Help runtime error occurred has in script

help runtime error occurred has in script

Java is missing from the Windows machine · 3rd party browser extensions are enabled for IE · urlmon. · Script error notifications are enabled · KMP. Description The error 'Runtime error RAISE_EXCEPTION has occurred' is received when attempting to execute a script using the Run mode. When MAXScript detects a runtime error in your script, it displays an error message and prints diagnostic information to the Listener output pane.

Help runtime error occurred has in script - suggest you

I created a pbix using the VennDiagram R Visual. I installed MS R Open v3.4.4 locally. I am using the VennDiagram R package v1.6.20. The diagram displays fine on my desktop. I published it to app.powerbi.com and all other visuals display correct but the Venn diagram. The dataset has less than 5000 records. I get this error:

Script Runtime Error
An error occurred while running the script
Please try again later or contact support. If you contact support, please provide these details.
Activity ID: 155f5684-ceb5-4a62-9644-1094a60367d2
Request ID: 3a68f729-afd8-e73f-f828-127a447a4aad
Correlation ID: 37987b20-4b97-1e92-ff40-dc47809e228f
Time: Wed Jun 10 2020 11:50:38 GMT-0700 (Mountain Standard Time)
Service version: 13.0.13524.230
Client version: 2006.1.01422-train
Cluster URI: https://wabi-west-us-redirect.analysis.windows.net/

Here is the R script:

library(VennDiagram)
listdataset <- lapply(dataset, function(x) { x } )
listcolor <- c("red", "yellow", "green", "blue", "gray")
listcolor <- head(listcolor, ncol(dataset))
venndiagram <- venn.diagram(listdataset, filename=NULL, na="remove", fill = listcolor, margin=0.1)
grid.draw(venndiagram)

This is me contacting support. If there is a better way to contact support, please let me know.

Runtime Error: What It Is and How to Fix It

A runtime error occurs while a program is running or when you first attempt to start the application. The error sometimes goes away on its own by simply reopening the app, but if not, there are a number of things you can try.

Runtime Errors

Depending on the situation, there are a few reasons why a runtime error might occur:

  • There's a bug in the software.
  • Memory or another system resource is in short supply.
  • You've entered a foreign character into a text field, or performed some kind of action that isn't allowed.

The error usually appears as a small window, often with an indication of the program that's being affected, and sometimes with an error code and message. The prompt might also include a suggestion to contact a support team or administrator.

Here are some examples:

Paying close attention to what the error says, if possible, is the best way to address it. If the error is too general to diagnose right off the bat, then follow the below steps in order. If it's particular, however, and mentions something like Microsoft Visual C++Runtime Library, then that's the step you should start at.

How to Fix a Runtime Error

Runtime errors pop up in a variety of situations, so the possible fixes are all over the board:

  1. Restart the computer. This is the likely solution if your computer suddenly feels like it's running much slower than usual.

    Some runtime errors are caused by memory-related issues, and restarting is the quickest way to close everything that's currently running on your PC. This will free up those previously used system resources for the program that's throwing the error.

  2. Update the program to its latest version. The runtime error might be caused by a bug that hasn't yet been patched in the release that you're using.

    For example, some users report a runtime error when they use NVIDIA GeForce Experience to check for graphics card updates. In this scenario, you'd update the NVIDIA program.

    You might need to re-download it from the software maker's site if there isn't a built-in method for checking for updates.

  3. Fully delete the program, and then reinstall it. An installation that doesn't quite finish properly can be the cause of the runtime error.

    The update procedure in the previous step might have done this, but if you're still getting the error, it's time to completely delete the program and confirm that it's being reinstalled from scratch.

    Some uninstallers don't do a great job at erasing every remnant of the file from the registry and hard drive. Try a dedicated program uninstaller if the normal tool from the app maker doesn't fix the error.

  4. Install the latest Microsoft Visual C++ Redistributable package. If your error says something about the runtime components of the Visual C++ libraries, this is likely solution.

  5. Use SFC scannow to repair corrupted Windows files. The SFC command is executed in a Command Prompt window, and might be the fix for the runtime error.

  6. Run System Restore to return your computer to a previous state. This could fix the runtime error is if it's caused by the Windows Registry being corrupt.

