Hon start game error, last error 14001

hon start game error, last error 14001

NOTICES/CIRCULARS. *Click on the title to download the pdf. Title/Notices. Schedule of Counselling for Round 03 Sliding Round and Other Activities of. Point Blank Error Solutuion (Error with equipped weapon. Please connect again) Start Game Error, Last Error - Heroes of Newerth Solved (). esports platform for gamers, Acer released a new in-game live tickets, reduce costs and errors, and can immediately report the.

Hon start game error, last error 14001 - where

Solved: The Application Has Failed to Start Because Its Side-By-Side Configuration Is Incorrect Error

Today we're looking at the error known as "The application has failed to start because its side-by-side configuration is incorrect." It concludes with "Please see the application event log or use the command-line sprers.eu tool for more details." This is a problematic error that can occur in many games and apps and even Microsoft Office, but it's an easy fix.

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Odds are you're missing the Visual C++ runtime package required, or there's a registry error. Visual C++ is a programming language, and most of the time, you have this installed by default. The only tricky part about the Visual C++ installers is that there are many versions.

Here are a couple of fixes for you; however, further down, we show you how to get more details to find out precisely what version you need for the geek in you. Updated. People are having success running System File Checker. We have added that below.

For those who prefer a video version:



1: Check for a Known Registry Problem

Verifying your registry entry is faster than the other steps and easy enough to check, so let's do that first.

Navigate to:

HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE > SOFTWARE > Microsoft > Windows > CurrentVersion > SideBySide > Winners > x86_sprers.eu_1fc8b3b9a1e18e3b_none_02dfd >

That second to last long entry could vary from computer to computer, but it is the only key with andcrt in the string.

Look to the right for Defaultand compare it with the keys below. The default Data version should match the highest number under Name. I know, a tad confusing.



So, here you can see my Default Data number is By looking below, you see, we have two entries, and is our highest number, and they match. In this case, this isn't your problem.

If your highest version number isn't the default key, we want to modify it to match. For example, let's say your highest version number is Right-click on the Default key and select Modify. Under Value Data, enter the highest number, which, again, just as an example, we entered Now that your Default key matches the highest version, reboot, and your problem should be solved.

2: Install the Visual C++ Runtimes

First, try and install the official Microsoft Visual C++ Redistributable Packageand see if the error is gone.

If not, a third-party app, including Visual C++ Runtime Installer (All-In-One)may also install older versions of Visual C++. Our experience is that this error is often because of an older version of Visual C++ missing.

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3: Track Down What Version of Visual C++ Runtime You're Missing

If you'd prefer only to install the correct, missing pack, we need to find out which one you're missing.

Press the Windows KEY + Sand type in event vieweruntil you see Event Viewerand click on that. Find Summary of Administrative Eventsand expand the Errorsubcategory and look for SideBySide.



Double-click SideBySide, and you will see a list of all events. If you see more than one, select the one with the date and time you got the error.



In this case, while a tad hard to figure out, you can see sprers.eu90, which refers to Microsoft Visual C++. Below that, you'll see the missing version number, in this case, If you Google that version, you will find that you need Microsoft Visual Studio (VC++ ) SP1. Other versions include:

Microsoft Visual C++ Redistributable
Microsoft Visual C++ Redistributable for Visual Studio
Microsoft Visual C++ Redistributable for Visual Studio
Microsoft Visual C++ Redistributable

Always install both the Bit and Bit versions of the Visual C++ Runtime that you're missing and reboot to ensure your application sees the correct runtimes.

4: Run System File Checker

Windows 10, Windows , or Windows 8users will need to first run the Deployment Image Servicing and Management (DISM) tool before running the System File Checker. DISM will use Windows Update to provide any files that are needed to fix corruption. If you skip this step, System File Checker might not work. Windows 7 and Vista users can skip this step.

You will need to first open the Command Prompt or PowerShell as administrator.



Type in sprers.eu /Online /Cleanup-image /Restorehealthand press enter. This may take a few minutes.

2: Running System File Checker

All you need to do is type in sfc /scannowand press the Enter key.



System File Checker will now scan for and replace files from the Windows cache, typically located at C:\Windows\System32\dllcache.

Once completed, you should see one of four possible results:

  • Windows Resource Protection did not find any integrity violations - You should be good to go as no issues were found.
  • Windows Resource Protection could not perform the requested operation - Run SFC from safe mode and also verify PendingDeletes, and PendingRenames folders exist under C:WinSxSTemp
  • Windows Resource Protection found corrupt files and successfully repaired them - Problems were found and fixed. Microsoft has a page here to show you how to view details.
  • Windows Resource Protection found corrupt files but could not fix some of them - Odds are the file couldn't be replaced, and you'll need to do so manually. Scroll back up to see how to view the log file to locate the file in question.

    A reboot will be required, and you're done.

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Guidance and Competences for the Provision of Services using Practitioners with Special Interests: Urgent and Emergency Care. London: Department of Health; 7NHS Plus, Royal College of Physicians, Faculty of Occupational Medicine. Varicella Zoster Virus &#x; Occupational Aspects of Management. London: Royal College of Physicians and Faculty of Occupational Medicine; 1Anonymous. Paramedic drafts EMS safety bill. EMS Insider ;22:33Anonymous. New FDA reporting rules take effect this month. EMS Insider ;23:14Anonymous. COBRA decisions put hospital staff on the spot .&#x;.&#x;. Consolidated Omnibus Budget Reconciliation Act. J Healthc Risk Manag ;182Anonymous. Medical emergencies aloft: are airlines equipped? University of California, Berkeley, wellness letter ;14:21Linn R, Werfel P, Brown J. Safety first .&#x;.&#x;. &#x;practice makes permanent&#x;. JEMS ;24Anonymous. Are you ready for JCAHO&#x;s new restraint standards? RN ;63hf7&#x;84Anonymous. Alert: state wants EMS error reports. EMS Insider ;28:74Anonymous. Patient-safety considerations. EMS Insider ;29:34Anonymous. Use score card to boost quality. ED Manag ;14&#x;172Anonymous. A positive sentinel event? AI says it&#x;s possible: use root-cause analysis in excellent outcomes, too. Healthcare Benchmarks Qual Improv ;1&#x;182Anonymous. At a glance. OR Manager ;181Anonymous. Thrombolytics safe for ambulance use. Pharm J ;4Anonymous. These tools show cause of close calls, adverse events. J Healthc Risk Manag ;25:3&#x;42Narinder T. Building safer healthcare systems: a case for error-in-medicine curriculum in medical training. Med J Armed Forces India ;592Rabinovici R, Frankel H, Kaplan L. Trauma evaluation and resuscitation. Curr Probl Surg ;40&#x;4Anonymous. AHP project launched to raise awareness of patient safety. Podiatry Now ;74Anonymous. Do your staff members risk misidentifying patients? ED Nursing ;7&#x;52Anonymous. Ask Sirenhead. Stop the blow hard. JEMS ;293Anonymous. 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    Annual Report & Accounts:

    Annual Report presented to Parliament pursuant to section 1 of the International Development (Reporting and Transparency) Act

    Accounts presented to the House of Commons pursuant to section 6(4) of the Government Resources and Accounts Act Accounts presented to the House of Lords by Command of Her Majesty Ordered by the House of Commons to be printed on 22nd September

    HC FCDO: © Crown Copyright

    This publication is licensed under the terms of the Open Government Licence v except where otherwise stated. To view this licence, visit sprers.eu open-government-licence/version/3/

    Where we have identified any third-party copyright information you will need to obtain permission from the copyright holders concerned. This publication is available at sprers.eu

    Any enquiries regarding this publication should be sent to the following address: FCDO ARA, King Charles St, Whitehall, London SW1A 2AH, or via email: [email protected]

    This is part of a series of departmental publications which, along with the Main Estimates and the document Public Expenditure: Statistical Analyses , present the government’s outturn for and planned expenditure for

    ISBN E – E

    Printed on paper containing 75% recycled fibre content minimum.

    Printed in the UK by HH Global Limited Group on behalf of the Controller of Her Majesty’s Stationery Office.

    Performance overview

    The Performance Overview section of this report sets out key information about the department, including the structures that have been established to ensure we deliver effectively. This section also outlines our objectives and a performance appraisal for the Financial Year, the first year of operation for the FCDO. 

    Foreword by the Foreign Secretary: FCDO Annual Report and Accounts The Rt Hon Elizabeth Truss MP

    It is a great honour to lead the Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office and to ensure that our foreign and development policy delivers for people across our great country. As we look ahead, we must continue making the case for building deeper economic, diplomatic and security partnerships in order to help us seize the opportunities – and tackle the challenges – of the modern age, defending our values and advancing our interests around the world.

    We are proud of the United Kingdom and our global role. We are delivering vaccines in record time as a strong science and tech superpower. We are a leader in development, delivering humanitarian support for those in need, and raising huge sums to support girls’ education. We are a fierce champion of freedom, free enterprise and democracy around the world.

    We are looking ahead to an autumn where Global Britain plants our flag on the world stage. In the coming weeks, we will be hosting the first Global Investment Summit, including a reception with Her Majesty the Queen. We will also be hosting the UN Climate Change Conference (COP26) in Glasgow, and a meeting of G7 Foreign and Development Ministers in Liverpool.

    This is Global Britain in action: going out into the world in a positive and confident spirit to tackle alongside our friends and allies the major challenges of our times – from Covid to climate change. By positioning the UK at the heart of a network of economic, diplomatic and security partnerships, we are making our country safer and more competitive, standing up for our values, and confirming our status as the best place to live, work and do business. Our mission is to project this vision to the world and ensure everyone in Britain knows that our best days lie ahead.

    Lead Non-Executive Director’s introduction to the Annual Report to Baroness Helena Louise Morrissey DBE

    In the to Financial Year, we witnessed the unfolding of a range of testing and unprecedented events for the United Kingdom. The COVID health crisis, exit from the European Union, and geopolitical tensions marked a challenging environment: the health, humanitarian, and socio-economic impacts of which threatened to interrupt, or at worst reverse, years of sustained global progress.

    Amid these developments, the UK Government announced the merger of the Foreign and Commonwealth Office and the Department for International Development, uniting development and diplomacy in one new department: the Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office, launched on 2 September There has never been a more important time to bring together the best of Britain’s international effort and project the UK as a force for good in the world. I transferred to Lead Non-Executive Director of the FCDO in September from my role as Lead Non-Executive Director at the Foreign and Commonwealth Office. Since the department’s formation, I have seen the FCDO respond to both external and internal challenge with sustained strength and pragmatism. The expression “changing an engine mid-flight” is strikingly pertinent for the FCDO this year. The department has managed an ambitious transformation portfolio, while simultaneously responding to immediate challenges and opportunities and developing a long-term, comprehensive strategy to shape and deliver future priorities.

    The FCDO’s Non-Executive Directors (NEDs) have provided exceptional leadership support to the department throughout this demanding and transformative year. John Coffey was appointed in September as lead NED on Audit and Risk, Ann Cormack was appointed in October as lead NED in Human Resources and Beverley Tew (appointed in October ) has taken up the role as lead NED in Finance. I am very grateful for all the NEDs’ support this year, particularly for providing tailored and knowledgeable advice in priority areas as the department’s transformation is taken forward. The NEDs have also helped the FCDO to establish a governance structure that is tailored to the department. Rather than bringing pieces from either legacy department, we have created a new structure that provides a platform for the NEDs to provide an effective and objective challenge to the rest of the Board and officials. As a result, across the FCDO, an effective structure for collective decision making on issues that have an impact across the department has been created. In this critical first year, governance brings together key stakeholders to set direction and provide assurance for the organisation.

    The department was founded under the leadership of the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs and First Secretary of State Rt Hon Dominic Raab MP. Sir Philip Barton was appointed as the FCDO’s Permanent Under-Secretary (PUS) and the FCDO’s Accounting Officer in August Director Generals have provided leadership in their respective areas: Juliet Chua in Finance and Corporate; Tom Drew for the Middle East and North Africa (MENA), Afghanistan and Pakistan; Moazzam Malik for Africa; Jenny Bates for the Indo-Pacific; Vijay Rangarajan for the Americas and Overseas Territories; Kumar Iyer in Delivery, Sir Ian Macleod in Legal and Nic Hailey for the FCDO’s Transformation. The FCDO’s Political Director, Sir Tim Barrow, was appointed in August  

    Our department

    About the FCDO

    We pursue our national interests and project the UK as a force for good in the world. We promote the interests of British citizens, safeguard the UK’s security, defend our values, reduce poverty and tackle global challenges with our international partners. We unite development and diplomacy in one new department. FCDO brings together the best of Britain’s international effort and demonstrates the UK acting as a force for good in the world.

    We employ around 17, staff in our diplomatic and development offices worldwide, including in overseas embassies and high commissions. Our UK-based staff work in King Charles Street, London and Abercrombie House, East Kilbride. We also have other London offices, including 22 Whitehall, and staff based in Milton Keynes.

    Transformation in to

    On 16 June , the Prime Minister announced that DFID and the FCO would merge, uniting development and diplomacy in one new department and bringing together Britain’s international effort.

    The FCDO launched on 2 September and an organisational-wide transformation is underway to forge a new, high-performing department, capable of leading and co-ordinating the UK’s international policy.

    The transformation is progressing well, with strong Ministerial support and direction. A new leadership team is in place, headed by a new Permanent Under-Secretary and Director Generals (DGs). A Headquarter structure has been agreed, organised around a new Directors structure with joint head offices in London and East Kilbride. Teams across the global network have been integrated bringing together legacy DFID and FCO staff. Heads of Mission are now accountable for the delivery of crossHMG country plans that have been agreed by Ministers and set out the strategic priorities for the UK’s international efforts in each country.

    Learning lessons from other countries that have merged development and foreign affairs ministries, we have prioritised creating a new shared culture to ensure we retain key staff and deliver the impact we can all be proud of. We have also worked hard to ensure the transformation portfolio represents best practice for programme delivery and that the dependencies between different elements of the transformation are fully understood and managed. FCDO transformation will receive additional scrutiny and guidance from the Infrastructure and Projects Authority having joined the Government’s Major Project Portfolio in July Resourcing challenges, in terms of securing both the staff and skills needed for delivery, and supporting the network to implement the transformation, are being addressed through ongoing recruitment exercises and prioritisation.

    The creation of the Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office was designed to align the UK’s international efforts and maximise our influence as a global force for good. Although savings through administrative efficiencies will be realised, the merger was not driven by these issues. The FCDO is more efficient than the former departments. In the HQ-level permanent director structure was reduced by one third and the FCDO has 5 fewer permanent Director Generals at HQ than the former departments. Additional efficiencies are being looked at as part of the forthcoming Spending Review.

    The direct costs relating to the merger of the FCO and DFID in were approximately £ million, £ million was for direct staff costs, £ million for specialist contractors and £ million for software licences to align the two organisations.

    The FCDO’s structure and people

    The FCDO is a ministerial department, supported by 12 agencies and public bodies. We work with the private sector, non-governmental organisations, overseas governments, and a range of other actors including multilateral organisations. With this operating model, we can deliver at scale and flexibly across the globe, including fragile and conflict-affected countries. We use a range of funding instruments to fulfil our objectives including grants, contracts and financial investments. Our accountability system includes an evidence-based business planning process, supported by governance, monitoring, audit, assurance and risk management processes.

    We employ 16, staff worldwide, including in overseas embassies and high commissions. Our UK-based staff work in King Charles Street, 22 Whitehall (London), Abercrombie House (East Kilbride) and Hanslope Park (near Milton Keynes). More information on our staff is provided in section Remuneration and Staff Report.

    Global distribution of FCDO Posts

    Delivering effectively

    In our first year of operation, the FCDO established a range of structures to ensure that our department consistently delivers effectively. This includes our transparency commitments, the way we collectively make decisions and our risk management approach. Details on these structures is outlined below.

    Governance arrangements

    The FCDO’s governance structure is made up of a number of boards and committees, each with its own remit. At the top of the governance structure is the Supervisory Board, which is chaired by the Foreign Secretary and meets quarterly. The Supervisory Board provides strategic direction, oversight, support, and challenge for the department with a view to the long-term health, reputation, and success of the FCDO. The Supervisory Board is made up of the PUS, DGs for Finance and Corporate, and Delivery, as well as all NEDs. Attendance for Ministers and other DGs is optional, depending on the agenda.

    The Management Board, chaired by the Permanent Under-Secretary, ensures the organisation delivers departmental priorities and objectives set by Ministers. It also ensures rigorous management of performance, strategic risk and people and duty of care to staff. It takes key decisions on changes in management approach. It is the highest official-level governance meeting and its membership includes all Director Generals and relevant Directors with all NEDs invited to attend in an advisory capacity. The Management Board meets monthly.

    Executive members of the Management Board meet weekly as the Executive Committee (ExCo). Reporting to the Management Board, ExCo takes decisions on strategic choices or challenges relating to sensitive or time-bound issues, day to day running of the department, emerging issues, risks or crises where early steers or a cross-departmental view, impact or action is required.

    The Strategy Committee is responsible for making sure the department is fit for the future. It focuses on challenge and strategic oversight, recommending changes to the FCDO’s strategic direction, building strategic capability, assessing coherence and links into UK Government strategy.

    The Investment Committee is responsible for assessing whether the FCDO is spending to achieve the best Value for Money (VFM).

    The People Committee (PC) is responsible for making sure the FCDO has the best workforce to deliver. It works to enable the organisation to have the right people in the right roles at the right times, to deliver its objectives and support the resilience and wellbeing of all FCDO staff.

    The Delivery Committee assesses whether the FCDO is delivering on its objectives: achieving the desired effect as well as undertaking the planned activity, to high standards, across all areas of the FCDO’s work including policy, programme and corporate.

    The Audit and Risk Assurance Committee (ARAC) supports the Management Board, and the PUS as Accounting Officer, to review decisions and processes designed to ensure sound systems of internal control. This includes risk management, financial reporting (including internal controls over financial accounting), internal and external audit, Arm’s Length Bodies, counter-fraud and safeguarding. The ARAC is chaired by a Non-Executive Director with suitable experience. It challenges the executive and promotes best practice across the FCDO, but has no executive responsibilities. It reports to the Supervisory Board.

    Finally, the Transformation Board is a temporary structure and accountable to the Management Board for delivery of the overall scope of the FCDO’s transformation portfolio. It takes key decisions affecting timescales, cost and quality of the portfolio and agrees programme objectives and scope.

    Approach to risk management

    Until September , FCO and DFID were two separate government departments, with distinct approaches to risk management. Both departments operated in some highly challenging environments and were willing to take carefully considered and well managed risks to deliver UK objectives. This section briefly sets out the approaches to risk management taken by the two predecessor departments, before considering the approach taken by the FCDO since September

    The FCDO faces a wide range of risks because of our global footprint and activities. We pursue our national interests and project the UK as a force for good in the world. The world we work in and the work we do, is inherently risky. Risk management helps us navigate the complexity and uncertainty we face in delivering our objectives. It is an essential part of the management of the FCDO, informing operational decisionmaking, policy options, planning and financial management and control.

    Both DFID and FCO, like other government departments (OGDs) and organisations, were severely affected by the COVID pandemic. From late until the merger of the two departments, additional structures, processes and policies were introduced in each department to both consider the impact of COVID on the delivery of wider objectives, and to manage risks to the delivery of new, more immediate priorities relating to COVID itself. These were adopted in addition to the existing risk management approaches in place and have now been mainstreamed into the new risk management approach for the FCDO.

    DFID approach pre-merger (April to August )

    DFID’s principle-based risk management approach was laid out in a risk policy and appetite statement, supported by guidance, training and tools. DFID assessed the risks it faced through six categories: risks posed by the external context; risks to the department’s reputation; fiduciary risks of funds being used for unintended purposes or not properly accounted for; safeguarding risks of unintended harm to people or the environment; risks to delivery of policy and programme objectives; and risks to operational capabilities and staff.

    DFID had an appetite for carefully considered and well managed risks to deliver UK objectives and achieve development outcomes. DFID undertook higher risk activities where the situation (for example, a humanitarian emergency) or the expected results justified them. The department also accepted risk to innovate, build the evidence base and work in new and transformative ways. When undertaking higher risk activities, the department’s aim was to ensure that the mitigating actions kept the risk to an acceptable level. In judging an acceptable level of residual risk as an ongoing appetite level, or to tolerate for shorter periods, the department demonstrated flexibility to adapt its approach to the context and available evidence base.

    Strategic risks for DFID as a whole were considered by the Management Board monthly; the Supervisory Board also reviewed risk at regular intervals. The risk policy and appetite statement was reviewed at least annually and an additional review was completed after the COVID outbreak. The Audit and Risk Assurance Committee provided oversight of the risk policy and implementation of risk management plans.

    FCO approach pre-merger (April to August )

    FCO’s risk management approach was articulated in a risk policy and appetite. The FCO assessed top risks in two categories: policy risks and operational risks. Policy risks related to the delivery of the FCO’s key foreign policy objectives, while operational risks were threats to the FCO’s ability to function successfully as an organisation. Policy and operational risks interacted, for example, in relation to crisis response.

    FCO’s appetite for foreign policy risks depended on the issue, potential impact on UK interests and political context. FCO assessed the risk of policy choices and agreed appropriate risk appetite with Ministers and Partners Across Government.

    The Audit and Risk Assurance Committee and the Executive Committee considered the Top Risk Register on a quarterly basis. Operational risks were scrutinised closely by the Audit and Risk Assurance Committee, on behalf of the Management Board, including deep dive investigations of key areas of risk. The Management Board and Supervisory Board also reviewed the Top Risk Register formally at least twice a year.

    FCDO approach post-merger (September to March and onwards)

    The FCDO will be the springboard for all our international efforts, integrating diplomacy and development to achieve greater impact and realise the Prime Minister’s vision for coherent international delivery across the whole of Government. With this in mind, the Foreign Secretary and Management Board are focusing on delivery of the real-world change we want to see. Risk management is a critical element of this approach.

    Since the departmental merger in September , the FCDO has adopted a single overarching risk management approach. Policies and processes have been established for escalation of risk throughout the organisation, ensuring appropriate accountability. We have developed a departmental FCDO Risk Appetite Statement, using UK Government best practice and extensive consultation, agreed by the Management Board and the Foreign Secretary. We have set risk management rules for our portfolio of policy programmes through a new Programme Operating Framework. A new FCDO Risk Management Policy was published in July , aligned to the principles set out in the UK Government’s ‘The Orange Book: Management of Risk – Principles and Concepts’.

    We introduced a new FCDO Principal Risk Report (PRR) in September , covering the most significant risks to FCDO’s performance and reputation. In March , the PRR contained 21 principal risks, alongside detail on linked secondary risks. The scope and number of principal risks is kept under constant review. The principal risks are organised into seven categories: strategy and context, policy and programme delivery, public service delivery and operations, people, safeguarding, financial and fiduciary and reputational. Each of the principal risks is owned by a Director or Deputy Director and has a Director General as a sponsor.

    The Management Board discusses principal risks monthly, including the FCDO’s overall risk profile and deep dives into individual risks. The board determines accountability for each of the principal risks, reviews risk exposure against risk appetite and monitors progress in implementing controls, drawing on management information, qualitative insights from across the organisation and wider evidence.

    Further information on our approach to risk management, including the governance of risk, can be found in Section

    Transparency

    The UK is globally recognised for its transparency and open-data, and the FCDO is committed to transparency to enable the best use of evidence, data and digital tools to inform our policy and actions. Transparency enables the FCDO to demonstrate the value and impact of our diplomatic and development work and supports our international standing and reputation.

    We fulfil our international, legal, and public transparency commitments [footnote 1]. In addition, we provide leadership in aid transparency as a member of the International Aid Transparency Initiative (IATI) and share information about our aid programming on the DevTracker platform. We are also committed to making better use of open data via the National Data Strategy and support the UK membership of the Open Government Partnership, promoting the values of Open Government and transparency across the world. We appointed a Board Sponsor to provide strategic leadership for transparency when the department was formed in September , and actively support the network of UK Government Transparency Champions established by Cabinet Office, to drive openness and accountability across all departments.

    The UK Aid Strategy () set out the commitment that ‘all UK government departments will achieve ‘good’ or ‘very good’ in the Aid Transparency Index (ATI) by ’. Prior to the formation of the FCDO, both legacy organisations were assessed in the global ATI, which was published in July Legacy DFID was classed as ‘very good’ among major donors, and legacy FCO improved its performance to ‘fair’. The FCDO has benefited from the expert programme delivery knowledge of our legacy departments and continues to strengthen transparency across our activity. We are committed to improving the transparency of aid globally and maintaining our high standards for overseas spending. We have promoted this across the UK Government via a Transparency Community of Practice which has established a beneficial exchange of learning between aid-spending departments. Although COVID meant this was temporarily put on hold, the FCDO will continue to build on this work.

    Scrutiny

    Our scrutiny arrangements respond to Section 5 of the International Development (Official Development Assistance Target) Act , which requires the Secretary of State to make arrangements for the independent evaluation of the extent to which Official Development Assistance (ODA) provided by the UK represents Value for Money in relation to the purposes for which it is provided; and to report on how the duty has been complied within the FCDO’s Annual Report. The Independent Commission for Aid Impact (ICAI) is the mechanism that provides ‘independent evaluation and scrutiny of the impact and value for money of all UK Government ODA’ and this section fulfils the duty to report. ICAI reports to the International Development Committee in Parliament and makes its reports available online.

    The FCDO is subject to parliamentary scrutiny by the International Development Committee and Foreign Affairs Committee, which monitors the policy, administration and spending of the department, and the Committee of Public Accounts, which scrutinises the VFM of public spending, as well as scrutiny by the National Audit Office (NAO), which assesses the VFM public spending for parliament.

    Evaluation arrangements

    We are also committed to evaluating our programmes to ensure that they deliver VFM and to generate learning that benefits our future work. The department uses evaluation, monitoring and other evidence tools across our programmes alongside policies for accountability and learning, and this is incorporated into programme conceptualisation and design. The FCDO’s sound approach to the use of evidence was acknowledged in the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) Development Cooperation Peer Review, which highlighted that the UK “values evidence and knowledge and has continued to reinforce its strong approach to results, evaluation and learning.”

    Monitoring and evaluation experts are embedded across our department. Evaluation support is also provided from the centre, through guidance, technical advice, quality assurance, conducting strategic evaluations, and learning and development opportunities:

    • standards: An internal interim evaluation policy was introduced this year, based on DFID’s protocols, and we have started the process for developing a full evaluation policy and strategy for the new merged department. We ensure evaluations conducted across the business reach expected standards of quality and rigour: between April and March our Evaluation Quality Assurance and Learning Service (EQUALS) responded to requests for quality assurance, 17 of which were from other government departments. The Global Evaluation Framework Agreement continues to provide a critical service for procurement of evaluation expertise to the FCDO and other government departments spending ODA

    • rigour and innovation: Through the Centre for Excellence for Development Impact and Learning (CEDIL) programme, we have pioneered new rigorous methodologies for hard-to-measure problems, including mapping frontier work on using big data and providing guidance on how to use this in impact evaluations. We have adapted our work to meet the priority needs of the new organisation. For example, we have developed and are leading a cross-FCDO workstream on how to design, measure and evaluate the department’s diplomatic and development influencing work. We have also been leading work on innovative approaches to adaptive management for complex and high-risk contexts

    • technical advice and guidance: Our Evaluation Advisers in the Evaluation Unit provide bespoke technical advice and support on monitoring, evaluation and learning to teams and priority work across the organisation, through a dedicated helpdesk. The FCDO Evaluation Quality Assurance and Learning Services (EQUALS) also provides expert, on-demand, and quick turnaround technical support to the FCDO, including 28 requests for technical assistance and work on 5 learning reviews in We developed a series of guidance notes to support the shifting needs and challenges of evaluating in the COVID context

    • strategic evaluations: This year, we have stepped up our efforts to provide strategic and thematic portfolio evaluations on key areas. We have designed a layered, sequenced, and proportionate approach to evaluating our investments on COVID interventions ranging across programme, portfolio, and thematic work. We have started a suite of thematic evaluations on priority areas, including Climate Smart Agriculture. We have completed learning reviews which synthesise our evidence on Beneficiary Engagement, Commercial Agriculture and Girls’ Education. We have provided support to the World Bank’s Fund for Impact Evaluation and the Strategic Impact Evaluation Fund, which has included COVID emergency evaluations on remote education, school return and response and recovery using educational technology. We completed the Evidence in Governance and Politics (EGAP) programme this year, which collected exciting new robust evidence on crime, community policing, community management of natural resources and incentivising citizens to access tax funded public services, as well as pioneering new and more rigorous methodologies for testing whether an invention is effective in multiple contexts

    Safeguarding

    Safeguarding against sexual exploitation, abuse, and sexual harassment (SEAH) is a priority for the FCDO. In September , we published the UK’s first strategy on tackling SEAH in the aid sector which sets out how we are working to ensure better safeguarding across this sector, within the UK Government and in the programmes we fund. The FCDO’s code of conduct states what type of sexual activity is unacceptable and the related consequences if the code is broken. The Safeguarding Team and Safeguarding Unit within the Internal Audit and Investigations Department, drives this work forward, focusing on both safeguarding policy and enforcement. We are introducing mandatory SEAH training for all staff as part of wide-ranging internal capability building. We continue to deliver on the commitments we made at the October London Safeguarding Summit to: prevent SEAH from occurring; listen to those who are affected; respond sensitively but robustly when harm or allegations of harm occur; and learn from every case. We continue to drive collective action by convening and chairing multiple international working groups. In October , we published a further progress report against the London Summit commitments.

    We launched the Resource and Support Hub (RSH) in May whose global and national hubs aim to build the safeguarding capacity and capability of smaller, locally based organisations, in particular. In March we announced details of a programme to make it easier for survivors of SEAH to report abuse, to improve the quality of investigations and strengthen support available to survivors and victims. Other initiatives we are supporting include: advanced safeguarding leadership training for hundreds of individuals worldwide through the Open University; a digital leadership and culture tool to help organisations assess their strengths and weaknesses on tackling SEAH; and initiatives such as the Misconduct Disclosure Scheme to prevent perpetrators from moving around the aid sector.

    The FCDO registered 12 new internal staff cases of SEAH this year and 22 internal cases were concluded in the same period. Internal cases mean the survivor, or the subject of complaint, is an FCDO staff member. In 8 of the 22 concluded cases the allegations were upheld, resulting in disciplinary action, up to and including dismissal. In the other cases there was either: insufficient information to progress to an investigation; lack of engagement from witnesses or the survivor; or the investigation concluded there was no evidence to support the allegations made.

    Since setting clearer expectations in early that legacy DFID and now FCDO partners must report credible suspicions and actual allegations of safeguarding abuses, we have seen an increase in reports to the FCDO of external safeguarding concerns, from 73 in to , to in to , in to and in to The increase in reporting is encouraging as it demonstrates confidence in our reporting system and that action will be taken in response to concerns raised. The most common case types reported in to were: SEAH; non-sexual discrimination and harassment; physical abuse; and child exploitation. In 55% of cases disciplinary action, up to and including dismissal, was taken; in 21% of cases there was no evidence; in 14% of cases partners took other action to strengthen safeguarding policies and control mechanisms; and in the remaining cases there was insufficient evidence or lack of engagement from witnesses or survivors, to progress investigations.

    Aims and objectives in to

    The creation of the FCDO in September and absence of an updated Single Departmental Plan in to for either legacy department [footnote 2] means that the FCDO did not have centrally agreed Strategic Objectives or Priority Outcomes to report against in the to Financial Year. We have nevertheless determined priority policy areas early on (outlined in the Performance Analysis sub-section).

    The Spending Review (SR) settlement required all departments to produce an Outcome Delivery Plan (ODP); this has replaced the Single Departmental Plan as the document by which departments will be held to account. ODPs outline Priority Outcome Metrics and Strategies. The FCDO’s and ODP was published in July and will be used to guide performance reporting for the to Annual Report.

    While performance reporting is optional for the to Financial Year because of the unprecedented pressures that the COVID outbreak has had on the whole of the UK Government, the FCDO has chosen to go beyond requirements to produce a bridging report, presenting information on our performance in priority policy areas this year. Key activities and achievements for the department are structured against ODP Priority Outcomes determined for the year ahead; the Performance Analysis sub-section of the to Annual Report will also take this approach, making comparisons easier.

