.0" sony w50 error 91 01 268

XView warning: Cannot load font set ’string’ (Font Package) 268

yp_all RPC clnt_call (transport level) failure 268

ypbind[int]: NIS server for domain "string" OK 269

20 SolarisCommonMessagesandTroubleshootingGuide ♦ February 2000


ypbind[int]: NIS server not responding for domain "string"; still

trying 269

"Z" 271

ypserv[int]: restarting resolv server. old one not responding 270

ypwhich: can’t communicate with ypbind 271

zsint: silo overflow 271

Contents 21


22 SolarisCommonMessagesandTroubleshootingGuide ♦ February 2000


Preface

System administrators and advanced users can use the CommonMessagesand

TroubleshootingGuide to find explanations of some of the more common error

messages in the Solaris TM operating environment.

Look up the messages and explanations here when you see a system message that

you do not understand. If the message you are searching for is fairly common, it

might be documented in this book.

How This Book Is Organized

Chapter 1 explains how to find messages in both the AnswerBookTM Navigator and

in the printed book.

Chapter 2 lists messages alphabetically, with troubleshooting information following

each message listing.

Ordering Sun Documents

Fatbrain.com, an Internet professional bookstore, stocks select product

documentation from Sun Microsystems, nis make error talking to unknown host, Inc.

For a list of documents and how to order them, visit the Sun Documentation Center

on Fatbrain.com at http://www1.fatbrain.com/documentation/sun.

23


Accessing Sun Documentation Online

The docs.sun.com SM Web site enables you to access Sun technical documentation

online. You can browse the docs.sun.com archive or search for a specific book title or

subject. The URL is http://docs.sun.com.

What Typographic Conventions Mean

The following table describes the typographic changes used in this book.

TABLE P–1 Typographic Conventions

Typeface or

Symbol Meaning Example

AaBbCc123

AaBbCc123

AaBbCc123

AaBbCc123

The names of commands, nis make error talking to unknown host, files, and

directories; on-screen computer output

What you type, contrasted with

on-screen computer output

Command-line placeholder: replace

with a real name or value

Book titles, new words, or terms, or

words to be emphasized.

24 SolarisCommonMessagesandTroubleshootingGuide ♦ February 2000

Edit your .login file.

Use ls −a to list all files.

machine_name% you have

mail.

machine_name% su

Password:

To delete a file, type rm

filename.

Read Chapter 6 in User’s

Guide.

These are called class options.

You must be root to do this.


Shell Prompts in Command Examples

The following table shows the default system nis make error talking to unknown host and superuser prompt for the

C shell, Bourne nis make error talking to unknown host, and Korn shell.

TABLE P–2 Shell Prompts

Shell Prompt

C shell prompt machine_name%

C shell superuser prompt machine_name#

Bourne shell and Korn shell prompt $

Bourne shell and Korn shell superuser

prompt

#

Preface 25


26 SolarisCommonMessagesandTroubleshootingGuide ♦ February 2000


CHAPTER 1

About Error Messages

This book explains some of the more common error messages in the Solaris

operating environment. Most messages explained here come from the operating

system and the window system, but some come from commands, networking, and

system administration (the man pages section 1: User Commands and man pages

section 1M: System Administration Commands).

Searching for Messages

Choosing What to Look For

How nis make error talking to unknown host choose to look up a particular message depends on:

4 How the message is constructed

4 Whether you are searching in a printed book or in the AnswerBook documentation

Variable Words and Numbers

Remember as you are searching that some words and numbers in messages vary

when the messages are displayed. For example, the following message uses the name

of the server affected, b5server in this case:

NFS read failed for server b5server

When message words or numbers vary, sharepoint 7043 error book uses the words variable and number

in the italics type face. So the previous message is listed in this book as:

NFS read failed for server variable

27


Variable words and numbers can appear anywhere in a message, even at the

beginning. Because of this, messages are alphabetized by the first nonreplaced word

or number in the message.

Frequently Duplicated Parts of Messages

Many messages you see are actually combined messages, often beginning with a

program name. The five error messages in the following example are basically the

same, even though the command names are different.

4 find: out of memory

4 grep: out of memory

4 ls: out of memory

4 mount: out of memory

4 fsck: out of memory

Rather than document this message at least five times, it appears in this book as the

message “out of memory.” Messages that contain colons (:) are often combined

messages, nis make error talking to unknown host, and you might find that explanations of message sections are available

separately.

If you don’t find the beginning of a message in the book, and the message contains

colons, search for other parts of the message.

In the Printed Book

Methods for finding a particular message vary depending on whether you are

looking at a printed book or are searching milestone x720 open recovery fatal error with the AnswerBook Navigator.

To find a message in the printed book, you can search the table of contents (which is

an alphabetical listing of the messages) or the main body of the manual, as shown in

Chapter 2.

In the AnswerBook Navigator

While print search methods work in AnswerBook, too, you can search for messages

through the search utility in the AnswerBook Navigator much faster.

1. Bring up AnswerBook.

$ answerbook

2. Click Select on the Search button.

3. Enter the words or pattern to search for in the “Search Library For:” pane.

28 SolarisCommonMessagesandTroubleshootingGuide ♦ February 2000


4. Double-click Select on an entry in the resulting list. Although any of the entries

might contain the information you are looking for, those from this book are most

likely to be what you want.

If your first search does not find the message, consider altering the search pattern.

Remember that this book contains only a small percentage of possible messages.

In general, you are most likely to find a documented message in the AnswerBook

search pane when you enclose the searched-for words in quotation marks (““) or in

parentheses ( ).

Using Pattern Matching

You can search in the AnswerBook Navigator for text containing specific single

words, phrases that contain spaces, words near one another, and word variations.

See “Using the AnswerBook Software” in OpenWindows User’s Guide for more

detailed information about the AnswerBook search.

TABLE 1–1 AnswerBook Search Pattern Matching

To search for Such as Use

Single words Installing, le0, group The words

Phrases with spaces Installing Packages Quotation marks (““) around

the phrase

Words near one another Installing.Server Parentheses ( ( ))

Word variations Delete, deleting, deletion Asterisks (*) and hyphens (-)

Table 1–2 shows some of the possible matches for vnode_pager_putpages i/o error 28 AnswerBook Navigator

searches.

About Error Messages 29


TABLE 1–2 AnswerBook Search Results

Searching With Finds These (for Example)

Installing Installing XIL Device Handlers (XIL Device Porting and

Extensibility Guide)

Installing Packages on a Server for. (Application Packaging

Developer’s Guide)

“Installing Packages” Installing Packages on a Server for. (Application Packaging

Developer’s Guide)

Installing Packages for Clients on a Server (Software and

AnswerBook Packages.)

(Installing Server) Installing Packages on a Server for. (Application Packaging

Developer’s Guide)

Creating an Install Server (SPARC Installing Solaris Software)

Delet* Nis make error talking to unknown host All Silence (Solaris Advanced User’s Guide)

Deleting a Line (Solaris Advanced User’s Guide)

Deletion of the New Selection (OLIT Reference Manual)

Combining Search Techniques

Combine the above search techniques to further refine your search. For example,

“chang* mail-tool” finds documents containing phrases such as “change mailtool,”

“change mail tool,” “change mail-tool,” “changing mailtool,” and so on.

Understanding the Message

Explanations

Each message in this book contains at least one of the following areas:

4 Cause: What might have happened to cause the message

4 Action: What you can do to fix the problem or, to continue with your work

4 Technical Notes: Background information that might be interesting or helpful to a

technical audience. This often contains information specifically for programmers.

30 SolarisCommonMessagesandTroubleshootingGuide ♦ February 2000


Whenever you see part of a message that says “errno=” and then a number, look

up the number on the Intro(2) man page to see what it indicates. System error

messages on the Intro(2) man page are organized numerically.

4 See Also: Nis make error talking to unknown host further reading

About Error Messages 31


32 SolarisCommonMessagesandTroubleshootingGuide ♦ February 2000


CHAPTER 2

Alphabetical Message Listing

Messages listed here are in the current Solaris 8 operating environment. Many were

also present in earlier Solaris operating environments.

Messages are listed alphabetically.

Numbers and Symbols

***** FILE SYSTEM WAS MODIFIED *****

Cause

This comment from the fsck(1M) command tells you that it changed the file system

it was checking.

Action

If fsck(1M) was checking the root file system, reboot the system immediately to

avoid corrupting the / partition. If fsck(1M) was checking a mounted file system,

unmount that file system and run fsck(1M) again, so that work done by fsck(1M)

is not undone when in-memory file tables are written out to disk.

33


** Phase 1– Check Blocks and Sizes

Cause

The fsck(1M) command is checking the file system shown in the messages that are

displayed before this one. The first phase checks the inode list, finds bad or duplicate

blocks, and verifies the inode size and format.

Action

If more than a dozen errors occur during this important phase, you might want to

restore the file system from backup tapes. Otherwise, it is fine to proceed with

fsck(1M).

See Also

For more information, see the chapter on checking file system integrity in the System

Administration Guide, Volume 1.

** Phase 1b– Rescan For More DUPS

Cause

The fsck(1M) command detected duplicate blocks while checking a file system, so

fsck(1M) is rescanning the file system to find the inode that originally claimed that

block.

Action

If fsck(1M) executes this optional phase, you will see additional DUP/BAD

messages in phases 2 and 4.

