Gigabyte halt on no errors

gigabyte halt on no errors

any errors or omissions that may appear in Halt on. The category determines whether the computer will stop if an error is detected during power up. The author assumes no responsibility for any errors or omissions that may appear in this The system will halt and the following error message will. download1.gigabyte.com › Files › Manual.

Gigabyte halt on no errors - pity, that

스레드: code 79 then Error sending end of post message to me. System Halt.

  • 06-27-2015 09:15 PM#1

    GoNz0- no está en línea
    ROG Guru: Green Belt ArrayGoNz0- PC Specs
    GoNz0- PC Specs
    Laptop (Model)Dell XPS 9530
    MotherboardRampage V Extreme
    Processor5930
    Memory (part number)[Ripjaws 4] F4-2666C15Q-16GRR
    Graphics Card #1Asus Strix GTX980
    CPU CoolerEk Evo Supremacy
    CaseCorsair 800D
    Power SupplyEnermax 1250w revolution 85
    Keyboard Logitech 710+
    Mouse Razer Mamba 2012
    Headset Sennheiser PC350
    OS Windows 8.1 Pro
    Network RouterAsus AC68u

    code 79 then Error sending end of post message to me. System Halt.

    Updated to the new bios yesterday and all seemed ok, try to power up tonight and get stuck in a code 79 loop until it finally swapped to the other bios and booted, then it gave me the message "Error sending end of post message to me. System Halt".?

    GoNz0-; 06-27-2015이(가) 09:25 PM에 마지막으로 편집


  • 06-27-2015 09:43 PM#2

    samboy87 no está en línea
    ROG Guru: Yellow Belt Arraysamboy87 PC Specs
    samboy87 PC Specs
    Laptop (Model)Laptop? Only Desktop!
    MotherboardAsus Rampage V Extreme Bios: 3202
    ProcessorIntel i7 5930K @ 4.2ghz/3.375ghz Adaptive Vcore 1.15v/Vcache 0.98v VCCSA @ 0.846v
    Memory (part number)G.Skill F4-3000C15Q16GRR @ 3000mhz CL14-14-14-34 T1 @ 1.36v
    Graphics Card #1Gigabyte GTX 1080 FE @ Stock boost 1968mhz/5011mhz
    MonitorAsus PG278Q Swift
    Storage #12x Samsung EVO 850Pro 256GB - Win 10 Home / Games
    Storage #2Toshiba 3TB
    CPU CoolerCorsair H110i GT
    CaseCorsair Obsidian 750D
    Power SupplyCorsair HX1000i / 1000W
    Keyboard Razer Blackwiddow Chroma
    Mouse Razer Deathadder Chroma
    Headset Razer Kraken Chroma 7.1
    Mouse Pad Razer FireFly Chroma
    Headset/Speakers Bower&Wilkins 2xCM9 s2 1xCMC2 S2
    OS Windows 10
    Network RouterNetgear Nighthawk R7000
    Accessory #1 ROG OC Panel
    Accessory #2 HTC Vive

    Have you tried Loading Default settings in bios after the update?


  • 06-27-2015 10:38 PM#3

    GoNz0- no está en línea
    ROG Guru: Green Belt ArrayGoNz0- PC Specs
    GoNz0- PC Specs
    Laptop (Model)Dell XPS 9530
    MotherboardRampage V Extreme
    Processor5930
    Memory (part number)[Ripjaws 4] F4-2666C15Q-16GRR
    Graphics Card #1Asus Strix GTX980
    CPU CoolerEk Evo Supremacy
    CaseCorsair 800D
    Power SupplyEnermax 1250w revolution 85
    Keyboard Logitech 710+
    Mouse Razer Mamba 2012
    Headset Sennheiser PC350
    OS Windows 8.1 Pro
    Network RouterAsus AC68u

    I will do but it resets them after every update anyway.