    Our ODP reporting, and delivery of the Priority Outcomes, will be underpinned by our new Delivery Framework approach. The FCDO began to institute a Delivery Framework approach in to

    This supports teams across all areas of FCDO work including policy, programme and corporate. It draws on robust tools, including Theories of Change, Outcomes Trees and KPIs, to clearly describe the real-world change we want to see and sets measurable targets to enable teams to monitor progress and take action to stay on course to deliver. This will continue to be rolled out in to and will provide a stronger focus on delivery across all that we do.

    Performance appraisal for to

    In the to Financial Year, the COVID health crisis has had an unprecedented impact on lives across the world. As the greatest health threat that the world has been subjected to in decades, the health, humanitarian, and socio-economic impacts of this crisis threaten to interrupt years of sustained progress in global poverty reduction and stability.

    At this critical time, the UK Government has united development and diplomacy in one new department: the FCDO.

    Combining our diplomatic and development expertise will make us even more effective at achieving long-term change, supporting others to become self-sufficient, and ensuring we leave no one behind. Dealing with an unprecedented set of challenges, we have been able to meet performance expectations in our first operational year, and effectively deliver maximum impact in priority areas, while handling exceptional financial constraints brought about by the worst economic downturn that the UK has experienced for more than years.

    FCDO key achievements

    The Integrated Review of Security, Defence, Development and Foreign Policy was published, defining the Government’s ambition for the UK’s role in the world and the long-term strategic aims for national security and foreign policy. This will see the UK becoming a problem solving and burden sharing nation and sets a strong direction for building back better from COVID, both domestically and internationally.

    We also used our presidency of the UN Security Council to drive further progress on global access to COVID vaccines and call for local ceasefires to allow their delivery to some of the world’s most vulnerable people.

    We hosted the Global Vaccine Summit which raised nearly US$ billion to immunise a further million children against a range of diseases.

    We committed up to £ billion of ODA to the UK’s international response, combatting the health, humanitarian, and socio-economic impacts of the pandemic and supporting the research, development and equitable global distribution of vaccines, treatment and tests.

    In the wake of the pandemic, we coordinated a repatriation effort that had no post-war precedent in terms of scale, complexity and duration. Consular teams handled over , enquiries and issued over 13, emergency travel documents. We provided personalised consular support in over 25, new cases.

    At the International Criminal Court we have seen the elections of Joanna Korner as Judge and Karim Khan as Chief Prosecutor. saw considerable progress on climate, culminating in 75 leaders making ambitious commitments at the Climate Ambition Summit on 12 December, co-convened by the UK, France and UN in partnership with Chile and Italy.

    Our Famine Prevention Call to Action combined aid expertise and humanitarian diplomacy to address the rising risk of famine across the world. Sustained UK efforts have mobilised additional funding for the world’s most vulnerable countries, including the doubling of World Bank Early Response Financing from US$ million to US$1 billion to support countries facing increased food security risks in taking early action.

    In to

    • the Integrated Review of Security, Defence, Development and Foreign Policy was published, defining the Government’s ambition for the UK’s role in the world and the long-term strategic aims for national security and foreign policy. This paves the way for the UK becoming a problem solving and burden sharing nation and sets a strong direction for building back better from COVID, both domestically and internationally

    • we also used our presidency of the UN Security Council to drive further progress on global access to COVID vaccines and call for local ceasefires to allow their delivery to some of the world’s most vulnerable people

    • in the UK imposed sanctions on individuals and entities in Russia, Saudi Arabia, Myanmar, DPRK, Belarus, Chechnya, Venezuela, The Gambia and Pakistan. Last year we introduced a UK Magnitsky sanctions law, to target individuals guilty of the most serious human rights abuses abroad. This year, we are extending this model to corruption

    • at the International Criminal Court we have seen the elections of Joanna Korner as Judge and Karim Khan as Chief Prosecutor

    • the FCDO coordinated a repatriation effort that had no post-war precedent in terms of scale, complexity and duration. Consular teams handled over , enquiries and issued over 13, emergency travel documents. We provided personalised consular support in over 25, new cases, and the FCDO travel advice pages were updated 7, times (a 98% increase compared to the previous Financial Year)

    • the FCDO committed up to £ billion of ODA to the UK’s international response to COVID, combatting the health, humanitarian, and socio-economic impacts of the pandemic and supporting the research, development and equitable global distribution of vaccines, treatment and tests

    • million British nationals were helped to return home at the peak of the pandemic. This included tens of thousands on UK Government Charter flights as well as hundreds of thousands more via commercial airlines kept open thanks to FCDO lobbying efforts

    • the FCDO facilitated catch-up programmes for , girls in low-income countries following COVID school closures

    • the FCDO established the Hygiene and Behaviour-Change Coalition with Unilever and jointly invested up to £ million in a unique programme to promote frequent handwashing with soap and surface hygiene – reaching 1 billion people across 37 countries

    • the Global Vaccine Summit hosted by the UK raised nearly US$ billion to support Gavi’s mission to immunise a further million children

    • saw considerable progress on climate, culminating in 75 leaders making ambitious commitments at the Climate Ambition Summit on 12 December. The summit was co-convened by the United Nations, the United Kingdom and France in partnership with Chile and Italy

    • the Foreign Secretary launched a Famine Prevention Call to Action in September combining the best of FCDO’s aid expertise and humanitarian diplomacy to address the rising risk of famine across the world. Sustained UK efforts have helped to mobilise additional funding to support the world’s most vulnerable countries, including the doubling of World Bank Early Response Financing from US$ million to US$1 billion to support countries facing increased food security risks in taking early action

    • the Foreign Secretary reaffirmed that the UK will be an energetic and dependable partner in the growing prosperity of the Indo-Pacific region and demonstrated UK commitment during several visits to the region

    • the FCDO was central to assessing, managing and mitigating the international-facing risks and impacts of the D20 operation. The operation was designed to ensure that the UK Government could moderate the worst disruptive impacts of the end of the EU Transition Period on the welfare, health and security of UK citizens and on the economic stability of the UK

    Delivering maximum impact

    With the UK committed to achieving, but not exceeding, the Official Development Assistance spending target of % of gross national income in to , the contraction of the economy as a result of the COVID pandemic prompted government to plan a £ billion in-year reduction in ODA-spending in the Financial Year. At the same time, we estimate that the impacts of the COVID pandemic are likely to have resulted in m additional people living in extreme poverty in , rising to m in [footnote 3].

    To ensure that our department delivered maximum impact in priority areas, while handling the pressures brought by the COVID outbreak, the FCDO conducted a rigorous prioritisation exercise. The Executive Committee discussed a paper setting out options to ensure resources were channelled into the most urgent and time sensitive work.

    ExCo agreed to use the baseline identified by the prioritisation exercises in both legacy departments, until the Integrated Review and Spending Review were published and prioritisation could be completed in line with the vision for the new department. Legacy FCO used a ‘Do/Do differently/Drop’ approach, while legacy DFID prioritised activities using a ‘Gold/Silver/Bronze’ rating. Both exercises identified three groupings of work according to the increase or decrease in resources that would be required. DGs used this baseline list of priorities to inform choices before the Integrated Review and Spending Review publications.

    For both legacy departments, work-streams in the ‘Gold/Do’ category included helping those most at risk throughout the pandemic through procurement of medical equipment and legalisation services. Ministerial priority work-streams were also prioritised. Workstreams in the ‘Bronze/Drop’ category included cross-Whitehall engagement on policies not related to COVID, bilateral relationships and visits, business planning and discretionary work such as corporate away days.

    By taking these decisions, we effectively delivered maximum impact in priority areas, putting the COVID response at the forefront of our work. A breakdown of our main areas of spend in the to Financial Year is provided in section Financial Review.

    The Performance Analysis sub-section of the report provides further information on our performance this year. As the FCDO is in its first year of operation, it will not be possible to draw on previous year strategic objectives and indicators to discuss performance and trends across earlier Financial Years.

    Future plans

    As announced in late , given the impact of the global pandemic on the economy and, as a result, the public finances, we will move from a target of spending % of gross national income as ODA to % in to This was a difficult – but temporary – decision. For the FCDO to achieve its strategy of integrating diplomacy and development to achieve greater impact, we will focus on:

    • delivery: Realising tangible real-world change is at the centre of what we do. That will be driven by clear accountability for delivery, using evidence-based approaches. The FCDO’s new Delivery Framework will work across the range of the department’s business, based on robust theories of change, with clear and measurable targets at all levels

    • alignment: The FCDO leads a whole of government international effort. All posts work to a single set of objectives (the Country Plan) for which the Head of Mission (HoM) is fully accountable. HoMs will be consulted on all programme and policy decisions in-country and will chair cross-Government Country Boards with clear lines of accountability to Ministers

    • integration of our toolkit: The FCDO integrates the full range of the UK’s diplomatic, development and domestic tools. Examples include shifting the strategy of CDC Group plc (CDC), the UK’s development finance institution, towards promoting energy transition and green infrastructure; pulling together targeted sanctions, diplomatic campaigns and aid programmes, to deliver our open societies agenda; and working with domestic departments to build the UK’s influence on key international objectives, such as countering money laundering and global health security

    • value for money: The FCDO provides the overseas platform for the whole of the UK Government, with a focus on value for money, effectiveness, and alignment of services and policies. We use evidence and data rigorously in how we design portfolios of activities, programmes and investments to achieve our goals. We improve and maintain a global estate and vehicle fleet that is secure, fit for purpose and maximises efficiency, utilising key investments (e.g. in our posts in Washington, Ottawa and Mexico City) to contribute to our sustainability objectives

    • coherent use of Official Development Assistance: The Foreign Secretary will lead an interim stocktake of the UK ODA portfolio at the mid-year point to assess spending plans across departments and ensure we meet the % GNI target. Coherence in our ODA spend across the Government will be driven by the FCDO’s new International Development Strategy

    • partnerships: The FCDO will strengthen our global reach to build a diverse range of partnerships with bilateral and multilateral partners, the private sector, civil society and beyond. Our Posts will strengthen understanding of, and access to, host Governments and influential individuals and groups. We will use these partnerships to deliver the Country Plan and strengthen the long-term benefit to the UK and global stability

    • crisis management: All Posts will be ready to deliver a whole of government response to crises, particularly those affecting the safety or welfare of British nationals and large-scale humanitarian crises. Teams will continue to work with international partners on crisis anticipation and invest in crisis management preparedness and in the skills and readiness of staff across the mission 

    Performance analysis

    For the Performance Analysis section of the to Annual Report and Accounts, we have produced a bridging report, presenting information on our performance in to against the priority policy areas. We will publish a separate document providing a final set of results for the to UK Aid Strategy, in early

    Key activities and achievements for the department across the to Financial Year are structured against Priority Outcomes determined for the year ahead. Our analysis is supported by a review on progress on the FCDO’s contribution to the United Nations (UN) Sustainable Development Goals. The Performance Analysis concludes by presenting information on our risk profile in to

    PO 1: Shape the international order and ensure the UK is a force for good in the world by: supporting sustainable development and humanitarian needs; promoting human rights and democracy; and establishing common international standards

    The FCDO will use its combined diplomatic and development tools to promote and project the UK as a force for good. We will react nimbly to human rights and humanitarian law violations and take action in multilateral fora and through our new sanctions regimes. We will use Official Development Assistance to support girls’ education and free journalism, and work with other donors and partners to respond effectively to humanitarian crises and reduce the risk of famines.

    Global goals

    The FCDO’s work under this outcome contributes to the following Global Goals, amongst others:

    Activities and achievements in to

    The FCDO has led the UK’s international response to COVID We have made available public commitments worth up to £ billion of ODA since the crisis began, making us one of the largest donors. Of these commitments, £ million was spent in Financial Year to We mobilised quickly when the crisis first began and worked with and through the international system, in order to achieve the scale of action and coordination needed to overcome this global crisis. In to

    • we committed up to £ million for the research, development and distribution of vaccines, treatments and tests, including a £ million commitment to COVAX in support of the provision of vaccines to low and lower-middle income countries [footnote 4]. Of the £ million, £ million was spent in Financial Year to

    • we also committed up to £ million to multilateral institutions like the UN, as well as to UK charities and international Non-Governmental Organisations (NGOs), to support the health and humanitarian response. Of the £ million, £ million was spent in Financial Year to

    • to support the global economic response, we also committed £ million to the IMF to help the poorest countries with their debt repayments so they could focus limited resources on their country response. This was spent in full in Financial Year to

    • over and above our funding commitments, the UK’s investment in its research and development has been a key contribution to the global vaccination effort, enabling Oxford and AstraZeneca to produce a new vaccine and already distribute million doses for no profit, with two-thirds going to lower- and middle-income countries

    • in addition to the public commitments, the FCDO created new, and adapted existing, programming amounting to more than £ million [footnote 5] ODA in Financial Year to This has primarily sought to help countries tackle the impacts of the pandemic on health, the economy, and education as well as where COVID has exacerbated pre-existing humanitarian crises. For example, we set up a new programme to respond to COVID in the Caribbean, which has helped deliver vital emergency health support. We set up a new programme in Jordan to provide cash emergency assistance to , families who have been economically impacted by COVID We adapted our flagship Girls’ Education Challenge programme in Sub-Saharan Africa and South Asia, which is supporting million marginalised and highly marginalised girls to benefit from a quality education, by ensuring remote teaching techniques reach key cohorts of girls of school age using no-tech or low-tech learning. This is keeping girls safe and learning through COVID In Somalia, we adapted a programme to support at least , internally displaced people and vulnerable urban poor, including by decongesting crowded informal settlements to reduce the risk of transmitting the virus, as well as providing shelter and promoting good hygiene

    • at the instigation of the UK, as Commonwealth Chair-in-Office, Commonwealth Leaders agreed and issued a comprehensive statement on the full range of global responses to the COVID pandemic, outlining their commitment to protect the health of their billion citizens and mitigate the consequences for them

    • we coordinated a global repatriation operation, supporting British nationals overseas to get home to the UK, including tens of thousands on UK Government charter flights. We worked with airlines to keep commercial flights operating, supporting million British nationals to return home. This operation had no postwar precedent in terms of scale, complexity, and duration. Repatriation charter flights were used where they were most needed and we ensured that they were affordable, charging a capped price per passenger. Every flight required specific permissions and each brought its own, individual challenges. In India, the sheer volume of travellers presented a challenge: 66 government charter flights brought back nearly 18, people, each of whom required an individual movement plan and permissions. In the Philippines, we navigated the logistical challenges of organising internal transfers by small boat and small aircraft, with our teams assisting at every stage of these journeys. The FCDO offered emergency loans to help repatriate people to the UK, and from 5 May introduced a new temporary loan to support British nationals who would otherwise be unable to return home. The FCDO has provided more than 3, loans with a total value of over £2 million

    Getting British Nationals home in to

    • the FCDO launched seven separate crisis operations

    • this culminated in a global repatriation charter operation that brought British nationals back to the UK on flights, from 57 different countries and territories

    • more than 19, British passengers from 60 cruise ships were successfully disembarked, including 1, people on direct or supported charters

    • staff supported the return of million British nationals via commercial routes, of whom we estimate , were directly assisted by the UK Government

    • we collaborated with partners to ensure the return of more than 4, British travellers on their charter flights

    In addition to our immediate COVID response work, the FCDO is leading international efforts to end the pandemic and strengthen global health security. In to

    • we worked with partners, through the G7 and elsewhere, to strengthen global health security as set out in the Prime Minister’s five-point plan for pandemic preparedness. Our new core contribution of £ million between and to the World Health Organization (WHO), will contribute to this by strengthening the WHO and supporting countries to implement the International Health Regulations and support wider UK global health priorities, including strengthening country health systems

    • we continued to be a leading donor to The Global Fund to fight AIDS, Tuberculosis, and Malaria, which has helped save 38 million lives since , and aims to save 16 million more over the next three years

    • the COVID pandemic impacted the delivery of Sexual Reproductive Health and Rights (SRHR) services throughout to with reports of large-scale disruption in family planning, antenatal care, and facility-based birth services. The FCDO was the lead donor to the United Nations Population Fund (UNFPA) Supplies, which played a critical role in addressing supply chain bottlenecks, procuring PPE, and advocating for family planning services to remain open. We have contributed towards UNFPA assisting over 10 million women, girls, and young people in 53 countries with services, information, and supplies

    • the FCDO’s Women’s Integrated Sexual Health (WISH) programme reached over million women and girls with lifesaving family planning services across 27 countries in Africa and Asia. We have also continued to support the global family planning partnership, FP, which has enabled 60 million additional users of modern contraception since

    As set out in the Integrated Review, tackling climate change and biodiversity loss is the number one international priority for the UK in and beyond. In this critical decade, the FCDO aims to tackle the causes and effects of climate change, reverse biodiversity loss and support secure and affordable energy for all. This includes delivering a successful COP26 in November (postponed from November due to COVID) and galvanising increased global action to tackle the climate crisis and protect nature. In to

    • we worked to deploy the full FCDO network behind COP26 priorities – engaging Heads of Mission, our overseas network of Climate, Energy and Environment Attachés and Advisers and four senior COP26 Regional Ambassadors, to embed climate and environmental considerations across the UK’s diplomatic and development efforts

    • as Presidents of both COP26 and the G7 in , the FCDO pursued action across our Presidencies, as well as working closely with our Italian partners to engage the G We championed this agenda in other multilateral fora too, notably at the United Nations where the UK hosted the first ever UN Security Council discussion on climate security in February , as well as with the International Financial Institutions

    • saw considerable progress on climate, culminating in 75 leaders making ambitious commitments at the Climate Ambition Summit on 12 December. The summit was co-convened by the United Nations, the United Kingdom and France in partnership with Chile and Italy

    • in January , the UK launched the Adaptation Action Coalition with co-chair Egypt, and continued to provide support to key initiatives to promote resilience, including the Least Developed Countries Initiative for Effective Adaptation and Resilience (LIFE-AR) and the Risk-informed Early Action Partnership (REAP)

    On 31 March , the Foreign Secretary and the COP President-designate hosted the Climate and Development Ministerial (CDM) which brought together Ministers from 35 climate vulnerable and donor countries, to focus on the implementation of the Paris Agreement and Sustainable Development agenda in those countries most vulnerable to climate change, including via more donor finance to support adaptation and resilience.

    • we recommitted to double our International Climate Finance to £ billion from to to to Within this commitment, we will ensure at least £3 billion is invested to deliver significant benefits for nature as well as for climate and people. We will also continue to aim for a balanced split between mitigation and adaptation

    • the FCDO supported low-income countries to understand how climate change will affect water availability and to manage their water resources sustainably. In the initial response to COVID, the UK provided £20 million of emergency support to UNICEF as part of their global appeal to support governments, including the provision of water and sanitation for vulnerable children

    • we led work internationally to support low-carbon, resilient and inclusive urbanisation in low-income countries and accelerate the development of compact cities. For example, in , the Managing Climate Risks for the Urban Poor (MCRUP) programme, supported 40 urban infrastructure projects in 36 cities, unlocking US$ million of Asian Development Bank (ADB) loans and over US$60 million of government finance

    • our portfolio of over 30 commercial agriculture programmes supported responsible production through the sustainable growth of small-scale producers and agribusinesses in low income countries. This included support to reduce food losses, a key target of Sustainable Development Goal (SDG) Responsible Production and Consumption

    • the FCDO contributed to efforts to sustainably manage marine resources and biodiverse ecosystems, including forests. Despite slow global progress, we continued to support efforts across a range of targets. As of November , the FCDO’s Blue Belt programme exceeded its target to protect 4 million km² of ocean around UK Overseas Territories. We also supported global research, pilot projects and other initiatives to reduce the use of plastics as well as increase their re-use and recycling efforts in low-income countries. The FCDO played a key role in defining the UK’s overarching ambition for the post Global Biodiversity Framework. We supported work focused on stopping illegal logging and illegal deforestation, promoting sustainable trade in timber and agricultural commodities, and catalysing investment into sustainable businesses

    The FCDO is committed to ensuring that the most marginalised receive a quality education. The right to education is indispensable for the exercise of essential human rights. In to

    • we helped millions of girls and boys continue to learn and stay safe during school closures. All of our bilateral education programmes rapidly adapted to respond to the global pandemic. For example, in Pakistan, million students (including million girls) were able to continue learning as a result of the FCDO’s provision of a COVID toolkit to make up for lessons missed and provided accessible online learning opportunities for children with disabilities. In Ethiopia, the FCDO’s education assistance included a US$5 million Contingency Response supporting digital technologies and connectivity for a coordinated government response during COVID and adapted ongoing educational leadership training to focus on ‘blended’ learning

    • at a global level, the UK announced £20 million for the UN Children’s Fund crisis appeal, which includes education, adding £5 million to the Education Cannot Wait (ECW) fund to support emergency education in fragile contexts, and a further £5 million to the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR). The ECW crisis fund has benefited around 4 million hard-to-reach girls, who risked leaving education permanently after the COVID outbreak whilst UNHCR support enabled 5, teachers to continue teaching in refugee camps across 10 different countries. The Global Partnership for Education, to which the UK is the largest donor, also quickly mobilised more than US$ million to support partner countries with planning and implementing their response to the pandemic

    In to , the UK:

    • developed a teaching and learning toolkit in Pakistan, supporting more than million students

    • supported remote and homebased learning in Nigeria, supporting 12, learners

    • ensured its bilateral programmes benefited around 4 million marginalised girls

    • pledged additional funding to UNHCR enabling 5, teachers to continue teaching in refugee camps

    Peace, stability, human rights, and open societies, based on the rule of law and democratic governance, are critical for global stability. The FCDO is a vocal proponent of SDG Peace, Justice and Security and made the promotion of open societies a top policy priority this year. In to

    • we worked with the United Nations Development Programme (UNDP) to support countries to deliver on SDG 16 through a more systematic approach to evidence collection, harnessing of best practices, peer-learning, and the facilitation of multi-stakeholder partnerships on SDG 16 reporting

    • the FCDO’s Rule of Law Expertise UK (ROLE UK) programme worked to strengthen the rule of law in low-income countries by supporting partnerships that provide high-quality pro bono legal and judicial expertise. ROLE UK currently has 38 partnerships, and has been working in Nepal, Nigeria, Uganda, Malawi, Kenya, Rwanda, and Tanzania, providing highly expert advice on strengthening justice systems

    • the FCDO’s International Action Against Corruption (I-ACT) programme has delivered specialist anti-corruption technical expertise and access to international partnerships to help tackle cross-border corruption. This has helped reduce corruption through support to asset recovery and return and by increasing the transparency of company ownership

    • the FCDO’S UK Action to Support Developing Countries Fighting Corruption (UK ACT) programme funds UK law enforcement authorities to pursue and investigate money laundering and bribery, related to low-income countries with links to the UK. Under UK ACT, £76,, of assets have been restrained, confiscated or returned in to

    • we prioritised media freedom; working with a range of partners, including BBC Media Action, to strengthen the ability of independent media in low-income countries to produce free, independent public interest journalism and provide a forum for constructive public debate, both offline and online. In to , the FCDO successfully helped to broaden the Media Freedom coalition to include 11 new members and secured a strong endorsement for coordinated action on Media Freedom in draft communique language, ahead of the G7 Foreign Ministers’ meeting in May

    The FCDO is an international advocate for equality. We successfully fought for a dedicated gender equality goal in the Sustainable Development Goals (SDG 5: Gender Equality) and targets on gender equality across the other Goals. COVID has often exacerbated the challenges of the most vulnerable. We work closely with international partners to ensure the most vulnerable groups are at the centre of global efforts to recover from COVID In to

    • we adapted existing programmes to ensure women and girls continue to access support during lockdowns, such as delivering support services online, strengthening national helplines and supporting women working in supply chains impacted by the COVID pandemic

    • in June , we launched global consultations on ‘the Murad Code’ for documenting conflict-related sexual violence (CRSV), to ensure that investigations into sexual violence crimes are safer, more ethical, and more effective. We also launched the Declaration of Humanity by Faith and Belief Leaders, to end CRSV and tackle the stigma faced by survivors. More than 50 faith and belief leaders, civil society organisations, and governments have endorsed the declaration

    • the FCDO continued to support the vital work of women’s rights organisations by ensuring their inclusion in the Action Coalition priorities, and by announcing an additional £1 million to the UN Trust Fund to End Violence Against Women in September , on top of our existing £21 million contribution to support long-term interventions for women and girl survivors of Gender Based Violence

    • the UK continued to fund the Women Mediators across the Commonwealth Network, which now supports 46 women peacebuilders from 21 countries

    • we delivered over £4 million of programming to support governments and civil society partners in repealing or reforming laws, which discriminate against LGBT+ people

    • the UK’s ongoing support to the Commonwealth Small States Office in Geneva, including the funding of two dedicated Commonwealth human rights advisers, helped Commonwealth small states engage with the UN Human Rights Council and fulfil their human rights treaty obligations

    • we increased international awareness and action on Disability Inclusion and addressed often multiple forms of discrimination, including action on violence against women and girls with disabilities. We co-chaired the Global Action on Disability (GLAD) network until March , handing over to the government of Norway to lead international action on efforts to combat and reverse discrimination

    • we widened the evidence base on what works to support people with disabilities, through the Disability Inclusive Development programme (£37 million). Activities testing different radio show formats in Nigeria and Tanzania provided evidence about what format is most effective in changing people’s attitudes and prejudice towards people with disabilities

    • we continued funding the Global Disability Summit Secretariat within the International Disability Alliance. The Secretariat leads accountability for the sets of commitments that were generated at the Global Disability Summit in

    The COVID pandemic has interrupted a period of sustained progress in global poverty reduction. The world faces an unprecedented humanitarian crisis resulting from the triple threat of conflict, compounded by climate change and COVID We will maintain the UK’s role as a force for good at times of crisis, while strengthening and modernising the collective international humanitarian response. In to

    • social protection was a core part of the FCDO’s response to the socio-economic impacts of the pandemic on poor and vulnerable families, including loss of income. We worked with partner governments to strengthen their social protection systems in more than 25 countries and supported governments and international partners to scale up their social protection support for the most vulnerable, to help them meet their basic needs and protect their livelihoods. We also established a COVID social protection helpline (SPACE) that provided expert advice to 35 countries, on how to use or adapt social protection systems to respond to crises

    • the FCDO established the Hygiene and Behaviour-Change Coalition with Unilever, jointly investing up to £ million in a unique programme to promote frequent handwashing with soap and surface hygiene – reaching 1 billion people across 37 countries. The coalition supported access to drinking water in humanitarian contexts, including 19 Internally Displaced Person (IDP) camps in Yemen

    • we adapted existing development programmes to address the impacts of COVID on food security. The COVID pandemic, conflict, locust swarms and climate change have left million people worldwide facing extreme hunger in the past year. The Global Agriculture and Food Security Program (GAFSP) committed all remaining funds to mitigate COVID impacts. In Bangladesh, lockdown restrictions had a disruptive impact on agricultural supply chains affecting food accessibility, agriculture input supplies, jobs, and farmer incomes. GAFSP supported a national network of producer organisations with over 8, smallholder farmers and set up 57 call centres to act as communication hubs between farmers, input dealers, traders, and service providers – facilitating the sale and delivery of food commodities and agricultural inputs in ways that minimised the risk of transmitting COVID The virtual call centres have benefitted about 30, small-scale farmers, of whom 46% are women

    • the UK, as a force for good in the world, has led by example through its launch of the Call to Action to Prevent Famine and appointment of the UK’s Special Envoy on Famine Prevention and Humanitarian Affairs in September This work demonstrates UK commitment to engage at senior levels across the humanitarian system to drive change and bring the international community together to tackle increasingly severe risks of famine and food insecurity, because it’s the right thing to do and it protects British interests. We can only tackle these global challenges by combining our diplomatic strength with our world-leading aid expertise. The Call to Action has worked across four objectives in the last year: mobilising prioritised, quality funding (including from International Financial Institutions) to the most vulnerable countries, catalysing political action to unblock humanitarian access and protection of civilians in these contexts (for example through the UK’s creation of a Group of Friends of Action on Conflict and Hunger at the UN Security Council), driving improved data and coordination and strengthening resilience to food crises to avert the risk of famine/food insecurity in the longer-term

    PO 2: Make the UK safer and more resilient to global threats

    The international security environment is deteriorating. Strategic geopolitical competition is intensifying, changing the nature of threats we must detect and counter and widening the geographic spread of our security concerns issues. COVID has highlighted the convergence of economic, health and security risks and enhanced the importance of supporting British people to stay safe abroad.

    The UK can only maximise the benefits of our openness if we are strong and secure at home. Security is essential to an international order in which open societies and economies like the UK can flourish and collaborate in pursuit of shared goals, free from coercion and interference.

    The FCDO will play a critical role in strengthening international security and making the UK safer and more resilient to global threats. Our capacity to prevent, deter, respond to and mitigate most threats relies on our relationships and influence abroad. We will coordinate the delivery of activity and relationships overseas to protect and promote UK resilience and a resilient global health system.

    Global Goals

    The FCDO’s work under this outcome contributes to the following Global Goals, amongst others:

    Activities and Achievements in to

    We provide resilient, professional, empathetic, and high-quality Consular Services for all who need it, 24/7/ days a year. The FCDO helps British people living and travelling abroad take responsibility for their safety. In to

    • the FCDO coordinated a repatriation effort that had no post-war precedent in terms of scale, complexity and duration. We provided personalised consular support in over 25, new cases, up 12% from the previous year, while continuing our support in 9, ongoing cases. We also issued 13, emergency travel documents and our 24/7 Consular Contact Centre answered around , enquiries. The FCDO travel advice pages were updated 7, times (a 98% increase compared to the previous Financial Year)

    • 86% of British people who accessed Consular Services were satisfied with the service they received, exceeding our the existing benchmark of 80%

    The FCDO works to strengthen global health security through supporting the provision of life saving vaccines to low and middle-income countries. We coordinate the delivery of activity and relationships overseas to protect and promote UK resilience and a resilient global health system. In

    • in addition to our work supporting the development and roll-out of COVID vaccines, the UK hosted the Global Vaccine Summit in June , raising nearly US$ billion to support Gavi’s mission to immunise a further million children, including catching up on routine immunisations interrupted by COVID The UK was the largest donor, pledging the equivalent of £ million per year, over the next five years

    The FCDO is committed to developing clearer areas of UK speciality in conflict resolution and dispute management, better aligning our tools and capabilities to improve the UK’s defence and resilience. We are doing more upstream to reduce threats, including from hostile states, terrorists, criminals and from new threats. We contribute to effective international efforts to prevent, manage, and support the transition out of conflict. In

    • in Nigeria, the FCDO supported aims to counter violence through inter-faith dialogue and community reconciliation processes. In Jonglei state, South Sudan, an area of intractable conflict with extreme levels of humanitarian need, FCDO supported peace dialogues including through enhancing the capacity of Women Mediators across the Commonwealth Network

    • the UK continued to support the UN Peacebuilding Fund (PBF), the UN’s only dedicated peacebuilding programme. PBF investment in Kasai and Kasai Central, Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC), contributed to the fight against impunity, the establishment of provincial Truth and Reconciliation Commissions and local peace committees to facilitate intercommunal dialogue

    The FCDO’s peacebuilding programme in Myanmar supported 80 local administrators with mediation training, enabling conflict-affected communities in the Mandalay region to manage resource-based conflicts more peacefully. Evidence suggests this is successfully resolving inter-communal disputes, including conflicts emerging from the COVID response.