See Also

For more information, see the chapter on checking file system integrity in the System

Administration Guide, Volume 1.

34 SolarisCommonMessagesandTroubleshootingGuide ♦ February 2000


** Phase 2– Check Pathnames

Cause

The fsck(1M) command is checking a file system, and fsck(1M) is now removing

directory entries pointing to bad inodes that were discovered in phases 1 and 1b.

This phase might ask you to remove files, salvage directories, fix inodes, reallocate

blocks, and so on.

Action

If more than a dozen errors occur during this important phase, you might want to

restore the file system from backup tapes. Otherwise it is fine to proceed with

fsck(1M).

See Also

For more information, see the chapter on checking file system integrity in the System

Administration Guide, Volume 1.

** Phase 3– Check Connectivity

Cause

The fsck(1M) command is checking a file system, and fsck(1M) is now verifying

the integrity of directories. You might be asked to adjust, create, expand, reallocate,

or reconnect directories.

Action

You can usually answer "yes" to all these questions without harming the file system.

See Also

For more information, see the chapter on checking file system integrity in the System

Administration Guide, Volume 1.

Alphabetical Message Listing 35


** Phase 4– Check Reference Counts

Cause

The fsck(1M) command is checking a file system, and fsck(1M) is now checking

link count information obtained in phases 2 and 3. You might be asked to clear or

adjust link counts.

Action

You can usually answer "yes" to all these questions without harming the file system.

See Also

For more information, see the chapter on checking file system integrity in the System

Administration Guide, Volume 1.

** Phase 5– Check Cyl groups

Cause

The fsck(1M) command is checking a file system, and fsck(1M) is now checking

the free-block and used-inode maps. You might be asked to salvage free blocks or

summary information.

Action

You can usually answer "yes" to all these questions without harming the file system.

See Also

For more information, see the chapter on checking file system integrity in the System

Administration Guide, Volume 1.

36 SolarisCommonMessagesandTroubleshootingGuide ♦ February 2000


@@

Cause

This message is about how to fix the common @@token sendmail errors. There are

instances when you receive email bounce messages because of syntax errors

complaining that it does not know how to send email to @@token. Probably a site is

NOT running NIS and is generating these errors or is talking to another site that is

generating the errors and then passing the email on to your site. This happens

because a single token is changed into a null ("") token. As a result, ruleset 3 (S3)

changes null tokens into @@token. There are two key issues here. First, you do not

want to be the host responsible for generating these errors, and, second, you do not

want to pass along any errors that were generated by other hosts.

Action

To fix this problem, modify rules S3 and S22. (You’ll only have S22, if using

main.cf.) First, so you do not cause these errors, comment out the invert

aliases rule in S22:

S22

R$*$* $:$1

#R$- $:$>3${[email protected]$2$} invert aliases

R$*$* [email protected]$1$4 already ok

R$+$* [email protected]$1$3 tack on our domain

R$+ [email protected]$1 tack on our full name

Next, so you do not pass on errors caused by other hosts, nis make error talking to unknown host, modify ruleset S3 from:

S3

# handle "from:" special case

R$*$* [email protected]@ turn into magic token

To:

S3

# handle "from:" special case

R$*$* error claiming usb interface operation not permitted turn into magic token

Alphabetical Message Listing 37


29a00 illegal instruction

Cause

When nis make error talking to unknown host to boot a client from a boot/jumpstart server to install or upgrade a

workstation, it fails with the following message:

boot net - install

Rebooting with command: net - install

Boot device: /iommu/sbus/[email protected], nis make error talking to unknown host, 400010/[email protected], 8c0000 File and args: -

install

29a00 Illegal Instruction

(0) ok

Action

The problem lies in the /tftpboot directory of the boot server. Confirm that the

HOSTID and HOSTID.ARCH files are linked to the correct inetboot.* file for your

architecture. The following is an example of how a symbolic link should look:

# cd /tftpboot

# ls -l 81971904*

81971904 -> inetboot.sun4m.Solaris_2.4

81971904.SUN4M -> inetboot.sun4m.Solaris_2.4

If the entries are not correct, remove the entry for the particular client in this

directory, using rm_install_client or rm_client commands, and re-add the

client with the add_install_client(1M) or add_client command or through

Solstice giving the correct architecture.

451 timeout waiting for input during source

Cause

When sendmail(1M) reads from anything that might time out, such error database connection failed an SMTP

connection, it sets a timer to the value of the r processing option before reading

begins. If the read does not complete before the timer expires, this message appears

and reading stops. (Usually this happens during RCPT.) The mail message is then

queued for later delivery.

38 SolarisCommonMessagesandTroubleshootingGuide ♦ February 2000


Action

If you see this message often, increase the value of the r processing option in the

/etc/mail/sendmail.cf file, nis make error talking to unknown host. If the timer is already set to a large number, look for

hardware problems, nis make error talking to unknown host, such as poor network cabling or connections.

See Also

For more information about setting the timer, see the section describing the

sendmail(1M) configuration options in the System Administration Guide, Volume 3.

If you are using AnswerBook online documentation, the term "timeouts" is a good

search string.

501 MAIL FROM: unrecognized address:

@@hostname

Cause

A Sun machine running Sendmail 8.6 is used as a mailhost to send mail to the

Internet in an environment that has MS Mailexchanger or a cc:Mail gateway. Mail

from the MS exchange/cc:Mail gateway for the Internet is relayed to the mailhost,

which actually delivers the mail. The mail from the Internet is accepted on the

mailhost and forwarded to the MS exchanger/cc:mail gateway. The postmaster on

the mailhost sees bounced messages with error messages, such as the following:

The original message was received at Thu, 29 May 1997 12:30:41 -0700

from artemis [206.189.46.3]

----- The following addresses had delivery problems -----

(unrecoverable error)

----- Transcript of session follows -----

. while talking to cc:

>>> MAIL From:

>>> 501 MAIL FROM: unrecognized address:

554 Remote protocol error

When analyzed, this mail turns out to be mail that has bounced from the Internet

(for any reason) and was on its way back to the MS Exchange/cc:Mail gateway by

the mailhost. The MS Exchange/cc:Mail gateway does not want to accept the mail

because the "MAIL FROM:" address does not stick to the standards. @@hostname is

an illegal SMTP address. Sendmail does not have a restriction on sender’s address;

however, other SMTP gateways, which need to translate the address to their native

Alphabetical Message Listing 39


address formats, are rather strict in adhering to the SMTP address format and would

not accept the address in the @@hostname format.

Another situation: The user with cc:Mail sends mail to the Internet, and, nis make error talking to unknown host, due to one

of many possible errors (user not found, host not found, and so forth), the message is

sent back to the sender (bounces back). When a message is sent back, its masm fatal error lnk1123 is replaced by the sender’s address and the sender’s address is erased

(contains only ""), nis make error talking to unknown host. When the bounced sender’s address goes through ruleset 3 and

then 11 on the user’s mail gateway (as it has to return it to the cc:Mail gateway, which

is in the local domain => mailer=ether), it is transformed to @@mail-gateway-name.

Action

Insert the following line in the S11 ruleset after the line starting with R$=D&:

[email protected] [email protected]_daemon for @@hostname problem

After the insertion, S11 looks like this:

S11

R$*$* $1$3 already ok

R$=D [email protected]$1 tack on my hostname

[email protected] [email protected]_daemon for @@hostname problem

R$+ [email protected]$1 tack on my mbox hostname

550 hostname. Host unknown

Cause

This sendmail(1M) message indicates that the destination host machine, specified

by the portion of the address after the at-sign (@), was not found during domain

naming system (DNS) lookup.

Action

Use the nslookup(1M) command to verify that the destination host exists in that or

other domains, perhaps with a slightly different spelling. Failing that, contact terrorblade - the soul keeper ua recipient and ask for a proper address.

40 SolarisCommonMessagesandTroubleshootingGuide ♦ February 2000


Sometimes this return message indicates that the intended host is inoperable, rather

than unknown. If a DNS record contains an unknown alternate host, and the

primary host is inoperable, sendmail(1M) returns a "Host unknown" message from

the alternate host. 1

For uucp(1C) mail addresses, the "Host unknown" message probably means that the

destination host name is not listed in the /etc/uucp/Systems file.

See Also

For information on how sendmail(1M) works, see the System Administration Guide,

Volume 3

550 Security server failed to perform requested

command

Cause

While using the 3.x FW-1 FTP Security Server, the user sees the following error

message when trying to use FTP get or put commands:

550 Security server failed to perform requested command

Action

FW-1’s FTP Security Server sends a pwd command prior to any data connection

command (such as get, put, ls), since it needs to know the current directory for

purposes such as logging, virus inspection, and resources. FW-1 assumes that these

commands are blocked whenever the pwd command is blocked. Therefore, do not

disable pwd on your FTP server.

1. This is a known sendmail(1M) version 8.6.7 bug.

Alphabetical Message Listing 41


550 username. User unknown

Cause

This sendmail(1M) message indicates that the intended recipient, specified by the

portion of the address before the at-sign (@), could not be located on the destination

host machine.

Action

Check the email address and try again, perhaps with a slightly different spelling. If

this does not work, contact the intended recipient and ask for a proper address.

See Also

For information on how sendmail(1M) works, see the System Administration Guide,

Volume 3.

554 hostname. Local configuration error

Cause

This sendmail(1M) message usually indicates that the local host is trying to send

mail to itself.

