Halt on no errors

halt on no errors

209.68.14.80 › ref › mbsys › bios › set › stdHalt-c. All Errors: The boot process will halt on all errors. You will be prompted for action in the event of recoverable errors. This is the normally the default. I chose "halt on no errors" in the BIOS but it still screams at me when theirs not a keyboard present. I really DO NOT want to attach a. halt on no errors

watch the thematic video

25 Facts About Doors - ROBLOX

Halt on no errors - idea)))) congratulate

WINSCP script halt on no errors

Forum » Scripting / Automation »

Guest

Hi all,

apologies if this has been covered a million times before (believe me I feel like I have read every post)

I have a script to download files via FTP to a local drive, it works up to the point where I get a permission error where it requires user input at which point it just stops. I have read you can over write this using the 'option batch continue' command however the script doesnt seem to recognise this as a command and I get 'option is not recognised as an internal or external command'

I have put the option command both before and after the WinSCP line in and out of quotes but get the same result.

below is my script:

@ECHO OFF
set TIMESTAMP_FORMAT=yyyy-mm-dd
cd "C:\Program Files (x86)\WinSCP"
for /F "tokens=* USEBACKQ" %%F in (`WinSCP.com /command "echo %%TIMESTAMP#%TIMESTAMP_FORMAT%%%" "exit"`) do set TIMESTAMP=%%F
set mydir=E:\folder\anotherfolder - Backups\%TIMESTAMP%
mkdir "%mydir%"
WinSCP.com /command ^
"option batch continue" ^
"open ftp://websiteftp:[email protected]" ^
"lcd ""%mydir%""" ^
"get *.*" ^
"exit"
pause

could anyone advise? I have seen example scripts where its not in quotes and just at the top of the script

Thanks

Reply with quote

martin◆
Site Admin
martin avatar
Joined:
Posts:
37,686
Location:
Prague, Czechia
Please attach a full session log file showing the problem (using the latest version of WinSCP).

To generate the session log file, use command-line argument. Submit the log with your post as an attachment. Note that passwords and passphrases not stored in the log. You may want to remove other data you consider sensitive though, such as host names, IP addresses, account names or file names (unless they are relevant to the problem). If you do not want to post the log publicly, you can mark the attachment as private.

Reply with quote

You can post new topics in this forum

Halting problem

Problem of determining whether a given program will finish running or continue forever

In computability theory, the halting problem is the problem of determining, from a description of an arbitrary computer program and an input, whether the program will finish running, or continue to run forever. Alan Turing proved in 1936 that a general algorithm to solve the halting problem for all possible program-input pairs cannot exist.

For any program that might determine if programs halt, a "pathological" program , called with some input, can pass its own source and its input to f and then specifically do the opposite of what f predicts g will do. No f can exist that handles this case. A key part of the proof is a mathematical definition of a computer and program, which is known as a Turing machine; the halting problem is undecidable over Turing machines. It is one of the first cases of decision problems proven to be unsolvable. This proof is significant to practical computing efforts, defining a class of applications which no programming invention can possibly perform perfectly.

Jack Copeland attributes the introduction of the term halting problem to the work of Martin Davis in the 1950s.[1]

Background[edit]

The halting problem is a decision problem about properties of computer programs on a fixed Turing-complete model of computation, i.e., all programs that can be written in some given programming language that is general enough to be equivalent to a Turing machine. The problem is to determine, given a program and an input to the program, whether the program will eventually halt when run with that input. In this abstract framework, there are no resource limitations on the amount of memory or time required for the program's execution; it can take arbitrarily long and use an arbitrary amount of storage space before halting. The question is simply whether the given program will ever halt on a particular input.

For example, in pseudocode, the program

does not halt; rather, it goes on forever in an infinite loop. On the other hand, the program

does halt.

While deciding whether these programs halt is simple, more complex programs prove problematic. One approach to the problem might be to run the program for some number of steps and check if it halts. But if the program does not halt, it is unknown whether the program will eventually halt or run forever. Turing proved no algorithm exists that always correctly decides whether, for a given arbitrary program and input, the program halts when run with that input. The essence of Turing's proof is that any such algorithm can be made to produce contradictory output and therefore cannot be correct.