    • the FCDO worked towards the establishment of a Conflict Centre, which will develop a more integrated UK approach to conflict and instability, harnessing conflict expertise from across the FCDO, the UK Government and beyond, and applying these where the UK can make a difference

    • the FCDO led diplomatic engagement to bolster the UK’s campaign to counter malicious cyber activity. We have grown the coalition of governments willing to work together to coordinate policies and actions to deter and respond to those who act recklessly in cyberspace. We were at the forefront of work to establish the European Union (EU) cyber sanctions regime and designate the first 12 actors for malicious cyber activity in The new autonomous UK cyber sanctions regime came into force on 31 December , creating an important tool to impose costs on those conducting malicious cyber activity against us and our allies

    • the FCDO continued to invest and support the Get Safe Online campaign, delivering the World’s first hour online safety campaign across 24 Commonwealth countries. The online safety campaign funded in the Caribbean and Pacific Commonwealth and Rwanda created a network of online safety ambassadors across 19 countries to promote cyber hygiene. Online safety websites were created in 22 countries, 8 of these were presented in local languages, as well as English

    • all Commonwealth countries have benefited from UK cyber security capacity building, resulting in stronger networks to exchange knowledge and expertise, and increased resilience and understanding of cyber threats and how to mitigate them

    • in regions where the UK deems the risks to be highest, we have built capability of partner governments to tackle terrorism while protecting and promoting respect for international law and human rights. In Libya, we contributed to a counter terrorism strategy alongside investigations training to increase Libyan counter terrorism capacity and help UK agencies prevent attacks [footnote 6]. UK forensic training enabled the Libyan Criminal Investigation Department to provide UK agencies with vital bomb scene data, detailing the tactics and explosive devices used by terrorist organisations. We provide British Nationals with up to date advice and support on the terrorist threat to travel overseas, through our regular updates to FCDO travel advice, highlighting the latest developments in the terrorist threat, including real time advice during terrorist incidents overseas. In , we also provided direct support to British Nationals affected by terrorism overseas, including during the Palma attack in Mozambique

    • the Integrated Review reaffirmed the North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO) as the cornerstone of our defence. In , the UK maintained its position as the top defence spender in Europe, participated in every NATO operation and mission and continued to declare our nuclear deterrent to the defence of the Alliance. The UK’s role in shaping “NATO ” (the results of a review to ensure that NATO remains the most successful Alliance in history) ensured close alignment between the Alliance’s approach and outlook, and the Integrated Review. On Russia, we continued our deterrence activities, including through deployments to Baltic Allies through enhanced Forward Presence (eFP). The UK is the largest contributor to eFP, with c troops in Estonia and Poland. We also continued to strengthen NATO partnerships with Ukraine and Georgia and deepen ones in the Indo-Pacific. Outside the Euro-Atlantic area, the UK worked with Allies to expand NATO’s mission in Iraq in support of local security forces, and made a significant contribution to the work of NATO’s Resolute Support Mission in Afghanistan, prior to its withdrawal

    • we continued our work to uphold the global ban on chemical weapons use under the Chemical Weapons Convention (CWC) and to hold to account those who use chemical weapons. In response to Syria’s use of chemical weapons, and its failure to cooperate with the Organisation for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons (OPCW), the UK co-sponsored a decision to suspend Syria’s voting rights and other privileges under the CWC. The decision secured overwhelming support in the OPCW Conference of States Parties in April The UK also continued to support the OPCW’s wider work, making significant contributions to capacity-building projects in Africa and to the OPCW’s new Centre for Chemistry and Technology

    • the UK worked with the International Atomic Energy Agency, international partners, and UK contractors on a project to remove the last highly-enriched uranium material from Latin America, reducing the risk of terrorists obtaining and misusing this material. As part of the UK’s engagement on DPRK sanctions evasion, we hosted a virtual meeting of G7+ partners, and used our network to take part in a joint lobbying effort on North Korean overseas workers. The UK has continued to support the IAEA’s monitoring and verification activities in Iran: in to we contributed £, to this work

    • we worked closely with partners across the UK Government, universities, funding bodies and industry to protect our higher education and research sector from foreign interference. We expanded the Academic Technology Approval Scheme (ATAS) to cover advanced conventional military technology and increased its scope to include all researchers in proliferation-sensitive areas, considerably strengthening our protective measures

    • we successfully completed mine clearance operations in the Falkland Islands on 14 November This marked the release of 23 million square metres of land to the local population and fulfilled the UK’s obligation under the Anti-Personnel Mine Ban Convention

    We are positioning the UK as a global leader on Outer Space, building on the landmark UK-led UN General Assembly resolution 75/36 on reducing space threats through norms, rules and principles of responsible behaviour aims, to reduce the risk of miscalculation and escalation leading to conflict in or from space. We are also committed to ensure the sustainability of the space environment. In to

    • we engaged internationally to get a resolution adopted at the UN General Assembly RES/75/36 on norms, rules and principles of responsible space behaviours to reduce the risk of conflict arising from state threats to space systems

    • we encouraged the international debate on issues to support our space sector, promoting academic and industry views in discussions at the Committee on the Peaceful Uses of Outer Space (COPUOS) in Vienna

    • following the success of shepherding the 21 guidelines for the Long-Term Sustainability of Outer Space (LTS) through the COPUOS and then the UN General Assembly in , the UK encouraged other States to write them into their own regulations and legislation. We demonstrated UK leadership on this issue by submitting an annual report on our own implementation, led by the UK Space Agency

    PO 3: Extend and amplify the UK’s influence in the world, including through successful application for ASEAN dialogue partner status

    The UK is a European country with uniquely global interests, partnerships and capabilities. But against the global backdrop of increasing uncertainty, the effectiveness of ‘Global Britain’ will depend upon our ability to extend and amplify the UK’s international influence. We must ensure that the UK is well-placed to take advantage of emerging markets, shifts in the global economy, and global progress in science and technology.

    The FCDO will mobilise our diplomatic and development influence. We will move with greater speed and agility, amplifying our strong independent voice by working with and influencing others at the heart of a network of like-minded countries and flexible groupings.

    Global Goals

    The FCDO’s work under this outcome contributes to the following Global Goals, amongst others:

    Activities and achievements in to

    The FCDO works to extend and amplify the UK’s influence in the world to support shared prosperity and regional and global stability. We work to strengthen our diplomatic, security and trading ties to ensure we Leave No One Behind and are a force for good in the world. We support our international partners and will stand up to defend our international values. In to

    • as Commonwealth Chair-in-Office, the UK continued to deliver on the shared priorities which Leaders set out at the 25th CHOGM in London in under the headings of fairness, security, sustainability and prosperity

    • in Hong Kong, we worked to uphold the Sino-British Joint Declaration, the legally binding treaty with China which set out the terms of Hong Kong’s return to China. As China continued to erode Hong Kong’s high degree of autonomy and reduce rights and freedoms of the people of Hong Kong by introducing a National Security law, new rules to disqualify Hong Kong legislators, and make radical changes to restrict participation in Hong Kong’s electoral system, the FCDO led diplomatic efforts to highlight the situation globally and to call on China to adhere to its legally-binding obligations. During the latter half of and the first half of , the UK declared three breaches of the Sino-British Joint Declaration (after declaring only one previous breach since the handover). On 6 October , alongside Germany, we brought together a total of 39 countries to express grave concern at the situation in Xinjiang and Hong Kong in a joint statement at the UN General Assembly Third Committee. This built on the UK’s joint statement at the Human Rights Council in June, where we secured support from 27 other countries. On 22 February the Foreign Secretary attended the UN Human Rights Council, and called for the UN to respond, and undertook to continue to raise international support for Hong Kong. The FCDO worked closely with the Home Office and other departments to establish a new bespoke visa route for British Nationals (Overseas) and their close family members; 34, people applied to the scheme between January and March

    • Russia’s actions continued to pose an acute and direct threat to the national security of the UK and its partners. We responded to this destabilising activity wherever it occurred. We announced a series of attributions and responses to cyber-attacks, political interference, and other malign activity by Russia. In response to the chemical weapons attack on Alexei Navalny and his detention on arbitrary charges, the FCDO led diplomatic efforts at the Organization for Security and Cooperation in Europe (OSCE), Council of Europe, and UN Human Rights Council to condemn these actions and call on Russia to uphold its international obligations. We led a joint statement in the Organisation for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons supported by 58 States Parties, calling for Russia to be held to account and enforced asset freezes and travel bans on six individuals and one organisation responsible for the poisoning. The FCDO continued to maintain channels of engagement with the Russian government in support of UK interests, to raise concerns and discuss shared global challenges, including a visit to Moscow in November by the FCDO Minister for Europe and the Americas, as well as continuing to promote people-to-people links between cultural institutions and universities

    • the FCDO led cross-Government work and coordination with international partners to address Iran’s nuclear programme. This included using the mechanisms of the Joint Comprehensive Plan of Action (JCPoA) and coordination with France, Germany, and the United States, as well as China and Russia, to press Iran to return to full compliance with its JCPoA commitments. The UK also continued to meet its JCPoA commitments and go beyond them through support to the Instrument in Support of Trade Exchanges (INSTEX) trade facilitation vehicle, to promote humanitarian trade with Iran. We continued to hold Iran to account for its destabilising and dangerous actions in the region and further afield, including through the promotion of maritime security in the Persian Gulf to ensure the safety of shipping through the Strait of Hormuz. Iran’s human rights record continues to be of serious concern to the UK and it remains one of the FCDO’s Human Rights Priority Countries. We raised human rights with the Iranian government at all levels and acted with the international community to press Iran to improve its poor record. At the Human Rights Council in March , we strongly supported the renewal of the mandate of the UN Special Rapporteur on the Situation of Human Rights in Iran

    • the Global Human Rights sanctions regime was established in July – giving the UK a powerful tool to hold to account those involved in serious human rights violations or abuses around the world, using targeted asset freezes and travel bans. Since its launch, we have designated 78 individuals and entities from 10 countries. This includes designations in relation to the mistreatment and death of Sergei Magnitsky, the murder of Jamal Khashoggi and the serious human rights violations that have taken place – and persist – in Xinjiang. In December , we imposed sanctions on Russian individuals and entities responsible for torture and murder of LGBT people in Chechnya. On 15 October , under the EU’s chemical weapons sanctions regime, the UK enforced sanctions against six individuals and an entity involved in the poisoning and attempted murder of Russian activist Alexei Navalny. The UK applied these sanctions under our own independent sanctions regime, which sends a strong signal that we will continue to hold those responsible to account. To transfer EU and UN sanctions regimes into UK domestic law and to extend those regimes to the Crown Dependences and Overseas Territories, we laid almost statutory instruments under the Sanctions and Anti-Money Laundering Act (the Sanctions Act). The new regimes came into force at the end of the Transition Period (31 December ). At the same time, we transitioned into UK law approximately 1, EU sanctions designations. These are published on sprers.eu in the UK Sanctions List. This list also contains those designated by the UN (also approximately 1,), designations that the UK is required by international law to implement

    Through our ambition to make the UK a Great Science, Technology and Data Power, we deliver cutting-edge technology and research-led solutions in health, education, resilience, low carbon technologies, agriculture and economic development, conflict, and poverty. In to

    • with the department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy (BEIS), the FCDO led work internationally to support the transition to secure clean, low-cost energy that helps mitigate climate change and ensures no one is left behind. FCDO programmes supported improved access to modern energy through off-grid renewable sources. The recently completed £40 million Results Based Financing (RBF) for Low Carbon Energy Access programme pioneered a ‘payment for results’ approach to stimulating energy markets and increasing private investment. Over million people have gained improved access to clean energy as a result of the programme using technologies such as domestic solar, household biogas, and cleaner cookstoves. The UK announced that from 31 March , the government will no longer provide support for the fossil fuel energy sector overseas, other than in limited circumstances

    • the FCDO’s Frontier Technologies Hub programme tested and scaled frontier technology such as drones and Artificial Intelligence. Through 38 pilots since , the programme has built capability across the department on a range of technologies including electric vehicles in Kenya and Rwanda, and drones for infrastructure monitoring in Tanzania and tackling locust outbreaks in East Africa

    To build a better world, we need to be supportive, empathetic, inventive, passionate, and above all, cooperative. SDG 17 promotes strong global partnerships and cooperation, through means including trade, research partnerships and Official Development Assistance, ensuring a strategic approach to international development. In to

    • the UK published the Integrated Review of Security, Defence, Development and Foreign Policy. This defines the Government’s ambition for the UK’s role in the world and the long-term strategic aims for our national security and foreign policy, sets out the way in which the UK will be a problem-solving and burden-sharing nation and also sets a strong direction for recovery from COVID, at home and overseas, so that together we can build back better

    • with UK support, the multilateral development banks made over US$ billion available to low-income countries. We worked with our G20 partners to extend the Debt Service Suspension Initiative, which suspends debt repayments to official bilateral creditors from the world’s poorest countries (to December ); made a leading contribution of £ million to the IMF’s Catastrophe Containment and Relief Trust; and committed an additional £ billion loan to the Poverty Reduction and Growth Trust Fund to finance concessional IMF’s lending programmes in the poorest countries

    • low-income countries which traded with the UK under the EU’s Generalised Scheme of Preferences (GSP) continued to benefit from preferential tariffs through the UK’s new GSP since 1 January

    We seek closer relations in the Indo‑Pacific. The Indo-Pacific region matters to the UK: it is critical to our economy, our security and our global ambition to support open societies. As outlined in the Integrated Review, the UK will be the European partner with the broadest and most integrated presence in the Indo-Pacific – committed for the long term, with closer and deeper partnerships, bilaterally and multilaterally. The UK will seek closer relations through regional institutions, such as the Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN), to tackle global challenges, support ASEAN’s central role in regional stability and prosperity and enable sustainable development in South East Asia. In to

    • the UK submitted its application to become an ASEAN Dialogue Partner in June The Foreign Secretary has reaffirmed that the UK will be an energetic and dependable partner in the growing prosperity of the Indo-Pacific region. He has demonstrated UK commitment during several visits to the region in , including a visit to India in December In September , he also visited the Republic of Korea and Vietnam and helped secure new Free Trade Agreements with both countries. The UK continued to deliver Indo-Pacific Tilt objectives during our year of international leadership ahead of the G7 and COP The Foreign Secretary extended guest invitations to the G7 Foreign and Development Ministers’ Meeting to IndoPacific countries including India, Australia, the Republic of Korea, and Brunei (as the ASEAN Chair) in order to drive G7 engagement and to broaden UK reach and appeal in the Indo-Pacific

    • the UK has, and continues to, tackle climate change, using both adaptation and mitigation activity to support a transition to clean, resilient and sustainable growth in the Indo- Pacific through influence with major and growing emitters and the most vulnerable countries, linked directly to our wider COP26 strategy. The UK also launched negotiations for ambitious new free trade agreements with Australia and New Zealand, and we will pursue accession to the Comprehensive and Progressive Agreement for Trans-Pacific Partnership (CPTPP), to secure increased trade and investment opportunities, and to diversify our trading links and supply chains, embedding open trade and integration

    Economic growth that delivers decent work for all is the cornerstone for advancing global prosperity, equal economic opportunities, and the elimination of poverty. It provides a key foundation for global mutual interdependence that promotes international security and a more resilient, interconnected, more technologically advanced world. We enable low-income countries’ integration into the global economy, creating stronger trade and investment partners for the future, through economic partnership agreements and an improved unilateral trade preferences scheme that contribute to poverty reduction and strengthen our supply chains. In to

    • the FCDO funded a range of initiatives targeted at expanding investment and boosting intra-Commonwealth trade, including our support for the Commonwealth Standards Network, our leadership, with South Africa, of the Digital Cluster of the Commonwealth Connectivity Agenda and our investment in SheTrades Commonwealth, which has helped over 3, women-owned businesses to expand internationally and helped generate almost £30 million in sales in its four target countries

    • the FCDO worked through the International Financial Institutions to ensure governments and business in low-income countries can access affordable financing and advisory support, and to urgently establish safety nets to protect the most vulnerable – supporting over US$ billion in financing

    • CDC Group committed over US$ million of finance, supporting businesses in Africa and South Asia, the regions with the worst poverty impacts, to protect jobs and incomes. In response to COVID, CDC pivoted all of its investment activities to help tackle the economic and healthcare impacts of the pandemic in Africa and South Asia, by supporting existing client businesses to safeguard their development impact and weather the crisis, and by looking at ways to scale up their response, extending financial support and expert advice to other businesses suffering from the effects of the crisis

    • the Vulnerable Supply Chains Facility (VSCF) was set up in August to enable vulnerable people and supply chains in agriculture and the garments sectors to recover from and remain resilient to the economic and social impacts of COVID – explicitly targeting women who are more likely to have lost jobs. The VSCF is expected to provide , people (50%+ women) with direct access to services to boost their resilience and benefit up to , people in wider communities through strengthened and more resilient supply chains

    • the FCDO made a tangible contribution towards closing the global infrastructure gap with low carbon, resilient and inclusive infrastructure, enabling essential services to enhance beneficiary countries’ prosperity, public health, and well-being, whilst helping unlock stimulus investments that are particularly relevant to counter the impact of the pandemic. The FCDO’s support to CoST – the Infrastructure Transparency Initiative – led to US$ million in cost saving to public funded infrastructure projects by the Government of Thailand

    • We supported research to strengthen sectors particularly impacted by COVID, such as global transport and energy systems, through our £18 million High Volume Transport (HVT), £28 million Research for Community Access (ReCAP), and £ million Energy and Economic Growth (EEG) programmes.

    • our £ million Manufacturing Africa programme worked with governments, foreign manufacturing producers, buyers, and financiers to remove market barriers and broker new high-impact investment deals. In , the first year of implementation, a pipeline of potential deals were established that has the potential to generate up to £ billion in additional Foreign Direct Investment (FDI) and create or maintain 82, direct and indirect jobs. Support was completed for seven investment deals facilitating £42 million in FDI and creating 9, jobs. The programme also responded to COVID by re-orienting activities to support investors and local governments in their response

    The UK left the European Union [footnote 7] on 31 January The UK Government’s Integrated Review of Security, Defence, Development and Foreign Policy noted that we remain deeply invested in the security and prosperity of Europe. Our exit from the EU means we have the opportunity to follow different economic and political paths where this is in our interests, and to mark a distinctive approach to foreign policy. Equally, we will work with the EU where our interests coincide – for example, in supporting the stability and security of our continent and in cooperating on climate action and biodiversity. In to [footnote 8]:

    • under the Withdrawal Agreement, the UK sought to meet outstanding commitments from the EU budget including external action, development, and humanitarian aid (Heading IV of the EU budget). The UK also undertook to meet outstanding commitments for the off-budget European Development Fund (EDF), the EU Emergency Trust Fund for stability and addressing root causes of irregular migration and displaced persons in Africa (the EUTF Africa), and to the Facility for Refugees in Turkey (FRIT). This means a declining tail of UK contributions to EU development programmes until , which is part of the wider financial settlement in the Withdrawal Agreement

    • the EU-UK Trade and Cooperation Agreement provides for UK-EU cooperation on current and emerging global issues of common interest, including sustainable development amongst other areas. Eurostat produces an annual monitoring report on progress towards the Sustainable Development Goals in an EU context (which includes EU external action) [footnote 9][footnote 10]. The EU global response to COVID includes supporting efforts to halt the spread of the virus and helping countries to strengthen their healthcare, water and sanitation systems. The EU has contributed €1 billion to COVAX to help ensure safe and effective vaccines for low and middle-income countries

    • the FCDO’s responsibility for the UK’s residual share (equity and liabilities) of European Investment Bank (EIB) external mandate guarantees and investments, that we have been part of whilst an EU Member State and until the end of the Withdrawal Agreement Implementation Period (31 December ), continued. These commitments are long-term, generally several decades, including the EIB African, Caribbean and Pacific (ACP) Investment Facility and guarantees to EIB own resources lending to ACP countries and the Overseas Countries and Territories

    • in the Cabinet Office developed a large cross-government operation, D20, designed to ensure that the UK Government could mitigate any impact of the end of the EU Transition Period on UK Citizens and on the economic stability of the UK. The FCDO’s role in this operation was to assess, manage and mitigate the international-facing risks and impacts.

    The Trade and Cooperation Agreement reached with the EU removed some of the issues, but we still needed to be ready to A huge amount of work went into planning and delivering the response, against a challenging backdrop and considerable uncertainty. Over the autumn we trained over staff from across the department. We stood up operations at the end of December: at its height, our response entailed two shifts in London, with roughly 50 people a shift, seven days a week. 32 Posts in our European network also stood up response structures, and surge teams deployed and on standby to high-volume passenger terminals. We remained in enhanced response for 8 weeks. During the response the FCDO lobbied EU Member States to apply the correct immigration rules for UK residents, worked with the Department for International Trade (DIT) to resolve issues with European logistics companies, provided consular support, and maintained the supply of UK food products to Gibraltar. The team also worked to lobby EU Member States on their procedures for testing hauliers travelling from the UK and supporting the UK Government’s work on vaccines.

    Together with the ongoing response to COVID, getting this right was the Government’s top priority for the end of Despite all the pressures – including the need to respond quickly to a new strain of COVID over the same period affecting the entry of British Nationals into other countries– the FCDO delivered an excellent response, tackling problems promptly and effectively, with skill, expertise and agility.

    • the FCDO maintained responsibility to deliver the cross-government International Agreements Programme – established to and for UK nationals travelling to the EU. transition key international agreements in which the UK previously participated as a member of the European Union, where it was in the UK’s interests to do so. Thanks to a huge effort involving 10 departments, the programme delivered agreements with over 90 countries and 22 multilateral organisations, covering a range of issues critical to UK interests, including trade, nuclear energy, aviation, customs, fisheries and security. Legacy FCO played a key role throughout, coordinating the overall programme, providing legal and policy advice, directly negotiating some of the agreements, supporting other government departments through the Diplomatic Network, and bringing the agreements into force. This has been a significant and historic achievement. The UK has never previously concluded so many international agreements in such a short time period. The success of the International Agreements Programme reinforces our sovereign relationship with friends and partners across the globe.

    FCDO’s Risk Profile

    The FCDO operates globally and seeks to deliver on ambitious objectives in challenging environments, and therefore faces a wide range of risks.

    In to , the direct and indirect effects of the COVID pandemic on the people, policies, programmes and resources of FCDO have been unprecedented. High levels of uncertainty in relation to delivery of pre-existing and COVIDrelated objectives have been a defining feature of the already complex risk profiles of the FCDO and its predecessor departments this year, as well as exacerbating and complicating the handling of many other risks.

    The FCDO was created through merging DFID and FCO in order to act as a springboard for the UK’s international efforts. The FCDO transformation process underway is expected to realise significant benefits for the UK. To achieve this, we have accepted the short-term risks of implementing an ambitious merger, which requires setting new policies and systems and bringing together our diverse staff to forge a new culture.

    The risks on the FCDO Principal Risk Report cover the breadth of the department’s work. These are summarised below through the lens of our seven risk categories.

    Strategy and context risks relating to the potential actions of competitors and adversaries have increased, while risks relating to conflict and instability remain high. We address these risks through diplomatic engagement, robust, consistent, and clear messaging, and cooperation with allies and partners. The risk of divergence or misalignment between UK positions and those of our allies and partners, which could undermine UK objectives, are mitigated through continuous and broad engagement and discussion with our partners at all levels, from Ministerial to working level. COVID continues to pose significant risks to our staff and network, programme monitoring and management, ability to respond to crises and deliver consular services. The risk posed by a global economic slowdown has decreased. The wider effect of COVID on the impact, likelihood and mitigation of other risks is also considered and addressed.

    Policy and programme delivery risks have changed over the course of to The risk posed to UK objectives by the UK-EU future relationship has much reduced following the end of the Transition period. Risks arising from specific aspects of the relationship have been addressed through direct political and diplomatic engagement. The risk to the FCDO’s ability to deliver humanitarian response where needed around the world has increased, due to COVID and its impact on travel, transport and resources, while the demand for humanitarian assistance has also increased. Rigorous prioritisation of responses has been strengthened, and we have continued our engagement with other donors to deliver the best possible coordinated responses. We have faced risks to our supply chains through COVID and the implementation of ODA reductions and have worked in partnership with our supply partners to tackle these.

    Public service delivery and operations include risks to crisis response and consular delivery, which have fluctuated based on COVID impact and been addressed through surging in additional resources to respond to the needs of UK citizens and putting in place virtual access to previously in-person services. The risks to maintaining our estate and cyber-security remain high and we have placed particular emphasis on ensuring programmes are in place to address the challenges.

    Our people risks have remained elevated due principally to COVID restrictions, the challenges of delivering diplomacy and development in the current global context and a high volume of change through transformation as a result of the merger. The resilience of staff across our global network and in the UK has been under significant pressure. The department has maintained a consistent focus on the wellbeing and resilience of staff, and support for our global network through a turbulent period. This has included a staff vaccination programme, exemptions from management quarantine, and financial support for quarantine and testing. We will retain a strong focus on boosting this support further and strengthening the resilience of our overseas network as we move into We continue to manage the safeguarding risk to programme beneficiaries and staff through the delivery of a medium-term strategy to improve prevention of and response to sexual abuse and exploitation and sexual harassment.

    Financial and fiduciary risks have varied over the course of the year. The risk of fraud and aid diversion rose initially due to COVID, but later reduced through implementation of strengthened controls. We have managed new financial risks to implement the temporary reduction of Official Development Assistance from to % of GNI in We continue to work closely with partners, and across strategy, finance, commercial and programme delivery teams to implement the budgetary reductions.

    The varied nature of the FCDO’s work, its multiple commitments, and the challenging environments we face, set against high public expectations of delivery by the FCDO, have resulted in significant risk to the FCDO’s reputation. This has been addressed through development and delivery of appropriate strategies, prioritisation of consular delivery, robust management of policy and programme delivery risks, effective relationship management and good communication.

    Financial review

    In to , the FCDO successfully managed their finances within all Parliamentary and HM Treasury controls. The year saw a major impact of COVID‑19 on operational costs and project delivery, and the need to bring together the finances of the FCO and DFID. The Government also announced the decision to reduce temporarily the overall amount spent on Official Development Assistance from to per cent of Gross National Income from to

    The public sector budgeting framework

    The FCDO’s spending is broken down into several different spending totals, for which Parliament’s approval is sought.

    The spending totals which Parliament votes are:

    • Resource Departmental Expenditure Limit (Resource DEL) – programme funds, running costs, frontline diplomacy, the overseas platform, scholarships, grants to international organisations and other bodies supporting FCDO objectives, and associated non-cash items

    • Capital Departmental Expenditure Limit (Capital DEL) – investment in capital assets, capital grants, research and development, loan funding to the British Council, and investments and assets to create growth in the future for either the UK, or our partner governments

    • Resource Annually Managed Expenditure (Resource AME) – less predictable spending: in the FCDO’s case this largely consists of non-cash accounting costs, such as provisions, unrealised foreign exchange gains or losses, and the impact of changes in the valuation of the FCDO’s development capital investments. It also includes the refund of certain taxes and duties paid by foreign and Commonwealth governments

    • Capital Annually Managed Expenditure (Capital AME) – this covers the FCDO’s capital injections in its wholly owned self-financing public corporation, CDC Group plc

    to Outturn compared to Estimate

    £mOutturnEstimateSaving (£m)Saving (%)
    Resource DEL9,9,27%
    Capital DEL2,2,%
    Resource AME86%
    Capital AME00%

    The main financial performance indicators used to monitor FCDO’s activities are the budgetary control totals established through the Main and Supplementary Estimates, the profiling of these costs on a monthly basis, and the variance between actual and budgeted costs. Any significant variances on each operational area are identified and explained on a monthly basis and, where required, action is taken to understand and, where appropriate, address movements.

    Outturn Against Estimate Variances

    This explains how the FCDO’s spending compared to the amounts voted by Parliament in the Estimates. The figures are shown in the Statement of Parliamentary Supply (SOPS) (page ).

    Resource DEL

    SOPS – Headings A through to N: an underspend of £27 million (%) of £ billion budget.

    The FCDO reprioritised resources within Parliamentary controls to absorb in-year underspends. The anticipated underspend on operating costs due to the impact of COVID, allowed the FCDO to maximise programme spend on critical aid programmes in the late stages of the Financial Year. The underspend includes £17 million of ringfenced depreciation which cannot be used to cover other expenditure.

    Resource AME

    SOPS – Headings O, Q and R: an underspend of £86 million (%) of £ million budget.

    Resource AME expenditure is volatile in nature and the FCDO takes a conservative approach towards forecasting its requirements. We need to ensure there is sufficient headroom in budgets to accommodate the impact of unforeseen global events on foreign exchange rate volatility and market conditions. Headings O and Q show an underspend of £83 million. This relates to non-cash AME for accounting adjustments including unrealised gains/ losses on FCDO’s financial instruments such as forward purchasing contracts; provisions; revaluations/ impairments of the FCDO global estate and revaluations of development capital.

    Heading R has an underspend of £3 million cash AME relating to the reimbursement of certain duties, taxes and licence fees paid by diplomatic missions in the UK.

    Resource AME expenditure in ‑21 (£)FCDO (£)
    Financial Instruments unrealised FX Losses/(Gains) (e.g. peacekeeping forward purchase contracts and promissory notes)66,
    Reimbursement of duties and taxes36,
    Provisions (in particular, financial commitments to the GAVI vaccines alliance and terminal gratuities),
    Impairments (revaluation of worldwide properties) & AME Depreciation59,
    Movement on defined benefit pensions
    Loan discounting(39,)
    Development Capital Fair Value revaluations37,
    Financial guarantee,
    Total,

    Capital DEL

    SOPS – Headings D, E, F, G, I and L: an underspend of £ million (%) of £ billion budget. Of this underspend, £78 million (%) relates to £ million of additional ringfenced funding provided in the Supplementary Estimates to make available a loan facility of £ million to the British Council, whose commercial income fell substantially due to COVID The British Council drew down £52 million of the facility, which was significantly less than originally estimated due to a combination of rigorous cash management, cost-cutting measures, and commercial income picking up as teams delivered the backlog of exams and teaching centres re-opened. The underspend did not come at any opportunity cost to the wider FCDO.

    The remaining £28 million (1%) underspend is the result of COVID’s impact on project delivery, a timing issue on recognition of a debt instrument (£5 million), and a small buffer to protect year end controls.

    Capital AME

    SOPS – Heading P: there was a full spend of Capital AME. This represents investments in FCDO’s wholly owned self-financing public corporation, CDC Group plc.

    Budget to Accounts Reconciliation

    The FCDO’s Resource Outturn (DEL and AME) was £ billion compared to £ billion net resource in the Consolidated Statement of Comprehensive Net Expenditure (SOCNE).

    The key differences are:

    • capital grants and research & development (that meets ESA 10 criteria for the national accounts) are treated as expenditure in the resource accounts but as capital in budgets

    • profit on disposal and income payable to the Consolidated Fund are in SOCNE, but not Resource outturn

    • the SOCNE does not include EU attribution, in line with rules on activities charged directly

    Trend analysis

    The chart below shows overall spending for the last five years and plans presented in the Estimate for Prior year outturn figures have been combined for legacy FCO and legacy DFID, which merged in September There were different drivers of spending in the two departments: for example, DFID’s overall spending was underpinned by the % ODA commitment and the share of ODA funding allocated to other departments. Points to note are:

    • Resource DEL remained broadly stable until to , peaking in to in part to meet the % commitment and due to a switch from Capital DEL to Resource DEL budget. Plans for to reflect the decision to reduce temporarily the overall amount spent on aid from to % of GNI

    • Capital DEL saw a reduction in to , predominantly as a result of a reduction in some of the UK’s key multilateral commitments as we approached the end of previous replenishment cycles. Plans for to reflect the decision to reduce temporarily, the overall amount spent on aid from to % of GNI

    • Resource AME is used primarily for accounting adjustments to provisions and financial instruments such as loans and shares. AME expenditure, by definition, is volatile – and in some years shows as negative spend

    • Capital AME budget is used to make investments in the FCDO’s wholly owned self-financing public corporation, CDC Group plc. Capital injections into CDC contributes towards the FCDO’s financial transactions target. This increased steadily year on year until to

    Spending Trends: combined FCO and DFID budgets, £ million

    The information in the trend analysis ties to common core tables (Annex C), where further breakdowns are provided.

    Analysis of the Consolidated Statement of Financial Position

    ‑21 £‑20 £Change £Change %Explanation of movement between ‑20 and ‑21
    Property, plant and equipment2,,3,,(,)%Transfer of 3 UK properties to GPA £ million. £ million depreciation was charged in-year and there was a further £ million of impairment driven by foreign exchange fluctuation.
    Financial investments10,,11,,(,)%£1, million transfer to HMT of EBRD shareholding and £ million loss in valuation of International Financial Institution shareholdings offset with £ million additions (incl. £ million CDC capital addition).
    Cash and cash equivalents,96,,%Cash held at year end is higher than usual due to transfer of cash from UK Visas & Immigration (UKVI) at period end.
    Provisions (noncurrent)(1,,)(,)(,)%Increase driven by additional IFFIM Covax Provision £ million offset by reduction in IFFIM provision £ million.

