Json error missing in parenthe

json error missing in parenthe

When calling extract.pl i get the following error message: infoplist_configuration.json file found; Release Mode; File "tpperlhelper.py", line 112. It must appear in parenthesis after the if keyword. Message. SyntaxError: Expected ')' (Edge) SyntaxError: missing) after condition (Firefox). Error type. The @? and @@ operators suppress the following errors: lacking object field or array element, unexpected JSON item type, and numeric errors. json error missing in parenthe

Json error missing in parenthe - you

UTF16 4 Expands a JSON array to a set of JSON values. value ----------- 1 true [2,false] Expands a JSON array to a set of values. value ----------- foo bar Returns the type of the outermost JSON value as a text string. Possible types are , , , , , and .Builds an arbitrary record from a JSON object (see note below). As with all functions returning , the caller must explicitly define the structure of the record with an clause. a b d

SyntaxError: missing ) after condition

The JavaScript exception "missing ) after condition" occurs when there is an error with how an condition is written. It must appear in parenthesis after the keyword.

Message

SyntaxError: Expected ')'(Edge)SyntaxError: missing ) after condition(Firefox)

Error type

What went wrong?

There is an error with how an condition is written. In any programming language, code needs to make decisions and carry out actions accordingly depending on different inputs. The if statement executes a statement if a specified condition is truthy. In JavaScript, this condition must appear in parenthesis after the keyword, like this:

Examples

Missing parenthesis

It might just be an oversight, carefully check all you parenthesis in your code.

if(3> Math.PI{ console.log("wait what?");}

To fix this code, you would need to add a parenthesis that closes the condition.

if(3> Math.PI){ console.log("wait what?");}

Misused keyword

If you are coming from another programming language, it is also easy to add keywords that don't mean the same or have no meaning at all in JavaScript.

if(done is true){ console.log("we are done!");}

Instead you need to use a correct comparison operator. For example:

if(done ===true){ console.log("we are done!");}

See also

<predicate2>

Returns if the nested path evaluates to a non-empty sequence, and when the nested path evaluates to an empty sequence. If the path evaluation throws an error, returns .

<path> starts with "Some text" <path> starts with $variable

The nested must evaluate to a sequence of textual items, and the other operand must evaluate to a single textual item. If evaluating of either operand throws an error, the result is . All items from the sequence are checked for starting with the right operand. The result is if a match is found, otherwise . However, if any of the comparisons throws an error, the result in the strict mode is . The result in the lax mode depends on whether the match or the error was found first.

( <predicate> ) is unknown

Returns if the nested predicate evaluates to , and otherwise.

<path1> == <path2> <path1> <> <path2> <path1> != <path2> <path1> < <path2> <path1> > <path2> <path1> <= <path2> <path1> >= <path2>

Both operands of a comparison evaluate to sequences of items. If either evaluation throws an error, the result is . Items from the left and right sequence are then compared pairwise. Similarly to the predicate, the result is if any of the comparisons returns , otherwise . However, if any of the comparisons throws an error, for example because the compared types are not compatible, the result in the strict mode is . The result in the lax mode depends on whether the comparison or the error was found first.

Comparison rules#

Null values in the context of comparison behave different than SQL null:

  • null == null –>

  • null != null, null < null, … –>

  • null compared to a scalar value –>

  • null compared to a JSON array or a JSON object –>

When comparing two scalar values, or is returned if the comparison is successfully performed. The semantics of the comparison is the same as in SQL. In case of an error, e.g. comparing text and number, is returned.

Comparing a scalar value with a JSON array or a JSON object, and comparing JSON arrays/objects is an error, so is returned.

Examples of filter#

Let return a sequence of three JSON objects:

{"customer" : 100, "region" : "AFRICA"}, {"region" : "ASIA"}, {"customer" : 300, "region" : "AFRICA", "comment" : null}
<path>?(@.region != "ASIA") --> {"customer" : 100, "region" : "AFRICA"}, {"customer" : 300, "region" : "AFRICA", "comment" : null} <path>?(!exists(@.customer)) --> {"region" : "ASIA"}

The following accessors are collectively referred to as item methods.

double()#

Converts numeric or text values into double values.