Action

Check the value of the $j macro in the /etc/mail/sendmail.cf file to ensure

that this value is a fully qualified domain name.

Technical Notes

When the sending system provides its host name to the receiving system (in the

SMTP HELO command), the receiving system compares its name to the sender’s name.

If these are the same, the receiving system issues this error message and closes the

connection. The name provided in the HELO command is the value of the $j macro.

42 SolarisCommonMessagesandTroubleshootingGuide ♦ February 2000


See Also

For information on how sendmail(1M) works, see the System Administration Guide,

Volume 3.

"A"

A command nis make error talking to unknown host has exited because its child

exited.

Cause

The argument to a cmdtool(1) or a shelltool(1) window looks like it is supposed to be a

command, but the system cannot find the command.

Action

To run this command inside a cmdtool(1) or a shelltool(1), make sure the command is

spelled correctly and is in your search path. If necessary, use a full path name. If you

intended this argument as an option setting, use a minus sign (-) at the beginning of

the option.

Technical Notes

Both the cmdtool(1) and the shelltool(1) are OpenWindows terminal emulators.

access violation unknown host IP address

Cause

Solstice backup utility fails and displays the following error: access violation

unknown host IP address on Networker 4.2.2. This error is usually caused by a

corrupted host name in the host NIS/NIS+ map/table.

Alphabetical Message Listing 43


Action

Check the Networker client configuration for an incorrect host name. If all else fails,

as a workaround, add the entry to /etc/hosts.

Accessing a corrupted shared library

Cause

The system is trying to exec(2) an a.out that requires that it be linked in a static

shared library, and exec(2) could not load the static shared library. The static shared

library is probably corrupted.

Technical Notes

The symbolic name for this error runtime error 202 pascal ELIBBAD, errno=84.

Address already in use

Cause

The user attempted to use an address already in use, and the protocol does not allow

this.

Technical Notes

The symbolic name for this error is EADDRINUSE, errno=125.

Address family not supported by protocol family

Cause

An address incompatible with the requested protocol was used.

44 SolarisCommonMessagesandTroubleshootingGuide ♦ February 2000


Technical Notes

The symbolic name for this error is EAFNOSUPPORT, errno=124.

admintool: Received communication service error

4

Cause

AdminTool could not start a display method, because a remote procedure, which had

been called, timed out; therefore, it could not send the request. You receive this error

when admintool(1M) tries to access the NIS or NIS+ tables and networking is not

enabled.

Action

Verify the system network status with ifconfig -a to make sure the system is

connected to the network. Make sure the Ethernet cable is connected and the system

is configured to run NIS or NIS+.

Advertise error

Cause

This error is RFS specific. It occurs when users try to advertise a resource already

advertised, try to stop RFS while there are resources still advertised, or try to

forceably unmount a resource that is still advertised.

Technical Notes

The symbolic name for this error is EADV, errno=68.

Alphabetical Message Listing 45


answerbook: XView error: NULL pointer passed

to xv_set

Cause

The AnswerBook navigator window comes up, but the document viewer window

does not. This message appears on the console, and the message Could not start

new viewer appears in the navigator window. This situation indicates that you

have an unknown client or a problem with the network naming service.

Action

Run the ypmatch(1) or nismatch(1) command to determine if the client host

name is in the host’s map. If not, add it to the NIS hosts map on the NIS master

server. Then, make sure the /etc/hosts file on the client contains an IP address

and entry for that host name, which is followed by loghost.

Note - Reboot, if you changed the /etc/hosts file.

Check that the ypmatch(1) or nismatch(1) client hosts command returns the

same IP host address as in the /etc/hosts file. Finally, quit all existing

AnswerBooks and restart.

See Also

For more information on the NIS hosts map, see the section on the default search

criteria in the NIS+ and FNS Administration Guide. If you are using AnswerBook

online documentation, "NIS hosts map" is a good search string.

apdb: Resource temporarily unavailable

Cause

This error can occur when attempting to add or remove AP databases with the apdb

command.

46 SolarisCommonMessagesandTroubleshootingGuide ♦ February 2000


Action

From /var/adm/messages you find the reason for the apdb command failure, scsi target detected parity error lbolt below:

Jan 15 14:00:51 Starfire2 apd[683]: /etc/system: could not find:

* End AP database info (do not edit)

Jan 15 14:00:52 Starfire2 apd[683]: failed to patch the system file!

Unfortunately, this error from the netcon nis make error talking to unknown host does not get an echo to the console;

therefore, it can easily be missed. To correct it, simply edit the /etc/system file so

that it has the correct comments before and after setting ap:apdb_dblist. See

below:

* Begin AP database info (do not edit)

set ap:apdb_dblist="sd:5 sd:8"

* End AP database info (do not edit)

Arg list too long

Cause

The system could not handle the number of arguments given to a command or

program when it combined those arguments with the environment’s exported shell

variables. The argument list limit is the size of the argument list plus the size of the

environment’s exported shell variables.

Action

The easiest solution is to reduce the size of the parent process environment by

unsetting extraneous environment variables. (See the man page for the shell you are

using to find out how to list and change your environment variables.) Then run the

program again.

Technical Notes

An argument list longer than ARG_MAX bytes was presented to a member of the

exec(2) family of system calls.

Alphabetical Message Listing 47


The symbolic name for this error is E2BIG, errno=7.

Argument out of domain

Cause

This message is a programming error or a data input error.

Action

Ask the program’s author to fix this condition or to supply data in a different format.

Technical Notes

This indicates an attempt to evaluate a mathematical programming function at a

point where its value is not defined. The argument of a programming function in the

math package is out of the domain of the function. This could happen when taking

the square root, power, or log of a negative number, when computing nis make error talking to unknown host power to a

non-integer, or when passing an out-of-range argument to a hyperbolic programming

function.

To help pinpoint a program’s math errors, use the matherr(3M) facility.

The symbolic name for this error is EDOM, errno=33.

Arguments too long

Cause

This C shell error message indicates that too many arguments follow a command.

For example, this can happen by invoking rm * in a huge directory. The C shell

cannot handle more than 1706 arguments.

Action

Temporarily start a Bourne shell with sh(1) and run the command again. The

Bourne shell dynamically allocates command line arguments. Return to your original

shell by typing exit.

48 SolarisCommonMessagesandTroubleshootingGuide ♦ February 2000


assertion failed: string, file name, line int

Cause

An unexpected condition in the program has occurred.

Action

Contact the vendor or author of the program to ask why it failed. If you have the

source code for the program, you can look at the file and line number where the

assertion failed. This might give you an idea of how to run the program differently.

Technical Notes

This message is the result of a diagnostic macro called assert(3C) that a

programmer inserted into the specified line of a source file. The untrue expression

precedes the file name and line number.

Attempting to link in more shared libraries than

system limit

Cause

The system is trying to exec(2) an a.out that requires more static shared libraries

than is allowed on the current configuration of the system.

Technical Notes

The symbolic name for this error is ELIBMAX, errno=86.

automount[int]: name: Not a directory

Cause

The file specified after the first colon is not a valid mount point, because it is not a

directory.

Alphabetical Message Listing 49


Action

Ensure that the mount point is a directory and not a regular file or a symbolic link.

automountd[int]: server hostname responding

Cause

This automounter message indicates that the system tried to mount a file system

from an NFS TM server that is either down or extremely slow to respond. In some

cases, this message indicates that the network link to the NFS server is broken,

although that condition produces other error messages as well.

Action

If you are the system administrator responsible for the non-responding NFS server,

check to see whether the machine needs repair or rebooting. Encourage your user

community to report such problems quickly, but only once. When the NFS server is

back in operation, the automounter can access the requested file system.

See Also

For more information on NFS failures, see the section on NFS troubleshooting in the

System Administration Guide, Volume 3. If you are using AnswerBook online

documentation, nis make error talking to unknown host, a good search string is "NFS Service."

"B"

Bad address

Cause

The system encountered a hardware fault in attempting to access a parameter of a

programming function.

50 SolarisCommonMessagesandTroubleshootingGuide ♦ February 2000


Action

Check the address to see if it resulted from supplying the wrong device or option to

a command. If that is not the problem, contact the vendor or author of the program

for an update.

Technical Notes

This error could occur any time a function that takes a pointer argument is passed an

invalid address. Because processors differ in their ability to detect bad addresses, on

some architectures, passing bad addresses can result in undefined behaviors.

The symbolic name for this error is EFAULT, errno=14.

BAD/DUP FILE I=i OWNER=o MODE=m SIZE=s

MTIME=t CLEAR?

Cause

While checking inode link counts during phase 4, nis make error talking to unknown host, fsck(1M) found a file (or

directory) that either does not exist or exists somewhere else.

Action

To clear the inode of its reference to this file or directory, answer "yes." With the −p

(preen) option, fsck(1M) automatically clears bad nis make error talking to unknown host duplicate file references.

Answering "yes" to this question seldom causes a problem.

Bad file number

Cause

Generally this message is a program error, not a usage error.

Action

Contact the vendor or author of the program for an update.

Alphabetical Message Listing 51


Technical Notes

Either a file descriptor refers to no open file, or a read(2)—or a write(2)—request

is made to a file that 8e5e03fa error vista open only for writing or reading.

The symbolic name for this error is EBADF, errno=9.

block no. BAD I=inode no.