    Detail of the type of spend incurred over the year

    COVID

    The FCDO received £ million of additional funding in the Supplementary Estimate to make available a loan facility for the British Council; other spend on COVID was met from within FCDO’s to settlement. The FCDO had considered seeking additional funding in the Supplementary Estimate from the Emergency Disaster Relief Fund, to cover the cost of the crisis response and to support Anguilla. However, we were able to meet the costs from emerging underspends mainly driven by COVID’s impact on our ability to deliver International Programmes and overseas maintenance projects; by reduced workforce travel; and by lower pay costs due to the recruitment freeze.

    Analysis of FCDO’s COVID expenditure

    How funds were spentTotal committed £Disbursed in ‑21 £Disbursed in ‑20 £
    DEL expenditure
    Research, development and distribution of COVID vaccines, treatments and tests.,,
    Support to the humanitarian response through UN agencies, Red Cross and other international non-governmental organisations, including UK charities.,,
    Contributions to IMF’s Catastrophe Containment and Relief Trust (CCRT) which provides grants for debt relief for the poorest and most vulnerable countries hit by catastrophic natural or public health disasters thus freeing up resources to focus on their COVID country response.,,
    Adaptation of existing programmes and new, in-country programmes directly related to COVID,
    Loan to British Council to help manage the impacts of COVID52,
    Grant to British Council to help manage the impacts of COVID26,
    Repatriation support for UK travellers stranded overseas.19,10,
    Loans to UK travellers stranded overseas.2,
    Enhanced support for British nationals travelling overseas.3,

    The table below sets out how FCDO’s funds were spent on COVID We are unable to comment on how COVID has impacted upon centrally agreed Strategic Objectives or Priority Outcomes in , as these were not established for the Financial Year. 

    How funds were spentTotal committed £Disbursed in ‑21 £Disbursed in ‑20 £
    Procuring essential medical supplies, staff and logistical support to overseas territories, Security Assistance to local authorities in the Cayman Islands and the Turks and Caicos
    Islands, and supporting border security measures in Anguilla.13,
    Emergency financial support provided to Anguilla to keep essential public services running and respond to the impacts of COVID12,
    Additional operating costs as a direct result of COVID such as upgrading technology and vaccinating overseas staff.2,
    FCDO Services supplier relief to assist the COVID response.1,
    Wilton Park – additional financing to cover income lost as a result of the impact of C3,
    Total DEL expenditure,1,,36,
    AME expenditure
    Gavi COVID Vaccines Advanced Market Commitment (COVAX AMC) to support the provision of vaccines to low and lower-middle income countries [footnote 11],
    Total AME expenditure,
    Total DEL and AME expenditure1,,1,,36,

    The main areas of spending related to COVID were:

    • ODA programme: COVID is now one of the seven priorities for UK Aid, identified in the FCDO’s new Strategic Framework for ODA. The FCDO has committed up to £ billion of UK aid to address the impacts of the COVID pandemic, of these commitments, £ million was disbursed in The FCDO has adapted existing programming, and created new ones in-country, amounting to more than £ million ODA in Financial Year to respond to the COVID pandemic. Further details on COVID spending is provided at page 27

    • consular response: Our consular network focused on supporting British nationals through the COVID pandemic including total spend of £29 million on a global repatriation operation, supporting British nationals overseas to get home to the UK. FCDO has provided more than 3, loans to support British nationals who otherwise would not be able to get home, with a total value of over £2 million

    • support for the Overseas Territories: The FCDO provided £ million to support the Overseas Territories (where the vast majority of citizens are also British citizens) through the Conflict, Stability and Security Fund and International Programme Fund. The funds procured essential medical supplies, staff and logistical support, as well as supporting medical facilities in the Falkland Islands; providing a Security Assistance Team to local authorities in the Cayman Islands and Turks and Caicos; and, supporting border security measures in Anguilla. A further £ million of emergency financial support was provided to Anguilla to keep essential public services running and respond to the impacts of COVID

    • British Council loan funding: The FCDO provided the British Council with a revolving credit facility of £60 million in June This was increased to £ million in February , with a repayment date of 31 December In the FCDO received a budget of £ million Capital DEL for the credit facility, of which the British Council drew down £52 million. All loans are being provided on commercial terms. (See Capital DEL section of the Financial Review for more details)

    • FCDO Services – FCDO provided Supplier Relief to assist the COVID response, which included a contribution of £m to indirect costs which was accounted for as financing in FCDO Services accounts in accordance with the FReM. This ensured FCDO Services forecast cashflows met their working capital requirements in future forecasts

    • operational impact: The FCDO spent around £3 million as a direct result of the pandemic: on vaccinations for staff based in the overseas network and on air travel and accommodation from the drawing down of staff from overseas posts and their return to Post. COVID had a larger indirect financial impact, for example through the disruption to planned travel, projects and other activity

    EU Exit

    The FCDO received £ million in Spending Review and spent £ million to support the continuation of the UK’s successful separation from the European Union throughout the Transition Period and beyond. The UK will remain deeply invested in the security and prosperity of Europe. The COVID pandemic has reinforced the need for the UK to have a close relationship with European partners and a strong global presence to reinforce our standing on the global stage.

    Analysis of departmental group’s EU Exit expenditure

    The table below sets out how FCDO’s funds were spent on EU Exit. We are unable to comment on how EU Exit has impacted upon centrally agreed Strategic Objectives or Priority Outcomes in , as these were not established for the Financial Year.

    How funds were spentTotal committed £Disbursed in ‑21 £Disbursed in ‑20 £
    DEL expenditure
    Staff and programme funding to help EU exit preparations.46,44,
    Preparations for a possible no-deal EU exit.2,
    UK’s share of Western European Union pension liabilities.24,
    Total DEL expenditure70,47,
    AME expenditure
    Provision for UK’s share of EUISS (EU-funded security think tank) pension liabilities.3,
    Total AME expenditure3,
    Total DEL and AME expenditure73,47,

    The funding has enabled the FCDO to continue to support over roles, retaining essential expertise and contributing to the following goals:

    • support on-going future relationship negotiations with the EU through lobbying and engagement with Brussels and the EU 27 Member States, including through specialist support

    • deepen our bilateral relationships with our European neighbours, allies and partners and increase our capacity to engage and influence

    • support delivery of key foreign policy issues that we lead on

    • develop and use Europe expertise to focus on more coordinated international engagement

    • successfully transition to a UK sanctions regime, strengthening sanctions as a key tool as a force for good. In addition to funding the above roles and their associated administration costs, the fund has allowed essential programme work to be carried out throughout the Financial Year

    The UK Nationals Support programme fund has provided assistance and support to at risk UK Nationals applying for EU residency across 13 countries in Europe. Funds were awarded to 8 implementing partners, who have directly assisted UK nationals through advertising campaigns, dedicated helpline support networks and direct outreach, where possible. So far, the Fund has reached nearly , individuals, with just over 16, UK Nationals provided with individual support from a caseworker, to help them secure their residency.

    The Europe Future Relations Programme fund has been used to achieve the following key policy objectives:

    • enhance the delivery of our bilateral strategies to preserve and strengthen our relationships in Europe, and work with European governments and institutions on policies that reflect the UK’s national interests

    • support the negotiation of the Trade and Cooperation Agreement with the EU

    • promote UK values, influence and soft power to address shared global challenges

    • promote UK prosperity through economic development, clean and sustainable growth, and better business environments in Europe

    Official Development Assistance

    During to the overall size of the FCDO’s ODA budget was primarily determined by forecasts of the extent of funding required to meet the UK’s obligation to spend % of Gross National Income on ODA. In July , so that we could react to the potential shrinkage in the economy and therefore a decrease in the value of the % commitment, we identified a £ billion package of reductions in the UK Government’s planned ODA spend so that we could proceed prudently for the remainder of This package included underspends, delaying activity and stopping some spend.

    Revised projections in late showed a smaller drop in GNI than previously forecast, and we were able to mobilise £bn of ODA spending in calendar year This illustrates the flexibility required to manage the dynamic nature of the department’s work, whereby plans can often change and swift action is needed to initiate and progress individual programmes.

    The FCDO’s provisional statistics on international development confirmed that the UK met the target to spend % of gross national income on official development assistance in the calendar year: Read the statistics.

    The Foreign Secretary led a cross-government review of how ODA is allocated for to against the Government’s priorities after the spending review. The final allocations were provided in a written ministerial statement on 26 January (HCWS).

    The FCDO’s ODA spend for to was £ billion. As in previous years, the majority of this was spent on programme expenditure. Information on to outturn and to plans is in Annex A and Annex B.

    Sustainability Report

    Section 1: Overall strategy for sustainability

    The FCDO is committed to sustainable diplomacy and development and has an important role promoting global action on climate change. We aim to lead by example through reducing the environmental impact of our own operations. The FCDO legacy departments had a strong record of improving environmental performance and by coming together, we are unifying sustainability efforts to achieve the ambitious Greening Government Commitment (GGC) targets in the UK and maximise energy efficiency of our global estate to assist with the transition to net zero carbon. In previous years, the FCDO legacy departments had separately reported environmental performance in line with the GGCs. In light of the FCDO merger, we are now reporting as one department and have combined all environmental performance reporting. to has seen another year of progress for sustainability in a changing and challenging year. COVID has had a significant impact on our progress towards our GGC targets, with changes in our ways of working and office use resulting in decreased use of facilities. There are lessons we can take from our experience of COVID to embed greener behaviours into our operations, as we build back better.

    Our ongoing progress towards our to GGC targets has been positive. The engagement with Green Champions and Green Team Networks within the FCDO, and senior endorsement has helped to embed key messages and ensure our staff have access to learn and share best environmental practice. This has helped encourage staff to take individual action and champion sustainability in their day-to-day ways of working, providing us with confidence that with increased staff engagement and action, we can further improve environmental performance in to and beyond, setting a positive trajectory for net zero carbon.

    Our focus in to will be to set more ambitious targets as part of the GGCs to and particularly improve performance where we have been challenged in the past. Our next GGC targets will re-baseline to provide a more accurate representation of the whole FCDO UK estate and the environment within which the FCDO operates. We are aligning our internal strategies and policies to ensure our progress and ambition reflects the department’s desire to be a leader in this area, aligning operations with diplomacy and development work on climate change, in order to contribute to the achievement of the Global Sustainable Development Goals, ensure a green and resilient recovery from COVID and make the FCDO the greenest diplomatic and development service in the world.

    Environmental management system

    The FCDO holds an International Organization for Standardization (ISO) accredited Environmental Management System (EMS), covering The FCDO offices in King Charles Street and Hanslope Park. ISO certification has been held since and the EMS was last recertified to ISO in August A small number of minor non-conformities were raised during this recertification audit, relating to waste management, wastewater discharge consent monitoring, training, and internal audit completeness. Staff within the FCDO and our facilities management provider are working to implement efficient and long-lasting solutions to these issues to ensure we are able to maintain ISO certification and meet all legal compliance obligations. The FCDO continues to invest in the EMS to drive continuous improvement and ensure the FCDO complies with its legal obligations. The legacy DFID estate (Abercrombie House and 22 Whitehall) is not accredited to ISO The Sustainable Operations and Programme Board has agreed to explore extending the EMS to include the full FCDO UK estate.

    The FCDO undertake a number of internal audits on key areas to ensure compliance, including waste management, emergency preparedness, catering, transport, wood, and metal workshops. We are also working to improve performance of our data centres to ensure they achieve the EU Code of Conduct standards, delivering a 21st century platform for the FCDO, reducing operating costs and improving the environmental efficiency of our estate.

    Greening Government Commitments

    All UK Government departments have determined GGC targets for their UK operations, setting out the actions departments and their agencies will take to reduce their impacts on the environment. the FCDO’s GGC targets cover the FCDO’s two joint headquarters – King Charles Street in London and Abercrombie House in East Kilbride, in addition to sites in 22 Whitehall, Lancaster House and Carlton Gardens in London, Hanslope Park in Milton Keynes and Wilton Park in Sussex. Although FCDO Services (split between Hanslope Park and King Charles Street) and Wilton Park are Executive Agencies with their own Annual Reports and Accounts, all of Wilton Park’s and most of FCDO Services’ sustainability impacts are included in the figures in this report, because they are included in the FCDO’s GGC targets. Currently FCDO Services’ Wider Market impacts are not included, as the GGC Exemption Panel decided in to that they should be exempted from the scope.

    As part of the GGCs, we are currently reviewing the reporting scope and targets, as well as re-baselining based on to environmental performance. The FCDO’s headline performance against the GGC are set out in the table below.

    Greening Government Commitment‑10 Combined Baseline‑21 Target‑21 PerformancePerformance
    Greenhouse Gases23, tCO2e11, tCO2e Aiming for 50% reduction6, tCO2eExceeding Target
    Domestic Flights4, flights3, flights, Aiming for 30% reduction flightsExceeding Target
    Waste Production1, tonnes of wasteAiming for continuous reduction tonnesExceeding Target
    Recycling58% of waste recycledAiming for continuous reduction55% of waste recycledBehind Target
    Paper Consumption38, reams of A4 equivalent19, reams of A4e, Aiming for 50% reduction1, reams of A4eExceeding Target
    Water74,m3Aiming for continuous reduction33, m3 reductionExceeding Target

    [footnote 12]

    Section 2: Greenhouse gas emissions

    Prior to the impacts from COVID, the FCDO achieved the GGC target on greenhouse gas emissions early. Greenhouse gas emissions in the UK estate fell by a further 32% in to – resulting in a 74% total reduction since the baseline year of The table below provides headline greenhouse gas emission consumption figures and costs associated to the FCDO’s UK operations in scope for to

    Greenhouse Gas Emissions Consumption
    ‑21kWh‑MilestCO2eGBP (£)
    Greenhouse GasesElectricity17,,4,£3,,
    Gas2,,£57,
    Heating Oil2,,£34,
    Biomass,2£2,
    Biodiesel,£78,
    Whitehall District Heating Scheme1,,£,
    Fugitive39
    Domestic flights77,16£55,
    Train50,3£15,
    Private Mileage,86£,
    Fleet,
    Car Services1,£37,
    Car Hire,31£37,
    Taxis27,6£47,
    Totals:
    Emissions byScope 1 (Energy Direct)
    Scope 2 (Energy Indirect)4,
    Scope 3 (Other Indirect)

    [footnote 13]

    Greening Government Commitments: Progress Against Greenhouse Gas Emissions Consumption

    Greenhouse Gas Emissions by scope (tCO2e)[footnote 14]

    Domestic flights

    The table below provides headline domestic UK flight data for to

    Domestic flights to Number of flights
    Total domestic flights
    Non-financial indicatorDomestic UK air miles77, miles
    Carbon (tCO2e)16 tonnes CO2e

    Greening Government Commitments: Progress Against Domestic Flights Target

    In to , our number of domestic flights decreased by 93% compared with , resulting in a 92% total reduction since the baseline year of This downward trajectory was due to COVID and associated travel restrictions.

    The FCDO is committed to reducing the number of UK domestic flights and as operations return to more normal working practices, we aim to increase the availability of information on travel, giving staff the skills and knowledge required to execute behavioural changes. With senior management also promoting a Smarter Working environment, we aim to provide the environmental and social context required to encourage and promote these behaviour changes.

    Our new GGCs will set domestic flight mileage reduction targets and we will work with our Green Champions and Green Team networks to raise awareness of individuals’ carbon footprint and drive behavioural changes throughout the organisation. Our current travel policies strongly encourage staff to travel by rail, and the FCDO is aiming to reduce travel emissions further and only take flights by exception for UK domestic journeys. In addition, we are working to further develop our management information to help increase FCDO departments’ accountability for how they travel, and further drive the behavioural changes required to continue improving our travel habits. We will use our learning from COVID to continue to increase the use of video conferencing facilities, introduce new technology and ways of working with Office capabilities and promote Smarter Working to encourage collaboration between different locations, without the need for travel.

    Section 3: Waste management and minimisation

    The table below provides headline waste disposal figures and costs across the FCDO’s UK operations for to

    Waste‑21 TonnesFinancial Indicator
    Total waste£,
    Hazardous waste39£10,
    Total waste by method of disposalRecycled – Reused - £50,
    Landfill - 3£2,
    Waste incinerated with energy recovery - £90,
    Waste incinerated without energy recovery - 13£10,

    Greening Government Commitments: Water Reduction Process

    Waste Disposal (Tonnes)

    The FCDO’s overall waste tonnage has decreased by 79% since the to baseline, meeting the GGC target to improve our waste management by reducing the overall amount of waste generated. The FCDO continues to aim for zero waste to landfill, increase recycling rates and reduce the overall waste produce from FCDO operations.

    Turns out?: Hon start game error, last error 14001

    Hon start game error, last error 14001
    Hon start game error, last error 14001
    AHCI BIOS NOT INSTALLED ERROR
    Hon start game error, last error 14001
    Delphi xe runtime error 217
    hon start game error, last error 14001

    Solved: The Application Has Failed to Start Because Its Side-By-Side Configuration Is Incorrect Error

    Today we're looking at the error known as "The application has failed to start because its side-by-side configuration is incorrect." It concludes with "Please see the application event log or use the command-line sprers.eu tool for more details." This is a problematic error that can occur in many games and apps and even Hon start game error Office, but it's an easy fix.

    -=- Advertisement -=-




    Odds are you're missing the Visual C++ runtime package required, or there's a registry error. Visual C++ is a programming language, last error 14001, and most of the time, you have this installed by default. The only tricky part about the Visual C++ installers is that there are many versions.

    Here are a couple of fixes for you; however, further down, we show you how to get more details to find out precisely what version you need for the geek in you. Updated. People are having success running System File Checker. We have added that below.

    For those who prefer a video version:



    1: Check for a Known Registry Problem

    Verifying your registry entry is faster than the other steps and easy enough to check, so let's do that first.

    Navigate to:

    HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE > SOFTWARE > Microsoft > Windows > CurrentVersion > SideBySide > Winners > x86_sprers.eu_1fc8b3b9a1e18e3b_none_02dfd >

    That second to last long entry could vary from computer to computer, but it is the only key last error 14001 andcrt in the string.

    Look to the right for Defaultand compare it with the keys below. The default Data version should match the highest number under Name. I know, a tad confusing.



    So, here you can see my Default Data number is By looking below, you see, we have two entries, hon start game error, and is our highest number, and they match. In this case, this isn't your problem.

    If your highest version number isn't the default key, we want to modify it to match. For example, let's say your highest version number is Right-click on the Default key and select Modify. Under Value Data, enter the highest number, which, again, just as an example, we entered Now that your Default key matches the highest version, reboot, and your problem should be solved.

    2: Install the Visual C++ Runtimes

    First, try and install the official Microsoft Visual C++ Redistributable Packageand see if the error is gone.

    If not, a third-party app, including Visual C++ Runtime Installer (All-In-One)may also install older versions of Visual C++. Our experience is that this error is often because of an older version of Visual C++ missing.

    -=- Advertisement -=-


    3: Track Down What Version of Visual C++ Runtime You're Missing

    If you'd prefer only to install the correct, missing pack, we need to find out which one you're missing.

    Press the Windows KEY + Sand type in event vieweruntil you see Event Viewerand click on that. Find Summary of Administrative Eventsand expand the Errorsubcategory and look for SideBySide.



    Double-click SideBySide, and you will see a list of all events. If you see more than one, select the one with the date and time you got the error.



    In this case, while a tad hard to figure out, you can see sprers.eu90, which refers to Microsoft Visual C++. Below that, you'll see the missing version number, in this case, If you Google that version, you will find that you need Microsoft Visual Studio (VC++ ) SP1. Other versions include:

    Microsoft Visual C++ Redistributable
    Microsoft Visual C++ Redistributable for Visual Studio
    Microsoft Visual C++ Redistributable for Visual Studio
    Microsoft Visual C++ Redistributable

    Always install both the Bit and Bit versions of the Visual C++ Runtime that you're missing and reboot to ensure your application sees the correct runtimes.

    4: Run System File Checker

    Windows 10, Windowsor Windows 8users will need to first run the Deployment Image Servicing and Management (DISM) tool before running the System File Checker. DISM will use Windows Update to provide any files that are needed to fix corruption. If you skip this step, System File Checker might not work. Windows 7 and Vista users can skip this step.

    You will need to first open the Command Prompt or PowerShell as administrator.



    Type in sprers.eu /Online /Cleanup-image /Restorehealthand press enter. This may take a few minutes.

    2: Running System File Checker

    All you need to do is type in sfc /scannowand press the Enter key.



    System File Checker will now scan for and replace files from the Windows cache, typically located at C:\Windows\System32\dllcache.

    Once completed, you should see one of four possible results:

  • Windows Resource Protection did not find any integrity violations - You should be good to go as no issues were found.
  • Windows Resource Protection could not perform the requested operation - Run SFC from safe mode and also verify PendingDeletes, and PendingRenames folders exist under C:WinSxSTemp
  • Windows Resource Protection found corrupt files and successfully repaired them - Problems were found and fixed. Microsoft has a page here to show you how to view details.
  • Windows Resource Protection found corrupt files but could not fix some of them - Odds are the file couldn't be replaced, and you'll need to do so manually. Scroll back up to see how to view the log file to locate the file in question.

    A reboot will be required, and you're done.

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  • Appendix 4Table of excluded studies