Let return a sequence :

<path>.double() --> -1e0, 23e4, 5.6e0

ceiling(), floor(), and abs()#

Gets the ceiling, the floor or the absolute value for every numeric item in the sequence. The semantics of the operations is the same as in SQL.

Let return a sequence :

<path>.ceiling() --> -1.0, -1, 2.0 <path>.floor() --> -2.0, -1, 1.0 <path>.abs() --> 1.5, 1, 1.3

keyvalue()#

Returns a collection of JSON objects including one object per every member of the original object for every JSON object in the sequence.

The returned objects have three members:

  • “name”, which is the original key,

  • “value”, which is the original bound value,

  • “id”, which is the unique number, specific to an input object.

Let be a sequence of three JSON objects:

{"customer" : 100, "region" : "AFRICA"}, {"region" : "ASIA"}, {"customer" : 300, "region" : "AFRICA", "comment" : null}
<path>.keyvalue() --> {"name" : "customer", "value" : 100, "id" : 0}, {"name" : "region", "value" : "AFRICA", "id" : 0}, {"name" : "region", "value" : "ASIA", "id" : 1}, {"name" : "customer", "value" : 300, "id" : 2}, {"name" : "region", "value" : "AFRICA", "id" : 2}, {"name" : "comment", "value" : null, "id" : 2}

It is required that all items in the input sequence are JSON objects.

The order of the returned values follows the order of the original JSON objects. However, within objects, the order of returned entries is arbitrary.

type()#

Returns a textual value containing the type name for every item in the sequence.

This method does not perform array unwrapping in the lax mode.

The returned values are:

  • for JSON null,

  • for a numeric item,

  • for a textual item,

  • for a boolean item,

  • for an item of type date,

  • for an item of type time,

  • for an item of type time with time zone,

  • for an item of type timestamp,

  • for an item of type timestamp with time zone,

  • for JSON array,

  • for JSON object,

size()#

Returns a numeric value containing the size for every JSON array in the sequence.

This method does not perform array unwrapping in the lax mode. Instead, all non-array items are wrapped in singleton JSON arrays, so their size is .

It is required that all items in the input sequence are JSON arrays.

Let return a sequence of three JSON arrays:

[0, 1, 2], ["a", "b", "c", "d"], [null, null] <path>.size() --> 3, 4, 2

Limitations#

The SQL standard describes the JSON path item method and the JSON path predicate. Trino does not support them.

JSON path modes#

The JSON path expression can be evaluated in two modes: strict and lax. In the strict mode, it is required that the input JSON data strictly fits the schema required by the path expression. In the lax mode, the input JSON data can diverge from the expected schema.

The following table shows the differences between the two modes.

Condition

strict mode

lax mode

Performing an operation which requires a non-array on an array, e.g.:

requires a JSON object

requires a numeric value

ERROR

The array is automatically unnested, and the operation is performed on each array element.

Performing an operation which requires an array on an non-array, e.g.:

, ,

ERROR

The non-array item is automatically wrapped in a singleton array, and the operation is performed on the array.

A structural error: accessing a non-existent element of an array or a non-existent member of a JSON object, e.g.:

(array index out of bounds)

, where the input JSON object does not have a member

ERROR

The error is suppressed, and the operation results in an empty sequence.

Examples of the lax mode behavior#

Let return a sequence of three items, a JSON array, a JSON object, and a scalar numeric value:

[1, "a", null], {"key1" : 1.0, "key2" : true}, -2e3

The following example shows the wildcard array accessor in the lax mode. The JSON array returns all its elements, while the JSON object and the number are wrapped in singleton arrays and then unnested, so effectively they appear unchanged in the output sequence:

<path>[*] --> 1, "a", null, {"key1" : 1.0, "key2" : true}, -2e3

When calling the method, the JSON object and the number are also wrapped in singleton arrays:

<path>.size() --> 3, 1, 1

In some cases, the lax mode cannot prevent failure. In the following example, even though the JSON array is unwrapped prior to calling the method, the item causes type mismatch.