  7. Reinstall Windows. If focusing on a specific program didn't fix the runtime error, or if it's interfering with the way Windows works as a whole, resetting is your last option.

How Programmers Can Prevent Runtime Errors

If you're the software maker, GeeksforGeeks suggests several ways to avoid runtime errors. Follow that link for a deeper dive into the different types of runtime errors, with examples of why they're happening and what you can do to prevent them. Some fixes include avoiding variables that haven't been initialized, and not declaring too much stack memory.

Thanks for letting us know!

Toggle Menu Runtime Errors

Runtime errors are named such because MATLAB cannot tell you there is an error until you run your code. Because of this, there is no indication in the script editor if you have runtime errors!

  • MATLAB will stop evaluating code at the first error. This means there may be multiple errors in your script, but you will only see one message at a time.
  • Not only will MATLAB stop evaluating at the first line an error is encountered, it will stop evaluating at the first expression an error is encountered on. It can help to have an understanding of the order in which MATLAB evaluates statements to help when isolating the source of an error:
    1. For assignment operations (), the right-hand side is evaluated first.
    2. For function calls and indexing operators (), the expressions inside the parenthesis are evaluated first. Thus, if an error occurs evaluating an expression inside the parenthesis, MATLAB will stop before attempting to evaluate the parts outside.

Example: Isolate the Source of the Error

When we run this, we get an error related to the name . Notice that the error message does not mention at all. Use this information to narrow in on the part of the code to inspect and change.

Isolate just the part of the more complex statement and run just that part. In this case, the error message indicates the problem is with so copy+paste that part as its own statement and run it in the command window. Resolve the error with that simple part, then substitute the correction back into the full statement.

Example: Error Using a Function

Example: Two Errors on a Line

This is a combination of the two errors above:

  1. The name is not defined.
  2. We are only providing a single argument to , but it requires a second.

MATLAB will stop on the first error, since it evaluates the arguments to a function first, it will stop with the error related to before attempting to evaluate .

We can still apply the same strategy to isolating and fixing the error, we will just see that when we fix the first try evaluating the expression again we will then get the second error and will repeat the isolation strategy with the new expression.

Example: Misleading Error Message

Because of how we have written this expression, MATLAB erroneously things we are trying to use parenthesis to index into a variable named , and so its generated error message is related to indexing. This is not in fact what we are trying to do at all, so in this case the error message is misleading.

We can still use the same strategy as before to isolate the smallest chunk of code that is causing the error.

  1. First try evaluating each side of the assignment operator, . There is no error on either side.
  2. The only bit of code left is the operator itself. We can conclude that our error is related to our usage of the assignment operator and seek out prior examples of variable assignment.

Example: Comparing Incompatible Types

Example: Invalid Indexes

This error is related to the value of the index we are using. You would get a similar error if the value of the index was not an integer, e.g. . That would suggest that the variable you have asked MATLAB to use as an index is not an appropriate index and you will have to re-think what it is you are trying to do.

One common mistake that would lead to this situation is attempting to use the value of another varible of interest as the index, instead of the location of that value:

In the example above, not only is not an integer value, but we probably don't want to be indexing by a value of at all, but rather positions of values within the array. A comparison will result in a logical array indicating at which positions in the array the comparison was true.

Error Messages

Script Controller Errors

In the following figure, an error dialog and script controller dialog are shown.

An error was detected while running the script assigned to a script controller.

This error was caused by the deletion of object Box001, whose position was used directly in the script.

The MAXScript Listener shows the following call stack trace-back for this error:

ADVANCED INFORMATION ON THIS SPECIFIC ERROR:

Since 3ds Max 8, the above way of accessing object properties is considered obsolete and a Bad Practice exactly because it can cause a large number of errors when a referenced object is deleted or cannot be found for other reasons (for example when an object with a Script Controller is brought into a scene via XRef).

The correct approach to avoid this specific kind of error would be to use a Variable assigned the Position track of Box001. Deleting the Box001 would not cause an error in the controller. As an added bonus, the controlled object would update its position when Box001 is moved along Z automatically.

Please see Script Controllers for details.