    Abbadi SM. Pre-hospital emergency care in remote areas in Jordan. Crit Care ;54Abbas HAE, hon start game error, Bassiuni NA, Baddar FM, last error 14001. Perception of front-line healthcare providers toward patient safety: a preliminary study in a university hospital in Egypt. Top Adv Pract Nurs ;82Abercrombie D. Critical patients, critical choices. Emerg Med Serv ;22&#x;54Adams CA. Basic knowledge. Emerg Med Serv ;301Agarwal S, Swanson S, Murphy A, Yaeger K, Sharek P, Halamek LP. Comparing the utility of a standard pediatric resuscitation cart with a pediatric resuscitation cart based on the Broselow tape: a randomized, controlled, crossover trial involving simulated resuscitation scenarios. Pediatrics ;:e&#x;332Alakeson V. Quality, Innovation, Productivity and Prevention (QIPP) and Personal Health Budgets. SCIE Social Care Online. Wythall: In Control; 7Alam HB, Velmahos GC. New trends in resuscitation. Curr Probl Surg ;48&#x;644Alam HB. Advances in resuscitation strategies. Int J Surg ;9:5&#x;123Alexander-Bratcher KM. Spotlight on the safety net. Mecklenburg Emergency Medical Services Agency. N C Med J ;68&#x;74Allison K, Porter K. Consensus on the pre-hospital approach to burns patient management. Accid Emerg Nurs ;12&#x;77Al-Shaqsi SZK. Response time as a sole performance indicator in EMS: pitfalls and solutions. Open Access Emerg Hon start game error ;2:1&#x;64Alvarez G, Coiera Flash execution error. Interdisciplinary communication: an uncharted source of medical error? J Crit Care ;21&#x;422Ammar A. Advanced technology does not work by itself. Prehosp Disaster Med ;17:S910Amnis A. Safe and Effective Service Improvement Using a &#x;Lean&#x; Approach. National Electronic Library for Medicines. London: NICE; 4Anderson PB. A comparative analysis of the emergency medical services and rescue responses to eight airliner crashes in the United States, &#x; Prehosp Disaster Med ;10&#x;531Anderson B. Being in the right place at the right time. Occup Health Saf ;69&#x;64Anderton D. Rationalising the Use of Dipyridamole Suspension. National Electronic Library for Medicines. London: NICE; 2Andrus CH, Villasenor EG, Kettelle JB, Roth R, Sweeney AM, Matolo NM. &#x;To err is human&#x;: uniformly reporting medical errors and near misses, a naïve, costly, and misdirected goal. J Am Coll Surg ;&#x;184Department of Health. How to Use Essence of Care SCIE Social Care Online. Wythall: In Control; 7Department of Health and Health Protection Agency. Clostridium difficile Infection: How to Deal with the Problem, hon start game error. National Electronic Library for Medicines. London: NICE; 7Department of Health, NHS. Developing the NHS Performance Regime. London: Department of Health; 7Department of Health. Overview and Scrutiny of Health &#x; Guidance. London: Department of Health, 7Department of Health. Raising Standards: Improving Performance in the NHS. London: Department of Health; 7Department of Health. NHS Knowledge and Skills Framework. London: Department of Health; 7Taylor JRA. Improvement partnership for ambulance services: what we do and how we do it. In Rawlins MD, Littlejohns P, editors. Clinical Excellence; Delivering Quality in the NHS . Oxford: Radcliffe Publishing; pp. 95&#x;81Department of Health. High Quality Care for all: NHS Next Stage Review Final Report. London: Department of Health; 7Department of Health. Framing the Contribution of Allied Health Professionals. London: Department of Health; 7Department of Health, last error 14001. Religion or Belief: A Practical Guide for the NHS. National Electronic Library for Medicines. London: NICE; 1Merkur S, McDaid D, Mladovsky P. Chronic Disease Management and Remote Patient Monitoring: European Observatory on Health Systems and Policies. Brussels: European Observatory on Health Systems and Policies, WHO European Centre for Health Policy; 7Department of Health Quality Framework Programme. Quality Accounts Toolkit: Advisory Guidance for Providers of NHS Services Producing Quality Accounts for the Year / London: Department of Health; 7Department of Health, NHS Flu Resilience. Learning the Lessons from the H1N1 Vaccination Campaign for Health Care. London: Department of Health; 1Department of Health. Essence of Care London: Department of Health; 7Department of Health, NHS Finance, hon start game error, Perfomance and Operations Directorate. The NHS Performance Framework: Implementation Guidance: April London: Department of Health; 7Department of Health, NHS Medical Directorate. The Framework for Quality Accounts: Response to Consultation. London: Department of Health; 7Department of Health. Using the Commissioning for Quality and Innovation (CQUIN) Payment Framework. London: Department of Health; 7Department of Health, NHS Finance, Performance and Operations Directorate. NHS Performance Framework: Implementation Guidance &#x; April . London: Department of Health; 7Department of Health. Guidance and Competences for the Provision of Services using Practitioners with Special Interests: Urgent and Emergency Care. London: Department of Health; 7NHS Plus, Royal College of Physicians, Faculty of Occupational Medicine. Varicella Zoster Virus &#x; Occupational Aspects of Management. London: Royal College of Physicians and Faculty of Occupational Medicine; 1Anonymous. Paramedic drafts EMS safety bill. EMS Insider ;22:33Anonymous. New FDA reporting rules take effect this month. EMS Insider ;23:14Anonymous. COBRA decisions put hospital staff on the spot .&#x.&#x. Consolidated Omnibus Budget Reconciliation Act. J Healthc Risk Sensor error minimed ;182Anonymous. Medical emergencies aloft: are airlines equipped? University of California, Berkeley, wellness letter ;14:21Linn R, Werfel P, Brown J. Safety first .&#x.&#x. &#x;practice makes permanent&#x. JEMS ;24Anonymous. Are you ready for JCAHO&#x;s new restraint standards? RN ;63hf7&#x;84Anonymous. Alert: state wants EMS error reports. EMS Insider ;28:74Anonymous. Patient-safety considerations. EMS Insider ;29:34Anonymous. Use score card to boost quality. ED Manag ;14&#x;172Anonymous. A positive sentinel event? AI says it&#x;s possible: use root-cause analysis in excellent outcomes, too. Healthcare Benchmarks Qual Improv ;1&#x;182Anonymous. At a glance. OR Manager ;181Anonymous. Thrombolytics safe for ambulance use. Pharm J ;4Anonymous. These tools show cause of close calls, adverse events. J Healthc Risk Manag ;25:3&#x;42Narinder T. Building safer healthcare systems: a case for error-in-medicine curriculum in medical training. Med J Armed Forces India ;592Rabinovici R, Frankel H, Kaplan L. Trauma evaluation and resuscitation. Curr Probl Surg ;40&#x;4Anonymous. AHP project launched to raise awareness of patient safety. Podiatry Now ;74Anonymous. Do your staff members risk misidentifying patients? ED Nursing ;7&#x;52Anonymous. Ask Sirenhead. Stop the blow hard. JEMS ;293Anonymous. NZNO welcomes coroner&#x;s report recommendations. Kai Tiaki Nurs N Z ;102Braun BI, Darcy L, Divi C, Robertson J, Fishbeck J. Hospital bioterrorism preparedness linkages with the community: improvements over time. Am J Infect Control ;32&#x;261Royal College of Nursing. RCN Review of the Year and Summary Accounts /. London: Royal College of Nursing; 1Anonymous. Using medication reconciliation to prevent errors. Jt Comm J Qual Patient Saf ;32&#x;22Anonymous. An obstacle last error 14001 error reporting remains. Pharm J ;2Anonymous. Prescribing safely. Pharm J ;2News in brief. Emerg Nurse ;15:24Frew SA. EMTALA compliance could have stopped failure cascade. ED Legal Letter ;18:6&#x;8.2Mackersie RC, Dicker RA. Pitfalls in the evaluation and management of the trauma patient. Curr Probl Surg ;44&#x;4Anonymous. Into the wild. Midwifery Matters ;:7&#x;81Anonymous. Prevention of venous thromboembolism: American College of Chest Physicians Evidence-Based Clinical Practice Guidelines (8th Edition), hon start game error. Chest&#x;;(Suppl. 6)S&#x;S2Anonymous. Bibliography and Other Resource Materials for Advancing Patient And Family-Centered Care. Bethesda, MD: Institute for Family-Centered Care; 1Monitor. Identifying Risk, Taking Action: Monitor&#x;s Approach to Service Performance in NHS Foundation Trusts. London: Monitor; 7Anonymous. Research worth reading. EMS Insider ;36&#x;115Anonymous. MHRA Liaison Officer Conference: Medicines and Healthcare Products Regulatory Last error 14001 London: Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency; 1Harvey S, Liddell A, McMahon L. Windmill NHS Response to the Financial Storm. London: The King&#x;s Fund; 1Anonymous. CLIR launches EMS Voluntary Event Notification Tool. EMS Insider ;374Anonymous. Noticeboard. Emerg Nurse ;184Anonymous. Standards for the Care of Critically Ill Children (4th Edition). Royal Hon start game error of Anaesthetists. London: The Paediatric Intensive Care Society; 2Anonymous. London Child Protection Procedures: 4th Edition, London: London Safeguarding Children Board; 7Anonymous. The GAT Handbook &#x; London: Association of Anaesthetists of GB and Ireland; 1Anonymous. Lives Plus (archived) &#x; Welsh Ambulance Service Trust. Secondary Lives Plus (archived) &#x; Welsh Ambulance Service Trust . URL: www​sprers.eu​.cfm?orgid=&#x;pid= (accessed 22 April )4Council GM. Treatment and Care Towards the End Of Life: Good Practice in Decision Making. London: General Medical Council; 1Anonymous. 10 steps to establish last error 14001 EMS risk management hon start game error. EMS Insider ;384Anonymous. Psoriasis: Clinical Knowledge Summaries. London: NICE; 1Anonymous. Facing the Future: A Review of Paediatric Services. London: Royal College of Paediatrics and Child Health; 2Anonymous. Deep Vein Thrombosis. Clinical Knowledge Summaries. London: NICE; 4Anonymous. Atrial Fibrillation. Clinical Knowledge Summaries. London: NICE; 2Department of Health, hon start game error. Ambulance Quality Indicators. East Midlands Strategic Health Authority. London: Department of Health; 1Anonymous. Clinical Governance Reading List. London: The King&#x;s Fund; 7Anonymous. Angiox mg Powder for Concentrate for Solution for Injection or Infusion &#x; Summary of Product Characteristics. Electronic Medicines Compendium. London: NICE; 7House of Commons Health Committee. Alcohol: First Report of Session &#x;10, Volume 1: Report, Together with Formal Minutes. London: House of Commons Health Committee; 7House of Commons Health Committee. Commissioning: Fourth Report of Session &#x; London: House of Commons Health Committee; 7House of Commons Health Committee. The Use of Overseas Doctors in Providing Out-Of-Hours Services. London: House of Commons Health Committee; 1House of Commons Health Committee. Public Health: Twelfth Report of Session. London: House of Commons Health Committee; &#x;12, 7Anonymous. Major Projects Authority Programme Assessment Review of the National Programme for IT. London: Cabinet Office; 7House of Commons Health Committee. Annual Accountability Hearing with Monitor: Tenth Report Of Session &#x; London: House of Commons Health Committee; 1National Audit Office. Department of Health &#x; Improving Emergency Care in England. National Audit Office Report (HC&#x;04). London: National Audit Office; 7Committee HoCPA. The National Programme for IT in the NHS: progress since London: House of Commons Public Accounts Committee; 7Klein S, McCarthy D. Gundersen Lutheran Health System: Performance Improvement Through Partnership. New York, NY: The Commonwealth Fund; 1House of Commons Health Committee. The Use of Management Consultants by the NHS and the Department of Health: Fifth Report of Session /9. London: House of Commons Health Committee; 1National Audit Office. A Short Guide: The NAO&#x;s Work on the Department of Health. London: National Audit Office; last error 14001 rowspan="1" colspan="1">Anonymous. Statement of Financial Entitlements (Amendment) Directions National Electronic Library for Medicines. London: NICE; 1National Audit Office. National Health Service Landscape Review. NAO Report (HC &#x;). London: National Audit Office; 1The London NHS Confederation. Grand Designs: The New London NHS. London: NHS Confederation; 1Strategic Health Authority PPI Leads Network. Performance Improvement Framework for Patient and Public Involvement in the NHS. London: Department of Health; 4NHS Connecting for Health. Department of Health Issues Guidance on Informatics Planning for / National Electronic Library for Medicines. London: NICE; 1NHS. Darlington PCT Prospectus / County Durham: Darlington Primary Care Trust; 7Authority LSH. Clinical Workforce Productivity in London&#x;s Health Sector: Final Report &#x; Appendices. 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London: Royal Free Hampstead NHS Trust; hon start game error colspan="1">1Department of Health. NHS &#x; From Good to Great: Hon start game error, People-Centred, Productive. London: Department of Health; 7NHS Improvement. An Integrated Approach: The Transferability of the Winning Principles &#x; Sharing the Learning. Coventry: NHS Improvement; 1hon start game error colspan="1">Anonymous. Independent Inquiry into Care Provided by Mid Staffordshire NHS Foundation Trust: January March Volume 1. London: Department of Health; 1NHS Lothian. Living and Dying Well in Lothian. Edinburgh: NHS Lothian; 7Edwards N. The Triumph of Hope Over Experience: Lessons from the History of Reorganisation. London: NHS Confederation; 7The NHS European Office. Representing the NHS in Europe &#x; Three Years of Achievement. London: NHS Confederation; 7NHS Institute for Innovation and Improvement, King&#x;s College London. Large Scale Change &#x; NHS Mobilisation. Coventry: NHS Institute for Innovation and Improvement; 7London N. Workforce for London Progress Report: Implementation &#x; Turning Strategy into Action. London: NHS London; 7Molyneux P. Health and Housing: Worlds Apart? Housing Care and Support Solutions to Health Challenges. Association of Public Health Observatories. London: National Housing Federation; 7Programme NNEoLC. Talking Needs Action Training Needs Analysis: The Pilot Sites Report their Findings for End of Life Care Communication Skills. SCIE Social Care Online; National Health Service. National End of Life Care Program. URL: http://beta​.scie-socialcareonline​sprers.eu​/talking-needs-action-training-needs-analysis-the-pilot-sites-report-their-findings-for-end-of-life-care-communication-skills​/r/a11GZZIAY (accessed 26 June )7Department of Health. The NHS Outcomes Framework /12. SCIE Social Care Online. London: Department of Health; 7NHS Institute for Innovation and Improvement. Medical Leadership Competency Framework: Enhancing Engagement in Medical Leadership (3rd Edition). London: NHS Institute for Innovation and Improvement and Academy of Medical Royal Colleges; 7NHS Institute for Innovation and Improvement. Annual Report and Accounts of the NHS Institute for Innovation and Improvement &#x; Coventry: NHS Institute for Innovation and Improvement; 7Department of Health. Liberating the NHS: Report on the Arms-Length Bodies Review. London: Department of Health; 7Department of Health, hon start game error. Guidance on the NHS Standard Contract for Acute Hospital Services &#x; London: Department of Health, 2Health Mandate. Accounting for Quality: An Analysis of the Impact of Quality Accounts in the NHS. London: Public Health England; 7Davis F. Paediatric Emergency Care. London: NICE; 7Bevington J. Healthy Boards for a Healthy London. London: NHS London; 7last error 14001 A, Seddon J, Brogan A, Jones C, Davies J, Matthias J. Lives Plus and the NHS Agenda &#x; Lessons from Systems Thinking: All Wales Medicines Strategy Group. NHS Wales; URL: www​sprers.eu​/Documents//Systems (accessed 28 July )4NHS Evidence. Transport Service for Dialysis Patients: To Improve Quality. QIPP &#x; NHS Evidence. London: NICE; 1NHS Institute for Innovation and Improvement. London KsC. Improving Healthcare Quality at Scale and Pace &#x; Lessons from the Productive Ward. Releasing Time To Care Programme &#x; Full Report. Coventry: NHS Institute for Innovation and Improvement; 2NHS Employers. Quality and Outcomes Framework Guidance for GMS Contract / London: British Medical Association and Hon start game error Employers; 7Department of Health. Liberating the NHS: Greater Choice and Control: Government Response: Extending Patient Choice of Provider (Any Qualified Provider). London: Department of Health; 7NHS Confederation. NHS Confederation Annual Review &#x; London: NHS Confederation; 7Ambulance Service Network. Critical Care Paramedics: Delivering Enhanced Pre-Hospital Trauma and Resuscitation Care: A Cost-Effective Approach. London: NHS Confederation; 4Monitor. NHS Foundation Trusts: Consolidated Accounts / London: Monitor; 7NICE. CG Transient Loss of Consciousness in Adults and Young People: Ambulance Service Slide Set. London: NICE; 4NHS Scotland. Partnership for Care Scotland&#x;s Health White Paper. Edinburgh: The Scottish Government; 1NHS Quality Improvement Scotland. The Provision of Safe and Effective Primary Medical Services Out of Hours Standards Aug Healthcare Improvement Scotland. Edinburgh: NHS Quality Improvement Scotland; last error 14001 rowspan="1" colspan="1">1NHS Quality Improvement Scotland. Report of Evidence Based Assessments from SHTG Aug Healthcare Improvement Scotland. Edinburgh: NHS Quality Improvement Scotland; 7Scottish Government Health Directorates. Delivering Better Health, Better Care through Continuous Improvement: Lessons from the National Programmes. Edinburgh: NHS Scotland; 4NHS Scotland. Wheelchair and Seating Services Modernisation: Action Plan. SCIE Social Care Online. Edinburgh: NHS Scotland; 1The Scottish Government. National Guidance for Child Protection in Scotland: SCIE Social Care Online. Edinburgh: NHS Scotland; 7WHO. Assessment of Health Security and Crises Management Capacity, Republic of Moldova. WHO Regional Office for Europe. Copenhagen: WHO; 1WHO. Assessment of Health Security and Crises Management Capacity, Armenia. WHO Regional Office for Europe. Copenhagen: WHO; 7WHO. Emergency Medical Services Systems in the European Union. WHO Regional Office for Europe. Copenhagen: WHO; 1Vaillard J, Lai T, Bevan G. Estonia Health System Performance Assessment: Snapshot. WHO Regional Office for Europe. Copenhagen: WHO; 1Anonymous. Promote safety in air ambulances by taking a stand against drugs. Hosp Employee Health ;84Anonymous. &#x;Patient Safety Act&#x; introduced. Geriatr Nurs ;17&#x;4The Hospital Infection Control Practices Advisory Committee Last error 14001 for Disease Control and Prevention Public Health Service USDoH, Human S. Part II. Recommendations for prevention of infections in health care personnel. Am J Infect Control ;26&#x;543Anonymous. Meningitis and meningococcemia. Emerg Nurse Leg Bull ;24:2&#x;77Anonymous. Missed subdural hematoma: $25 million. Healthc Canon ix5000 ps cam sensor error Manag ;21:3&#x;42Anonymous. Diagnostic failure causes death: $4 million verdict, hon start game error. Healthc Risk Manag ;22:3&#x;42Hall Y. Misdiagnosis results in death, $1 million verdict. Healthc Risk Manag ;22:2&#x;32American College of Emergency Physicians Board of Directors. Alternate ambulance transportation and destination. Ann Emerg Med ;524Anonymous. Check your stretcher fasteners. EMS Insider ;28:44Anonymous. Improper IV leads to amputation. Healthc Risk Manag ;23:2&#x;42Anonymous. Injury prevention model broadens safety scope: create situations where human error can&#x;t happen. Healthc Risk Manag ;24:3&#x;44Anonymous. Research update. Poor communication key to clinical errors. Aust Nurs J ;103Medicine PaD. Abstracts of scientific and invited papers for 6th Asia-Pacific Conference on Disaster Medicine, Fukuoka, Japan, 18&#x;22 February Prehospital Disaster Med ;17:S1&#x;3510Anonymous. Heart attack and triage: $25 million FL settlement. Healthc Risk Manag URL: www​sprers.eu last error 14001 28 July )2Anonymous. Relatives plan to sue after death of overdose patient who was kept waiting. Nurs Times ;99:52Anonymous. Medical condition list and appropriate use of air medical transport. Air Med J ;22&#x;191Anonymous. Don&#x;t harm patients with high-alert drugs. ED Nurs ;7&#x;92Anonymous. Policy statement. EMS as an essential public safety service. Ann Emerg Med ;434Anonymous. Ambulance safety becomes a priority. EMS Insider ;31:54The National Prescribing Centre. Supplementary Prescribing National Prescribing Centre. London: The National Prescribing Centre (now part of NICE Medicines and Prescribing Centre); 7Jones D, Mitchell A. Lean Thinking for the NHS. London: NHS Confederation; 7Anonymous. Designing future ambulance transport for patient safety. J Oper Depart Pract ;24Anonymous. NIH funds pilot program for EMS error reporting system on a national basis. EMS Insider ;33:74South Western Ambulance Service. What is NHS Pathways? Secondary What is NHS Pathways? Exeter: South Western Ambulance Service; 4Anonymous. Last word. JEMS ;324Anonymous. Top 5 in the news. Jt Comm Perspect Patient Saf ;7:25Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists. Standards for Maternity Care. London: Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists; 7Anonymous. Let&#x;s Talk About Restraint: Rights, Risks and Responsibility. London: Royal College of Nursing; 4Anonymous. Disruptive Innovation &#x; What Does it Mean for the NHS? London: NHS Confederation; 4Anonymous, last error 14001. Engaging Clinicians in a Quality Agenda. Penarth: All Wales Medicines 3d contr terrorism episode-2 yf lg Group; last error 14001 rowspan="1" colspan="1">7Healthcare Commission. State of Healthcare London: Healthcare Commission; 7Anonymous. hon start game error Situation Report No. 4, 9 September WHO Regional Office for Europe. Copenhagen: WHO; 1Anonymous. High Court judgement Oakes v Neininger &#x; Ors EWHC (QB) (19 March ) URL: www​sprers.eu​.aspx?EntryID= (accessed 24 September )4European Health Telematics Association. Sustainable Telemedicine: Paradigms for Future-Proof Healthcare. Brussels: European Health Telematics Association; 7Goodrich J, Cornwell J. Seeing the Person in the Patient: The Point of Care Review Paper. London: The King&#x;s Fund; 7Anonymous. Stepping Up: Using Health Standards to Improve Public Health. London: Faculty of Public Health; 7Anonymous. 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Australian Aviation Psychology Symposium. Aldershot: Aviation resource management; 4Foot C, Raleigh V, Ross S, Lyscom T. How do Quality Accounts Measure Up? Findings from the First Year. London: The King&#x;s Fund; 7Foot R, Semple Y, Mulholland P. Medicines Utilisation Data: A Vital Commodity in Today&#x;s NHS. National Electronic Library for Medicines. London: NICE; 7Forry S. Mechanism of injury. Making a vital assessment tool work. JEMS ;17&#x;64Foresman-Capuzzi J. Reply. J Emerg Nurs ;37&#x;134Forsström J. Why certification of medical software would be useful? Int J Med Inf ;47&#x;517Fortin W. Need a TIP? .&#x.&#x. November Publisher&#x;s Page, &#x;Repairing the safety nets&#x. JEMS ;21&#x;134Fourie P. Respiratory sinus arrhythmia feedback for enhanced parasympathetic responses in clients diagnosed with post-traumatic stress disorder and anxiety: a case study. Prehosp Disaster Med ;17(Suppl. 2):S75&#x;61Frakes MA. Rapid sequence induction medications: an update, last error 14001. J Emerg Nurs ;29&#x;402Frakes MA, hon start game error, High K, Stocking J. Transport nurse safety practices, perceptions, and experiences: the air and surface transport nurses association survey. Air Med J ;28&#x;51Frazer RS. Air medical accidents involving collision with objects, last error 14001. Air Med J ;20&#x;161Frazer E. Ensuring quality patient care and safety for patients requiring air transport. Lippincott&#x;s case management: managing the process of patient care. Lippincotts Case Manag ;11&#x;94Frazer E. A change in culture is required. Air Med J ;27&#x;31French A, Nedza A. Better health care: organizations focus on decreasing EMS clinical errors. EMS Insider ;28:64Friendship J. Editorial. Aust Emerg Nurs J ;7:3&#x;51Fromm Jr RE, Varon J. Critical care transport. Crit Care Clin ;16&#x;4NHS Confederation patient safety fact sheets. National Electronic Library for Medicines. London: NICE; 4Furness D, Gough B. From Feast to Famine: Reforming the NHS for an Age of Austerity. 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In Kyle RR Jr, Bosseau Murray W. Clinical Simulation. Oxford: Academic Press; 4Gandy G. Immobilization errors in EMS. Emerg Med Serv ;33&#x;74Gandy WE. What must a claimant prove? EMS World ;403Garcia A. Critical care issues in the early management of severe trauma. Surg Clin North Am ;86&#x;872Garcia T. Addressing airway issues: how to keep ETI a prehospital skill. JEMS ;36&#x;3, 85, 874Garpenby P. Resource dependency, last error 14001, doctors and the state: quality control in Sweden. Soc Sci Med ;49&#x;241Garrett BM, MacPhee M, Jackson C. Implementing high-fidelity simulation in Canada: reflections on 3 years of practice. Nurse Educ Today ;31&#x;767Gausche M, Seidel JS. Out-of-hospital care of pediatric patients. Pediatr Clin North Am ;46&#x;274Gausche-Hill M, Lewis RJ, Henderson DP, Haynes BE. Design and implementation of a controlled trial of pediatric endotracheal intubation in the out-of-hospital setting. Ann Emerg Med ;36&#x;656Gausche-Hill M. Integrating children into our emergency care system: achieving the vision. Ann Emerg Med ;48&#x;47Gebbie KM, Merrill J. Identification of emergency preparedness competencies for the healthcare workforce. Prehosp Disaster Med ;17(Supp. 2):S657Geelen-Baass C, Geelen-Baass B. Abstract. To prescribe or to administer? That is the question. J Emerg Prim Health Care ;5:2p1Geidl L, Deckert Z, Zrunek P, Gottardi R, Sterz F, Wieselthaler G, et al. Intuitive use and usability of ventricular assist device peripheral components in simulated emergency conditions. Artif Organs ;35&#x;801Georges J-L, Livarek B, Gibault-Genty G, Aziza JP, Hautecoeur JL, Soleille H. Reduction of radiation delivered to patients undergoing invasive coronary procedures. Effect of a programme for dose reduction based on radiation-protection training. Arch Cardiovasc Dis ;&#x;71Georges JL, Gibault-Genty G, Charbonnel C, Aziza J-P, Fetoui A, last error 14001, Pessenti-Rossi D, et al. 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Environmental management system implementation in the mining industry: a key to achieving cleaner production. Int J Miner Process ;64&#x;411Hilson G. Defining &#x;cleaner production&#x; and &#x;pollution prevention&#x; in the mining context. Miner Eng ;16&#x;211Hirabayashi Y, Seo N. Tracheal intubation by non-anesthesia residents using the Pentax-AWS airway scope and Macintosh laryngoscope. J Clin Anesth ;21&#x;712Hobgood CD, John O, Swart G. Emergency medicine resident errors: identification and educational utilization. Acad Emerg Med ;7&#x;203Hobgood C, Xie J, Weiner B, Hooker J. Error identification, disclosure, and reporting: practice patterns of three emergency medicine provider types. Acad Emerg Med ;11&#x;92Hobgood C, Anantharaman V, Bandiera G, Cameron P, Halpern P, Holliman CJ. International Federation for Emergency Medicine model curriculum for emergency medicine specialists. Afr J Emerg Med ;1&#x;953Hockberger RS, Binder LS, Chisholm CD, Cushman JT, Hayden SR, Sklar DP. The model of the clinical practice of emergency medicine: a 2-year update. Ann Emerg Med ;45&#x;742Hoffman JR, Schriger DL, Votey SR, Luo JS. The empiric use of hypertonic dextrose in patients with altered mental status: a reappraisal. Ann Emerg Med ;21&#x;41Hogan MP, Boone DC. Trauma education and assessment. Injury ;39&#x;54Hohenstein C, Fleischmann T. Patient safety in a high risk area &#x; a Critical Incident Reporting System (CIRS) in the field of prehospital emergency medicine. Notarzt ;23:1&#x;64Holden RJ, Karsh B-T. The technology acceptance model: its past and its future in health care. J Biomed Inform ;43&#x;727Holleran R. Remembering Michelle North. Air Med J ;24&#x;41Holliman CJ, Field JM, Meador SA, Wuerz RC. Medication mishaps: avoiding inappropriate use of prehospital meds, hon start game error. Emerg Med Serv ;21&#x;2, 25&#x;64Hon C-Y, Gamage B, Bryce EA, last error 14001, LoChang J, Yassi A, Maultsaid D, et al. Personal protective equipment in health care: can online infection control courses transfer knowledge and improve proper selection and use? Am J Infect Control ;36:e33&#x;72Hood DD, Kneale TD, Hanson ME, Alexander SB. Global applications of the LSTATTM patient care platform. Prehosp Disaster Med ;17:S552Hopmeier MJ, Carmona R, Noji E. Mundane to critical: the need for transition from individual care to population health maintenance and support. Prehosp Disaster Med ;17:S281Horton JN, Harmer M. The selection of trainees. Best Pract Res Clin Anaesthesiol ;8&#x;893Hoskins JD, Graham RF, last error 14001, Robinson DR, Lutz CC, Folio LR, hon start game error. Mass casualty tracking with air traffic control methodologies. J Am Coll Surg ;&#x;81Houghland JE, Druck J. Effective clinical teaching by residents in emergency medicine. Ann Emerg Med ;55&#x;92Hoyle L. Condition yellow: a hospital-wide approach to ED overcrowding. J Emerg Nurs ;39&#x;54Hu P, Defouw G, Mackenzie C, Handley C, Seebode S, last error 14001, Davies P, et al. What is happening to the patient during pre-hospital trauma care? AMIA Annu Symp Proc 6Huda Q, Malik SMMR, last error 14001. High risk areas for public health emergencies: a risk assessment model for conducting vulnerability analysis of hazard prone areas in Bangladesh. Prehosp Disaster Med ;17(Suppl. 2):S12&#x;131Hüter L, Schwarzkopf K, Rödiger J, Preussler NP, Schreiber T. Students insert the laryngeal tube quicker and more often successful than the esophageal&#x;tracheal combitube in a manikin. Resuscitation ;80&#x;43Hughes JD. Quality products &#x; resources. J Healthc Qual ;24&#x;62Hunt EA, Fiedor-Hamilton M, Eppich WJ. Resuscitation education: narrowing the gap between evidence-based resuscitation guidelines and performance using best educational practices. 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    Annual Report & Accounts:

    Annual Report presented to Parliament pursuant to section 1 of the International Development (Reporting and Transparency) Act

    Accounts presented to the House of Commons pursuant to section 6(4) of hon start game error Government Resources and Accounts Act Accounts presented to the House of Lords by Command of Her Majesty Ordered by the House of Commons to be printed on 22nd September

    HC FCDO: © Crown Copyright

    This publication is licensed under the terms of the Open Government Licence v except where otherwise stated. To view this licence, visit sprers.eu open-government-licence/version/3/

    Where we have identified any third-party copyright information you will need to obtain permission from the copyright holders concerned. This publication is available at sprers.eu

    Any enquiries regarding this publication should be sent to the following address: FCDO ARA, King Charles St, Whitehall, London SW1A 2AH, or via email: [email protected]

    This is part of a series of departmental publications which, along with the Main Estimates and the document Public Expenditure: Statistical Analysespresent the government’s outturn for and planned expenditure for

    ISBN E – E

    Printed on paper containing 75% recycled fibre content minimum.

    Printed in the UK by HH Global Limited Group on behalf of the Controller of Her Majesty’s Stationery Office.

    Performance overview

    The Performance Overview section of this report sets out key information about the department, including the structures that have been established to ensure we deliver effectively. This section also outlines our error 10106 in creazione socket and a performance appraisal for the Financial Year, the first year of operation for the FCDO. 

    Foreword by the Foreign Secretary: FCDO Annual Report and Accounts The Rt Hon Elizabeth Truss MP

    It is a great honour to lead the Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office and to ensure that our foreign and development policy delivers for people across our great country. As we look ahead, we must continue making the case for building deeper economic, diplomatic and security partnerships in order to help us seize the opportunities – and tackle the challenges – of the modern age, defending our values and advancing our interests around the world.

    We are proud of the United Kingdom and our global role. We are delivering vaccines in record time as a strong science and tech superpower, last error 14001. We are a leader in development, delivering humanitarian support for those in need, and raising huge sums to support girls’ education. We are a fierce champion of freedom, free enterprise and democracy around the world.

    We are looking ahead to an autumn where Global Britain plants our flag on the world stage. In the coming weeks, we will be hosting the first Global Investment Summit, including a reception with Her Majesty the Queen. We will also be hosting the UN Climate Change Conference (COP26) in Glasgow, and a meeting of G7 Foreign and Development Ministers in Liverpool.

    This is Global Britain in action: going out into the world in a positive and confident spirit to tackle alongside our friends and allies the major challenges of our times – from Covid to climate change. By positioning the UK at the heart of a network of economic, diplomatic and security partnerships, we are making our country safer and more competitive, standing up for our values, and confirming our status as the best place to live, work and do business. Our mission is to project this vision to the world and disk read error occurred windows 7 toshiba everyone in Britain knows that our best days lie ahead.

    Lead Non-Executive Director’s introduction to the Annual Report to Baroness Helena Louise Morrissey DBE

    In the to Financial Year, we witnessed the unfolding of a range of testing and unprecedented events for the United Kingdom. The COVID health crisis, exit from the European Union, and geopolitical tensions marked a challenging environment: the health, humanitarian, and socio-economic impacts of which threatened to interrupt, or at worst reverse, years of sustained global progress.

    Amid these developments, the UK Government announced the merger of the Foreign and Commonwealth Office and the Department for International Development, uniting development and diplomacy in one new department: the Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office, launched on 2 September There has never been a more important time to bring together the best of Britain’s international effort and project the UK as a force for good in the world. I transferred to Lead Non-Executive Director of the FCDO in September from my role as Lead Non-Executive Director at the Foreign and Commonwealth Office, hon start game error. Since the department’s formation, I have seen the FCDO respond to both external and internal challenge with sustained strength and pragmatism. The expression “changing an engine mid-flight” is strikingly pertinent for the FCDO this year. The department has managed an ambitious transformation portfolio, while simultaneously responding to immediate challenges and opportunities and developing a long-term, comprehensive strategy to shape and deliver future priorities.

    The FCDO’s Non-Executive Directors (NEDs) have provided exceptional leadership support to the department throughout this demanding and transformative year. John Coffey was appointed in September as lead NED on Audit and Risk, Ann Cormack was appointed in October as lead NED in Human Resources and Hon start game error Tew (appointed in October ) has taken up the role as lead NED in Finance. I am very grateful for all the NEDs’ support this year, particularly for providing tailored and knowledgeable advice in priority areas as the department’s transformation is taken forward. The NEDs have also helped the FCDO to establish a governance structure that is tailored to the department. Rather than bringing pieces from either legacy department, we have created a new structure that provides a platform for the NEDs to provide an effective and objective challenge to the rest of the Board and officials. As a result, across the FCDO, hon start game error, an effective structure for collective decision making on issues that have an impact across the department has been created. In this critical first year, governance brings together key stakeholders to set direction and provide assurance for the organisation.

    The department was founded under the leadership of the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs and First Secretary of State Rt Hon Dominic Raab MP. Sir Philip Barton was appointed as the FCDO’s Permanent Under-Secretary (PUS) and the FCDO’s Accounting Officer in August Director Generals have provided leadership in their respective areas: Juliet Chua in Finance and Corporate; Tom Drew for the Middle East and North Africa (MENA), Afghanistan and Pakistan; Moazzam Malik for Africa; Jenny Bates for the Indo-Pacific; Vijay Rangarajan for the Americas and Overseas Last error 14001 Kumar Iyer in Delivery, Sir Ian Macleod in Legal and Nic Hailey for the FCDO’s Transformation, last error 14001. The FCDO’s Political Director, Sir Tim Barrow, was appointed in August  

    Our department

    About the FCDO

    We pursue our national interests and project the UK as a force for good in the world. We promote the interests of British citizens, safeguard the UK’s security, defend our values, reduce poverty and tackle global challenges with our international partners. We unite development and diplomacy in one new department, hon start game error. FCDO brings together the best of Britain’s international effort and demonstrates the UK acting as a force for good in the world.

    We employ around 17, staff in our diplomatic and development offices worldwide, including in overseas embassies and high commissions. Our UK-based staff work in King Charles Street, London and Abercrombie House, East Kilbride. We also have other London offices, including 22 Whitehall, and staff based in Milton Keynes.

    Transformation in to

    On 16 Junethe Prime Minister announced that DFID and the FCO would merge, uniting development and diplomacy in one new department and bringing together Britain’s international effort.

    The FCDO launched on 2 September and an organisational-wide transformation is underway to forge a new, last error 14001, high-performing department, capable of leading and co-ordinating the UK’s international policy.

    The transformation is progressing well, with strong Ministerial support and direction. A new leadership team is in place, headed by a new Permanent Under-Secretary and Director Generals (DGs). A Headquarter structure has been agreed, organised around a new Directors structure with joint head offices in London and East Kilbride. Teams across the global last error 14001 have been integrated bringing together legacy DFID and FCO staff. Heads of Mission are now accountable for the delivery of crossHMG country plans that have been agreed by Ministers and set out the strategic priorities for the UK’s international efforts in each country.

    Learning lessons from other countries that have merged development and foreign affairs ministries, we have prioritised creating a new shared culture to ensure we hon start game error key staff and deliver the impact we can all be proud of. We have also worked hard to ensure the transformation portfolio represents best practice for programme delivery and that the dependencies between different elements of the transformation are fully understood and managed. FCDO transformation will receive additional scrutiny and guidance from the Infrastructure and Projects Authority having joined the Government’s Major Project Portfolio in July Resourcing challenges, in terms of securing both the staff and skills needed for delivery, and supporting the network to implement the transformation, are being addressed through ongoing recruitment exercises and prioritisation.

    The creation of the Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office was designed to align the UK’s international efforts and maximise our influence as a global force for good. Although savings through administrative efficiencies will be realised, the merger was not driven by these issues. The FCDO is hon start game error efficient than the former departments, last error 14001. In the HQ-level permanent director structure was reduced by one third and the FCDO has 5 fewer permanent Director Generals at HQ than the former departments. Additional efficiencies are being looked at as part of the forthcoming Spending Review.

    The direct costs relating to the merger of the FCO and DFID in were approximately £ million, £ million was for direct staff costs, £ million for specialist contractors and £ million for software licences to align the two organisations.

    The FCDO’s structure and people

    The FCDO is a ministerial department, supported by 12 agencies and public bodies. We work with the private sector, non-governmental organisations, overseas governments, and a range of other actors including multilateral organisations. With this operating model, we can deliver at scale and flexibly across the globe, including fragile and conflict-affected countries. We use a range of funding instruments to fulfil our objectives including grants, contracts and financial investments. Our accountability system includes an evidence-based business planning process, supported by governance, monitoring, audit, assurance and risk management processes.

    We employ 16, staff worldwide, platform 5, error data in overseas embassies and high commissions. Our UK-based staff work in King Charles Street, 22 Whitehall (London), Abercrombie House (East Kilbride) and Hanslope Park (near Milton Keynes). More information on our staff is provided in section Remuneration and Staff Report.

    Global distribution of FCDO Posts

    Delivering effectively

    In our first year of operation, the FCDO established a range of structures to ensure that our department consistently delivers effectively. This includes our transparency commitments, the way we collectively make decisions and our risk management approach. Details on these structures is outlined below.

    Governance arrangements

    The FCDO’s governance structure is made up of a number of boards and committees, each with its own remit. At the top of the governance structure is the Supervisory Board, which is chaired by the Foreign Secretary and meets quarterly. The Supervisory Board provides strategic direction, oversight, support, and challenge for the department with a view to the long-term health, reputation, and success of the FCDO. The Supervisory Board is made up of the PUS, DGs for Finance and Corporate, and Delivery, as well as all NEDs. Attendance for Ministers and other DGs is optional, depending on the agenda.

    The Management Board, chaired by the Permanent Under-Secretary, ensures the organisation delivers departmental priorities and objectives set by Ministers. It also ensures rigorous management of performance, strategic risk and people and duty of care to staff. It takes key decisions on changes in management approach. It is the highest official-level governance meeting and its membership includes all Director Generals and relevant Directors hon start game error all NEDs invited to attend in an advisory capacity. The Management Board meets monthly.

    Executive members of the Management Board meet weekly as the Executive Committee (ExCo). Reporting to the Management Board, ExCo takes decisions on strategic choices or challenges relating to sensitive or time-bound issues, day to day running of the department, emerging issues, risks or crises where early steers or a cross-departmental view, impact or action is required.

    The Strategy Committee is ricoh error code sc 672 for making sure the department is fit for the future. It focuses on challenge and strategic oversight, last error 14001, recommending changes to the FCDO’s strategic direction, building strategic capability, assessing coherence and links into UK Government strategy.

    The Investment Committee is responsible for assessing whether the FCDO is spending to achieve the best Value for Money (VFM).

    The People Committee (PC) is responsible for making sure the FCDO has the best workforce to deliver. It works to enable the organisation to have the right people in the right roles at the right times, to deliver its objectives and support the resilience and wellbeing of all FCDO staff.

    The Delivery Committee assesses whether the FCDO is delivering on its objectives: achieving the desired effect as well as undertaking the planned activity, to high hon start game error, across all areas of the FCDO’s work including policy, programme and corporate.

    The Audit and Risk Assurance Committee (ARAC) supports the Management Board, and the PUS as Accounting Officer, to review decisions and processes designed to ensure sound systems of internal control. This includes risk management, financial reporting (including internal controls over financial accounting), internal and external audit, Arm’s Length Bodies, counter-fraud and safeguarding. The ARAC is chaired by a Non-Executive Director with suitable experience. It challenges the executive and promotes best practice across the Last error 14001, but has no executive responsibilities. It reports to the Supervisory Board.

    Finally, the Transformation Board is a temporary structure and accountable to the Management Board for delivery of the overall scope of the FCDO’s transformation portfolio. It takes key decisions affecting timescales, cost and quality of the portfolio and agrees programme objectives and scope.

    Approach to risk management

    Until SeptemberFCO and DFID were two separate government departments, with distinct approaches to risk management. Both departments operated in some highly challenging environments and were willing to take carefully considered and well managed hlae steam error to deliver UK objectives. This section briefly sets out the approaches to risk management taken by the two predecessor departments, before considering the approach taken by the FCDO since September

    The FCDO faces a wide range of risks because of our global footprint and activities. We pursue our national interests and project the UK as a force for good in the world. The world we work in and the work we do, is inherently risky. Risk management helps us navigate the complexity and uncertainty we face in delivering our objectives. It is an essential part of the management of the FCDO, informing operational decisionmaking, policy options, planning and financial management and control.