<path>.floor() --> ERROR

json_exists#

The function determines whether a JSON value satisfies a JSON path specification.

JSON_EXISTS( json_input [ FORMAT JSON [ ENCODING { UTF8 UTF32 } ] ], json_path [ PASSING json_argument [, ...] ] [ RETURNING type ] [ { ERROR

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Json error missing in parenthe

Json error missing in parenthe - are

UNKNOWN r ---+---------+---------+---+--------------- 1 (123,"a b c") Builds an arbitrary set of records from a JSON array of objects (see note below). As with all functions returning , the caller must explicitly define the structure of the record with an clause. a ABSENT ON NULL } ] ], [ { WITH UNIQUE [ KEYS ]

[Solved]-ExtJs Json missing ) in parenthetical Zend Framework-ext.js

{"urut":"24","workid":"1026","workname":"Material for Common RF Work","pr_number":"PRF-15000984","prj_kode":"Q000145","sit_kode":"210","prj_nama":"Telkomsel IBC 2014","sit_nama":"Poin Square","kode_brg":"410011-LEON","nama_brg":"Coaxial Cable - 7/8 inch","qty":"1","uom":"Mtr","val_kode":"IDR","currency":"0","price":"62475","tgl_pr":"2017-04-10","totalPR":"3399.0000","pricePR":"62475.0000","totalPricePR":212352525,"totalPO":3001,"totalPricePO":"129900000.00000000","totalPrice":62475,"id":"78173","sup_kode":"VDR0007","sup_nama":"AndrewHongkongLtd","invoiceto":"PTQDCTechnologies","ket":"","tujuan":"Jl.DanauSingkarakNo.65B-C, SeiAgul, Medan20117","tgl_kirim":"2017-05-29T00: 00: 00","po_term":"-","top":"0","budgettype":"Project","net_act":"208","qtySupp":"1","priceSupp":"62475","totalPriceSupp":62475,"statusppn":"N","valueppn":0,"valueppnSupp":0,"percentppn":0,"gtotal":62475}

{INSERTKEYS} {1,2,3} EMPTY ARRAY UTF32 } ] ] ] )

Argument passing conventions#

There are two conventions for passing keys and values:

SELECTjson_object('key1':1,'key2':true)--> '{"key1":1,"key2":true}'SELECTjson_object(KEY'key1'VALUE1,KEY'key2'VALUEtrue)--> '{"key1":1,"key2":true}'

In the second convention, you can omit the keyword:

SELECTjson_object('key1'VALUE1,'key2'VALUEtrue)--> '{"key1":1,"key2":true}'

Argument types#

The keys can be arbitrary expressions. They must be of character string type. Each key is converted into a JSON text item, and it becomes a key in the created JSON object. Keys must not be null.

The values can be arbitrary expressions. Each passed value is converted into a JSON item according to its type, and optional and specification.

You can pass SQL values of types boolean, numeric, and character string. They are converted to corresponding JSON literals:

SELECTjson_object('x':true,'y':12e-1,'z':'text')--> '{"x":true,"y":1.2,"z":"text"}'

Additionally to SQL values, you can pass JSON values. They are character or binary strings with a specified format and optional encoding:

SELECTjson_object('x':'[ "text" ] 'FORMATJSON,'y':X'5B0035005D00'FORMATJSONENCODINGUTF16)--> '{"x":["text"],"y":[5]}'

You can also nest other JSON-returning functions. In that case, the option is implicit:

SELECTjson_object('x':json_query('{"key" : [ "value" ]}','lax $.key'))--> '{"x":["value"]}'

Other passed values are cast to varchar, and they become JSON text literals:

SELECTjson_object('x':DATE'2001-01-31','y':UUID'12151fd2-7586-11e9-8f9e-2a86e4085a59')--> '{"x":"2001-01-31","y":"12151fd2-7586-11e9-8f9e-2a86e4085a59"}'

You can omit the arguments altogether to get an empty object:

SELECTjson_object()--> '{}'

Null handling#

The values passed for JSON object keys must not be null. It is allowed to pass for JSON object values. A null value is treated according to the specified null treatment option. If is specified, a JSON object entry with value is added to the result. If is specified, the entry is omitted in the result. is the default configuration.:

SELECTjson_object('x':null,'y':1)--> '{"x":null,"y":1}'SELECTjson_object('x':null,'y':1NULLONNULL)--> '{"x":null,"y":1}'SELECTjson_object('x':null,'y':1ABSENTONNULL)--> '{"y":1}'

Key uniqueness#

If a duplicate key is encountered, it is handled according to the specified key uniqueness constraint.