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Runtime Error: What It Help runtime error occurred has in script and How to Fix It

A runtime error occurs while a program is running or when you first attempt to start the application. The error sometimes goes away on its own by simply reopening the app, but if not, there are a number of things you can try.

Runtime Errors

Depending on the situation, there are a few reasons why a runtime error might occur:

  • There's a bug in the software.
  • Memory or another system resource is in short supply.
  • You've entered a foreign character into a text field, or performed some kind of action that isn't allowed.

The error usually appears as a small window, often with an indication of the program that's being affected, and sometimes with an error code and message. The prompt might also include a suggestion to contact a support team or administrator.

Here are some examples:

Paying close attention to what the error says, if possible, is the best way to address it. If the error is too general to diagnose right off the bat, then follow the below steps in order. If it's particular, however, and mentions something like Microsoft Visual C++Runtime Library, then that's the step you should start at.

How to Fix a Runtime Error

Runtime errors pop up in a variety of situations, so the possible fixes are all over the board:

  1. Restart the computer. This is the likely solution if your computer suddenly feels like it's running much slower than usual.

    Some runtime errors are caused by memory-related issues, and restarting is the quickest way to close everything that's currently running on your PC. This will free up those previously used system resources for the program that's throwing the error.

  2. Update the program to its latest version, help runtime error occurred has in script. The runtime error might be caused by a bug that hasn't yet been patched in the release that you're using.

    For example, some users report a runtime error when they use NVIDIA GeForce Experience to check for graphics card updates. In this scenario, you'd update the NVIDIA program.

    You might need to re-download it from the software maker's site if there isn't a built-in method for checking for updates.

  3. Fully delete the program, and then reinstall it. An installation that doesn't quite finish properly can be the cause of the runtime error.

    The update procedure in the previous step might have done this, but if you're still getting the error, it's time to completely delete the program and confirm that it's being reinstalled from scratch, help runtime error occurred has in script.

    Some uninstallers don't do a great job at erasing every remnant of the file from the registry and hard drive. Try a dedicated program uninstaller if the normal tool from the app maker doesn't fix the error.

  4. Install the latest Microsoft Visual C++ Redistributable package. If your error says something about the runtime components of the Visual C++ libraries, this is likely solution.

  5. Use SFC scannow to repair corrupted Windows files. The SFC command is executed in a Command Prompt window, and might be the fix for the runtime error.

  6. Run System Restore to return your computer to a previous state. This could fix the runtime error is if it's caused by the Windows Registry being corrupt.

  7. Reinstall Windows. If focusing on a specific program didn't fix the runtime error, or if it's interfering with the way Windows works as a whole, resetting is your last option.

How Programmers Can Prevent Runtime Errors

If you're the software maker, GeeksforGeeks suggests several ways to avoid runtime errors. Follow that link for a deeper dive into the different types of runtime errors, with examples of why they're happening and what you can do to prevent them. Some fixes include avoiding variables that haven't been initialized, and not declaring too much stack memory.

Thanks for letting us know!

Error handling, "try.catch"

No matter how great we are at programming, sometimes our scripts have errors. They may occur because of our mistakes, an unexpected user input, an erroneous server response, and for a thousand other reasons.

Usually, a script “dies” (immediately stops) in case of an error, printing it to console.

But there’s a syntax construct that allows us to “catch” errors so the script can, instead of dying, do something more reasonable.

The “try…catch” syntax

The construct has two main blocks:and then :

It works like this:

  1. First, the code in is executed.
  2. If there were no errors, then is ignored: the execution reaches the end of and goes on, skipping .
  3. If an error occurs, then the execution is stopped, and control flows to the beginning of. The variable (we can use any name for it) will contain an error object with details about what happened.

So, an error inside the block does not kill the script – we have a chance to handle it in .

Let’s look at some examples.

  • An errorless example: shows and :

  • An example with an error: shows and :

only works for runtime errors

For to work, the code must be runnable. In other words, it should be valid JavaScript.

It won’t work if the code is syntactically wrong, for instance it has unmatched curly braces:

The JavaScript engine first reads the code, and then runs it. The errors that occur on the reading phase are called “parse-time” errors and are unrecoverable (from inside that code). That’s because the engine can’t understand the code.