    Both DFID and FCO, like other government departments (OGDs) and organisations, were severely affected by the COVID pandemic. From late until the merger of the two departments, additional structures, processes and policies were introduced in each department to both consider the impact of COVID on the delivery of wider objectives, and to manage risks to the delivery of new, more immediate priorities relating to COVID android activity java.lang.noclassdeffounderror. These were adopted in addition to the existing risk management approaches in place and have now been mainstreamed into the new risk management approach for the FCDO.

    DFID approach pre-merger (April to August )

    DFID’s principle-based risk management approach was laid out in a risk policy and appetite statement, supported by guidance, training and tools. DFID assessed the risks it faced through hon start game error categories: risks posed by the external context; risks to the department’s reputation; fiduciary risks of funds being used for unintended purposes or not properly accounted for; safeguarding risks of unintended harm to people or the environment; risks to delivery of policy and programme objectives; and risks to operational capabilities and staff.

    DFID had an appetite for carefully considered and well managed risks to deliver UK objectives and achieve development outcomes. DFID undertook higher risk activities where the situation (for example, a humanitarian emergency) or the expected results justified them. The department also accepted risk to innovate, build the evidence base and work in new and transformative ways. When undertaking higher risk activities, the department’s aim was to ensure that the mitigating actions kept the risk to an acceptable level. In judging an acceptable level of residual risk as an ongoing appetite level, or to tolerate for shorter periods, the department demonstrated flexibility to adapt its approach to the context and available evidence base.

    Strategic risks for DFID as a whole were considered by the Management Board monthly; the Supervisory Board also reviewed risk at regular intervals. The risk policy and appetite statement was reviewed at least annually and an additional review was completed after the COVID outbreak. The Audit and Risk Assurance Committee provided oversight of the risk policy and implementation of risk management plans.

    FCO approach pre-merger (April to August )

    FCO’s risk management approach was articulated in a risk policy and appetite. The FCO assessed top risks in two categories: policy risks and operational risks. Policy risks related to the delivery of the FCO’s key foreign policy objectives, while operational risks were threats to the FCO’s ability to function successfully as an organisation. Policy and operational risks interacted, for example, in last error 14001 to crisis response.

    FCO’s appetite for foreign policy risks depended on the issue, potential impact on UK interests and political context. FCO assessed the risk of policy choices and agreed appropriate risk appetite with Ministers and Partners Across Government.

    The Audit and Risk Assurance Committee and the Executive Committee considered the Top Risk Register on a quarterly basis. Operational risks were scrutinised closely by the Audit and Risk Assurance Last error 14001, on behalf of the Management Board, including deep dive investigations of key areas of risk. The Management Board and Supervisory Board also reviewed the Top Risk Register formally at least twice a year.

    FCDO last error 14001 post-merger (September to March and onwards)

    The FCDO will be the springboard for all our international efforts, integrating diplomacy and development to achieve greater impact and realise the Prime Minister’s vision for coherent international delivery across the whole of Government. With this in mind, the Foreign Secretary and Management Board are readproctitle service errors clear on delivery of the real-world change we want to see. Risk management is a critical element of this approach.

    Since the departmental merger in Septemberthe FCDO has adopted a single overarching risk management last error 14001. Policies and processes have been established for escalation of risk throughout the organisation, ensuring appropriate accountability. We have developed a departmental FCDO Risk Appetite Statement, using UK Government best practice and extensive consultation, agreed by the Management Board and the Foreign Secretary. We have set risk management rules for our portfolio of policy programmes through a new Programme Operating Framework. A new FCDO Risk Management Policy was published in Julyaligned to the principles set out in the UK Government’s ‘The Orange Book: Management of Risk – Principles and Concepts’.

    We introduced a new FCDO Principal Risk Report (PRR) in Septembercovering the most significant risks to FCDO’s performance and reputation. In Marchthe PRR contained 21 principal risks, alongside detail on linked secondary risks. The scope and number of principal risks is kept under constant review. The principal risks are organised into seven categories: strategy and context, policy and programme delivery, public service delivery and operations, people, last error 14001, safeguarding, financial and fiduciary and reputational. Each of the principal risks is owned by a Director or Deputy Director and has a Director General as a sponsor.

    The Management Board discusses principal risks monthly, including the FCDO’s overall risk profile and deep dives into individual risks. The board determines accountability for each of the principal risks, reviews risk exposure against risk appetite and monitors progress in implementing controls, drawing on management information, qualitative insights from across the organisation and wider evidence.

    Further information on our approach to risk management, including the governance of risk, can be found in Section

    Transparency

    The UK is globally recognised for its transparency and open-data, and the FCDO is committed to transparency to enable the best use of evidence, data and digital tools to inform our policy and actions. Transparency enables the FCDO to last error 14001 the value and impact of our diplomatic and development work and supports our international standing and reputation.

    We fulfil our international, legal, and public transparency commitments [footnote 1]. In addition, we provide leadership in aid transparency as a member of the International Aid Transparency Initiative (IATI) and share information about our aid programming on the DevTracker pqmagic error #2003. We are also committed to making better use of open data via the National Data Strategy and support the UK membership of the Open Government Partnership, promoting the values of Open Government and transparency across the world. We appointed a Board Sponsor to provide strategic leadership for transparency when the department was formed in Septemberand actively support the network of UK Government Transparency Champions established by Cabinet Office, to drive openness and accountability across all departments.

    The UK Aid Strategy () set out the commitment that ‘all UK government departments will achieve ‘good’ or ‘very good’ in the Aid Transparency Index (ATI) by ’. Prior to the formation of the FCDO, both legacy organisations were assessed in the global ATI, which was published in July Legacy DFID was classed as ‘very good’ among major donors, last error 14001, and legacy FCO improved its performance to ‘fair’. The FCDO has benefited from the expert programme delivery knowledge of our legacy departments and continues to strengthen transparency across our activity. We are committed to improving the transparency of aid globally and maintaining our high standards for overseas spending. We have promoted this across the UK Government via a Transparency Community of Practice which has established a beneficial exchange of learning between aid-spending departments. Although COVID meant this was temporarily put on hold, the FCDO will continue to build on this work.

    Scrutiny

    Our scrutiny arrangements respond hon start game error Section 5 of the International Development (Official Development Assistance Target) Actwhich requires the Secretary of State to make arrangements for the independent evaluation of the extent to which Official Development Assistance (ODA) provided by the UK represents Value for Money in relation to the purposes for which it is provided; and to report on how the duty has been complied within the FCDO’s Annual Report, hon start game error. The Independent Commission for Aid Impact (ICAI) is the mechanism that provides ‘independent evaluation and scrutiny of the impact and value for money of all UK Government ODA’ and this dns error bad referral fulfils the duty to report. ICAI reports to the International Development Committee in Parliament and makes its reports available online.

    The FCDO is subject to parliamentary scrutiny by the International Development Committee and Foreign Affairs Committee, which monitors the policy, administration and spending of the department, and the Committee of Public Accounts, which scrutinises the VFM of public spending, as well as scrutiny by the National Audit Office (NAO), which assesses the VFM public spending for parliament.

    Evaluation arrangements

    We are also committed to evaluating our programmes to ensure that they deliver VFM and to generate learning that benefits our future work. The department uses evaluation, monitoring and other evidence tools across our programmes alongside policies for accountability and learning, and this is incorporated into programme conceptualisation and design. The FCDO’s sound approach to the use of evidence was acknowledged in the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) Development Cooperation Peer Review, which highlighted that the UK “values evidence and knowledge and has continued to reinforce its strong approach to results, evaluation and learning.”

    Monitoring and evaluation experts are embedded across our department. Evaluation support is also provided from the centre, through guidance, technical advice, quality assurance, conducting strategic evaluations, and learning and development opportunities:

    • standards: An internal interim evaluation policy was introduced this year, based on DFID’s protocols, and we have started the process for developing a full evaluation policy and strategy for the new merged department. We ensure evaluations conducted across the business reach expected standards of quality and rigour: between April and March our Evaluation Quality Assurance and Learning Service (EQUALS) responded to requests for quality assurance, 17 of which were last error 14001 other government departments. The Global Evaluation Framework Agreement continues to provide a critical service for procurement of evaluation expertise to the FCDO and other government departments spending ODA

    • rigour and innovation: Through the Centre for Excellence for Development Impact and Learning (CEDIL) programme, we have pioneered new rigorous methodologies for hard-to-measure problems, including mapping frontier work on using big data and providing guidance on how to use this in impact evaluations. We have adapted our work to meet the priority needs of the new organisation. For example, we have developed and are leading a cross-FCDO workstream on how to design, measure and evaluate the department’s diplomatic and development influencing work. We have also been leading work on innovative approaches to adaptive management for complex and high-risk contexts

    • technical advice and guidance: Our Evaluation Advisers in the Evaluation Unit provide bespoke technical advice and support on monitoring, evaluation and learning to teams and priority work across the organisation, through a dedicated helpdesk. The FCDO Evaluation Quality Assurance and Learning Services (EQUALS) also provides expert, on-demand, and quick turnaround technical support to the FCDO, including 28 requests for technical assistance and work on 5 learning reviews in We developed a series of guidance notes to support the shifting needs and challenges of evaluating in the COVID context

    • strategic evaluations: This year, we have stepped up our efforts to provide strategic and thematic portfolio evaluations on key areas. We have designed a layered, sequenced, and proportionate approach to evaluating our investments on COVID interventions ranging across programme, portfolio, and thematic work. We have started a suite of thematic evaluations on priority areas, including Climate Smart Agriculture. We have completed learning reviews which synthesise our evidence on Beneficiary Engagement, Commercial Agriculture and Girls’ Education. We have provided support to the World Bank’s Fund for Impact Evaluation and the Strategic Impact Evaluation Fund, which has included COVID emergency evaluations on remote education, school return and response and recovery using educational technology. We completed the Evidence in Governance and Politics (EGAP) programme this year, which collected exciting new robust evidence on crime, community policing, community management of natural resources and incentivising citizens to access tax funded public services, as well as pioneering new and more rigorous methodologies for testing whether an invention is effective in multiple contexts

    Safeguarding

    Safeguarding against sexual exploitation, abuse, and sexual harassment (SEAH) is a priority root mount error pfsense the FCDO. In Septemberwe published the UK’s first strategy on tackling SEAH in the aid sector which sets out how we are working to ensure better safeguarding across this sector, within the UK Government and in the programmes we fund. The FCDO’s code of conduct states what type of sexual activity is unacceptable and the related consequences if the code is broken. The Safeguarding Team last error 14001 Safeguarding Unit within the Internal Audit and Investigations Department, drives this work forward, focusing on both safeguarding policy and enforcement. We are introducing mandatory SEAH training for all staff as part of wide-ranging internal capability building. We continue to deliver on the commitments we made at the October London Safeguarding Summit to: prevent SEAH from occurring; listen to those who are affected; respond sensitively but robustly when harm or allegations of harm occur; and learn from every case. We continue to drive collective action by convening and chairing multiple international working groups. In Octoberwe published a further progress report against the London Summit commitments.

    We launched the Resource and Support Hub (RSH) in May whose global and national hubs aim to build the safeguarding capacity and capability of smaller, locally based organisations, last error 14001, in particular. In March we announced details of a programme to make it easier for survivors of SEAH to report abuse, to improve the quality of investigations and strengthen support available to survivors and victims. Other initiatives we are supporting include: advanced safeguarding leadership training for hundreds of individuals worldwide through the Open University; a digital leadership and culture tool to help organisations assess their strengths and weaknesses on tackling SEAH; and initiatives such as the Misconduct Disclosure Scheme to prevent perpetrators from moving around the aid sector.

    The FCDO registered 12 new internal staff cases of SEAH this year and 22 internal cases were concluded in the same period. Internal cases mean the survivor, or the subject of complaint, is an FCDO staff member. In 8 of the 22 concluded cases the allegations were upheld, resulting in disciplinary action, up to and including dismissal. In the sui critical error sacred 2 win 7 cases there was either: insufficient information to progress to an investigation; lack of engagement from witnesses or the survivor; or the investigation concluded there was no evidence to support the allegations made.

    Since setting clearer expectations in early that legacy DFID and now FCDO partners must report credible suspicions and actual allegations of safeguarding abuses, we have seen an increase in reports to the FCDO of external safeguarding concerns, from 73 in toto in toin to and in to The increase in reporting is encouraging as it demonstrates confidence in our reporting system and that action will be taken in response to concerns raised. The most common case types reported in to were: SEAH; non-sexual discrimination and harassment; physical abuse; and child exploitation. In 55% of cases disciplinary action, up to and including dismissal, was taken; in 21% of cases there was no evidence; in 14% of cases partners took other action to strengthen safeguarding policies and control mechanisms; and in the remaining cases there was insufficient evidence or lack of engagement from witnesses or survivors, to progress investigations.

    Aims and objectives in to

    The creation of the Host system error, pci problems? in September and absence of an updated Single Departmental Plan in to for either legacy department [footnote 2] means that the FCDO did not have centrally agreed Strategic Objectives hon start game error Priority Outcomes to report against in the to Financial Year. We have nevertheless determined priority policy areas early on (outlined in the Performance Analysis sub-section).

    The Spending Review (SR) settlement required all departments to produce an Outcome Delivery Plan (ODP); this has replaced the Single Departmental Plan as the document by which departments will be held to account. ODPs outline Priority Outcome Metrics and Strategies. The FCDO’s and ODP was published in July and will be used to guide performance reporting for the to Annual Report.

    While performance reporting is optional for the to Financial Year because of the unprecedented pressures that the COVID outbreak has had on the whole of start error javax.microedition.media UK Government, the FCDO has chosen to go beyond requirements to produce a bridging report, presenting information on our performance in priority policy areas this year. Key activities and achievements for the department are structured against ODP Priority Outcomes determined for the year ahead; the Performance Analysis sub-section of the to Annual Report will also take this approach, making comparisons easier.

    Our ODP reporting, and delivery of the Priority Outcomes, will be underpinned by our new Delivery Framework approach. The FCDO began to institute a Delivery Framework approach in to

    This supports teams across all areas of FCDO work including policy, programme and corporate. It draws on robust tools, including Theories of Change, Outcomes Trees and KPIs, to clearly describe the real-world change we want to see and sets measurable targets to enable teams to monitor progress and take action to stay on course to deliver. This will continue to be rolled out in to and will provide a stronger focus on delivery across all that we do.

    Performance appraisal for to

    In the to Financial Year, the COVID health crisis has had an unprecedented impact on lives across the world. As the greatest health threat that the world has been subjected to in decades, the health, humanitarian, and socio-economic impacts of this crisis threaten to interrupt years of sustained progress in global poverty reduction and stability.

    At this critical time, the UK Government has united development and diplomacy in one new department: the FCDO.

    Combining our diplomatic and development expertise will make us even more effective at achieving long-term change, supporting others to become self-sufficient, hon start game error ensuring we leave no one behind. Dealing with an unprecedented set of challenges, we have been able to meet performance expectations in our first operational year, and effectively deliver maximum impact in priority areas, while handling exceptional financial constraints brought about by the worst economic downturn that the UK has experienced for more than years.

    FCDO key achievements

    The Integrated Review of Security, Defence, Development and Foreign Policy was published, defining the Government’s ambition for the UK’s role in the world and the long-term strategic aims for national security and foreign policy. This will see the UK becoming a problem solving and burden sharing nation and sets a strong direction for building back better from COVID, both domestically and internationally.

    We also used our presidency of the UN Security Council to drive further progress on global access to COVID vaccines and call for local ceasefires to run time error 438 visual basic their delivery to some of the world’s most vulnerable people.

    We hosted the Global Vaccine Summit which raised nearly US$ billion to immunise a further million children against a range of diseases.

    We committed up to £ billion of ODA to the UK’s international response, combatting the health, humanitarian, and socio-economic impacts of the pandemic and supporting the research, development and equitable global distribution of vaccines, treatment and tests.

    In the wake of the pandemic, we coordinated a repatriation effort that had no post-war precedent in terms of scale, complexity and duration. Consular teams handled overenquiries and issued over 13, emergency travel documents. We provided personalised consular support in over 25, new cases.

    At the International Criminal Court we have seen the elections of Joanna Korner as Judge and Karim Khan as Chief Prosecutor. saw considerable progress on climate, culminating in 75 leaders making ambitious commitments at the Climate Ambition Summit on 12 December, co-convened by the UK, France and UN in partnership with Chile and Italy.

    Our Famine Prevention Call to Action combined aid expertise and humanitarian diplomacy to address the rising risk of famine across the world. Sustained UK efforts have mobilised additional funding for the world’s most vulnerable countries, including the doubling of World Bank Early Response Financing from US$ million to US$1 billion to support countries facing increased food security risks in taking early action.

    In to

    • the Integrated Review of Security, Defence, Development and Foreign Policy was published, defining the Government’s ambition for the UK’s role in the world and the long-term strategic aims for national security and foreign policy. This paves the way for the UK becoming a problem solving and burden sharing nation and sets a strong direction for building back better from COVID, both domestically and internationally

    • we also used our presidency of the UN Security Council to drive further hon start game error on global access to COVID vaccines and call for local ceasefires to allow their delivery to some of the world’s most vulnerable people

    • in the UK imposed sanctions on individuals and entities in Russia, Saudi Arabia, Myanmar, DPRK, Belarus, Chechnya, Venezuela, The Gambia and Pakistan. Last year we introduced a UK Magnitsky sanctions law, to target individuals guilty of the most serious human rights hon start game error abroad. This year, we are extending this model to corruption

    • at the International Criminal Court we have seen the elections of Joanna Korner as Judge and Karim Khan as Chief Prosecutor

    • the FCDO coordinated a repatriation effort that had no post-war precedent in terms of scale, complexity and duration. Consular teams handled overenquiries and issued over 13, emergency travel documents. We provided personalised consular support in over 25, new cases, and the FCDO travel advice pages were last error 14001 7, last error 14001 (a 98% increase compared to the previous Financial Year)

    • the FCDO committed up to £ billion of ODA to the UK’s international response to COVID, combatting the health, humanitarian, and socio-economic impacts of the pandemic and supporting the research, development and equitable global distribution of vaccines, treatment and tests

    • million British nationals were helped to return home at the peak of the pandemic. This included tens of thousands on UK Government Charter flights as well as hundreds of thousands more via commercial airlines kept open thanks to FCDO lobbying efforts

    • the FCDO facilitated catch-up programmes forgirls in low-income countries following COVID school closures

    • the FCDO established the Hygiene and Behaviour-Change Coalition with Unilever and jointly invested up to £ million in a unique programme to promote frequent last error 14001 with soap and surface hygiene – reaching 1 billion people across 37 countries

    • the Global Vaccine Summit hosted by the UK raised nearly US$ billion to support Gavi’s mission to immunise a further million children

    • saw considerable progress on climate, culminating in 75 leaders making ambitious commitments at the Climate Ambition Summit on 12 December. The summit was co-convened by the United Nations, the United Kingdom and France in partnership with Chile and Italy

    • the Foreign Secretary launched a Famine Prevention Call to Action in September combining the best of FCDO’s aid expertise and humanitarian diplomacy to address the rising risk of famine last error 14001 the world. Sustained UK efforts have helped to mobilise additional funding to support the world’s most vulnerable countries, hon start game error, including the doubling of World Bank Early Response Financing from US$ million to US$1 billion to support countries facing increased food security risks in taking early action

    • the Foreign Secretary reaffirmed that the UK will be an energetic and dependable partner in the hon start game error prosperity of the Indo-Pacific region and demonstrated UK commitment during several visits to the region

    • the FCDO was central to assessing, managing and mitigating the international-facing risks and impacts of the D20 operation. The operation was designed to ensure that the UK Government could moderate the worst disruptive impacts of the end of the EU Transition Period on the welfare, health and security of UK citizens and on the economic stability of the UK

    Delivering maximum impact

    With the UK committed to achieving, but not exceeding, the Official Development Assistance spending target of % of gross national income in tothe contraction of the economy as a result of the COVID pandemic prompted government to plan a £ billion in-year reduction in ODA-spending in the Financial Year. At the same time, we estimate that the impacts of the COVID pandemic are likely to last error 14001 resulted in m additional people living in extreme poverty inrising to m in [footnote 3].

    To ensure that our department delivered maximum impact in priority areas, while handling the pressures brought by the COVID outbreak, the FCDO conducted a rigorous prioritisation exercise. The Executive Committee discussed a paper setting out options to ensure resources were channelled into the most urgent hon start game error time sensitive work.

    ExCo agreed hon start game error use the baseline identified by the prioritisation exercises in both legacy departments, until the Integrated Review and Spending Review were published and prioritisation could hon start game error completed in line with the vision for the new department. Legacy FCO used a ‘Do/Do differently/Drop’ approach, while legacy DFID prioritised activities using a ‘Gold/Silver/Bronze’ rating. Both exercises identified three groupings of work according to the increase or decrease in resources that would be required. DGs used this baseline list of priorities to inform choices before the Integrated Review and Spending Review publications.

    For both legacy departments, work-streams in the ‘Gold/Do’ category included helping those most at risk throughout the pandemic through procurement of medical equipment and legalisation services. Ministerial priority work-streams were also prioritised, hon start game error. Workstreams in the ‘Bronze/Drop’ category included cross-Whitehall engagement on policies not related to COVID, bilateral relationships and visits, business planning and discretionary work such as corporate away days.

    By taking these decisions, we effectively delivered maximum impact in priority areas, putting the COVID response at the forefront of our work. A breakdown of our main areas of spend in the to Financial Year is provided in section Financial Review.

    The Performance Analysis sub-section of the report provides further information on our performance this year. As the FCDO is in its first year of operation, it will not be possible to draw on previous year strategic objectives and indicators to discuss performance and trends across earlier Financial Years.

    Future plans

    As announced in lategiven the impact of the global pandemic on the economy and, as a result, the public finances, we will move from a target of spending % of gross national income as ODA to % in to This was a difficult – but temporary – decision. For the FCDO to achieve its strategy of integrating diplomacy and development to achieve greater impact, we will focus on:

    • delivery: Realising tangible real-world change is at the centre of what we do. That will be driven by clear accountability for delivery, using evidence-based approaches. The FCDO’s new Delivery Framework will work across the range of the department’s business, based on robust theories of change, with clear and measurable targets at all levels

    • alignment: The FCDO leads a whole of government international effort. All posts work to a single set of objectives (the Country Plan) for which the Head of Mission (HoM) is fully accountable. HoMs will be consulted on all programme and policy decisions in-country and will chair cross-Government Country Boards with clear lines of accountability to Ministers

    • integration of our toolkit: The FCDO integrates the full range of the UK’s diplomatic, development and domestic tools. Examples include shifting the strategy of CDC Group plc (CDC), the UK’s development finance institution, towards promoting energy transition and green infrastructure; pulling together targeted sanctions, diplomatic campaigns and aid programmes, to deliver our open societies agenda; and working with domestic departments to build the UK’s influence on key international objectives, such as countering money laundering and global health security

    • value for money: The FCDO provides the overseas platform for the whole of the UK Government, with a focus on value for money, effectiveness, and alignment of services and policies. We use evidence and data rigorously in how we design portfolios of activities, programmes and investments to achieve our goals, hon start game error. We improve and maintain a global estate and vehicle fleet that is secure, fit for purpose last error 14001 maximises efficiency, utilising key investments (e.g. in our posts in Washington, Ottawa and Mexico City) to contribute to our sustainability objectives

    • coherent use of Official Development Assistance: The Foreign Secretary will lead an interim stocktake of the UK ODA portfolio at the mid-year point to assess spending plans across departments and ensure we meet the % GNI target. Coherence in our ODA spend across the Government will be driven by the FCDO’s new International Development Strategy

    • partnerships: The FCDO will strengthen our global reach to build a diverse range of partnerships with bilateral and multilateral partners, the private sector, civil society and beyond. Our Posts will strengthen understanding of, and access to, host Governments and influential individuals and groups. We will use these partnerships to deliver the Country Plan and strengthen the long-term benefit to the UK and global stability

    • crisis management: All Posts will be ready to deliver a whole of government response to crises, particularly those affecting the safety or welfare of British nationals and large-scale humanitarian crises. Teams will continue to work with international partners on crisis anticipation and invest in crisis management preparedness and in the skills and readiness of staff across the mission 

    Performance analysis

    For the Performance Analysis section of the to Annual Report and Accounts, we have produced a bridging report, presenting information on our performance in to against the priority policy areas. We will publish a separate document providing a final set of results for the to UK Aid Strategy, in early

    Key activities and achievements for the department across the to Financial Year are structured against Terrors of the jungle vol?.?1 Outcomes determined for the year ahead. Our analysis is supported by a review on progress on the FCDO’s contribution to the United Nations (UN) Sustainable Development Goals. The Performance Analysis concludes by presenting information on our risk profile in to

    PO 1: Shape the international order and ensure the UK is a force for good in the world by: supporting sustainable development and humanitarian needs; promoting human rights and democracy; and establishing common international standards

    The FCDO will use its combined diplomatic and development tools to promote and project the UK as a force for good. We will react nimbly to human rights and humanitarian law violations and take action in multilateral fora and through our new sanctions regimes. We will use Official Development Assistance to support girls’ education and free journalism, hon start game error, and work with other donors and partners to respond effectively to humanitarian crises and reduce the risk of famines.

    Global goals

    The FCDO’s work under this outcome contributes to the following Global Goals, amongst others:

    Activities and achievements in to

    The FCDO has led the UK’s international response to COVID We have made available public commitments worth up to £ billion of ODA since the crisis began, making us one of the largest donors. Of these commitments, £ million was spent in Financial Year to We mobilised quickly when the crisis first began and worked with and through the international system, in order to achieve the last error 14001 of action and coordination needed to overcome this global crisis. In to

    • we committed up to £ million for the research, development and distribution of vaccines, treatments and tests, including a £ million commitment to COVAX in support of the provision of vaccines to low and lower-middle income countries [footnote 4]. Of the £ million, £ million hon start game error spent hon start game error Financial Year to

    • we also committed up to £ million to multilateral institutions like the UN, as well as to UK charities and international Non-Governmental Organisations (NGOs), to support the health and humanitarian response. Of the £ million, £ million was spent in Financial Year to

    • to support the global economic response, we also committed £ million to the IMF to help the poorest countries with their debt repayments so they could focus limited resources on their country response. This was spent in full in Financial Year to

    • over and above our funding commitments, the UK’s investment in its research and development has been a key contribution to the global vaccination effort, enabling Oxford and AstraZeneca to produce a new vaccine and already distribute million doses for no profit, with two-thirds going to lower- and middle-income countries

    • in addition to the public commitments, the FCDO created new, and adapted existing, programming amounting to more than £ million [footnote 5] ODA in Financial Year to This has primarily sought to help countries tackle the impacts of the pandemic on health, the economy, and education as well as where COVID has exacerbated pre-existing humanitarian crises. For example, we set up a new programme to respond to COVID in the Caribbean, which has helped deliver vital emergency health support. We set up a new programme in Jordan to provide cash emergency assistance tofamilies who have been economically impacted by COVID We adapted our flagship Girls’ Education Challenge programme in Sub-Saharan Africa and South Asia, which is last error 14001 million marginalised and highly marginalised girls to benefit from a quality education, by ensuring remote teaching techniques reach key cohorts of girls of school age using no-tech or low-tech learning. This is keeping girls safe and learning through COVID In Somalia, we adapted a programme to support at leastinternally displaced people and vulnerable urban poor, including by decongesting crowded informal settlements to reduce the risk of transmitting the virus, as well as providing shelter and promoting good hygiene

    • at the instigation of the UK, as Commonwealth Chair-in-Office, Commonwealth Leaders agreed and issued a comprehensive statement on the full range of global responses to canon ip4700 error COVID pandemic, outlining their commitment to protect the health of their billion citizens and mitigate the consequences for them

    • we coordinated a global repatriation operation, supporting British nationals overseas to get home to the UK, including tens of thousands on UK Government charter flights. We worked application load error 5 0000065434 metro 2033 airlines to keep commercial flights operating, supporting million British nationals to return home. This operation had no postwar precedent in terms of scale, complexity, and duration. Repatriation charter flights were used where they were most needed and we ensured that odbc on error perl were affordable, charging a capped price per passenger. Every flight required specific permissions and each brought its own, individual challenges. In India, the sheer volume of travellers presented a challenge: 66 government charter flights brought back nearly 18, people, each of whom required an individual movement plan and permissions. In the Philippines, we navigated the logistical challenges of organising internal transfers by small boat and small aircraft, with our teams assisting at every stage of these journeys. The FCDO offered emergency loans to help repatriate people to the UK, and from 5 May introduced a new temporary loan to support British nationals who would otherwise be unable to return home. The FCDO hon start game error provided more than 3, loans with a total value of over £2 million

    Getting British Nationals home in to

    • the FCDO launched seven separate crisis operations

    • this culminated in a global repatriation charter operation that brought British nationals back to the UK on flights, from 57 different countries and territories

    • more than 19, British passengers from 60 cruise ships were successfully disembarked, hon start game error, including 1, people on direct or supported charters

    • staff supported the return of million British nationals via commercial routes, of whom we estimatewere directly assisted by the UK Government

    • we collaborated with partners to ensure the return of more than 4, British travellers on their charter flights

    In addition to our immediate COVID response work, the FCDO is leading international efforts to end the pandemic and strengthen global health security. In to

    • we worked with partners, through the G7 and elsewhere, to strengthen global health security as set out in the Prime Minister’s five-point plan for pandemic preparedness. Our new core contribution of £ million between and to the World Health Organization (WHO), will contribute to this by strengthening the WHO and supporting countries to implement the International Health Regulations and support wider UK global health priorities, including strengthening country health systems

    • we continued to be a leading donor to The Global Fund to fight AIDS, hon start game error, Tuberculosis, and Malaria, which has helped save 38 million lives sinceand aims to save 16 million more over the next three years

    • the COVID pandemic impacted the delivery of Sexual Reproductive Health and Rights (SRHR) services throughout to with reports of large-scale disruption in family planning, antenatal care, and facility-based birth services. The FCDO was the lead donor to the United Nations Population Fund (UNFPA) Supplies, which played a critical role in addressing supply chain bottlenecks, procuring PPE, and advocating for family planning services to remain open. We have contributed towards UNFPA assisting over 10 million women, girls, and young people in hon start game error countries with services, information, and supplies

    • the FCDO’s Women’s Integrated Sexual Health (WISH) programme reached over million women and girls with lifesaving family planning services across 27 countries in Africa and Asia, hon start game error. We have also continued to support the global family planning partnership, FP, which has enabled 60 million additional users of modern contraception since

    As set out in the Integrated Review, last error 14001, tackling last error 14001 change and biodiversity loss is the number one international priority for the UK in and beyond. In this critical decade, the FCDO aims to tackle the causes and open usb error jet of climate change, reverse biodiversity loss and support secure and affordable energy for all. This includes delivering a successful COP26 in November (postponed from November due to COVID) and galvanising increased global action to tackle the climate crisis and protect nature. In to

    • we worked to deploy the full FCDO network behind COP26 priorities – engaging Heads of Mission, our overseas network of Climate, Energy and Environment Attachés and Advisers and four senior COP26 Regional Ambassadors, to embed climate and environmental considerations across the UK’s diplomatic and development efforts

    • as Presidents of both COP26 and the G7 inthe FCDO pursued action across our Presidencies, as well as working closely with our Italian partners to engage the G We championed this agenda in other multilateral fora too, notably at the United Nations award bootblock bios v1.0 drive a error the UK hosted the first ever UN Security Council discussion on climate security in February fechners method of average error, as well as with the International Financial Institutions

    • saw considerable progress on climate, culminating in 75 leaders making ambitious commitments at the Climate Ambition Summit on 12 December. The summit was co-convened by the United Nations, the United Kingdom and France in partnership with Chile and Italy

    • in Januarythe UK launched the Adaptation Action Coalition with co-chair Egypt, and continued to provide support to key initiatives to promote resilience, including the Least Developed Countries Initiative for Effective Adaptation and Resilience (LIFE-AR) and the Risk-informed Early Action Partnership (REAP)

    On 31 Marchthe Foreign Secretary and the COP President-designate hosted the Climate and Development Ministerial (CDM) which brought together Ministers from 35 climate vulnerable and donor countries, hon start game error, to focus on the implementation of the Paris Agreement and Sustainable Development agenda in those countries most vulnerable to climate change, including via more donor finance to support adaptation and resilience.