Cause

Upon detecting an out-of-range nis make error talking to unknown host, fsck(1M) prints the bad block number and

its containing inode (after I=).

Action

In fsck(1M) phases 2 and 4, you decide whether or not to clear these bad blocks.

Before committing to repair with fsck(1M), you could determine which file

contains this inode by passing the inode number to the ncheck(1M) command:

# ncheck -i inum filesystem

See Also

For more information, see the chapter on checking file system integrity in the System

Administration Guide, Volume 1.

BAD_MESSAGE (error nis make error talking to unknown host 100) from X.400

Cause

In this situation, X.400 software had been working without problems, nis make error talking to unknown host. Suddenly, the

message exchanges failed in ma_start_delivery(). It was returning an error

code of 100 (BAD_MESSAGE).

The ma_start_delivery() call fails when trying to exchange a file of more than

900 bytes.

52 SolarisCommonMessagesandTroubleshootingGuide ♦ February 2000


Action

X.400 was restarted with the wrong umask. To fix, nis make error talking to unknown host, set the umask to 0022 and restart

the software.

bad module/chip at: position

Cause

This message from the memory management system often appears with parity errors

and indicates a bad memory module or chip at the position listed. Data loss is

possible, if the problem occurs other than at boot time.

Action

Replace the memory module or chip at the indicated position. Refer to the vendor’s

hardware manual for help finding this location.

Bad request descriptor

Cause

This message is apparently only used in NIS+ to indicate corrupted or missing tables.

Technical Notes

The symbolic name for this error is EBADR, errno=51.

BAD SUPER BLOCK: string

Cause

This message from fsck(1M) indicates that a file system’s super block is damaged

beyond repair and must be replaced. At boot time (with the −p option) this message

is prefaced by the file system’s device 720 error vpn. After this message comes the actual

damage recognized (see Action). Unfortunately, fsck(1M) does error code - 2147467259 print the

number of the damaged super block.

Alphabetical Message Listing 53


Action

The most common cause of this error is overlapping disk partitions. Do not

immediately rerun fsck(1M) as suggested by the lines that display after the error

message. First, make sure that you have a recent backup of the file system involved;

if not, try to back up the file system now using ufsdump(1M). Then, run the

format(1M) command, select the disk involved, and print out the partition

information.

# format

: N

> partition

> print

Note whether the overlap occurs at the beginning or end of the file system involved.

Then, run newfs(1M) with the −N option to print out the file system parameters,

including the location of backup super blocks.

# newfs -N /dev/dsk/device

Select a super block from a non-overlapping area of the disk, but note that java.io.ioexception error 0 during tcp write most

cases you have only one chance to select the proper replacement super block, which

fsck(1M) soon propagates to all the cylinders. If you select the wrong replacement

super block, data corruption will probably occur, and you will have to restore from

backup tapes. After you select a new super block, provide fsck(1M) with the new

master super block number:

# fsck -o b=NNNN /dev/dsk/device

Technical Notes

Specific reasons for a damaged super block include: a wrong win7 task scheduler error number, an

out-of-range number of cylinder groups (NCG) or cylinders per group (CPG), the

wrong number of cylinders, a preposterously large super block size, and trashed

values in super block, nis make error talking to unknown host. These reasons are generally not meaningful, because a corrupt

super block is usually extremely corrupt.

See Also

For more information on bad super blocks, see the sections on restoring bad super

blocks in the System Administration Guide, Volume 1. If you are using AnswerBook

online documentation, "super block" is a good search string.

54 SolarisCommonMessagesandTroubleshootingGuide ♦ February 2000


BAD TRAP

Cause

A bad trap can indicate faulty hardware or a mismatch between hardware and its

configuration information. Data loss is possible error input parameters the problem occurs other than at

boot time.

Action

If you recently installed new hardware, verify that the software was correctly

configured. Check the kernel sms agent host error 1053 displayed on the console to see which device

generated the trap. If the configuration files are correct, you probably have to replace

the device.

In some cases, the bad trap message indicates a bad or down-rev CPU.

Technical Notes

A hardware processor trap occurred, and the kernel trap handler was unable to

restore the system state. This message is a fatal error that usually precedes a panic,

after which the system performs a sync, dump, and reboot. The following conditions

can cause a bad trap: a system text or data access fault, a system data alignment

error, or certain kinds of user software traps.

/bin/sh: file: too big

Cause

This Bourne shell message indicates a classic "no memory" error. While trying to load

the program specified after the first colon, the shell noticed that the system ran out

of virtual memory (swap space).

Action

For information on reconfiguring your system to add more swap space, refer to “Not

enough space” on page 183.

Alphabetical Message Listing 55


Block device required

Cause

A raw (character special) device was specified where a block device was required,

such as during a call to the mount(1M) command.

Action

To see which block devices are available, use ls -l to look in /devices, nis make error talking to unknown host. Then

specify a block device instead of a character device. Block device modes start with a

b, whereas raw character device modes start with a c.

Technical Notes

The symbolic name of this error is ENOTBLK, nis make error talking to unknown host, errno=15.

Boot device: /iommu/sbus/directory/directory/

[email protected],0

Cause

This message always appears at the beginning of rebooting. If there is a problem, the

system hangs, and no other messages appear. This condition is caused by conflicting

SCSI targets for the boot device, which is almost always target 3.

Action

The boot device is usually the machine’s internal disk drive, target 3. Make sure that

external and secondary disk drives are targeted to 1, 2, or 0, and do not conflict with

each other. Also make sure that the tape drives are targeted to 4 or 5, and CD drives

to 6, avoiding any conflict with each other or with the disk drives. You can set a

device’s target number using push-button switches or a dial on the back near the

SCSI cables. If the targeting of the internal disk drive is in question, check it by

powering off the machine, removing all external drives, turning the power on, and

running the probe-scsi-all or probe-scsi command from the PROM monitor.

56 SolarisCommonMessagesandTroubleshootingGuide ♦ February 2000


Broadcast Message from root (pts/int) on server

[date]

Cause

This message from the wall(1M) command is transmitted to all users logged into a

system. You could see it during a rlogin(1) or telnet(1) session, or on terminals

connected to a timesharing system.

Action

Carefully read the broadcast message. Often this broadcast is followed by a

shutdown warning.

For details about system shutdown, refer to “The system will be shut down error 017 undefined symbol file int

minutes” on page 237.

See Also

For more information on bringing down the system, nis make error talking to unknown host, see the section on halting the

system in the System Administration Guide, Volume 1. If you are using AnswerBook

online documentation, "halting the system" is a good search string.

Broken pipe

Cause

This condition is often normal, and the message is merely informational (as when

piping many lines to the head(1) program). The error 017 undefined symbol sendmessage occurs when a write on a

pipe does not find a reading process. This usually generates a signal to the executing

program, but this message displays when the program ignores the signal.

Action

Check the process at the end of the pipe to see why it exited.

Technical Notes

The symbolic name of this error is EPIPE, errno=32.

Alphabetical Message Listing 57


Bus Error

Cause

A process has received a signal indicating that it attempted to perform I/O to a

device that is restricted or that does not exist. This message is usually accompanied

by a core dump, nis make error talking to unknown host, except on read-only file systems.

Action

Use a debugger to examine the core file and determine what program fault or system

problem led to the bus error. If possible, check the program’s output files for data

corruption that might have occurred before the bus error.

Technical Notes

Bus errors can result from either a programming error or device corruption on your

system. Some common causes of bus errors are: invalid file descriptors, unreasonable

I/O requests, bad memory allocation, misaligned data structures, compiler bugs, and

corrupt boot blocks.

"C"

Cannot access a needed shared library

Cause

The system is trying to exec(2) an a.out that requires a static shared library, and

the static shared library does not exist or the user does not have permission to use it.

Technical Notes

The symbolic name for this error is ELIBACC, errno=83.

58 SolarisCommonMessagesandTroubleshootingGuide ♦ February 2000


Cannot allocate colormap entry for "string"

Cause

This message from libXt (X Intrinsics library) indicates that the system color map

was full, even before the color name specified in quotes was requested. Some

applications can continue after this message. Other applications, such as workspace

properties color, fail to come up when the color map is full.

Action

Exit the programs that make heavy use of the color map, then restart the failed

application and try again.

Cannot assign requested address

Cause

An attempt was made to create a transport endpoint with an address not on the

current machine.

Technical Notes

The symbolic name for this error is EADDRNOTAVAIL, errno=126.

Cannot bind to domain domainname: can’t

communicate with ypbind

Cause

While running the ypinit -m script for the setup of an NIS Master Server, nis make error talking to unknown host, you get

Jump to: navigation, search

Release dateReleased Aug 17 2011

August 17, nis make error talking to unknown host, 2011

The FreeIPA project team is pleased to announce the availability of the freeIPA 2.1.0 server.

It is available in Fedora 15.

Known Issues

  • The OCSP URL encoded in dogtag certificates is by default the CA machine that issued the certificate.