So, can only handle errors that occur in valid code. Such errors are called “runtime errors” or, sometimes, “exceptions”.

works synchronously

If an exception happens in “scheduled” code, like inthen won’t catch it:

That’s because the function itself is executed later, when the engine has already left the construct.

To catch an exception inside a scheduled function, must be inside that function:

Error object

When an error occurs, JavaScript generates an object containing the details about it. The object is then passed as an argument to :

For all built-in errors, the error object has two main properties:

Error name. For instance, for an undefined variable that’s .
Textual message about error details.

There are other non-standard properties available in most environments. One of most widely used and supported is:

Current call stack: a string with information about the sequence of nested calls that led to the error. Used for debugging purposes.

For instance:

Optional “catch” binding

This is a recent addition to the language. Old browsers may need polyfills.

If we don’t need error details, may omit it:

Using “try…catch”

Let’s explore a real-life use case of .

As we already know, JavaScript supports the JSON.parse(str) method to read JSON-encoded values.

Usually it’s used to decode data received over the network, from the server or another source.

We receive it and call like this:

You can find more detailed information about JSON in the JSON methods, toJSON chapter.

If is malformed, generates an error, so the script “dies”.

Should we be satisfied with that? Of course not!

This way, if something’s wrong with the data, the visitor will never know that (unless they open the developer console). And people really don’t like when something “just dies” without any error message.

Let’s use to handle the error:

Here we use the block only to show the message, but we can do much more: send a new network request, suggest an alternative to the visitor, send information about the error to a logging facility, …. All much better than just dying.

Throwing our own errors

What if is syntactically correct, but doesn’t have a required property?

Like this:

Here runs normally, but the absence of is actually an error for us.

To unify error handling, we’ll use the operator.

“Throw” operator

The operator generates an error.

The syntax is:

Technically, we can use anything as an error object. That may be even a primitive, like a number or a string, but it’s better to use objects, preferably with and properties (to stay somewhat compatible with built-in errors).

JavaScript has many built-in constructors for standard errors:, and others. We can use them to create error objects as well.

Their syntax is:

For built-in errors (not for any objects, just for errors), the property is exactly the name of the constructor. And is taken from the argument.

For instance:

Let’s see what kind of error generates:

As we can see, that’s a .

And in our case, the absence of is an error, as users must have a .

So let’s throw it:

In the linethe operator generates a with the giventhe same way as JavaScript would generate it itself. The execution of immediately stops and the control flow jumps into .

Now became a single place for all error handling: both for and other cases.

Rethrowing

In the example above we use to handle incorrect data. But is it possible that another unexpected error occurs within the block? Like a programming error (variable is not defined) or something else, not just this “incorrect data” thing.

For example:

Of course, everything’s possible! Programmers do make mistakes. Even in help runtime error occurred has in script utilities used by millions for decades – suddenly a bug may be discovered that leads to terrible hacks.

In our case, is placed to catch “incorrect data” errors. But by its nature, gets all errors from. Here it gets an unexpected error, but still shows the same message. That’s wrong and also makes the code more difficult to debug.

To avoid such problems, we can employ the “rethrowing” technique. The rule is simple:

Catch should only process errors that it knows and “rethrow” all others.

The “rethrowing” technique can be explained in more detail as:

  1. Catch gets all errors.
  2. In the block we analyze the error object .
  3. If we don’t know how to handle it, we do .

Usually, we can check the error type using the operator:

We can also get the error class name from property. All native errors have it. Another option is to read .

In the code below, we use rethrowing so that only handles :

The error throwing on line from inside block “falls out” of and can be either caught by an outer construct (if it help runtime error occurred has in script, or it kills the script.

So the block actually handles only errors that it knows how to deal with and “skips” all others.

The example below demonstrates how such errors can be caught by one more level of :

Here only knows how to handlewhile the outer knows how to handle everything.

try…catch…finally

Wait, that’s not all.

The construct may have one more code clause: .

If it exists, it runs in all cases:

  • afterhelp runtime error occurred has in script, if there were no errors,
  • afterif there were errors.