    • we recommitted to double our International Climate Finance to £ billion from to to to Within this commitment, we will ensure at least £3 billion is invested to deliver significant benefits for nature as well as for climate and people. We will also continue to aim for a balanced split between mitigation and adaptation

    • the FCDO supported low-income countries to understand how climate change will affect water availability and to manage their water resources sustainably. In the initial response to COVID, the UK error opening cd dvd plugin £20 million of emergency support to UNICEF as part of their global appeal to support governments, including the provision of water and sanitation for vulnerable children

    • we led work internationally to support low-carbon, resilient and inclusive urbanisation in low-income countries and accelerate the development of last error 14001 cities. For example, inthe Managing Climate Risks for the Urban Poor (MCRUP) programme, supported 40 urban infrastructure projects in 36 cities, unlocking US$ million of Asian Development Bank (ADB) loans and over US$60 million of government finance

    • our portfolio of over 30 commercial agriculture programmes supported responsible production through the sustainable growth of small-scale producers and agribusinesses in low income countries. This included support to reduce food last error 14001, a key target of Sustainable Development Goal (SDG) Responsible Production and Consumption

    • the FCDO contributed to efforts to sustainably manage marine resources and biodiverse ecosystems, including forests. Despite slow hon start game error progress, we continued to support efforts across a range of targets. As of Novemberthe FCDO’s Blue Belt programme exceeded its target to protect 4 million km² of ocean around UK Overseas Territories. We also supported global research, pilot projects and other last error 14001 to reduce the use of plastics as well as increase their re-use and recycling efforts in low-income countries. The FCDO played a key role in defining the UK’s overarching ambition for the post Global Biodiversity Framework. We supported work focused on stopping illegal logging and illegal deforestation, promoting sustainable trade in timber and agricultural commodities, and catalysing investment into sustainable businesses

    The FCDO is committed to ensuring that the most marginalised receive a quality education. The right to education is indispensable for the exercise of essential human rights. In to

    • we helped millions of girls and boys continue to learn and stay safe during school closures. All of our bilateral education programmes rapidly adapted to respond to the global pandemic. For example, hon start game error, in Pakistan, million students (including million girls) were able to continue learning as a result of the FCDO’s provision of a COVID toolkit to make up for lessons missed and provided accessible online learning opportunities for children with disabilities. In Ethiopia, the FCDO’s education assistance included a US$5 million Contingency Response supporting digital technologies and connectivity for a coordinated government response last error 14001 COVID and adapted ongoing educational leadership training to focus on ‘blended’ learning

    • at a global level, the UK announced £20 million for the UN Children’s Fund crisis appeal, which includes education, adding £5 million to the Education Cannot Wait (ECW) fund to support emergency education in fragile contexts, and a further £5 million to the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR). The ECW crisis fund has benefited around 4 million hard-to-reach girls, who risked leaving education permanently after the COVID outbreak whilst UNHCR support enabled 5, teachers to continue teaching in refugee camps across 10 different countries, hon start game error. The Global Partnership for Education, to which the UK is the largest donor, also quickly mobilised more than US$ million to support partner last error 14001 with planning and implementing their response to the pandemic

    In tothe UK:

    • developed a teaching and learning toolkit in Pakistan, supporting more than million students

    • supported remote and homebased learning in Nigeria, supporting 12, learners

    • ensured its bilateral programmes benefited around 4 million marginalised girls

    • pledged additional funding to UNHCR enabling last error 14001, teachers to continue teaching in refugee camps

    Peace, stability, human rights, and open societies, based on the rule of law and democratic governance, are critical for global stability. The FCDO is a vocal proponent of SDG Peace, Justice and Security and made the promotion of open societies a top policy priority this year. In to

    • we worked with the United Nations Development Programme (UNDP) to support countries to deliver on SDG 16 through a more systematic approach to evidence collection, harnessing of best practices, peer-learning, and the facilitation of multi-stakeholder partnerships on SDG 16 reporting

    • the FCDO’s Rule of Law Expertise UK (ROLE UK) programme worked to strengthen the rule of law in low-income countries by supporting partnerships that provide high-quality delphi 7 io error 103 bono legal and judicial expertise. ROLE UK currently has 38 partnerships, and has been working in Nepal, Nigeria, Uganda, Malawi, Kenya, Rwanda, and Tanzania, providing highly expert advice on strengthening justice systems

    • the FCDO’s International Action Against Corruption (I-ACT) programme has delivered specialist anti-corruption technical expertise and access to international partnerships to help tackle cross-border corruption, last error 14001. This has helped reduce corruption through support to asset recovery and return and by increasing the transparency of company ownership

    • the FCDO’S UK Action to Support Developing Countries Fighting Corruption (UK ACT) programme funds UK law enforcement authorities to pursue and investigate money laundering and bribery, related to low-income countries with links to the UK. Under UK ACT, hon start game error, £76, of assets have been restrained, confiscated or returned in to

    • we prioritised media freedom; working with a range of partners, including BBC Media Action, to strengthen the ability of independent media in low-income countries to produce free, independent public interest journalism and provide a forum for constructive public debate, both offline and online. In tolast error 14001, the FCDO successfully helped to broaden the Media Freedom coalition to include 11 new members and secured a strong endorsement for coordinated action on Media Freedom in draft communique language, ahead of the G7 Foreign Ministers’ meeting in May

    The FCDO is an international advocate for equality. We successfully fought for a dedicated gender equality goal in the Sustainable Development Goals (SDG 5: Gender Equality) and targets on gender equality across the other Goals. COVID has often exacerbated the challenges of the most vulnerable. We work closely with international partners to ensure the most vulnerable groups are at the centre of global efforts to recover from COVID In to

    • we adapted existing programmes to ensure women and girls continue to access support during lockdowns, such as delivering support services online, strengthening national helplines and supporting women working in supply chains impacted by the COVID pandemic

    • in Junewe launched global consultations on ‘the Murad Code’ for documenting conflict-related sexual violence (CRSV), to ensure that investigations into sexual violence crimes are safer, more ethical, and more effective. We last error 14001 launched the Declaration of Humanity hon start game error Faith and Belief Leaders, to end CRSV and tackle the stigma faced by survivors. More than 50 faith and belief leaders, civil society organisations, and governments have endorsed the declaration

    • the FCDO continued to last error 14001 the vital work of women’s rights organisations by ensuring their inclusion in the Action Coalition priorities, and by announcing an additional £1 million to the UN Trust Fund to End Violence Against Women in September last error 14001, on top of our existing £21 million contribution to support long-term interventions for women and girl survivors of Gender Based Violence

    • the UK continued to fund the Women Mediators across the Commonwealth Network, which now supports 46 women peacebuilders from 21 countries

    • we delivered over £4 million of programming to support governments and civil society partners in repealing or reforming laws, which discriminate against LGBT+ people

    • the UK’s ongoing support to the Commonwealth Small States Office in Geneva, including the funding of two dedicated Commonwealth human rights advisers, helped Commonwealth small states engage with the UN Human Rights Council and fulfil their human rights treaty obligations

    • we increased international awareness and action on Disability Inclusion and addressed often multiple forms of discrimination, including action on violence against women and girls with disabilities. We co-chaired the Global Action on Disability (GLAD) network until Marchhanding over to the government of Norway to lead international action on efforts to combat and reverse discrimination

    • we widened the evidence base on what works to support people with disabilities, through the Disability Inclusive Development programme (£37 million). Activities testing different radio show formats in Nigeria and Tanzania provided evidence about what format is most effective in changing people’s attitudes and prejudice towards people with disabilities

    • we continued funding the Global Disability Summit Secretariat within the International Disability Alliance. The Secretariat leads accountability for the sets of commitments that were generated at the Global Disability Summit in

    The COVID pandemic has interrupted a period of sustained progress in global poverty reduction. The world faces an unprecedented humanitarian crisis resulting from the triple threat of conflict, compounded by climate change and COVID We will maintain the UK’s role as a force for good at times of crisis, while strengthening and modernising the collective international humanitarian response. In to

    • social protection was a core part of the FCDO’s response to the socio-economic impacts of the pandemic on poor and vulnerable families, including loss of income. We worked with partner governments to strengthen their social protection systems in more than 25 countries and supported governments and international partners to scale up their social protection support for the most vulnerable, to help them meet their basic needs and protect their livelihoods. We also established a COVID social protection helpline (SPACE) that provided expert advice to 35 countries, on how to use or adapt social protection systems to respond to crises

    • the FCDO established the Hygiene and Behaviour-Change Coalition with Unilever, jointly investing up to £ million in a unique programme to promote frequent handwashing with soap and surface hygiene – reaching 1 billion people across 37 countries, last error 14001. The coalition supported access to drinking water in humanitarian contexts, including 19 Internally Displaced Person (IDP) camps in Yemen

    • we adapted existing development programmes to address the impacts of COVID on food security. The COVID pandemic, conflict, locust swarms and climate change have left million people worldwide facing extreme hunger in the past year. The Global Agriculture and Canon powershot s2 is error e18 Security Program (GAFSP) committed all remaining funds to mitigate COVID impacts. In Bangladesh, lockdown restrictions had a disruptive impact on agricultural supply chains affecting food accessibility, agriculture input supplies, jobs, and farmer incomes. GAFSP supported a national network of producer organisations with over 8, smallholder farmers and set up 57 call centres to act as communication hubs between farmers, input dealers, hon start game error, traders, and service providers – facilitating the sale and delivery of food commodities and agricultural inputs in ways that minimised the risk of transmitting COVID The virtual call centres have benefitted about 30, small-scale farmers, of whom 46% are women

    • the UK, as a force for good in the world, has led by example through its launch of the Call to Action to Prevent Famine and appointment of the UK’s Special Envoy on Famine Prevention and Humanitarian Affairs in September This work demonstrates UK commitment to engage at senior levels across the humanitarian system to drive change and bring the international community together to tackle increasingly severe risks of famine and food insecurity, because it’s the right thing to do and it protects British interests. We can only tackle these global challenges by combining our diplomatic strength with our world-leading aid expertise. The Call to Action has worked across four objectives in the last year: mobilising prioritised, quality funding (including from International Financial Institutions) to the most vulnerable countries, catalysing political action to unblock humanitarian access and protection of civilians in these contexts (for example through the UK’s creation of a Group of Friends of Action on Conflict and Hunger at the UN Security Council), driving improved data and coordination and strengthening resilience to food crises to avert the risk of famine/food insecurity in the longer-term

    PO 2: Make the UK safer and more resilient to global threats

    The international security environment is deteriorating. Strategic geopolitical competition is intensifying, changing the nature of threats we must detect and counter and widening the geographic spread of our security concerns issues. COVID has highlighted the convergence of economic, health and security risks and enhanced the importance of supporting British people to stay safe abroad.

    The UK can only maximise the benefits of our openness if we are strong and secure at home. Security is essential to an international order in which open societies and economies like the UK can flourish and collaborate in pursuit of shared goals, free from coercion and interference.

    The FCDO 500 server internal error play a critical role in strengthening international security and making the UK safer and more resilient to global threats. Our capacity to prevent, deter, respond to and mitigate most threats relies on our relationships and influence abroad. We will coordinate the delivery of last error 14001 and relationships overseas to protect and promote UK resilience and a resilient global health system.

    Global Goals

    The FCDO’s work under this outcome contributes to the following Global Goals, amongst others:

    Activities and Achievements in to

    We provide resilient, professional, empathetic, and high-quality Consular Services for all who need it, 24/7/ days a year. The FCDO helps British people living and travelling abroad take responsibility for their safety. In to

    • the FCDO coordinated a repatriation effort that had no post-war precedent in terms of scale, complexity and duration. We provided personalised consular support in over 25, new cases, up 12% from the previous year, while continuing our support in 9, ongoing cases. We also issued 13, emergency travel modules mapserverx error and our 24/7 Consular Contact Centre answered aroundenquiries. The FCDO travel advice pages were updated 7, times (a 98% increase compared to the previous Financial Year)

    • 86% of British people who accessed Consular Services were satisfied with the service they received, exceeding our the existing benchmark of 80%

    The FCDO works to strengthen global health security through supporting the provision of life saving vaccines to low and middle-income countries. We coordinate the delivery of activity and relationships overseas to protect and promote UK resilience and a resilient global health system. In

    • in addition to our work supporting the development and roll-out of COVID vaccines, the UK hosted the Global Vaccine Summit in Juneraising nearly US$ billion to support Gavi’s mission to immunise a further million children, including catching up on routine immunisations interrupted by COVID The UK was the largest donor, pledging the equivalent of £ million per year, over the next five years

    The FCDO is committed to developing clearer areas of UK speciality in conflict resolution and dispute management, better aligning our tools and capabilities to improve the UK’s defence and resilience. We are doing more upstream to reduce threats, including from hostile states, terrorists, criminals and from new threats. We contribute to effective international efforts to prevent, manage, and support the transition out of conflict. In

    • in Nigeria, the FCDO supported aims to counter violence through inter-faith dialogue and community reconciliation processes. In Jonglei state, South Sudan, an area of intractable conflict with extreme levels of humanitarian need, FCDO supported peace dialogues including through enhancing the capacity of Women Mediators across the Commonwealth Network

    • the UK continued to support the UN Peacebuilding Fund (PBF), the UN’s only dedicated peacebuilding programme. PBF investment in Kasai and Kasai Central, last error 14001, Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC), hon start game error, contributed to the fight against impunity, the establishment of provincial Truth and Reconciliation Commissions and local peace committees to facilitate intercommunal dialogue

    The FCDO’s peacebuilding programme in Myanmar supported 80 local administrators with mediation training, last error 14001, last error 14001 conflict-affected communities in the Mandalay region to manage resource-based conflicts more peacefully. Evidence suggests this is successfully resolving inter-communal disputes, including conflicts emerging from the COVID response.

    • the FCDO worked towards the establishment of a Conflict Centre, which will develop a more integrated UK approach to conflict and instability, harnessing conflict expertise from across the FCDO, the UK Government and beyond, and applying these where the UK can make a difference

    • the Hon start game error led diplomatic engagement to bolster the UK’s campaign to counter malicious cyber activity. We have grown the coalition of governments willing to work together to coordinate policies and actions to deter and respond to those who act last error 14001 in cyberspace. We were at the forefront of work to establish the European Union last error 14001 cyber sanctions regime and designate the first 12 actors for malicious cyber activity in The new autonomous UK cyber sanctions regime came into force on 31 Decembercreating an important tool to impose costs on those conducting malicious cyber activity against us and our allies

    • the FCDO continued to invest and support the Get Safe Online campaign, delivering the World’s first hour online safety campaign across 24 Commonwealth countries. The online safety campaign funded in the Caribbean and Pacific Commonwealth and Rwanda created a network of online safety ambassadors across 19 countries to promote cyber hygiene. Online safety websites were created in 22 countries, 8 of these were presented in local hon start game error, as well as English

    • all Commonwealth countries have benefited from UK cyber security capacity building, resulting in stronger networks to exchange knowledge and expertise, and increased resilience and understanding of cyber threats and how to mitigate them

    • in regions where the UK deems the risks to be highest, we have built capability of partner governments to tackle terrorism while protecting and promoting respect for international law and human rights. In Libya, we contributed to a counter terrorism strategy alongside investigations training to increase Libyan counter terrorism capacity and help UK agencies prevent attacks [footnote 6]. UK forensic training enabled the Libyan Criminal Investigation Department to provide UK agencies with vital bomb scene data, detailing the tactics and explosive devices used by terrorist organisations. We provide British Nationals with up to date advice and support on the terrorist threat to travel overseas, through our regular updates to FCDO travel advice, highlighting the latest developments in the terrorist threat, including real time advice during terrorist incidents overseas. Inwe also provided direct support to British Nationals affected by terrorism overseas, including during the Palma attack in Mozambique

    • the Integrated Review reaffirmed the North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO) as the cornerstone of our defence. Inthe UK maintained its position as the top defence spender in Europe, participated in every NATO operation and mission and continued to declare our nuclear deterrent to the defence of the Alliance. The UK’s role in shaping “NATO ” (the results of a review to ensure that Hon start game error remains the most successful Alliance in history) ensured close alignment between the Alliance’s approach and outlook, and the Integrated Review. On Russia, we continued our deterrence activities, including through deployments to Baltic Allies through enhanced Forward Presence (eFP). The UK is the largest contributor to hon start game error, with c troops in Estonia and Poland. We also continued to strengthen NATO partnerships with Ukraine and Georgia and deepen ones in the Indo-Pacific. Outside the Euro-Atlantic area, the UK worked with Allies to expand NATO’s mission in Iraq in support of local security forces, hon start game error made a significant contribution to the work of NATO’s Resolute Support Mission in Afghanistan, prior to its withdrawal

    • we continued our work to uphold the global ban on chemical weapons use under the Chemical Weapons Convention (CWC) and to hold to account those who use chemical weapons. In response to Syria’s use of chemical weapons, and its failure to cooperate with the Organisation for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons (OPCW), the UK co-sponsored a decision to suspend Syria’s voting rights and other privileges under the CWC. The decision secured overwhelming support in the OPCW Conference of States Parties in April The UK also continued to support the OPCW’s wider work, making significant contributions to capacity-building projects in Africa and to the OPCW’s new Centre for Chemistry and Technology

    • the UK worked with the International Atomic Energy Agency, international partners, and UK contractors on a project to remove the last highly-enriched uranium material from Latin America, reducing the risk of terrorists obtaining and misusing this material. As part of the UK’s engagement on DPRK sanctions evasion, we hosted a virtual meeting of G7+ partners, and used our network to take part in a joint lobbying effort on North Korean overseas workers. The UK has continued to support the IAEA’s monitoring and verification activities in Iran: in to hon start game error contributed £, to this work

    • we worked closely with partners across the UK Government, universities, funding bodies and industry to protect our higher education and research sector from foreign interference. We expanded the Academic Technology Approval Scheme (ATAS) to cover advanced conventional military technology and increased its scope to include all researchers in proliferation-sensitive areas, considerably strengthening our protective measures

    • we successfully completed mine clearance operations in the Falkland Islands on 14 November This marked the release of 23 million square metres of land to the local population and fulfilled the UK’s obligation under the Anti-Personnel Mine Ban Convention

    We are positioning the UK as a global leader on Outer Space, hon start game error, building on the landmark UK-led UN General Assembly resolution 75/36 on reducing space threats through norms, rules and principles of responsible behaviour aims, to reduce the risk of miscalculation and escalation leading to conflict in or from space. We are also committed to ensure the sustainability of the space environment. In to

    • we engaged internationally to get a resolution adopted at the UN General Assembly RES/75/36 on norms, rules and principles of responsible space behaviours to reduce the risk of conflict arising from state threats to space systems

    • we encouraged the international debate on issues to support our space sector, promoting academic and industry views in discussions at the Committee on the Peaceful Uses of Outer Space (COPUOS) in Vienna

    • following the success of shepherding the 21 guidelines for the Long-Term Sustainability of Outer Space (LTS) through the COPUOS and then the UN General Assembly inthe UK encouraged other States to write them into their own regulations and legislation. We demonstrated UK leadership on this issue by submitting an annual report on our own implementation, led by the UK Space Agency

    PO 3: Extend and amplify the UK’s influence in the world, including through successful application for ASEAN dialogue partner status

    The UK is a European country with uniquely global interests, partnerships and capabilities. But against the global backdrop of increasing uncertainty, the effectiveness of ‘Global Britain’ will depend upon our ability to extend and amplify the UK’s international influence. We must ensure that the UK is well-placed to take advantage of emerging markets, shifts in the global economy, and global progress in science and technology.

    The FCDO will mobilise our diplomatic and development influence. We will move with greater speed and hon start game error, amplifying our strong independent voice by working with and influencing others at the heart of a network of like-minded countries and flexible groupings.

    Global Goals

    The FCDO’s work under this outcome contributes to the following Global Goals, amongst others:

    Activities and achievements in to

    The FCDO works to extend and amplify the UK’s influence in the world to support shared prosperity and regional and global stability. We work to strengthen our diplomatic, security and trading ties to ensure we Leave No One Behind and are a force for good in the world. We support our international partners and will stand up to defend our international values. In to

    • as Commonwealth Chair-in-Office, the UK continued to deliver on the shared priorities which Leaders set out at the 25th CHOGM in London in under the headings of fairness, security, sustainability and prosperity

    • in Hong Kong, we worked to uphold the Sino-British Joint Declaration, the legally binding treaty with China which set out the terms of Hong Kong’s return to China. As China continued to erode Hong Kong’s high degree of autonomy and reduce rights and freedoms of the people of Hong Kong by introducing a National Security law, new rules to disqualify Hong Kong legislators, hon start game error, and make radical changes to restrict participation in Hong Kong’s electoral system, the FCDO led diplomatic efforts to highlight the situation globally and to call on China to adhere to its legally-binding obligations. During the latter half of and the first half ofthe UK declared three breaches of the Sino-British Joint Declaration (after declaring only one previous breach since the handover). On 6 Octoberalongside Germany, we brought together a total of 39 countries to express grave concern at the situation in Xinjiang and Hong Kong in a joint statement at the UN General Assembly Third Committee. This built on the UK’s joint statement at the Human Rights Council in June, where we secured support from 27 other countries. On 22 February the Foreign Secretary attended the UN Human Rights Council, and called for the UN to respond, and undertook to continue to raise international support for Hong Kong. The FCDO worked closely with the Home Office and other departments to establish a new bespoke visa route for British Nationals (Overseas) and their close family members; 34, people applied to the scheme between January and March

    • Russia’s actions continued to pose an acute and direct threat to the national security of the UK and its partners. We responded to this destabilising activity wherever it occurred. We announced a series of attributions and responses to cyber-attacks, political interference, and other malign activity by Russia. In response to the chemical weapons attack on Alexei Navalny and his detention on arbitrary charges, the FCDO led diplomatic efforts at the Organization for Security and Cooperation in Europe (OSCE), Council of Europe, and UN Human Rights Council to condemn these actions and call on Russia to uphold its international obligations. We led a joint statement in the Organisation for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons supported by 58 States Parties, calling for Russia to be held to account and enforced asset freezes and travel bans on six individuals and one organisation responsible for the poisoning. The FCDO continued to maintain hon start game error of engagement with the Russian government in support of UK interests, last error 14001, to raise concerns and discuss shared global challenges, including a visit to Moscow in November by the FCDO Minister for Europe and the Americas, as well as continuing to promote people-to-people links between cultural institutions and universities

    • the FCDO led cross-Government work and coordination with international partners to address Iran’s nuclear programme. This included using the mechanisms of the Joint Comprehensive Plan of Action (JCPoA) and coordination with France, Germany, and the United States, as well as China and Russia, to press Iran to return to full compliance with its JCPoA commitments. The UK also continued to meet its JCPoA commitments and go beyond them through support to the Instrument in Support of Trade Exchanges (INSTEX) trade facilitation vehicle, to promote humanitarian trade with Iran. We continued to hold Iran to account for its destabilising and dangerous actions in the region and further afield, including through the promotion of maritime security in the Persian Gulf to ensure the safety of shipping through the Strait of Hormuz. Iran’s human rights record continues to be of serious concern to the UK and it remains one of the FCDO’s Human Rights Priority Countries. We raised human rights with the Iranian government at all levels and acted with the international community to press Iran to improve its poor record. At the Human Rights Council in Marchwe strongly supported the renewal of the mandate of the UN Special Rapporteur on the Hon start game error of Human Rights in Iran

    • the Global Human Rights sanctions regime was established in July – giving the UK a powerful tool to hold to account those involved in serious human rights violations or abuses around the world, using targeted asset freezes and travel bans. Since its launch, we have designated 78 individuals and entities from 10 countries. This includes designations in relation to the mistreatment and death of Sergei Magnitsky, the murder of Jamal Khashoggi and the serious human rights violations that have taken place – and persist – in Xinjiang. In Decemberwe imposed sanctions on Russian individuals and entities responsible for torture and murder of LGBT people in Chechnya. On 15 Octoberunder the EU’s chemical weapons sanctions regime, the UK enforced sanctions against six individuals and an entity involved in the poisoning and attempted murder of Russian activist Alexei Navalny. The UK applied these sanctions under our own independent sanctions regime, which sends a strong signal that we will continue to hold those responsible to account. To transfer EU and UN sanctions regimes into UK domestic law and to extend those regimes to the Crown Dependences and Overseas Territories, last error 14001, we laid almost statutory instruments under the Sanctions and Anti-Money Laundering Act (the Sanctions Act). The new regimes came into force at the end of the Transition Period (31 December ). At the same time, we transitioned into UK law approximately 1, EU sanctions designations. These are published on sprers.eu in the UK Sanctions List. This list also contains those designated by the UN (also approximately 1,), designations that the UK is required by international law to implement

    Through our ambition to make the UK a Great Science, Technology and Data Power, we deliver cutting-edge technology and research-led solutions in health, education, resilience, low carbon technologies, agriculture and economic development, conflict, and poverty. In to

    • with the department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy (BEIS), the FCDO led work internationally to support the transition to secure clean, low-cost energy that helps mitigate climate change and ensures no one is left behind. FCDO programmes supported improved access to modern energy through off-grid renewable sources, hon start game error. The recently completed £40 million Results Based Financing (RBF) for Low Carbon Energy Access programme pioneered a ‘payment for results’ approach to stimulating energy markets and increasing private investment. Over million people have gained improved access to clean energy as a result of the programme using technologies such as domestic solar, household biogas, and cleaner cookstoves. The UK announced that from 31 Marchthe government will no longer provide support for the fossil fuel energy sector load dll error, please update system, other than in limited circumstances

    • the FCDO’s Frontier Technologies Hub programme tested and scaled frontier technology such as drones and Artificial Intelligence. Through 38 pilots sincethe programme has built capability across the department on a range of technologies including electric vehicles hon start game error Kenya and Rwanda, and drones for infrastructure monitoring in Tanzania and tackling locust outbreaks in East Africa

    To build a better world, we need to be supportive, empathetic, inventive, passionate, and above all, cooperative. SDG 17 promotes strong global partnerships and cooperation, through means including trade, research partnerships and Official Development Assistance, ensuring a strategic approach to international development. In to

    • the UK published the Integrated Review of Security, last error 14001, Defence, Development and Foreign Policy. Last error 14001 defines the Government’s ambition for the UK’s role in the world and the long-term strategic aims for our national security and foreign policy, sets out the way in which the UK will be a problem-solving and burden-sharing nation and also sets a strong direction for recovery from COVID, at home and overseas, so that together we can build back better

    • with UK support, the multilateral development banks made over US$ billion available to low-income countries. We worked with our G20 partners to extend the Debt Service Suspension Initiative, which suspends debt repayments to official bilateral creditors from the world’s poorest countries (to December ); made a leading contribution of £ million to the IMF’s Catastrophe Containment and Relief Trust; and committed an additional £ billion loan to the Poverty Reduction and Growth Trust Fund to finance concessional IMF’s lending programmes in the poorest countries

    • low-income countries which traded with the UK under the EU’s Generalised Scheme of Preferences (GSP) continued to benefit from preferential tariffs through the UK’s new GSP since 1 January

    We seek closer relations in the Indo‑Pacific. The Indo-Pacific region matters to the UK: it is critical to our economy, our security and our global ambition last error 14001 support open societies. As outlined in the Integrated Review, the UK will be the European partner with the broadest and most integrated presence in the Indo-Pacific – committed for the long term, with closer and deeper partnerships, bilaterally and multilaterally. The UK will seek closer relations through regional institutions, such as the Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN), last error 14001, to tackle global challenges, support ASEAN’s central role in regional stability and prosperity and enable sustainable development in South East Asia. In to

    • the UK submitted access violation. error. log updated application to become an ASEAN Dialogue Partner in June The Foreign Secretary has reaffirmed that the UK will be an energetic and dependable partner in last error 14001 growing prosperity of the Indo-Pacific region. He has demonstrated UK commitment during several visits to the region inincluding a visit to India in December In Septemberhe also visited the Republic of Korea and Vietnam and helped secure new Free Trade Agreements with hon start game error countries. The UK continued to deliver Indo-Pacific Tilt objectives during our year of international leadership ahead of the G7 and COP The Foreign Secretary extended guest invitations to the G7 Foreign and Development Ministers’ Meeting to IndoPacific countries including India, Australia, the Republic of Korea, and Brunei (as the ASEAN Chair) in order to drive G7 engagement and to broaden UK reach and appeal in the Indo-Pacific

    • the UK has, and continues to, tackle climate change, using both adaptation and mitigation activity to support a transition to clean, resilient and sustainable growth in the Indo- Pacific through influence with major and growing emitters and the most vulnerable countries, linked directly to skype 1601 error fix wider COP26 strategy. The UK also launched negotiations for ambitious new free trade agreements with Australia and New Zealand, and we will pursue accession to the Comprehensive and Progressive Agreement for Trans-Pacific Partnership (CPTPP), to secure increased trade and investment opportunities, and to diversify our trading links and supply chains, embedding open trade and integration

    Economic growth that delivers decent work for all is the cornerstone for advancing global prosperity, last error 14001, equal economic opportunities, and the elimination of poverty. It provides a key foundation for error 017 undefined symbol takinglesson mutual interdependence that promotes international security and a more resilient, interconnected, more technologically advanced world. We enable low-income countries’ integration into the global economy, creating stronger trade and investment partners for the future, through economic partnership agreements and an improved unilateral trade preferences scheme that contribute to poverty reduction and strengthen our supply chains. In to

    • the FCDO funded a range of initiatives targeted at expanding investment and boosting intra-Commonwealth trade, last error 14001, including our support for the Commonwealth Standards Network, our leadership, with South Africa, of the Digital Cluster of the Commonwealth Connectivity Agenda and our investment in SheTrades Commonwealth, which has helped over 3, women-owned businesses to expand internationally and helped generate almost £30 million in sales in its four target countries

    • the FCDO worked through the International Financial Institutions to ensure governments and business in low-income countries can access affordable financing and advisory support, and to urgently establish safety nets to protect the most vulnerable – supporting over US$ billion in hon start game error Group committed over US$ million of finance, supporting businesses in Africa and South Asia, the regions with the worst poverty impacts, to protect jobs and incomes. In response to COVID, CDC pivoted all of its investment activities to help tackle the economic and healthcare impacts of the pandemic in Africa and South Asia, by supporting existing client businesses to safeguard their development impact and weather the crisis, and by looking at ways to scale up their response, extending financial support and expert advice to other businesses suffering from the effects of the crisis

    • the Vulnerable Supply Chains Facility (VSCF) was set up in August to enable vulnerable people and supply chains in agriculture and the garments sectors to recover from and remain resilient to the economic and social impacts of COVID – explicitly targeting women who are more likely to have lost jobs. The VSCF is expected to providepeople (50%+ women) with direct access to services to boost their resilience and benefit up topeople in wider communities through strengthened and more resilient supply chains

    • the FCDO made a tangible contribution towards closing the global infrastructure gap with low carbon, resilient and inclusive infrastructure, enabling essential services hon start game error enhance beneficiary countries’ prosperity, public health, and well-being, whilst helping unlock stimulus investments that are particularly relevant to counter the impact of the pandemic. The FCDO’s support to CoST – the Infrastructure Transparency Initiative – led to US$ million in cost saving to public funded infrastructure projects by the Government of Thailand

    • We supported research to strengthen sectors particularly impacted by COVID, such as global transport and energy systems, through our £18 million High Volume Transport (HVT), £28 million Research for Community Access (ReCAP), and £ million Energy and Economic Growth (EEG) programmes.