  • 06-28-2015 04:14 AM#4

    Chino no está en línea
    ROG Guru: Grand Master Array

  • 06-28-2015 06:55 AM#5

    GoNz0- no está en línea
    ROG Guru: Green Belt ArrayGoNz0- PC Specs
    GoNz0- PC Specs
    Laptop (Model)Dell XPS 9530
    MotherboardRampage V Extreme
    Processor5930
    Memory (part number)[Ripjaws 4] F4-2666C15Q-16GRR
    Graphics Card #1Asus Strix GTX980
    CPU CoolerEk Evo Supremacy
    CaseCorsair 800D
    Power SupplyEnermax 1250w revolution 85
    Keyboard Logitech 710+
    Mouse Razer Mamba 2012
    Headset Sennheiser PC350
    OS Windows 8.1 Pro
    Network RouterAsus AC68u


  • 06-28-2015 05:58 PM#6

    GoNz0- no está en línea
    ROG Guru: Green Belt ArrayGoNz0- PC Specs
    GoNz0- PC Specs
    Laptop (Model)Dell XPS 9530
    MotherboardRampage V Extreme
    Processor5930
    Memory (part number)[Ripjaws 4] F4-2666C15Q-16GRR
    Graphics Card #1Asus Strix GTX980
    CPU CoolerEk Evo Supremacy
    CaseCorsair 800D
    Power SupplyEnermax 1250w revolution 85
    Keyboard Logitech 710+
    Mouse Razer Mamba 2012
    Headset Sennheiser PC350
    OS Windows 8.1 Pro
    Network RouterAsus AC68u

    it wiped out all 3 raid arrays after BIOS 1401 freaked out with the 78-79 code so the 1502 BIOS has somehow caused an issue preventing it posting on more than one occasion. Bad flash taking out a good backup BIOS, how?

    oh and bare 1 stick of ram and nothing else bar the VGA didn't improve things.

    RMA#2 coming up.


  • 06-29-2015 06:58 PM#7

    GoNz0- no está en línea
    ROG Guru: Green Belt ArrayGoNz0- PC Specs
    GoNz0- PC Specs
    Laptop (Model)Dell XPS 9530
    MotherboardRampage V Extreme
    Processor5930
    Memory (part number)[Ripjaws 4] F4-2666C15Q-16GRR
    Graphics Card #1Asus Strix GTX980
    CPU CoolerEk Evo Supremacy
    CaseCorsair 800D
    Power SupplyEnermax 1250w revolution 85
    Keyboard Logitech 710+
    Mouse Razer Mamba 2012
    Headset Sennheiser PC350
    OS Windows 8.1 Pro
    Network RouterAsus AC68u

    Let us hope this is passed back to the developers so it is pulled. Asus?


  • 06-30-2015 12:05 AM#8

    GoNz0- no está en línea
    ROG Guru: Green Belt ArrayGoNz0- PC Specs
    GoNz0- PC Specs
    Laptop (Model)Dell XPS 9530
    MotherboardRampage V Extreme
    Processor5930
    Memory (part number)[Ripjaws 4] F4-2666C15Q-16GRR
    Graphics Card #1Asus Strix GTX980
    CPU CoolerEk Evo Supremacy
    CaseCorsair 800D
    Power SupplyEnermax 1250w revolution 85
    Keyboard Logitech 710+
    Mouse Razer Mamba 2012
    Headset Sennheiser PC350
    OS Windows 8.1 Pro
    Network RouterAsus AC68u

    I have put it back on as I didn't realise I had left it on the 1502 BIOS, so for now it seems ok and I have backed up to the 2nd BIOS as swapping between the 2 seemed to cause the FUBAR, so I assume Asus didn't test for this factor as it should not be able to happen. It must be to do with the microcode (the CPU is updating message).

    If it takes a dive in the next week I will pull the drives and try to get 1402 via flashback working again or RMA the damn thing for a refund as it has been a pain in the ass.


  • Off with his head! (headless GA-H55M-UD2H)

    I decided to use my old Gigabyte H55M-UD2H motherboard in a NAS server I was putting together. While I was fine with using a video card to install the OS, I didn’t want the video card sucking up the extra watts while it was running.

    Turned out, getting this Gigabyte motherboard to boot headless wasn’t too terribly difficult. Before I get to the details though, note that I was using the Intel i7 860 which is one of the LGA 1156 processors that doesn’t support the on-board video the motherboard has.