The extended syntax looks like this:

Try running this code:

The code has two ways of execution:

  1. If you answer “Yes” to “Make an error?”, then .
  2. If you say “No”, then .

The clause is often used when we start doing something and want to finalize it in any case of outcome.

For instance, we want to measure the time that a Fibonacci numbers function takes. Naturally, we can start measuring before it runs and finish afterwards. But what if there’s an error during the function call? In particular, the implementation of in the code below returns an error for negative or non-integer numbers.

The clause is a great place to finish the measurements no matter what.

Here guarantees that the time will be measured correctly in both situations – in case of a successful execution of and in case of an error in it:

You can check by running the code with entering into – it executes normally, afterhelp runtime error occurred has in script. And then enter – there will be an immediate error, and the execution will take. Both measurements are done correctly.

In other words, the function may finish with orthat doesn’t matter. The clause executes in both cases.

Variables are local inside

Please note that and variables in the code above are declared before.

Otherwise, if we declared in block, it would only be visible inside of it.

The clause works for any exit from. That includes an explicit .

In the example below, there’s a in. In this case, is executed just before the control returns to the outer code.

The construct, help runtime error occurred has in script, without clause, is also useful. We apply it when we don’t want to handle errors here (let them fall through), but want to be sure that processes that we started are finalized.

In the code above, an error inside always falls out, because there’s no. But works before the execution flow leaves the function.

Global catch

The information from this section is not a part of the core JavaScript.

Let’s imagine we’ve got a fatal error outside ofand the script died. Like a programming error or some other terrible thing.

Is there a way to react on such occurrences? We may want to log the error, show something to the user (normally they don’t see error messages), etc.

There is none in the specification, help runtime error occurred has in script, but environments usually provide it, because it’s really useful. For instance, Node.js has for that, help runtime error occurred has in script. And in the browser we can assign a function to the special help runtime error occurred has in script property, that will run in case of an uncaught error.

The syntax:

Error message.
URL of the script where error happened.
,
Line and column numbers where error happened.
Error object.

For instance:

The role of the global handler is usually not to recover the script execution – that’s probably impossible in case of programming errors, but to send the error message to developers.

There are also web-services that provide error-logging for such cases, like https://errorception.com or http://www.muscula.com.

They work like this:

  1. We register at the service and get a piece of JS (or a script URL) from them to insert on pages.
  2. That JS script sets a custom function.
  3. When an error occurs, it sends a network request about it to the service.
  4. We can log in to the service web interface and see errors.

Summary

The construct allows to handle runtime errors. It literally allows to “try” running the code help runtime error occurred has in script “catch” errors that may occur in it.

The syntax is:

There may be no section or noso shorter constructs and are also valid.

Error objects have following properties:

  • – the human-readable error message.
  • – the string with error name (error constructor name).
  • (non-standard, but well-supported) – the stack at the moment of error creation.

If an error object is not needed, we can omit it by using help runtime error occurred has in script instead of .

We can also generate our own errors using the operator. Technically, the argument of can be anything, but usually it’s an error object inheriting from the built-in class. More on extending errors in the next help runtime error occurred has in script is a very important pattern of error handling: a block usually expects and knows how to handle the particular error type, so it should rethrow errors it doesn’t know.

Even if we don’t havemost environments allow us to setup a “global” error handler to catch errors that “fall out”. In-browser, that’s .

Toggle Menu Runtime Errors

Runtime errors are named such because MATLAB cannot tell you there is an error until you run your code. Because of this, there is no indication in the script editor if you have runtime errors!

  • MATLAB will stop evaluating code at the first error. This means there may be multiple errors in your script, but you will only see one message at a time.
  • Not only will MATLAB stop evaluating at the first line an error is encountered, it will stop evaluating at the first expression an error is encountered on. It can help runtime error occurred has in script to have an understanding of the order in which MATLAB evaluates statements to help when isolating the source of an error:
    1. For assignment operations (), the right-hand side is evaluated first.
    2. For function calls and indexing operators (), the expressions inside the help runtime error occurred has in script are evaluated first. Thus, if an error occurs evaluating an expression inside the parenthesis, MATLAB will stop before attempting to evaluate the parts outside.

Example: Isolate the Source of the Error

When we run this, we get an error related to the name. Notice that the error message does not mention at all. Use this information to narrow in on the part of the code to inspect and change.