    • our £ million Manufacturing Africa programme worked with governments, foreign manufacturing producers, buyers, and financiers to remove market barriers and broker new high-impact investment deals. Inthe first year of implementation, a pipeline of potential deals were established that has the potential to generate up to £ billion in additional Foreign Direct Investment (FDI) and create or maintain 82, direct and indirect jobs. Support was completed for seven investment deals facilitating £42 million in FDI and creating 9, jobs. The programme also responded to COVID by re-orienting activities to support investors and local governments in their response

    The UK left the European Union [footnote 7] on 31 January The UK Government’s Integrated Review of Security, Defence, last error 14001, Development and Foreign Policy noted that we remain deeply invested in the security and prosperity of Europe. Our exit from the EU means we have the opportunity to follow different economic and political paths where this is in our interests, and to mark a distinctive approach to foreign policy. Equally, we will work with the EU where our interests coincide – for example, last error 14001, in supporting the stability and security of our continent and in cooperating on climate action and biodiversity. In to [footnote 8]:

    • under the Withdrawal Agreement, the UK sought to meet outstanding commitments from the EU budget including external action, development, and humanitarian aid (Heading IV of the EU budget). The UK also undertook to meet outstanding commitments for the off-budget European Development Fund (EDF), the EU Emergency Trust Fund for stability and addressing root causes of irregular migration and displaced persons in Africa (the EUTF Africa), and to the Facility for Refugees in Turkey (FRIT). This means a declining tail of UK contributions to EU development programmes untilwhich is part of the wider financial settlement in the Withdrawal Agreement

    • the EU-UK Trade and Cooperation Agreement provides for UK-EU cooperation on current and emerging global issues of common interest, including sustainable development amongst other areas. Eurostat produces an annual monitoring report on progress towards the Sustainable Development Goals in an EU context (which includes EU external action) [footnote 9][footnote 10]. The EU global response to COVID includes supporting efforts to halt the spread of the virus and helping countries to strengthen their healthcare, water and sanitation systems. The EU has contributed €1 billion to COVAX to help ensure safe and effective vaccines for low and middle-income countries

    • the FCDO’s responsibility for the UK’s residual share (equity and liabilities) of European Investment Bank (EIB) external mandate guarantees and investments, that we have been part of whilst an EU Member State and until the end of the Withdrawal Agreement Implementation Period (31 December ), continued. These commitments are long-term, last error 14001, generally several decades, including the EIB African, Caribbean and Pacific (ACP) Investment Facility and guarantees to EIB own resources lending to ACP countries and the Overseas Countries and Territories

    • in the Cabinet Office developed a large cross-government operation, D20, designed to ensure that the UK Government could mitigate any impact of the end of the EU Transition Period on UK Citizens and on the economic stability of the UK. The FCDO’s role in this operation was to assess, manage and mitigate the international-facing risks and impacts.

    The Trade and Cooperation Agreement reached with the EU removed some of the issues, but we still needed to be ready to A huge amount of work went into planning and delivering the response, against a challenging backdrop and considerable last error 14001. Over the autumn we trained over staff from across the department. We stood up operations at the end of December: at its height, our response entailed two shifts in London, with roughly 50 people a shift, seven days a week. 32 Posts in our European network also stood up response structures, and surge teams deployed and on standby to high-volume passenger terminals. We remained in enhanced response for 8 weeks. During the response the FCDO lobbied EU Member States to apply the correct immigration rules for UK residents, worked with the Department for International Trade (DIT) to resolve issues with European logistics companies, provided consular support, and maintained the supply of UK food products to Gibraltar. The team also worked hp error 49.2f9d lobby EU Member States on their procedures for testing hauliers travelling from the UK and supporting the UK Government’s work on vaccines.

    Together with the ongoing response to COVID, getting this right was the Government’s top priority for the end of Despite all the pressures – including the need to respond quickly to a new strain of COVID over the same period affecting the entry of British Nationals into other countries– the FCDO delivered an excellent response, tackling problems promptly and effectively, with skill, expertise and agility.

    • the FCDO maintained responsibility to deliver the cross-government International Agreements Programme – established to and for UK nationals travelling to the EU. transition key international agreements in which the UK previously participated as a member of the European Union, where it was in the UK’s interests to do so. Thanks to a huge effort involving 10 departments, the programme delivered agreements with over 90 countries and 22 multilateral organisations, last error 14001, covering a range of issues critical to UK interests, including trade, nuclear energy, aviation, customs, fisheries and security. Legacy FCO played a key role throughout, coordinating the overall programme, providing legal and policy advice, directly negotiating some of the agreements, supporting other government departments through the Diplomatic Network, and bringing the agreements into last error 14001. This has been security-violation error cisco significant and historic achievement. The UK has never previously concluded so many international agreements in such a short time period. The success of the International Agreements Programme reinforces our sovereign relationship with friends and partners across the globe.

    FCDO’s Risk Profile

    The FCDO operates globally and seeks to deliver on ambitious objectives in challenging environments, and therefore faces a wide range of risks.

    In tothe direct and indirect effects of the COVID pandemic on last error 14001 people, policies, programmes and resources of FCDO have been unprecedented. High levels of uncertainty in relation to delivery of pre-existing and COVIDrelated objectives have been a defining feature of the already complex risk profiles of the FCDO and its predecessor departments this year, as well as exacerbating and complicating the handling of many other risks.

    The FCDO was created through merging DFID and FCO in order to act as a springboard for the UK’s international efforts. The FCDO transformation process underway is expected to realise significant benefits for the UK. To achieve this, hon start game error, we have accepted the short-term risks of implementing an ambitious merger, which requires setting new policies and systems and bringing together our diverse staff to forge a new culture.

    The risks on the Last error 14001 Principal Risk Report cover the breadth of the department’s work. These are summarised below through the lens of our seven risk categories.

    Strategy and context risks relating to the potential actions of competitors and adversaries have increased, while risks relating to conflict and instability remain high. We address these risks through diplomatic engagement, robust, consistent, and clear messaging, and cooperation with allies and partners. The risk of divergence or misalignment between UK positions and those of our allies and partners, which could undermine UK objectives, are mitigated through continuous and broad engagement and discussion with our partners at all levels, from Ministerial to working level. COVID continues to pose significant risks to our staff and network, programme monitoring and management, ability to respond to crises and deliver consular services, last error 14001. The risk posed by a global economic slowdown has decreased. The wider effect of COVID on the impact, last error 14001, likelihood and mitigation of other risks is also considered and addressed.

    Policy and programme delivery risks have changed over the course of to The risk posed to UK objectives by the UK-EU future relationship has much reduced following the end of the Transition period. Risks arising from specific aspects of the relationship have been addressed through direct political and diplomatic engagement. The risk to the FCDO’s ability to deliver humanitarian response where needed around the world has increased, due to COVID and its impact on travel, transport and resources, while the demand for humanitarian assistance has also increased. Rigorous prioritisation of responses has been strengthened, and we have continued our engagement hon start game error other donors to deliver the best possible coordinated responses. We have faced risks hon start game error our supply chains through COVID and the implementation of ODA reductions and have worked in partnership with our supply partners to tackle these.

    Public service delivery and operations include risks to crisis response and consular delivery, which have fluctuated based on COVID impact and been addressed through surging in additional resources to respond to the needs of UK citizens and putting in place virtual access to previously in-person services. The risks to maintaining our estate and cyber-security remain high and we have placed particular emphasis on ensuring programmes are in place to address the challenges.

    Our people risks have remained elevated due principally to COVID restrictions, last error 14001, the challenges of delivering diplomacy and development in the current global context and a high volume of change through transformation as a result of the merger. The resilience of staff across our global network and in the UK has been under significant pressure. The department has maintained a consistent focus on the wellbeing and resilience of staff, and support for our global network through a turbulent period. This has included a staff vaccination programme, exemptions from management quarantine, and financial support for quarantine and testing. We will retain a strong focus central seven - error boosting this support further and strengthening the resilience of our overseas network as we move into We continue to manage the safeguarding risk to programme beneficiaries and hon start game error through the delivery of hon start game error medium-term strategy to improve prevention of and response to sexual abuse and exploitation and sexual harassment.

    Financial and fiduciary risks have varied over the course of the year. The risk of fraud and aid diversion rose initially due to COVID, but later reduced through implementation of strengthened controls. We have managed new financial risks to implement the temporary reduction of Official Development Assistance from to % of GNI in We continue to work closely with partners, and across strategy, finance, commercial and programme delivery teams to implement the budgetary reductions.

    The varied nature of the FCDO’s work, its multiple commitments, and the challenging environments we face, set against high public expectations of delivery by the FCDO, have resulted in significant risk to the FCDO’s reputation. This has been addressed through development and delivery of appropriate strategies, prioritisation of consular delivery, robust management of policy and programme delivery risks, effective relationship management and good communication.

    Financial review

    In tothe FCDO successfully managed their finances within all Parliamentary and HM Treasury controls. The year saw a major impact of COVID‑19 on operational costs and project delivery, and the need to bring together the finances of the FCO and DFID. The Government also announced the decision to reduce temporarily the overall amount spent on Official Development Assistance from to per cent of Gross National Income from to

    The public sector budgeting framework

    The FCDO’s spending is broken down last error 14001 several different spending totals, for which Parliament’s approval is sought.

    The spending totals which Parliament votes are:

    • Resource Departmental Expenditure Limit (Resource DEL) – programme funds, running costs, frontline diplomacy, the overseas platform, scholarships, grants to international starforce vista error 1275 and other bodies supporting FCDO objectives, and associated non-cash items

    • Capital Departmental Expenditure Limit (Capital DEL) – investment in capital assets, capital grants, research and development, loan funding to the British Council, and investments and assets to create growth in the future for either the UK, or our partner governments

    • Resource Annually Managed Expenditure (Resource AME) – less predictable spending: in the FCDO’s case this largely consists of non-cash accounting costs, such as provisions, unrealised foreign exchange gains or losses, and the impact of changes in the valuation of the FCDO’s development capital investments. It also includes the refund of certain taxes and duties paid by foreign and Commonwealth governments

    • Capital Annually Managed Expenditure (Capital AME) – this covers the FCDO’s capital injections in its wholly owned self-financing public corporation, CDC Group plc

    to Outturn compared to Estimate

    £mOutturnEstimateSaving (£m)Saving (%)
    Resource DEL9,9,27%
    Capital DEL2,2,%
    Resource AME86%
    Capital AME00%

    The main financial performance indicators used to monitor FCDO’s activities are the budgetary control totals established through the Main and Supplementary Estimates, the profiling of these costs on a monthly basis, and the variance between actual and budgeted costs. Any significant variances on each operational area are identified and explained on a monthly basis and, where required, action is taken to understand and, where appropriate, address movements.

    Outturn Against Estimate Variances

    This explains how the FCDO’s spending compared to the amounts voted by Parliament in the Estimates. The figures are shown in the Statement of Parliamentary Supply (SOPS) (page ).

    Resource DEL

    SOPS – Headings A through to N: an underspend of £27 million (%) of £ billion budget.

    The FCDO reprioritised resources within Parliamentary controls to absorb in-year underspends. The anticipated underspend on operating costs due to the impact of COVID, allowed the FCDO to maximise programme spend on critical aid programmes in the late stages of the Financial Year. The underspend includes £17 million of ringfenced depreciation which cannot be used to cover other expenditure.

    Resource AME

    SOPS – Headings O, Q and R: an underspend of £86 million (%) of £ million budget.

    Resource AME expenditure is volatile in nature and the FCDO takes a conservative approach towards forecasting its requirements. We need to ensure there is sufficient headroom in budgets to accommodate the impact of unforeseen global events on foreign exchange rate volatility and market conditions, hon start game error. Headings O and Q show an underspend of £83 million. This relates to non-cash AME for accounting adjustments including unrealised gains/ losses on FCDO’s financial instruments such as forward purchasing contracts; provisions; revaluations/ impairments of the FCDO global estate and revaluations of development capital.

    Heading R has an underspend of £3 last error 14001 cash AME relating to the reimbursement of certain duties, taxes and licence fees paid by diplomatic missions in the UK.

    Resource AME expenditure in ‑21 (£)FCDO (£)
    Financial Instruments unrealised FX Losses/(Gains) (e.g. peacekeeping forward purchase contracts and promissory notes)66,
    Reimbursement of duties and taxes36,
    Provisions (in particular, financial commitments to the GAVI vaccines alliance and terminal gratuities),
    Impairments (revaluation of worldwide properties) & AME Depreciation59,
    Movement on defined benefit pensions
    Loan discounting(39,)
    Development Capital Fair Value revaluations37,
    Financial guarantee,
    Total,

    Capital DEL

    SOPS – Headings D, E, F, G, I and L: an underspend of £ million (%) of £ billion budget. Of this underspend, £78 million (%) relates to £ million of additional ringfenced funding provided in the Supplementary Estimates to make available a loan facility of £ million to the British Council, whose commercial income fell substantially due to COVID The British Council linux error /bin/insmod exited abnormally down hon start game error million of the facility, which was significantly less than originally estimated due to a combination of rigorous cash management, cost-cutting measures, and commercial income picking up as teams delivered the backlog of exams and teaching centres re-opened. The underspend did not come at any opportunity cost to the wider FCDO.

    The remaining £28 million (1%) underspend is the result of COVID’s impact on project delivery, a timing issue on recognition of a debt instrument (£5 million), and a small buffer to protect year end controls.

    Capital AME

    SOPS – Heading Hon start game error there was a full spend of Capital AME. This represents investments in FCDO’s wholly owned self-financing public corporation, CDC Group plc.

    Budget to Accounts Reconciliation

    The FCDO’s Resource Outturn (DEL and AME) was £ billion compared to £ billion net resource in the Consolidated Statement of Comprehensive Net Expenditure (SOCNE).

    The key differences are:

    • capital grants and research & development (that meets ESA 10 criteria for the national accounts) are treated as expenditure in the resource accounts but as capital in budgets

    • profit on disposal and income payable to the Consolidated Fund last error 14001 in SOCNE, but not Resource outturn

    • the SOCNE does not include EU attribution, in line with rules on activities charged directly

    Trend analysis

    The samsung smart hdd error below shows overall spending for the last five years and plans presented in the Estimate for Prior year outturn figures have been combined for legacy FCO and legacy DFID, which merged in September There were different drivers of spending in the two departments: for example, DFID’s overall spending was underpinned by the % ODA commitment and the share of ODA funding allocated to other departments. Points to note are:

    • Resource DEL remained broadly stable until topeaking in to in part to meet the % commitment and due to a switch from Capital DEL to Resource DEL budget. Plans for to reflect the decision to reduce temporarily the overall amount spent on aid from to % of GNI

    • Capital DEL saw a reduction in topredominantly as a result of a reduction in some of the UK’s key multilateral commitments as we approached the end of previous replenishment cycles. Plans for to reflect the decision to reduce temporarily, the overall amount spent on aid from to % of GNI

    • Resource AME is used primarily for accounting adjustments to provisions and financial instruments such as loans and shares. AME expenditure, by definition, is volatile – and in some years shows as negative spend

    • Capital AME budget is used to make investments in the FCDO’s wholly owned self-financing public corporation, hon start game error, CDC Group plc. Capital injections into CDC contributes towards the FCDO’s financial transactions target. This increased steadily year on year until to

    Spending Trends: combined FCO and DFID budgets, £ million

    The information in the trend analysis ties to common core tables (Annex C), where further breakdowns are provided.

    Analysis of the Consolidated Statement of Financial Position

    ‑21 £‑20 £Change £Change %Explanation of movement between ‑20 and ‑21
    Property, plant and equipment2,3,(,)%Transfer of 3 UK properties to GPA £ million. £ million depreciation was charged in-year and there was a further £ million of impairment driven by foreign exchange fluctuation.
    Financial investments10,11,(,)%£1, million transfer to HMT of EBRD shareholding and £ million loss in valuation of International Financial Institution shareholdings offset with £ million additions (incl. £ million CDC capital addition).
    Cash and cash equivalents,96,,%Cash held at year end is higher than usual due to transfer of cash from UK Visas & Immigration (UKVI) at period end.
    Provisions (noncurrent)(1,)(,)(,)%Increase driven by additional IFFIM Covax Provision £ million offset by reduction in IFFIM provision £ million.

    Detail of the type of spend incurred over the year

    COVID

    The FCDO received £ million of additional funding in the Supplementary Estimate to make available a loan facility for the British Council; other spend on COVID was met from within FCDO’s to settlement. The FCDO had considered seeking additional funding in the Supplementary Estimate from the Emergency Disaster Relief Fund, to cover the cost of the crisis response and to support Anguilla. However, we were able to meet the costs from emerging underspends mainly driven by COVID’s impact on our ability to deliver International Programmes and overseas maintenance projects; by reduced workforce travel; and by lower pay costs due to the recruitment freeze.

    Analysis of FCDO’s COVID expenditure

    How funds were spentTotal committed £Disbursed in ‑21 £Disbursed in ‑20 £
    DEL expenditure
    Research, development and distribution of COVID vaccines, treatments and tests.,,
    Support to the humanitarian response through UN agencies, Red Cross and other international non-governmental organisations, including UK charities.,,
    Contributions to IMF’s Catastrophe Containment and Relief Trust (CCRT) which provides grants for debt relief for the poorest and most vulnerable countries hit by catastrophic natural or public health disasters thus freeing up resources to focus on their COVID country response.,,
    Adaptation of existing programmes and new, in-country programmes directly related to COVID,
    Loan to British Council to help manage the impacts of COVID52,
    Grant to British Council to help manage the impacts of COVID26,
    Repatriation support for UK travellers stranded overseas.19,10,
    Loans to UK travellers stranded overseas.2,
    Enhanced support for British nationals travelling overseas.3,

    The table below sets out how FCDO’s funds were spent on COVID We are unable to comment on how COVID has impacted upon centrally agreed Strategic Objectives or Priority Outcomes inas these were not established for the Financial Year. 

    How funds were spentTotal committed £Disbursed in ‑21 £Disbursed in ‑20 £
    Procuring essential medical supplies, staff and logistical support to overseas territories, Security Assistance to local authorities in the Cayman Islands and the Turks and Caicos
    Islands, and supporting border security measures in Anguilla.13,
    Emergency financial support provided to Anguilla to keep essential public services running and respond to the impacts of COVID12,
    Additional operating costs as a direct result of COVID such as upgrading technology and vaccinating overseas staff.2,
    FCDO Services supplier relief to assist the COVID response.1,
    Wilton Park – additional financing to cover income lost as a result of the impact of C3,
    Total DEL expenditure,1,36,
    AME expenditure
    Gavi COVID Vaccines Advanced Market Commitment (COVAX AMC) to support the provision of vaccines to low and lower-middle income countries [footnote 11],
    Total AME expenditure,
    Total DEL and AME expenditure1,1,36,

    The main areas of spending related to COVID were:

    • ODA programme: COVID is now one of the seven priorities for UK Aid, hon start game error, identified in the FCDO’s new Strategic Framework for ODA. The FCDO has committed up to £ billion of UK aid to address the impacts of the COVID pandemic, of these commitments, £ million was disbursed in The FCDO has adapted existing programming, and created new ones in-country, amounting to more than £ million ODA in Financial Year to respond to the COVID pandemic. Further details on COVID spending is provided at page 27

    • consular response: Our consular network focused on supporting British nationals through the COVID pandemic including total spend of £29 million on a global repatriation operation, supporting Hon start game error nationals overseas to get home to the UK. FCDO has provided more than 3, loans to support British nationals who otherwise would not last error 14001 able to get home, with a total value of over £2 million

    • support for the Overseas Territories: The FCDO provided £ million to support the Overseas Territories (where the vast majority of citizens are also British citizens) through the Conflict, Stability and Security Fund and International Programme Fund. The funds procured essential medical supplies, staff and logistical support, as well as supporting medical facilities in the Falkland Islands; providing a Security Assistance Team to local authorities in the Cayman Islands and Turks and Caicos; and, supporting border security measures in Anguilla. A further £ million of emergency financial support was provided to Anguilla to keep essential public services running and respond to the impacts of COVID

    • British Council loan funding: The FCDO provided the British Council with a revolving credit facility of hon start game error million in June This was increased to £ million in Februarywith a repayment date of 31 December In hon start game error FCDO received a budget of £ million Capital DEL for the credit facility, hon start game error, of which the British Council drew down £52 million. All loans are being provided on commercial terms. pioneer p5630mp error-11 Capital DEL section of the Financial Review for more details)

    • FCDO Services – FCDO provided Supplier Relief to assist the COVID response, which included a contribution of £m to indirect costs which was accounted for as financing in FCDO Services accounts in accordance with the FReM. This ensured FCDO Pbsvc error ac3 forecast cashflows met their working capital requirements in future forecasts

    • operational impact: The Last error 14001 spent around £3 million as a direct result of the pandemic: on vaccinations for staff based in the overseas network and on air travel and accommodation from the drawing down of staff from overseas posts and their return to Post. COVID had a larger indirect financial impact, for example through the disruption to planned travel, projects and other activity

    EU Exit

    The FCDO received £ million in Spending Review and spent £ million to support the continuation of the UK’s successful separation from the European Union throughout the Transition Period and beyond. The UK will remain deeply invested in the security hon start game error prosperity of Europe. The COVID pandemic has reinforced the need for the UK to have a close relationship with European partners and a strong global presence to reinforce our standing on the global stage.

    Analysis of departmental group’s EU Exit expenditure

    The table below sets out how FCDO’s funds were spent on EU Exit. We are unable to comment on how EU Exit has impacted upon centrally agreed Strategic Objectives or Priority Outcomes inas these were not established for the Financial Year.

    How funds were spentTotal committed £Disbursed in ‑21 £Disbursed in ‑20 £
    DEL expenditure
    Staff and programme funding to help EU exit preparations.46,44,
    Preparations for a possible no-deal EU exit.2,
    UK’s share of Western European Union pension liabilities.24,
    Total DEL expenditure70,47,
    AME expenditure
    Provision for UK’s share of EUISS (EU-funded security think tank) pension liabilities.3,
    Total AME expenditure3,
    Total DEL and AME expenditure73,47,

    The funding has enabled the FCDO to continue to support over roles, retaining essential expertise and contributing to the following goals:

    • support on-going future relationship negotiations with the EU through lobbying and engagement with Brussels and the EU 27 Member States, including through specialist support

    • deepen our bilateral relationships with our European neighbours, allies and partners and increase our capacity to engage and influence

    • support delivery of key foreign policy issues that we lead on

    • develop and use Europe expertise to focus on more coordinated international engagement

    • successfully transition to a UK sanctions regime, strengthening sanctions as a key tool as a force for good. In addition to funding the above roles and their associated administration costs, the fund has allowed essential programme work to be carried out throughout the Financial Year

    The UK Nationals Support programme fund has provided assistance and support to at risk UK Nationals applying for EU residency across 13 countries in Europe. Funds were awarded to 8 implementing partners, hon start game error have directly assisted UK nationals through advertising campaigns, last error 14001, dedicated helpline support networks and direct outreach, where possible. So far, the Fund has reached nearlyindividuals, with just over 16, UK Nationals provided with individual support from a caseworker, to help them secure their residency.

    The Europe Future Relations Programme fund has been used to achieve the following key policy objectives:

    • enhance the delivery of our bilateral strategies to preserve and strengthen our relationships in Europe, and work with European governments and institutions on policies that reflect the UK’s national interests

    • support the negotiation of the Trade and Cooperation Agreement with the EU

    • promote UK values, influence and soft power to address shared global challenges

    • promote UK prosperity through economic development, clean and sustainable growth, and better business environments in Europe

    Official Development Assistance

    During to the overall size of the FCDO’s ODA budget was primarily determined by forecasts of the extent of funding required to meet the UK’s obligation to spend % of Gross National Income on ODA. In Julyso that we could react to the potential shrinkage in the economy and therefore a decrease in the value of the % commitment, we identified a £ billion package of reductions in the UK Government’s planned ODA spend so that we could proceed prudently for the remainder of This package included underspends, delaying activity and stopping some spend.

    Revised projections in late showed a smaller drop in GNI than previously forecast, and we were able to mobilise £bn of ODA spending in calendar year This illustrates the flexibility required to manage the dynamic nature of the department’s work, whereby plans can often change and swift action is needed to initiate and progress individual programmes.

    The Syntax error on line 299 of /etc/apache2/apache2.conf provisional statistics on international development confirmed that the UK met the target to spend % of gross national income on official development assistance in the calendar year: Read the statistics.

    The Foreign Secretary led a cross-government review of how ODA is allocated for to against the Government’s priorities after the spending review. The final allocations were provided in a written ministerial statement on 26 January (HCWS).

    The FCDO’s ODA spend for to was £ billion. As in previous years, the majority of this was spent on programme expenditure. Last error 14001 on to outturn and to plans is in Annex A and Annex B.

    Sustainability Report

    Section 1: Overall strategy for sustainability

    The FCDO is committed to sustainable diplomacy and development and has an important role promoting global action on climate change. We aim to lead by example through reducing the environmental impact of our own operations. The FCDO legacy departments had a strong record of improving environmental performance and by coming together, we are unifying sustainability efforts to achieve the ambitious Greening Government Commitment (GGC) targets in the UK and maximise energy efficiency of our global estate to assist with the transition to net zero carbon. In previous years, the FCDO legacy departments had separately reported environmental performance in line with the GGCs. In light of the FCDO merger, we are now reporting as one department and have combined all environmental performance reporting. to has seen another year of progress for sustainability in a changing and challenging year. COVID has had a significant impact on our progress towards our GGC targets, with changes in our ways of working and office use resulting in decreased use of facilities. There are lessons we can take from our experience of COVID to embed greener behaviours into our operations, as we build back better.

    Our ongoing progress towards our to GGC targets has hon start game error positive. The engagement with Green Champions and Green Team Networks within the FCDO, and senior endorsement has helped to embed key messages and ensure our staff have access to learn and share best environmental practice. This has helped encourage staff to take individual action and champion sustainability in their day-to-day ways of working, providing us with confidence that with increased staff engagement and action, last error 14001, we can further asus error beep codes environmental performance in to and beyond, setting a positive trajectory for net zero carbon.

    Our focus in to will be to set more ambitious targets as part of the GGCs to and particularly improve performance where we have been challenged in the past. Our next GGC targets will re-baseline to provide a more accurate representation of the whole FCDO UK estate and the environment within which the FCDO operates. We are aligning our internal strategies and policies to ensure our progress and ambition reflects the department’s desire to be a leader in this area, aligning operations with diplomacy and development work on climate change, in order to contribute to the achievement of the Global Sustainable Development Goals, ensure a green and resilient recovery from COVID and make the FCDO the greenest diplomatic and development service in the hon start game error management system

    The FCDO holds an International Organization for Standardization (ISO) accredited Environmental Management System (EMS), covering The FCDO offices in King Charles Street and Hanslope Park. ISO certification has been held since and the EMS was last recertified to ISO in August A small number of minor non-conformities were raised during this recertification audit, last error 14001, relating to waste management, wastewater discharge consent monitoring, training, last error 14001, and internal audit completeness, hon start game error. Staff within the FCDO and our facilities management provider are working to implement efficient and long-lasting solutions to these issues to ensure we are able to maintain ISO certification and meet all legal compliance obligations. The FCDO continues to invest in the EMS to drive continuous improvement and ensure the FCDO complies with its legal obligations. The legacy DFID estate (Abercrombie House and 22 Whitehall) is not accredited to ISO The Sustainable Operations and Programme Board has agreed to explore extending the EMS to include the full FCDO UK estate.

    The FCDO undertake a number of internal audits on key areas to ensure compliance, including waste management, emergency preparedness, catering, transport, wood, and metal workshops. We are also working to improve performance of our data centres to ensure they achieve the EU Code of Conduct standards, delivering a 21st century platform for the FCDO, reducing operating costs and improving the environmental efficiency of i/q error 32 estate.

    Greening Government Commitments

    All UK Government departments have determined GGC targets for their UK operations, setting out the actions departments and their agencies will take to reduce their impacts on the environment. the FCDO’s GGC targets cover the FCDO’s two joint headquarters – King Charles Street in London and Abercrombie House in East Kilbride, in addition to sites in 22 Whitehall, Lancaster House and Carlton Gardens in London, Hanslope Park in Milton Keynes and Wilton Park in Sussex. Although FCDO Services (split between Hanslope Park and King Charles Street) and Wilton Park are Executive Agencies with their own Annual Reports and Accounts, all of Wilton Park’s and most of FCDO Services’ sustainability impacts are included in the figures in this report, last error 14001, because they are included in the FCDO’s GGC targets. Currently FCDO Services’ Wider Market impacts are not included, as the GGC Exemption Panel decided in to that they should be exempted from the scope.

    As part of the GGCs, we are currently reviewing the reporting scope and targets, as well as re-baselining based on to environmental performance. The FCDO’s headline performance against the GGC are set out in the table below.

    Greening Government Commitment‑10 Combined Baseline‑21 Target‑21 PerformancePerformance
    Greenhouse Gases23, tCO2e11, tCO2e Aiming for 50% reduction6, tCO2eExceeding Target
    Domestic Flights4, flights3, flights, Aiming for 30% reduction flightsExceeding Target
    Waste Production1, tonnes of wasteAiming for continuous reduction tonnesExceeding Target
    Recycling58% of waste last error 14001 for continuous reduction55% of waste recycledBehind Target
    Paper Consumption38, reams of A4 equivalent19, reams of A4e, Aiming for 50% reduction1, reams of A4eExceeding Target
    Water74,m3Aiming for continuous reduction33, m3 reductionExceeding Target

    [footnote 12]

    Section 2: Greenhouse gas emissions

    Prior to the impacts from COVID, the FCDO achieved the GGC target on greenhouse gas emissions early. Greenhouse gas emissions in the UK estate fell by a further 32% in to – resulting in a 74% total reduction since the baseline year of The table below provides headline greenhouse gas emission consumption figures and costs associated to the FCDO’s UK operations in scope for to

    Greenhouse Gas Emissions Consumption
    ‑21kWh‑MilestCO2eGBP (£)
    Greenhouse GasesElectricity17,4,£3,
    Gas2,£57,
    Heating Oil2,£34,
    Biomass,2£2,
    Biodiesel,£78,
    Whitehall District Heating Scheme1,£,
    Fugitive39
    Domestic flights77,16£55,
    Train50,3£15,
    Private Mileage,86£,
    Fleet,
    Car Services1,£37,
    Car Hire,31£37,
    Taxis27,6£47,
    Totals:
    Emissions byScope 1 (Energy Direct)
    Scope 2 (Energy Indirect)4,
    Scope 3 (Other Indirect)

    [footnote 13]

    Greening Government Commitments: Progress Against Hp 9050 4c18 service error Gas Emissions Consumption

    Greenhouse Gas Emissions by scope (tCO2e)[footnote 14]

    Domestic flights

    The table below provides headline domestic UK flight data for to

    Domestic flights to Number of flights
    Total domestic flights
    Non-financial indicatorDomestic UK air miles77, last error 14001, miles
    Carbon (tCO2e)16 tonnes CO2e

    Greening Government Commitments: Progress Against Domestic Flights Target

    In toour number of domestic flights decreased by 93% compared withresulting in a 92% total reduction since the baseline year of This downward trajectory was due to COVID and associated travel restrictions.

    The FCDO is committed to reducing the number of UK domestic flights and as operations return to more normal working practices, we aim to increase the availability of information on travel, giving staff the skills and knowledge required to execute behavioural changes. With senior management also promoting a Smarter Working environment, we aim to provide the environmental and social context required to encourage and promote these behaviour changes.

    Our new GGCs will set domestic flight mileage reduction targets and we will work with our Green Champions and Green Team networks to raise awareness of individuals’ carbon footprint and drive behavioural changes throughout the organisation. Our current travel policies strongly encourage staff to travel by rail, and the FCDO is aiming to reduce travel emissions further and only take flights by exception for UK domestic journeys. In addition, we are working to further develop our management information to help increase FCDO departments’ accountability for how they travel, and further drive the behavioural changes required to continue improving our travel habits. We will use our learning from COVID to continue to increase the use of video conferencing facilities, introduce new technology and ways of working with Office capabilities and promote Smarter Working to encourage collaboration between different locations, without the need for travel.

    Section 3: Waste management and minimisation

    The table below provides headline waste disposal figures and costs across the FCDO’s UK operations for to

    Waste‑21 TonnesFinancial Indicator
    Total waste£,
    Hazardous waste39£10,
    Total waste by method of disposalRecycled – Reused - £50,
    Landfill - 3£2,
    Waste incinerated with energy recovery - £90,
    Waste incinerated without energy recovery - 13£10,

    Greening Government Commitments: Water Reduction Process

    Waste Disposal (Tonnes)

    The FCDO’s overall waste tonnage has decreased by 79% since the to baseline, meeting the GGC target to improve our waste management by reducing the overall amount of waste generated. The FCDO continues to aim for zero waste to landfill, increase recycling rates and reduce the overall waste produce from FCDO operations.

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