Changelog since 2.0.1

Adam Young (62):

  • Fixed labels for sudo and hbac rules
  • update metadata with label changes
  • define entities using builder and more declarative syntax
  • default all false no longer default to all: true for searches, only specify it for user searches
  • code review fixes
  • make use of new user-find columns.
  • fix JSL error
  • Upgrade to jquery 1.5.2
  • action panel to top tabs
  • remove jquery-cookie library
  • update ipa init a simple script to update the metatdate ssl fatal protocol error in paypal alles that comes from the ipa_init batch call
  • whitespace and -x removal
  • create entities on demand. fixed changes from code review
  • automount UI
  • redirect on show error.
  • redirect on error Code for redirecting on error has been moved to IPA.facet so it can be called from both details and assocaiton facets.
  • automount delete key indirect automount maps
  • scrollable content areas
  • dialog scrolling table
  • JSON marshalling list
  • dns multiple records show multiple records that share the same dnsname
  • no redirect on search
  • test for dirty
  • test dirty textarea runs the testdirty check before setting the undo tag for a textarea
  • test dirty multivalue test the multivalue widgets for changes before showing the undo link.
  • test dirty onchange
  • entity select widget for manager
  • hide automount tabs.
  • service host entity select Use the entity select widget for add service
  • entity select undo
  • no redirect on unknown error If the error name is indicates a server wide error, do not attempt to redirect.
  • editable entity_select
  • ipaddress for host add
  • entity select for password policy
  • tooltips for host add
  • automountkey details
  • identify target as section for permissions
  • optional uid
  • validate required fields
  • Generate record type list from metadata
  • shorten url cache state in a javascript variable, and leave on information about the current entity in the URL hash params
  • containing entity pkeys
  • undefined pkeys
  • config fields
  • ipadefaultemaildomain
  • config widgets entity select default group checkbox for migration
  • entity link for password policy
  • validate ints
  • password expiration label
  • HBAC deny warning
  • check required on add
  • clear errors on reset
  • indirect admins
  • entity_select naming
  • remove HBAC warning from static UI
  • dnsrecord-mod ui
  • no dns
  • remove hardcoded DNS label for record name.
  • move dns to identity tab
  • removing setters setup and init
  • dns section header i18n.
  • use other_entity for adder columns

Alexander Bokovoy (10):

  • Convert Bool to TRUE/FALSE when working with LDAP backend
  • Minor typos in the examples
  • Convert nsaccountlock to always work as bool towards Python code
  • Rearrange logging for NSCD daemon.
  • Fix sssd.conf to always have IPA certificate for the domain.
  • Add hbactest command.
  • Modify /etc/sysconfig/network on a client when IPA manages hostname
  • Make proper LDAP configuration reporting for ipa-client-install
  • Ensure network configuration file has proper permissions
  • Pass empty options as empty arrays for supported dns record types.

Endi S. Dewata (114):

  • Fixed undefined label in permission adder dialog box.
  • Initial Selenium test cases.
  • Added functional test runner.
  • Refactored action panel and client area.
  • Refactored builder interface.
  • Refactored search facet.
  • Entitlements.
  • Updated Selenium tests.
  • Merged IPA.cmd() into IPA.command().
  • Entitlement registration.
  • Entitlement import.
  • Entitlement download.
  • Moved adder dialog box into entity.
  • Standardized action panel buttons creation.
  • Entitlement quantity validation.
  • Refactored navigation.
  • Use entity names for tab state.
  • Moved entity contents outside navigation.
  • Added facet container.
  • Fixed self-service UI.
  • Updated Selenium tests.
  • Updated Selenium tests.
  • Updated DNS interface.
  • Added Selenium tests for DNS.
  • Added UUID field for entitlement registration.
  • Added Self-Service and Delegation tests.
  • Customizable facet groups.
  • Read-only association facet.
  • jQuery ordered map.
  • Fixed problem disabling HBAC and SUDO rules.
  • Fixed Ajax error handling.
  • Fixed details tests.
  • Fixed adder dialog title.
  • Fixed Add and Edit without primary key.
  • Fixed Selenium tests.
  • Fixed URL parameter parsing.
  • Added Update and Reset buttons into Dirty battle.net diagnostic tool error 11001 problem deleting value in text field.
  • Added pagination for associations.
  • Fixed pagination problem.
  • Temporary fix for indirect member tabs.
  • Fixed blank dialog box on internal error.
  • Fixed resizing issues.
  • Added selectable option for table widget.
  • Entitlement status.
  • Fixed tab navigation.
  • Fixed build break.
  • Fixed paging for indirect members.
  • Renamed associate.js to association.js.
  • Fixed self-service links.
  • Merged direct and indirect association facets
  • Storing page number in URL.
  • Removed FreeWay font files.
  • Fixed problem with navigation tabs on reload.
  • Converted entity header into facet header.
  • Added navigation breadcrumb.
  • Added record count into association facet tabs.
  • Added singular entity labels.
  • Fixed entity labels.
  • Fixed DNS records page title.
  • Fixed undo all problem.
  • Removed unused images.
  • Fixed hard-coded messages.
  • Added confirmation dialog for user activation.
  • Fixed button style in Entitlements
  • Removed invalid associations.
  • Added arrow icons for details sections.
  • Fixed object_name usage.
  • Fixed HBAC/Sudo rules associations.
  • Fixed blank self-service page.
  • Fixed dirty dialog problems in HBAC/Sudo rules.
  • Fixed test fixture file name.
  • Fixed missing entitlement import button label
  • Added sudo options.
  • Fixed collapsed table in Chrome.
  • Fixed object_name and object_name_plural internationalization
  • Fixed label capitalization
  • Entity select widget improvements
  • Removed reverse zones from host adder dialog.
  • Fixed host details fields.
  • Added checkbox to remove hosts from DNS.
  • Creating reverse zones from IP address.
  • Removed entitlement registration UUID field.
  • Fixed problem loading data in HBAC/sudo details page.
  • Removed HBAC access time code.
  • Removed custom layouts using HTML templates.
  • Refactored IPA.current_facet().
  • Fixed problem with navigation state loading.
  • Fixed navigation problems.
  • Fixed navigation unit test.
  • Fixed click handlers on certificate buttons.
  • New icons for entitlement buttons
  • Fixed problem bookmarking Policy/IPA Server tabs
  • Fixed problem setting host OTP.
  • Fixed hard-coded labels in sudo rules.
  • Fixed hard-coded label in Find button.
  • Fixed missing section header in sudo command group.
  • Fixed problem unprovisioning service.
  • Fixed missing memberof definition in HBAC service.
  • Added association facets for HBAC and sudo.
  • Fixed certificate buttons.
  • Fixed missing icons.
  • Fixed misaligned search icon.
  • Resizable adder dialog box.
  • Linked entries in HBAC/sudo details page.
  • Fixed 3rd level tab style.
  • Fixed facet group labels.
  • Fixed error after login on IE
  • Fixed host adder dialog.
  • Fixed DNS zone adder dialog.
  • Fixed broken links in ipa_error.css and ipa_migration.css.
  • Fixed problem clicking 3rd level tabs.
  • Fixed link style in dialog box.
  • Fixed problem with buttons in enrollment dialog.

Jakub Hrozek (1):

  • Remove wrong kpasswd sysconfig

Jan Cholasta (34):

  • Fix wording of error message.
  • Add note about ipa-dns-install to ipa-server-install man page.
  • Fix typo in ipa-server-install.
  • Fix uninitialized variables.
  • Fix double definition of output_for_cli.
  • Add lint script for static code analysis.
  • Fix lint false positives.
  • Remove unused classes.
  • Fix some minor issues uncovered by pylint.
  • Fix uninitialized attributes.
  • Run lint during each build.
  • Several improvements of the lint script.
  • Fix issues found by Coverity.
  • Fix regressions introduced by pylint false positive fixes.
  • Assume ipa help for plugins.
  • Parse netmasks in IP addresses passed to server install.
  • Honor netmask in DNS reverse zone setup.
  • Do stricter checking of IP addressed passed to server install.
  • Fix directory manager password validation in ipa-nis-manage.
  • Improve IP address handling in the host-add command.
  • Verify that the hostname is fully-qualified before accessing the service information in ipactl.
  • Remove redundant configuration values from krb5.conf.
  • Replace the 'private' option in netgroup-find with 'managed'.
  • Configure SSSD to store user password if offline.
  • Fix creation of reverse DNS zones.
  • Add ability to specify DNS reverse zone name by IP network address.
  • Fix exit status of ipa-nis-manage enable.
  • Update minimum required version of python-netaddr.
  • Clean up of IP address checks in install scripts.
  • Don't delete NIS netgroup compat suffix on 'ipa-nis-manage disable'.
  • Fix ipa-compat-manage not working after recent ipa-nis-manage change.
  • Make sure that hostname specified by user is not an IP address.
  • Fix external CA install.
  • Ask for reverse DNS zone information in attended install right after asking for DNS forwarders, so that DNS configuration is done in one place.