Isolate just the part of the more complex statement and run just that part. In this case, the error message indicates the problem is with so copy+paste that part as its own statement and run it in the command window. Resolve the error with that simple part, then substitute the correction back into the full statement.

Example: Error Using a Function

Example: Two Errors on a Line

This is a combination of the two errors above:

  1. The name is not defined.
  2. We are only providing a single argument tobut it requires a second.

MATLAB will stop on the first error, since it evaluates the arguments to a function first, it will stop with the error related to before attempting to evaluate .

We can still apply the same strategy to isolating and fixing the error, we will just see that when we fix the first try evaluating the expression again we will then get the second error and will repeat the isolation strategy with the new expression.

Example: Misleading Error Message

Because of how we have written this expression, help runtime error occurred has in script, MATLAB erroneously things we are trying to use parenthesis to index into a variable namedand so its generated error message is related to indexing. This is not in fact what we are trying to do at all, so in this case the error message is misleading.

We can still use the same strategy as before to isolate the smallest chunk of code that is causing the error.

  1. First try evaluating each side of the assignment operator. There is no error on either side.
  2. The only bit of code left is the help runtime error occurred has in script operator itself. We can conclude that our error is related to our usage of the assignment operator and seek out prior examples of variable assignment.

Example: Comparing Incompatible Types

Example: Invalid Indexes

This error is related to the value of the index we are using. You would get a similar error if the value of the index was not an integer, e.g. That would suggest that the variable you have asked MATLAB to use as an index is not an appropriate index and you will have to re-think what it is you are trying to do.

One common mistake that would lead to this situation is attempting to use the value of another varible of interest as the index, instead of the location of that value:

In the example above, not only is not an integer value, help runtime error occurred has in script, but we probably don't want to be indexing by a value of at all, but rather positions of values within the array. A comparison will result in a logical array indicating at which positions in the array the comparison was true.

Error Messages

Script Controller Errors

In the following figure, an error dialog and script controller dialog are shown.

An error was detected while running the script assigned to a script controller.

This error was caused by the minecraft internal server error of object Box001, whose position was used directly in the script.

The MAXScript Listener shows the following call stack trace-back for this error:

ADVANCED INFORMATION ON THIS SPECIFIC ERROR:

Since 3ds Max 8, the above way of accessing object properties is considered obsolete and a Bad Practice exactly because it can cause a large number of errors when a referenced object is deleted or cannot be found for other reasons (for example when an object with a Script Controller is brought into a scene via XRef).

The correct approach to avoid this specific kind of error would be to use a Variable assigned the Position track of Box001. Deleting the Box001 would not cause an error in the controller. As an added bonus, the controlled object would update its position when Box001 is moved along Z automatically.

Please see Script Controllers for details.

I created a pbix using the VennDiagram R Visual. I installed MS R Open v3.4.4 locally. I am using the VennDiagram R package v1.6.20. The diagram displays fine on my desktop. I published it to app.powerbi.com and all other visuals display correct but the Venn diagram. The dataset has less than 5000 records. I get this error:

Script Runtime Error
An error occurred while running the script
Please try again later or contact support. If you contact support, help runtime error occurred has in script, please provide these details.
Activity ID: 155f5684-ceb5-4a62-9644-1094a60367d2
Request ID: 3a68f729-afd8-e73f-f828-127a447a4aad
Correlation ID: 37987b20-4b97-1e92-ff40-dc47809e228f
Time: Wed Jun 10 2020 11:50:38 GMT-0700 (Mountain Standard Time)
Service version: 13.0.13524.230
Client version: 2006.1.01422-train
Cluster URI: https://wabi-west-us-redirect.analysis.windows.net/

Here is the R script:

library(VennDiagram)
listdataset <- lapply(dataset, function(x) { x } )
listcolor <- c("red", "yellow", "green", "blue", "gray")
listcolor <- head(listcolor, ncol(dataset))
venndiagram <- venn.diagram(listdataset, filename=NULL, na="remove", fill = listcolor, margin=0.1)
grid.draw(venndiagram)

This is me contacting support. If there is a better way to contact support, please let me know.

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