If is specified, a duplicate key results in a query failure:

SELECTjson_object('x':null,'x':1WITHUNIQUEKEYS)--> failure: "duplicate key passed to JSON_OBJECT function"

Note that this option is not supported if any of the arguments has a specification.

If is specified, duplicate keys are not supported due to implementation limitation. is the default configuration.

Returned type#

The SQL standard imposes that there is no dedicated data type to represent JSON data in SQL. Instead, JSON data is represented as character or binary strings. By default, the function returns varchar containing the textual representation of the JSON object. With the clause, you can specify other character string type:

SELECTjson_object('x':1RETURNINGVARCHAR(100))--> '{"x":1}'

You can also specify to use varbinary and the required encoding as return type. The default encoding is UTF8:

SELECTjson_object('x':1RETURNINGVARBINARY)--> X'7b 22 78 22 3a 31 7d'SELECTjson_object('x':1RETURNINGVARBINARYFORMATJSONENCODINGUTF8)--> X'7b 22 78 22 3a 31 7d'SELECTjson_object('x':1RETURNINGVARBINARYFORMATJSONENCODINGUTF16)--> X'7b 00 22 00 78 00 22 00 3a 00 31 00 7d 00'SELECTjson_object('x':1RETURNINGVARBINARYFORMATJSONENCODINGUTF32)--> X'7b 00 00 00 22 00 00 00 78 00 00 00 22 00 00 00 3a 00 00 00 31 00 00 00 7d 00 00 00'

Warning

The following functions and operators are not compliant with the SQL standard, and should be considered deprecated. According to the SQL standard, there shall be no data type. Instead, JSON values should be represented as string values. The remaining functionality of the following functions is covered by the functions described previously.

Cast to JSON#

The following types can be cast to JSON:

Additionally, , , and types can be cast to JSON when the following requirements are met:

  • types can be cast when the element type of the array is one of the supported types.

  • types can be cast when the key type of the map is and the value type of the map is a supported type,

  • types can be cast when every field type of the row is a supported type.

Note

Cast operations with supported character string types treat the input as a string, not validated as JSON. This means that a cast operation with a string-type input of invalid JSON results in a succesful cast to invalid JSON.

Instead, consider using the function to create validated JSON from a string.

The following examples show the behavior of casting to JSON with these types:

SELECTCAST(NULLASJSON);-- NULLSELECTCAST(1ASJSON);-- JSON '1'SELECTCAST(9223372036854775807ASJSON);-- JSON '9223372036854775807'SELECTCAST('abc'ASJSON);-- JSON '"abc"'SELECTCAST(trueASJSON);-- JSON 'true'SELECTCAST(1.234ASJSON);-- JSON '1.234'SELECTCAST(ARRAY[1,23,456]ASJSON);-- JSON '[1,23,456]'SELECTCAST(ARRAY[1,NULL,456]ASJSON);-- JSON '[1,null,456]'SELECTCAST(ARRAY[ARRAY[1,23],ARRAY[456]]ASJSON);-- JSON '[[1,23],[456]]'SELECTCAST(MAP(ARRAY['k1','k2','k3'],ARRAY[1,23,456])ASJSON);-- JSON '{"k1":1,"k2":23,"k3":456}'SELECTCAST(CAST(ROW(123,'abc',true)ASROW(v1BIGINT,v2VARCHAR,v3BOOLEAN))ASJSON);-- JSON '{"v1":123,"v2":"abc","v3":true}'

Casting from NULL to is not straightforward. Casting from a standalone will produce a SQL instead of . However, when casting from arrays or map containing s, the produced will have s in it.