John Dennis (9):

  • Module for DN objects plus unit test
  • assert_deepequal supports callback for equality testing
  • Add backslash escape support for cvs reader
  • Use DN class in get_primary_key_from_dn to return decoded value
  • Update test_role_plugin test to include a comma in a privilege
  • Ticket 1485 - DN pairwise grouping
  • Make AVA, RDN & DN comparison case insensitive. No need for lowercase normalization.
  • Clean up existing DN object usage
  • transifex translation adjustment

Jr Aquino (15):

  • Escape LDAP characters in member and memberof searches
  • Add memberHost and memberUser to default indexes
  • Optimize and dynamically verify rm cannot remove input/output error membership
  • Delete the sudoers entry when disabling Schema Compat
  • Return copy of config from ipa_get_config()
  • Typo in host_nis_groups has been creating 2 CN's
  • Add sudorule and hbacrule to memberof and indirectmemberof attributes
  • Display remaining external hosts when removing from sudorule
  • Raise DuplicateEntry Error when adding a duplicate sudo option
  • Don't add empty tuple to entry_attrs['externalhost']
  • oneliner correct typo in ipasudorunas_group
  • Return correct "RunAs External Group" when removing members
  • remove escapes from the cvs parser in ipaserver/install/ldapupdate
  • Correct behavior for sudorunasgroup vs sudorunasuser
  • Correct sudo runasuser and runasgroup attributes in schema

Martin Kosek (68):

  • Inconsistent error message for duplicate user
  • Replica installation fails for self-signed server
  • Remove doc from API.txt
  • Revert "Remove doc from API.txt"
  • Password policy commands do not include cospriority
  • Improve DNS PTR record validation
  • Remove unwanted trimming in text fields
  • Need force option in DNS zone adder dialog
  • IPA replica is not started after the reboot
  • Improve Directory Service open port checker
  • Log temporary files in ipa-client-install
  • Prevent uninstalling client on the IPA server
  • pwpolicy-mod doesn't accept old attribute values
  • Forbid reinstallation in ipa-client-install
  • ipa-client-install uninstall does not work on IPA server
  • LDAP Updater may crash IPA installer
  • NS records not updated by replica
  • Bad return values for ipa-rmkeytab command
  • Update spec with missing BuildRequires for pylint check
  • Let selinux-policy handle port 7390
  • Limit passwd plugin to user container
  • Consolidate man pages and IPA tools help
  • Remove doc from API.txt
  • Improve service manipulation in client install
  • Running ipa-replica-manage as non-root cause errors
  • KDC autodiscovery may fail when domain is not realm
  • A new flag to disable creation of UPG
  • Fix reverse zone creation in ipa-replica-prepare
  • Improve interactive mode for DNS plugin
  • Localization fails for MaxArgumentError
  • Fix forward zone creation in ipa-replica-prepare
  • Connection check program for replica installation
  • Fix support for nss-pam-ldapd
  • Skip know_host check for ipa-replica-conncheck
  • IPA installation with --no-host-dns fails
  • Handle LDAP search references
  • Add ignore lists to migrate-ds command
  • Improve DNS zone creation
  • Add a list of managed hosts
  • Missing krbprincipalname when uid is not set
  • Add port 9443 to replica port checking
  • Fix doc for sudorule runasuser commands
  • Improve IP address handling in IPA option parser
  • Multi-process build problems
  • DNS installation fails when domain and host domain mismatch
  • Fix IPA install for secure umask
  • Allow recursion by default
  • Add DNS record modification command
  • Filter reverse zones in dnszone-find
  • Remove sensitive information from logs
  • Fix ipa-dns-install
  • Fix self-signed replica installation
  • Check IPA configuration in install tools
  • Add new dnszone-find test
  • Fix typo in ipa-replica-prepare
  • Improve long integer type validation
  • Fix sudorule-remove-user
  • Add missing automount summaries
  • Fix man page ipa-csreplica-manage
  • Fix automountkey commands summary
  • Fix invalid issuer in unit tests
  • Hide continue option from automountkey-del
  • Improve error message in ipactl
  • Improve dnszone-add error message
  • Fix idnsUpdatePolicy for reverse zone record
  • Fix client enrollment
  • Update 389-ds-base version
  • Update pki-ca version

Nalin Dahyabhai (1):

  • Select a server with a CA on it when submitting signing requests.

Pavel Zuna (1):

  • Fix gidnumber option of user-add command.

Petr Vobornik (3):

  • fixed empty dns record update
  • Fixed adding host without DNS reverse zone
  • Redirection after changing browser configuration

Rich Megginson (3):

  • winsync enables disabled users in AD
  • modify user deleted in AD crashes winsync
  • memory leak in ipa_winsync_get_new_ds_user_dn_cb

Rob Crittenden (90):

  • Allow a client to enroll using principal when the host has a OTP
  • Make retrieval of the CA during DNS discovery non-fatal.
  • Cache the value of get_ipa_config() in the request context.
  • Change default gecos from uid to first and last name.
  • Fix ORDERING in some attributetypes and remove other unnecessary elements.
  • postalCode should be a string not an integer.
  • Fix traceback in ipa-nis-manage.
  • Suppress --on-master from ipa-client-install command-line and man page.
  • Sort entries returned by *-find by the primary key (if any).
  • The default groups we create should have ipaUniqueId set
  • Always ask members in LDAP*ReverseMember commands.
  • Provide attributelevelrights for the aci components in permission_show.
  • Wait for memberof task and DS to start before proceeding in installation.
  • Convert manager from userid to dn for storage and back for displaying.
  • Modify the default attributes shown in user-find to match the UI design.
  • Ensure that the zonemgr passed to the installer conforms to IA5String.
  • Handle principal not found errors when converting replication a greements
  • Bump version to 2.0.90 to distinguish between 2.0.x
  • Properly handle --no-reverse being passed on the CLI in interactive mode
  • Update min nvr for selinux-policy and pki-ca for F-15+
  • Test for forwarded Kerberos credentials cache in wsgi code.
  • Properly configure nsswitch.conf when using the --no-sssd nis make error talking to unknown host 389-ds SSL host checking by defauilt
  • Configure Managed Entries on replicas.
  • Document that deleting and re-adding a replica requires a dirsrv restart.
  • Fix migration to work between v2 servers and remove search/size limits.
  • Add option to limit the attributes allowed in an entry.
  • Include the word 'member' with autogenerated optional member labels.
  • Do a lazy retrieval of the LDAP schema rather than at module load.
  • Add UID, Nis make error talking to unknown host and e-mail to the user default attributes.
  • Fix external CA installation
  • Remove root autobind search restriction, fix upgrade logging & error handling
  • Support initializing memberof during replication re-init using GSSAPI
  • Do better detection on status of CA DS instance when installing.
  • Fix indirect member calculation
  • Remove automountinformation as part of the DN for automount.
  • Don't let a JSON error get lost in cascading errors.
  • Add message output summary to sudorule del, mod and find.
  • Return an error message when revocation reason 7 is used
  • Require an imported certificate's issuer to match our issuer.
  • On a master configure sssd to only talk to the local master.
  • The IP address provided to ipa-server-install must be local
  • Do lazy LDAP schema retrieval in json handler.
  • Make data type of certificates more obvious/predictable internally.
  • Update translation files
  • Let the framework be able to override the hostname.
  • Make dogtag an optional (and default un-) installed component in a replica.
  • Slight performance improvement by not doing some checking in production mode
  • Set the client auth callback after creating the SSL connection.
  • Add pwd expiration notif (ipapwdexpadvnotify) to config plugin def attr list
  • Enforce class rules when query=True, continue to not run validators.
  • find_entry_by_attr() should fail if multiple entries are found
  • Fix error in AttrValueNotFound exception example
  • Fix test failure in updater when adding values to a single-value attr
  • Reset failed login count to 0 when admin resets password.
  • Disallow direct modifications to enrolledBy.
  • Document registering to an entitlement server with a UUID as not implemented.
  • In sudo labels we should use RunAs and not Run As.
  • Remove the ability to create new HBAC deny rules.
  • Validate that the certificate subject base is in valid DN format.
  • Use information from the certificate subject when setting the NSS nickname.
  • Create tool to manage dogtag replication agreements
  • Fix failing tests due to object name changes
  • Set nickname of the RA to 'IPA RA' gta iv .exe application error avoid confusion with dogtag RA
  • Set the ipa-modrdn plugin precedence to 60 so it runs last
  • Generate a database password by default in all cases.
  • Specify the package name when the replication plugin is missing.
  • Change client enrollment principal prompt to hopefully be clearer.
  • Optionally wait for 389-ds postop plugins to complete
  • A removed external host is shown in output when removing external hosts.
  • Don't set krbLastPwdChange when setting a host OTP password.
  • Fix regression when calculating external groups.
  • With the external user/group management fixed, correct the unit tests.
  • Set a default minimum value for class Int, handle long values better.
  • Make ipa-client-install error messages more understandable and relevant.
  • Add Alexander Bokovoy and Jan Cholasta to contributors file
  • Only call entry_from_entry() after waiting for the new entry.
  • Hide the HBAC access type attribute now that deny is deprecated.
  • Autofill the default revocation reason
  • Don't check for leading/trailing spaces in a File parameter
  • Add an arch-specific Requires on cyrus-sasl-gssapi
  • Revert use of 'can be at least' to 'must be at least' in minvalue validator
  • Don't leave dangling map if adding an indirect map fails
  • Fix message in test case for checking minimum values
  • When setting a host password don't set krbPasswordExpiration.
  • Set minimum version of pki-ca to 9.0.10 to pick up new ipa cert profile
  • Deprecated managing users and runas user/group in sudorule add/mod
  • Fix date order in changelog.
  • Re-arrange CA configuration code to reduce the number of restarts.

Simo Sorce (4):

  • Fix resource leaks.
  • ipautil: Preserve environment unless explicitly overridden by caller.
  • install-scripts: avoid using --list with chkconfig
  • Don't set the password expiration to the current time

Yuri Chornoivan (1):

  • Typos in freeIPA messages and man page

Kyle Baker (5):

  • Background images and tab hover
  • Search bar style and positioning changes
  • List page spacing changes
  • Tab and spacing on list
  • Facet icon swap and tab sizing

Getting message, "unknown host" when trying to get host properties of newly add client name into policy.