Programming consequences[edit]

Some infinite loops can be quite useful. For instance, event loops are typically coded as infinite loops.[2] However, most subroutines are intended to finish.[3] In particular, in hard real-time computing, programmers attempt to write subroutines that are not only guaranteed to finish, but are also guaranteed to finish before a given deadline[4]

Sometimes these programmers use some general-purpose (Turing-complete) programming language, but attempt to write in a restricted style—such as MISRA C or SPARK—that makes it easy to prove that the resulting subroutines finish before the given deadline.[citation needed]

Other times these programmers apply the rule of least power—they deliberately use a computer language that is not quite fully Turing-complete. Frequently, these are languages that guarantee all subroutines finish, such as Coq.[citation needed]

Common pitfalls[edit]

The difficulty in the halting problem lies in the requirement that the decision procedure must work for all programs and inputs. A particular program either halts on a given input or does not halt. Consider one algorithm that always answers "halts" and another that always answers "does not halt". For any specific program and input, one of these two algorithms answers correctly, even though nobody may know which one. Yet neither algorithm solves the halting problem generally.

There are programs (interpreters) that simulate the execution of whatever source code they are given. Such programs can demonstrate that a program does halt if this is the case: the interpreter itself will eventually halt its simulation, which shows that the original program halted. However, an interpreter will not halt if its input program does not halt, so this approach cannot solve the halting problem as stated; it does not successfully answer "does not halt" for programs that do not halt.

The halting problem is theoretically decidable for linear bounded automata (LBAs) or deterministic machines with finite memory. A machine with finite memory has a finite number of configurations, and thus any deterministic program on it must eventually either halt or repeat a previous configuration:[5]

...any finite-state machine, if left completely to itself, will fall eventually into a perfectly periodic repetitive pattern. The duration of this repeating pattern cannot exceed the number of internal states of the machine...

However, a computer with a million small parts, each with two states, would have at least 21,000,000 possible states:

This is a 1 followed by about three hundred thousand zeroes ... Even if such a machine were to operate at the frequencies of cosmic rays, the aeons of galactic evolution would be as nothing compared to the time of a journey through such a cycle:

Although a machine may be finite, and finite automata "have a number of theoretical limitations":

...the magnitudes involved should lead one to suspect that theorems and arguments based chiefly on the mere finiteness [of] the state diagram may not carry a great deal of significance.

It can also be decided automatically whether a nondeterministic machine with finite memory halts on none, some, or all of the possible sequences of nondeterministic decisions, by enumerating states after each possible decision.

History[edit]

Further information: Algorithm § History: Development of the notion of "algorithm"

The halting problem is historically important because it was one of the first problems to be proved undecidable. In April 1936, Alonzo Church published his proof of the undecidability of a problem in the lambda calculus. Turing's proof was published later, in January 1937. Since then, many other undecidable problems have been described.

Timeline[edit]

  • 1900 (1900): David Hilbert poses his "23 questions" (now known as Hilbert's problems) at the Second International Congress of Mathematicians in Paris. "Of these, the second was that of proving the consistency of the 'Peano axioms' on which, as he had shown, the rigour of mathematics depended".[7]
  • 1920 (1920) – 1921 (1921): Emil Post explores the halting problem for tag systems, regarding it as a candidate for unsolvability.[8] Its unsolvability was not established until much later, by Marvin Minsky.
  • 1928 (1928): Hilbert recasts his 'Second Problem' at the Bologna International Congress. He posed three questions: i.e. #1: Was mathematics complete? #2: Was mathematics consistent? #3: Was mathematics decidable? The third question is known as the Entscheidungsproblem (Decision Problem).
  • 1930 (1930): Kurt Gödel announces a proof as an answer to the first two of Hilbert's 1928 questions. "At first he [Hilbert] was only angry and frustrated, but then he began to try to deal constructively with the problem... Gödel himself felt—and expressed the thought in his paper—that his work did not contradict Hilbert's formalistic point of view"
  • 1931 (1931): Gödel publishes "On Formally Undecidable Propositions of Principia Mathematica and Related Systems I"[15]
  • 19 April 1935 (1935-04-19): Alonzo Church publishes "An Unsolvable Problem of Elementary Number Theory", which proposes that the intuitive notion of an effectively calculable function can be formalized by the general recursive functions or equivalently by the lambda-definable functions. He proves that the halting problem for lambda calculus (i.e., whether a given lambda-expression has a normal form) is not effectively calculable.
  • 1936 (1936): Church publishes the first proof that the Entscheidungsproblem is unsolvable.[17]
  • 7 October 1936 (1936-10-07): Emil Post's paper "Finite Combinatory Processes. Formulation I" is received. Post adds to his "process" an instruction "(C) Stop". He called such a process "type 1 ... if the process it determines terminates for each specific problem."
  • May 1936 (1936-05) – January 1937 (1937-01): Alan Turing's paper On Computable Numbers With an Application to the Entscheidungsproblem went to press in May 1936 and reached print in January 1937.[19] Turing's proof departs from calculation by recursive functions and introduces the notion of computation by machine. This is one of the "first examples of decision problems proved unsolvable".[page needed]
  • 1939 (1939): J. Barkley Rosser observes the essential equivalence of "effective method" defined by Gödel, Church, and Turing[21]
  • 1943 (1943): In a paper, Stephen Kleene states that "In setting up a complete algorithmic theory, what we do is describe a procedure ... which procedure necessarily terminates and in such manner that from the outcome we can read a definite answer, 'Yes' or 'No,' to the question, 'Is the predicate value true?'."
  • 1952 (1952): Kleene includes a discussion of the unsolvability of the halting problem for Turing machines and reformulates it in terms of machines that "eventually stop", i.e. halt: "... there is no algorithm for deciding whether any given machine, when started from any given situation, eventually stops."
  • 1952 (1952): Martin Davis uses the term 'halting problem' in a series of lectures at the Control Systems Laboratory at the University of Illinois in 1952. It is likely that this is the first such use of the term.[23]