Cast from JSON#

Casting to , , , , , , or is supported. Casting to and is supported when the element type of the array is one of the supported types, or when the key type of the map is and value type of the map is one of the supported types. Behaviors of the casts are shown with the examples below:

SELECTCAST(JSON'null'ASVARCHAR);-- NULLSELECTCAST(JSON'1'ASINTEGER);-- 1SELECTCAST(JSON'9223372036854775807'ASBIGINT);-- 9223372036854775807SELECTCAST(JSON'"abc"'ASVARCHAR);-- abcSELECTCAST(JSON'true'ASBOOLEAN);-- trueSELECTCAST(JSON'1.234'ASDOUBLE);-- 1.234SELECTCAST(JSON'[1,23,456]'ASARRAY(INTEGER));-- [1, 23, 456]SELECTCAST(JSON'[1,null,456]'ASARRAY(INTEGER));-- [1, NULL, 456]SELECTCAST(JSON'[[1,23],[456]]'ASARRAY(ARRAY(INTEGER)));-- [[1, 23], [456]]SELECTCAST(JSON'{"k1":1,"k2":23,"k3":456}'ASMAP(VARCHAR,INTEGER));-- {k1=1, k2=23, k3=456}SELECTCAST(JSON'{"v1":123,"v2":"abc","v3":true}'ASROW(v1BIGINT,v2VARCHAR,v3BOOLEAN));-- {v1=123, v2=abc, v3=true}SELECTCAST(JSON'[123,"abc",true]'ASROW(v1BIGINT,v2VARCHAR,v3BOOLEAN));-- {v1=123, v2=abc, v3=true}

JSON arrays can have mixed element types and JSON maps can have mixed value types. This makes it impossible to cast them to SQL arrays and maps in some cases. To address this, Trino supports partial casting of arrays and maps:

SELECTCAST(JSON'[[1, 23], 456]'ASARRAY(JSON));-- [JSON '[1,23]', JSON '456']SELECTCAST(JSON'{"k1": [1, 23], "k2": 456}'ASMAP(VARCHAR,JSON));-- {k1 = JSON '[1,23]', k2 = JSON '456'}SELECTCAST(JSON'[null]'ASARRAY(JSON));-- [JSON 'null']

When casting from to , both JSON array and JSON object are supported.

JSON functions#

(json) → boolean#

Determine if is a scalar (i.e. a JSON number, a JSON string, , or ):

SELECTis_json_scalar('1');-- trueSELECTis_json_scalar('[1, 2, 3]');-- false
(json, value) → boolean#

Determine if exists in (a string containing a JSON array):

SELECTjson_array_contains('[1, 2, 3]',2);-- true
(json_array, index) → json#

Warning

The semantics of this function are broken. If the extracted element is a string, it will be converted into an invalid value that is not properly quoted (the value will not be surrounded by quotes and any interior quotes will not be escaped).

We recommend against using this function. It cannot be fixed without impacting existing usages and may be removed in a future release.

Returns the element at the specified index into the . The index is zero-based:

SELECTjson_array_get('["a", [3, 9], "c"]',0);-- JSON 'a' (invalid JSON)SELECTjson_array_get('["a", [3, 9], "c"]',1);-- JSON '[3,9]'

This function also supports negative indexes for fetching element indexed from the end of an array:

SELECTjson_array_get('["c", [3, 9], "a"]',-1);-- JSON 'a' (invalid JSON)SELECTjson_array_get('["c", [3, 9], "a"]',-2);-- JSON '[3,9]'

If the element at the specified index doesn’t exist, the function returns null:

SELECTjson_array_get('[]',0);-- NULLSELECTjson_array_get('["a", "b", "c"]',10);-- NULLSELECTjson_array_get('["c", "b", "a"]',-10);-- NULL
(json) → bigint#

Returns the array length of (a string containing a JSON array):

SELECTjson_array_length('[1, 2, 3]');-- 3

Evaluates the JSONPath-like expression on (a string containing JSON) and returns the result as a JSON string:

SELECTjson_extract(json,'$.store.book');SELECTjson_extract(json,'$.store[book]');SELECTjson_extract(json,'$.store["book name"]');

Like , but returns the result value as a string (as opposed to being encoded as JSON). The value referenced by must be a scalar (boolean, number or string).