Problem

Getting message, "unknown host" when trying to get host properties of newly add client name into policy.

Error Message

unknown host hostname
ping: unknown host hostname
hostname: Unknown host

Solution

Environment:
In all examples, "clienthostname" is theshort hostname, "clienthostname.mycompany.com" is the full qualified domain name(FQDN), and 192.168.0.128 is the IP address.  Master server isSolaris.

Exact Error:
unknown hostclienthostname

Change:
Adding new client to NetBackuppolicies.  When new client names are added, they are automatically listedunder "Host Properties" > "Clients".  The asynchronous socket error 10060 hostname of theclient is used.

Troubleshooting:




















Cause:
Master server (and media servers) cannotconnect to the client by it hostname.  The error message represent thehostname being referred to is not known to any name directories for nameresolutions.  This includes DNS, nis make error talking to unknown host, NIS, and hosts files.  In the aboveexample, the master server is configured to resolve only the FDQN,clienthostname.mycompany.com but not the short name clienthostname.

Note: You will have similar issues if you want to define clientof FQDN in NetBackup policies, but only configure resolution for short name.

Solution:

(There are 3 options)

A) Add the shot name as analias to /etc/hosts file.

Example:




B) If using DNS, configure local DNS configuration toappend the domain name as a suffix.  Refer to your Network/SystemAdministrator for more assistance on this.

Example: For Solaris (andcompatible UNIX) you can add the domainname to /etc/resolv.conf:






Note: Configuration andtroubleshooting DNS, NIS, LDAP, and other directory services are outside thescope of NetBackup configuration.  Please refer to your SystemAdministrator, Network Administrator, Operating System support vendor, and/orNetwork hardware support vendor for assistance.


C) If you cannot make any changes with options A, or B,AND you are required to add the client to a NetBackup policy for backup, use theworking hostname instead.  In this example it is the FQDN name,clienthostname.mycompany.com, that you will use for the policy clientlist.







Generated by NetworkManager

In what universe does this makes any sense? The DNS server at 10.10.10.11 is good, nis make error talking to unknown host. I'm resolving names with it right now to post this question. I can do host

[[email protected] network-scripts]# date
Mon Feb 23 15:19:06 CST 2015
[[email protected] network-scripts]# host infradc2012.infrasupport.local
infradc2012.infrasupport.local has address 10.10.10.11
[[email protected] network-scripts]# ping infradc2012.infrasupport.local
ping: unknown host infradc2012.infrasupport.local
[[email protected] network-scripts]# date
Mon Feb 23 15:19:16 CST 2015
[[email protected] network-scripts]#
[[email protected] network-scripts]# more /etc/resolv.conf

search bullseyebreach.com
nameserver 10.10.10.11
[[email protected] network-scripts]#
[[email protected] network-scripts]#
[[email protected] network-scripts]# more ifcfg-eth0
TYPE="Ethernet"
BOOTPROTO="static"
DEFROUTE="yes"
IPV4_FAILURE_FATAL="no"
IPV6INIT="yes"
IPV6_AUTOCONF="yes"
IPV6_DEFROUTE="yes"
IPV6_FAILURE_FATAL="no"
NAME="eth0"
UUID="8df61ac9-355d-4d3c-8741-ca5c76d69b25"
ONBOOT="yes"
HWADDR="00:1A:4A:92:C6:01"
PEERDNS="yes"
PEERROUTES="yes"
IPV6_PEERDNS="yes"
IPV6_PEERROUTES="yes"
BROADCAST="10.10.10.255"
IPADDR="10.10.10.7"
NETMASK="255.255.255.0"
NETWORK="10.10.10.0"
GATEWAY="10.10.10.1"
DNS1="10.10.10.11"
[[email protected] network-scripts]#

OK, the above didn't come from RHEL. It came from a Nis make error talking to unknown host 21 RHEV 3.5 virtual machine in a RHEV 3.5 environment I cloned. After cloning, I updated ifcfg-eth0 with its new MAC address and a new IP Address. What I don't get is why does ping resolve addresses differently than the host command?

thanks

Log in to join networkerror 500 internal server error tinymce filemanager conversation

hosts_access.5   [plain text]