Etymology of the phrase "halting problem"[edit]

In none of his work did Turing use the word "halting" or "termination". Turing's biographer Hodges does not have the word "halting" or words "halting problem" in his index. The earliest recorded use of the words "halting problem" is in a proof by Davis in 1958:

"Theorem 2.2 There exists a Turing machine whose halting problem is recursively unsolvable.
A related problem is the printing problem for a simple Turing machine Z with respect to a symbol Si".

Davis adds no attribution for his proof, so one infers that it is original with him. But Davis has said that Kleene stated the proof informally. Copeland states that:[1]

"The halting problem was so named (and it appears, first stated)[23] by Martin Davis... (It is often said that Turing stated and proved the halting theorem in 'On Computable Numbers', but strictly this is not true)."

Formalization[edit]

In his original proof Turing formalized the concept of algorithm by introducing Turing machines. However, the result is in no way specific to them; it applies equally to any other model of computation that is equivalent in its computational power to Turing machines, such as Markov algorithms, Lambda calculus, Post systems, register machines, or tag systems.

What is important is that the formalization allows a straightforward mapping of algorithms to some data type that the algorithm can operate upon. For example, if the formalism lets algorithms define functions over strings (such as Turing machines) then there should be a mapping of these algorithms to strings, and if the formalism lets algorithms define functions over natural numbers (such as computable functions) then there should be a mapping of algorithms to natural numbers. The mapping to strings is usually the most straightforward, but strings over an alphabet with ncharacters can also be mapped to numbers by interpreting them as numbers in an n-ary numeral system.

Representation as a set[edit]

Main article: Decision problem

The conventional representation of decision problems is the set of objects possessing the property in question. The halting set

K = {(i, x) Standard Settings ]

Halt On

Some PCs give you the ability to tell the BIOS specifically which types of errors will halt the computer during the power-on self test section of the boot process. Using this, you can tell the PC to ignore certain types of errors; common settings for this parameter are:

  • All Errors: The boot process will halt on all errors. You will be prompted for action in the event of recoverable errors. This is the normally the default setting, and is also the recommended one.
  • No Errors: The POST will not stop of any type of error. Not recommended except for very special cases.
  • All But Keyboard: The boot process will stop for any error except a keyboard error. This can be useful for setting up a machine without a keyboard, for example for a file or print server.
  • All But Diskette/Floppy: All errors will halt the system except diskette errors. In my opinion, if your floppy drive has recurring and known problems, it is most likely best just to replace (or disconnect) the drive rather than using this.

Warning: Telling the system not to halt for any error types is generally not wise. You may end up missing a problem with your system that you will want to know about.

Next: Advanced Features


Home  -  Search  -  Topics  -  Up

Google

Custom Search







Systems and Components Reference Guide program i eventually halts when run with input 0}
  • {i

    CMOS battery failed

    The CMOS battery is no longer functional. Contact your system dealer for a replacement battery.