SELECTjson_extract_scalar('[1, 2, 3]','$[2]');SELECTjson_extract_scalar(json,'$.store.book[0].author');
(json) → varchar#

Returns the JSON text serialized from the input JSON value. This is inverse function to .

SELECTjson_format(JSON'[1, 2, 3]');-- '[1,2,3]'SELECTjson_format(JSON'"a"');-- '"a"'

Note

and have completely different semantics.

serializes the input JSON value to JSON text conforming to RFC 7159. The JSON value can be a JSON object, a JSON array, a JSON string, a JSON number, , or .

SELECTjson_format(JSON'{"a": 1, "b": 2}');-- '{"a":1,"b":2}'SELECTjson_format(JSON'[1, 2, 3]');-- '[1,2,3]'SELECTjson_format(JSON'"abc"');-- '"abc"'SELECTjson_format(JSON'42');-- '42'SELECTjson_format(JSON'true');-- 'true'SELECTjson_format(JSON'null');-- 'null'

casts the JSON value to the corresponding SQL VARCHAR value. For JSON string, JSON number, , or , the cast behavior is same as the corresponding SQL type. JSON object and JSON array cannot be cast to VARCHAR.

SELECTCAST(JSON'{"a": 1, "b": 2}'ASVARCHAR);-- ERROR!SELECTCAST(JSON'[1, 2, 3]'ASVARCHAR);-- ERROR!SELECTCAST(JSON'"abc"'ASVARCHAR);-- 'abc' (the double quote is gone)SELECTCAST(JSON'42'ASVARCHAR);-- '42'SELECTCAST(JSON'true'ASVARCHAR);-- 'true'SELECTCAST(JSON'null'ASVARCHAR);-- NULL
(string) → json#

Returns the JSON value deserialized from the input JSON text. This is inverse function to :

SELECTjson_parse('[1, 2, 3]');-- JSON '[1,2,3]'SELECTjson_parse('"abc"');-- JSON '"abc"'

Note

and have completely different semantics.

expects a JSON text conforming to RFC 7159, and returns the JSON value deserialized from the JSON text. The JSON value can be a JSON object, a JSON array, a JSON string, a JSON number, , or .

SELECTjson_parse('not_json');-- ERROR!SELECTjson_parse('["a": 1, "b": 2]');-- JSON '["a": 1, "b": 2]'SELECTjson_parse('[1, 2, 3]');-- JSON '[1,2,3]'SELECTjson_parse('"abc"');-- JSON '"abc"'SELECTjson_parse('42');-- JSON '42'SELECTjson_parse('true');-- JSON 'true'SELECTjson_parse('null');-- JSON 'null'

takes any VARCHAR value as input, and returns a JSON string with its value set to input string.

SELECTCAST('not_json'ASJSON);-- JSON '"not_json"'SELECTCAST('["a": 1, "b": 2]'ASJSON);-- JSON '"[\"a\": 1, \"b\": 2]"'SELECTCAST('[1, 2, 3]'ASJSON);-- JSON '"[1, 2, 3]"'SELECTCAST('"abc"'ASJSON);-- JSON '"\"abc\""'SELECTCAST('42'ASJSON);-- JSON '"42"'SELECTCAST('true'ASJSON);-- JSON '"true"'SELECTCAST('null'ASJSON);-- JSON '"null"'
(json, json_path) → bigint#

Like , but returns the size of the value. For objects or arrays, the size is the number of members, and the size of a scalar value is zero.

SELECTjson_size('{"x": {"a": 1, "b": 2}}','$.x');-- 2SELECTjson_size('{"x": [1, 2, 3]}','$.x');-- 3SELECTjson_size('{"x": {"a": 1, "b": 2}}','$.x.a');-- 0