.TH HOSTS_ACCESS 5 .SH NAME hosts_access \- format of host access control files .SH DESCRIPTION This manual page describes a simple access control language that is based on client (host name/address, user name), and server (process name, host name/address) patterns. Examples are given at the end. The impatient reader is encouraged to skip to the EXAMPLES section for a quick introduction. .PP An extended version of the access control language is described in the \fIhosts_options\fR(5) document. The extensions are turned on at program build time by building with -DPROCESS_OPTIONS. .PP In the following text, \fIdaemon\fR is the the process name of a network daemon process, and \fIclient\fR is the name and/or address of a host requesting runtime error 230. Network daemon process names are specified in the inetd configuration file. .SH ACCESS CONTROL FILES The access control software consults two files. The search stops at the first match: .IP \(bu Access will be granted when a (daemon,client) pair matches an entry in the \fI/etc/hosts.allow\fR file. .IP \(bu Otherwise, access will be denied when a (daemon,client) pair matches an entry in the \fI/etc/hosts.deny\fR file. .IP \(bu Otherwise, access will be granted. .PP A non-existing access control file is treated as if it were an empty file. Thus, access control can be turned off by providing no access control files. .SH ACCESS CONTROL RULES Each access control file consists of zero or more lines of text. These lines are processed in order of appearance. The nis make error talking to unknown host terminates when a match is found. .IP \(bu A newline character is ignored when it is preceded by a backslash character. This permits you to break up long lines so that they are easier to edit. .IP \(bu Blank lines or lines that begin with a `#\' character are ignored. This permits you to insert comments and whitespace so that the tables are easier to read. .IP \(bu All other lines should satisfy the following format, things between [] being optional: .sp error 017 undefined symbol inifile +3 daemon_list : client_list [ : shell_command ] .PP \fIdaemon_list\fR is a list of one or more daemon process names (argv[0] values) or wildcards (see below). .PP \fIclient_list\fR is a list of one or more host names, host addresses, patterns or wildcards (see below) that will be matched against the client host name or address. .PP The more complex forms \[email protected]\fR and \[email protected]\fR are explained in the sections on server endpoint patterns and on client username lookups, respectively. .PP List elements should be separated by blanks and/or commas. .PP With the exception of NIS (YP) netgroup lookups, all access control checks are case insensitive. .ne 4 .SH PATTERNS The access control language implements the following patterns: .IP \(bu A string that begins with a `.\' character. A host name is matched if the last components of its name match the specified pattern. For example, the pattern `.tue.nl\' matches the host name `wzv.win.tue.nl\'. .IP \(bu A string that ends with a `.\' character. A host address is matched if its first numeric fields match the given string. For example, the pattern `131.155.\' matches the address of (almost) every host on the Eind\%hoven University network (131.155.x.x). .IP \(bu A string that begins with an `@\' character is treated as an NIS (formerly YP) netgroup name. A host name is matched if it is a host member of the paradox 128 + error 8 netgroup. Netgroup matches are not supported for daemon process names or for client user names. .IP \(bu An expression of the form `n.n.n.n/m.m.m.m\' is interpreted as a `net/mask\' pair. A host address is matched if `net\' is equal to the bitwise AND of the address and the `mask\'. For example, the net/mask pattern `131.155.72.0/255.255.254.0\' matches every address in the range `131.155.72.0\' through `131.155.73.255\'. .SH WILDCARDS The access control language supports explicit wildcards: .IP ALL The universal wildcard, always matches. .IP LOCAL Matches any host whose name does not contain a dot character. .IP UNKNOWN Matches any user whose name is unknown, and matches any host whose name \fIor\fR address raw read error rate samsung unknown. This pattern should be used with care: host names may be unavailable due to temporary name server problems, nis make error talking to unknown host. A network address will be unavailable when the software cannot figure out what type of network it is talking to. .IP KNOWN Matches any user whose name is known, and matches any host whose name \fIand\fR address are known. This pattern should be used with care: host names may be unavailable due to temporary name server problems. A network address will be unavailable when the software cannot figure out what type of network it is talking to. .IP PARANOID Matches any host whose name does not match its address. When tcpd is built with -DPARANOID (default mode), it drops requests from such clients even before looking at the access control tables. Build without -DPARANOID when you want mapservermng file load error - no ipadress control over such requests. .ne 6 .SH OPERATORS .IP EXCEPT Intended use is of the form: `list_1 EXCEPT list_2\'; this construct matches anything that matches \fIlist_1\fR unless it matches \fIlist_2\fR. The EXCEPT pioneer deh-p3950mp error ao can be used in daemon_lists and in client_lists. The EXCEPT operator can be nested: if the control language would permit the use of parentheses, `a EXCEPT b EXCEPT c\' would parse as `(a EXCEPT (b EXCEPT c))\'. .br .ne 6 .SH SHELL COMMANDS If the first-matched access control rule contains a shell command, that command is subjected to %<letter> substitutions (see next section). The result is executed by a \fI/bin/sh\fR child process with standard input, output and error connected to \fI/dev/null\fR. Specify an `&\' at the end of the command if you do not want to wait until it has completed. .PP Shell commands should not rely on the PATH setting of the inetd. Instead, they should use absolute path names, or they should begin with an explicit PATH=whatever statement. .PP The \fIhosts_options\fR(5) document describes an alternative language that uses the shell command field in a different and incompatible way. .SH % EXPANSIONS The following expansions are available within shell commands: .IP "%a (%A)" The client (server) host address. .IP %c Client information: [email protected], nis make error talking to unknown host, [email protected], a host name, or just an address, nis make error talking to unknown host, depending on how much information is available. .IP %d The daemon process name (argv[0] value). .IP "%h (%H)" The client (server) host name or address, if the host name is unavailable. .IP "%n (%N)" The client (server) host name (or "unknown" or "paranoid"). .IP %p The daemon process id. .IP %s Server information: [email protected], [email protected], or just a daemon name, nis make error talking to unknown host, depending on how much information is available. .IP %u The client user name (or "unknown"). .IP %% Expands to a single `%\' character. .PP Characters in % expansions that may confuse the shell are replaced by underscores. .SH SERVER ENDPOINT PATTERNS In order to distinguish clients by the network address that they connect to, use patterns of the form: .sp .ti +3 [email protected]_pattern : client_list . .sp Patterns like these can be used when the machine has different internet addresses with different internet hostnames. Service providers can use this facility to offer FTP, GOPHER or WWW archives with internet names that may even belong to different organizations. See also the `twist' option in the hosts_options(5) document. Some systems (Solaris, FreeBSD) can have more than one internet address on one physical interface; with other systems you may have to resort to SLIP or PPP pseudo interfaces that live in a dedicated network address space. .sp The host_pattern obeys the same syntax rules as host names and addresses in client_list context. Usually, server endpoint information is available only with connection-oriented services. .SH CLIENT USERNAME LOOKUP When the client host supports the RFC 931 protocol or one of its descendants (TAP, IDENT, RFC 1413) the wrapper programs can retrieve additional information about the owner of a connection. Client username information, when available, is logged together with the client host name, and can be used to match patterns like: .PP .ti +3 daemon_list : . [email protected]_pattern . .PP The daemon wrappers can be configured at compile time to perform rule-driven username lookups (default) or to always interrogate the client host. In the case of rule-driven username lookups, the above rule would cause username lookup only when both the \fIdaemon_list\fR and the \fIhost_pattern\fR match. .PP A user pattern has the same syntax as a daemon process pattern, so the same wildcards apply (netgroup membership is not supported). One should not get carried away with username lookups, though. .IP \(bu The client username information cannot be trusted when it is needed most, i.e. when the client system has been compromised. In general, ALL and (UN)KNOWN are the only user name patterns that make sense, nis make error talking to unknown host. .IP \(bu Username lookups are possible only with TCP-based services, and only when the client host runs a suitable daemon; in all send packet error wsagetlasterror = wsaewouldblock cases the result is "unknown". .IP \(bu A well-known UNIX kernel bug may cause loss of service when username lookups are blocked nis make error talking to unknown host a firewall. The wrapper README document describes a procedure to find out if your kernel has this bug. .IP \(bu Username lookups may cause noticeable delays for non-UNIX users. The default timeout for username lookups is 10 seconds: too short to cope with slow networks, but long enough to irritate PC users. .PP Selective username lookups can alleviate the last problem. For example, a rule like: .PP .ti +3 daemon_list : @pcnetgroup [email protected] .PP would match members of the pc netgroup without doing username lookups, but would perform username lookups with all other systems. .SH DETECTING ADDRESS SPOOFING ATTACKS A flaw in the sequence number generator of many TCP/IP implementations allows intruders to easily impersonate trusted hosts and to break in via, for example, the remote shell service. The IDENT (RFC931 etc.) service can be used to detect such and other host address spoofing attacks. .PP Before accepting a client request, the wrappers fatal error class xsltprocessor not found use the IDENT service to find out that the client did not send the request at all. When the client host provides IDENT service, a negative IDENT lookup result (the client matches `[email protected]') is strong evidence of a host spoofing attack. .PP A positive IDENT lookup result (the client matches `[email protected]') is less trustworthy. It is possible for an intruder to spoof both the client connection and the IDENT lookup, although doing so is much harder than spoofing just a client connection. It may also be that the client\'s IDENT server is lying. .PP Note: IDENT lookups don\'t work with UDP services. .SH EXAMPLES The language is flexible enough that different types of access control policy can be expressed with a minimum of fuss. Although the language uses two access control tables, nis make error talking to unknown host, the most common policies can be implemented with one of the tables being trivial or even empty. .PP When reading the examples below it is important to realize that the allow table is scanned before the deny table, that the search terminates when a match is found, and that access is granted when no match is found at all. .PP The examples use host and domain names. They can be improved by including address and/or nis make error talking to unknown host information, to reduce the impact of temporary name server lookup failures. .SH MOSTLY CLOSED In this case, access is denied by default. Only explicitly authorized hosts are permitted access. .PP The default policy (no access) is implemented with a trivial deny file: .PP .ne 2 /etc/hosts.deny: .in +3 ALL: ALL .PP This denies all service to all hosts, unless they are permitted access by entries in the allow file. .PP The explicitly authorized hosts are listed in the allow file. For example: .PP .ne 2 /etc/hosts.allow: .in +3 ALL: LOCAL @some_netgroup .br ALL: .foobar.edu EXCEPT terminalserver.foobar.edu .PP The first rule permits access from hosts in the local domain (no `.\' in the host name) and from members of the \fIsome_netgroup\fP netgroup. The second rule permits access from all hosts in the \fIfoobar.edu\fP domain (notice the leading dot), with the exception of \fIterminalserver.foobar.edu\fP. .SH MOSTLY OPEN Here, access is granted by default; only explicitly specified hosts are refused service. .PP The default policy (access granted) makes the allow file redundant so that it can be omitted. The explicitly non-authorized hosts are listed in the deny file. For example: .PP /etc/hosts.deny: .in +3 ALL: some.host.name. some.domain .br ALL EXCEPT in.fingerd: other.host.name. other.domain .PP The first rule denies some hosts and domains all services; the second rule still permits finger requests from other hosts and domains. .SH BOOBY TRAPS The next example permits tftp requests from hosts in the local domain (notice the leading dot). Requests from any other hosts are denied. Instead of the requested file, a finger probe is sent to the offending host. The result is mailed to the superuser. .PP .ne 2 /etc/hosts.allow: .in +3 .nf in.tftpd: LOCAL. my.domain .PP .ne 2 /etc/hosts.deny: .in +3 .nf in.tftpd: ALL: (/some/where/safe_finger -l @%h \\ /usr/ucb/mail -s %d-%h root) & .fi .PP The safe_finger command comes with the tcpd wrapper and should be installed in a suitable place. It limits possible damage from data sent by the remote finger server. It gives better protection than the standard finger call duty black ops error code 740. .PP The expansion of the %h (client host) and %d (service name) sequences is described in the section on shell commands, nis make error talking to unknown host. .PP Warning: do not booby-trap your finger daemon, unless you are prepared for infinite finger loops. .PP On network firewall systems this trick can be carried even further. The typical network firewall only provides a limited set of services to the outer world. All other services can be "bugged" just like the above tftp example. The result is an excellent early-warning system. .br .ne 4 .SH DIAGNOSTICS An error is reported when a syntax error is found in a host access control rule; when the length of an access control rule exceeds the capacity of an internal buffer; when an access control rule is not terminated by a newline character; when the result of %<letter> expansion would overflow an internal buffer; when a system call fails that shouldn\'t. All problems are reported via the syslog daemon. .SH FILES .na .nf /etc/hosts.allow, (daemon,client) pairs that are granted access. /etc/hosts.deny, (daemon,client) pairs that are denied access. .ad .fi .SH SEE ALSO .nf tcpd(8) tcp/ip daemon wrapper program. tcpdchk(8), tcpdmatch(8), test programs. .SH BUGS If a name server lookup times out, the host name will not be available to the access control software, even though the host is registered. .PP Domain name server lookups are case insensitive; NIS (formerly YP) netgroup lookups are case sensitive. .SH AUTHOR .na .nf Wietse Venema ([email protected]) Department of Mathematics and Computing Science Eindhoven University of Technology Den Dolech 2, nis make error talking to unknown host, P.O. Box 513, 5600 MB Eindhoven, The Netherlands \" @(#) hosts_access.5 1.20 95/01/30 19:51:46

G    sendmail Error Messages

Explanation: Possible reasons are as follows:
  • An address record for the host was not xbox 360 e73 error.
  • The file does not define a relay host that can handle mail addresses outside of your company.

User Action:

  1. If BIND is not configured on your host, nis make error talking to unknown host, verify that the host's address is defined. Check the file if you are resolving addresses locally or issue the command if you are using NIS. The hosts entry in the file defines the services used.

    If the host is not defined, ask your system administrator to correct the problem.

  2. Check for MX records for the host by using the command as follows:


    If a record nis make error talking to unknown host, go to step 3.

  3. Check for nis make error talking to unknown host records by using the command. If the address is not found, have the BIND domain administrator for the destination domain add an address () record for the host in the destination domain.
  4. If the mail was addressed to a host outside of your company, you might not be able to send the mail directly. Check your configuration by entering the following command:


    If the braces are empty (that is, do not contain a host name), reconfigure and specify a relay host. Send the message nis make error talking to unknown host. See Section 11.3 for more information on specifying a relay name.

nis make error talking to unknown host

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