    CMOS checksum error - Defaults loaded

    Checksum of CMOS is incorrect, so the system loads the default equipment configuration. A checksum error may indicate that CMOS has become corrupt. This error may have been caused by a weak battery. Check the battery and replace if necessary.

    CPU at nnnn

    Displays the running speed of the CPU.

    Display switch is set incorrectly

    The display switch on the motherboard can be set to either monochrome or color. This message indicates the switch is set to a different setting than indicated in Setup. Determine which setting is correct, and then either turn off the system and change the jumper, or enter Setup and change the VIDEO selection.

    Press ESC to skip memory test

    The user may press Esc to skip the full memory test.

    Floppy disk(s) fail

    Cannot find or initialize the floppy drive controller or the drive. Make sure the controller is installed correctly. If no floppy drives are installed, be sure the Diskette Drive selection in Setup is set to NONE or AUTO.

    HARD DISK initializing
    Please wait a moment

    Some hard drives require extra time to initialize.

    HARD DISK INSTALL FAILURE

    Cannot find or initialize the hard drive controller or the drive. Make sure the controller is installed correctly. If no hard drives are installed, be sure the Hard Drive selection in Setup is set to NONE.

    Hard disk(s) diagnosis fail

    The system may run specific disk diagnostic routines. This message appears if one or more hard disks return an error when the diagnostics run.

    Keyboard error or no keyboard present

    Cannot initialize the keyboard. Make sure the keyboard is attached correctly and no keys are pressed during POST. To purposely configure the system without a keyboard, set the error halt condition in Setup to HALT ON ALL, BUT KEYBOARD. The BIOS then ignores the missing keyboard during POST.

    Keyboard is locked out - Unlock the key

    This message usually indicates that one or more keys have been pressed during the keyboard tests. Be sure no objects are resting on the keyboard.

    Memory Test:

    This message displays during a full memory test, counting down the memory areas being tested.

    Memory test fail

    If POST detects an error during memory testing, additional information appears giving specifics about the type and location of the memory error.

    Override enabled - Defaults loaded

    If the system cannot boot using the current CMOS configuration, the BIOS can override the current configuration with a set of BIOS defaults designed for the most stable, minimal-performance system operations.

    Press TAB to show POST screen

    System OEMs may replace the Phoenix Technologies' AwardBIOS POST display with their own proprietary display. Including this message in the OEM display permits the operator to switch between the OEM display and the default POST display.

    Primary master hard disk fail

    POST detects an error in the primary master IDE hard drive.

    Primary slave hard disk fail

    POST detects an error in the secondary master IDE hard drive.

    Resuming from disk, Press TAB to show POST screen

    Phoenix Technologies offers a save-to-disk feature for notebook computers. This message may appear when the operator re-starts the system after a save-to-disk shut-down. See the Press Tab & message above for a description of this feature.

    Secondary master hard disk fail

    POST detects an error in the primary slave IDE hard drive.

    Secondary slave hard disk fail

    POST detects an error in the secondary slave IDE hard drive.


    [ The PC Guide program i halts when run on input x}

    represents the halting problem, halt on no errors.

    This set is recursively enumerable, which means there is a computable function that lists all of the pairs (ix) it contains. However, the complement of this set is not recursively enumerable.

    There are many equivalent formulations of the halting problem; any set whose Turing degree equals that of the halting problem is such a formulation. Examples of such sets include:

    • {i

      [ The PC Guide

      WINSCP script halt on no errors

      Forum » Scripting / Automation »

      Guest

      Hi all,

      apologies if this has been covered a million times before (believe me I feel like I have read every post)

      I have a script to download files via FTP to a local drive, it works up to the point where I get a permission error where it requires user input at which point it just stops. I have read you can over write this using the 'option batch continue' command however the script doesnt seem to recognise this as a command and I get 'option is not recognised as an internal halt on no errors external command'

      I have put the option command both before and after the WinSCP line in and out of quotes but get the same result.

      below is my script:

      @ECHO OFF
      set TIMESTAMP_FORMAT=yyyy-mm-dd
      cd "C:\Program Files (x86)\WinSCP"
      for /F "tokens=* USEBACKQ" %%F in (`WinSCP.com /command "echo %%TIMESTAMP#%TIMESTAMP_FORMAT%%%" "exit"`) do set TIMESTAMP=%%F
      set mydir=E:\folder\anotherfolder - Backups\%TIMESTAMP%
      mkdir "%mydir%"
      WinSCP.com /command ^
      "option batch continue" ^
      "open ftp://websiteftp:[email protected]" ^
      "lcd ""%mydir%""" ^
      "get *.*" ^
      "exit"
      pause

      could anyone advise? I have seen example scripts where its not in quotes and just at the top of the script

      Thanks

      Reply with quote

      martin◆ halt on no errors
      Site Admin
      martin avatar
      Joined:
      Posts: halt on no errors
      halt on no errors 37,686
      Location:
      Prague, Czechia
      Please attach a full session log file showing the problem (using the latest version of WinSCP), halt on no errors.

      To error inflating class android.widget.listview the session log file, use command-line argument. Submit the log with your post as an attachment, halt on no errors. Note that passwords and passphrases not stored in the log. You may want to remove other data you consider sensitive though, such as host names, IP addresses, halt on no errors, account names or file names (unless they are relevant to the problem). If you do not want to post the log publicly, you can mark the attachment as private.

      Reply with quote

      You can post new topics in this forum

      How to fix No ROM basic system halted error

      Updated: 06/02/2020 by Computer Hope

      Computer hard drive

      The No ROM basic system halted error can be confusing, halt on no errors, but generally means there are no bootable devices. The error can happen if there is no active partition defined in fdisk, hard drive not set up properly, corrupt MBR, or the hard drive is bad.

      Trying to boot from non-bootable media

      If you are attempting to boot from the hard drive, make sure no floppy diskettes, CDs, USB drives are in or connected to the computer. The computer may be attempting to boot from one of these and is causing the error.

      Create active partition

      After halt on no errors up your hard drive through fdisk, you may receive the error message "No ROM basic system halted." This error indicates the hard drive's active partition is not set correctly, halt on no errors. To resolve the issue, boot from a bootable diskette and enter erwin error 1920 service event log watch. Within fdisk, choose option 2 to set active partition and set the drive you want to be bootable as the active partition.

      Verify hard drive properly set up in CMOS

      Verify that the hard drive is properly set up in CMOS setup. If no hard drive is seen continue with the next steps.

      Check cables

      If creating an active partition does not resolve your issue or fdisk does not detect a hard drive, verify that the hard drive cables are connected correctly.

      Replace drive

      Finally, if none of the above solutions resolve this error, unfortunately the hard drive is most likely bad. We recommend contacting the manufacturer of the hard drive to have it replaced or purchasing a new hard drive.

      My P5N-E SLI motherboard has been suffering from the Startup failures since updating the BIOS from 0202 to 0608 - pretty big jump, about 8 months apart. Never had any problems with 0202, but decided to update nevertheless.

      Did the update in Windows first, but re-flashed using the AWDFLASH P5NESLI.BIN /py/sn/wb/cc/cp/cd, to clear all the remnants of the old BIOS.

      Still startup problems - again this morning.

      The computer is 100% Orthos and Memtest stable, never suffered BSOD's or any other errors in Windows, playing Far Cry, NHL 07 and Quake 4 without any issues at all.

      Decided to change the Boot option from "Halt on [All errors]" to "Halt on [No errors]".

      What is the worst case scenario? I know all is stable, and all the voltage, frequency and timings settings in BIOS are working fine.

      Is it possible to do any damage to any of the components, if something fails down the road?

      I would appreciate your comments and sugestions.

       

      System BIOS Standard Settings ]

      Halt On

      Some PCs give you the ability to tell the BIOS specifically which types of errors will halt the computer during the power-on self test section of the boot process. Using this, you can tell the PC to ignore certain types of errors; common settings for this parameter are:

      • All Errors: The boot process will halt on all errors. You will be prompted for action in the event of recoverable errors. This is the normally the default setting, and is also the recommended one.
      • No Errors: The POST will not stop of any type of error. Not recommended except for very special cases.
      • All But Keyboard: The boot process will stop for any error except a keyboard error. This can be useful for setting up a machine without a keyboard, for example for a file or print server.
      • All But Diskette/Floppy: All errors will halt the system except diskette errors. In my opinion, if your floppy drive has recurring and known problems, it is most likely best just to replace (or disconnect) the drive rather than using this.

      Warning: Telling the system not to halt for any error types is halt on no errors not wise. You may end up missing a problem with your system that you will want to know about.

      Next: Advanced Features


      Home  -  Search  -  Topics  -  Up

      Google

      Custom Search







    0 Comments

    Leave a Comment