    Configuring the Gigabyte BIOS for headless mode

    Consumer motherboards tend to throw an error on boot (and refuse to continue) if they don’t detect both of the following:

    Fortunately, in the Standard CMOS section of the BIOS, you’ll find a Halt On setting below the list of hard drives. Change this to Halt On: No Errors.

    If that’s all you do before yanking the video card, there’s a chance that the system won’t boot and will instead flash the power light at you non-stop (which will continue blinking even if you hold the power button to shut it off).

    To solve (or avoid) that new problem, you have to make sure that the Full Screen Logo is enabled in the BIOS. Don’t ask why. I know it’s counter-intuitive, and am assuming it’s a firmware bug. You’ll find that setting in the Advanced BIOS section. Look for the Full Screen Logo Show option and make sure it’s Enabled.

    An image to summarize:

     

    With both of those set and saved, shut down the computer one more time (don’t power off during the actual BIOS load – do it sometime after), pull out the video card, and your system should hopefully boot!

    Note that on the first boot after the video card has been removed, the computer will start for a few seconds, power down, and then automatically turn on again a few seconds later. This is normal when you’ve changed a piece of hardware, so don’t panic.

    Other tips/bits to keep in mind…

    1. Make sure you’ve set up a static IP address on the headless system (or have another way to find it on your network).
    2. Using a UPS is a good idea: if you get one of those multiple-flicker power outages (anything that kills power while BIOS is loading), the BIOS might fall back to fail-safe settings which you obviously won’t see on a headless system.
    3. Keep a video card and keyboard nearby in case you run into future boot issues, need to change BIOS settings, etc.

     


    BIOS Power-On Self-Test (POST) Codes

    The system BIOS provides a basic power-on self-test (POST), during which the BIOS checks the basic devices required for the server to operate. The progress of the self-test is indicated by a series of POST codes. This chapter explains the BIOS POST testing, provides an alternate method for viewing the codes, describes how to change POST options, and lists the POST codes.

    This chapter contains the following sections:

    About POST

    The POST is a systematic check of basic system devices. As the testing progresses, the BIOS displays codes that you can use to interpret the status of your server. The codes appear at the bottom right corner of the system’s VGA screen, after the self-test has progressed far enough to initialize the video monitor. Because the codes might scroll off of the screen too quickly to be read, an alternate method of displaying POST codes is to redirect the output of the console to a serial port (see Redirecting Console Output).

    You can also see some of the post codes on LEDs inside the front panel of your server node (see POST Code LEDs).

    How BIOS POST Memory Testing Works

    The BIOS POST memory testing is performed as follows:

    1. The first megabyte of DRAM is tested by the BIOS before the BIOS code is shadowed (that is, copied from ROM to DRAM).

    2. Once executing out of DRAM, the BIOS performs a simple memory test (a write/read of every location with the pattern ).



    Note - This memory test is performed only if Quick Boot is not enabled from the Boot Settings Configuration screen. Enabling Quick Boot causes the BIOS to skip the memory test. See Changing POST Options for more information.


    3. The BIOS polls the memory controllers for both correctable and non-correctable memory errors and logs those errors into the SP.

    4. The message appears at the end of POST.

    Redirecting Console Output

    You can access BIOS POST codes remotely using the web interface or the CLI.


    procedure icon  To Access BIOS POST Codes Using the Web Interface

    1. Open a browser and use the SP’s IP address as the URL.

    Refer to the Sun Integrated Lights Out Manager 2.0 User’s Guide (820-1188) for information on how to obtain the IP address of the SP.

    2. Type a user name and password as follows:

    User name: Password:

    3. The ILOM SP web interface screen appears.

    4. Click the Remote Control tab.

    5. Click the Redirection tab.

    6. Click the Start Redirection button.

    The javaRConsole window appears and prompts you for your user name and password again, then the current POST screen appears.


    procedure icon  To Access BIOS POST Codes Using the CLI

    1. Log in to the SP cli with the command SP IP address and use the command to start the serial console.

    Changing POST Options

    These instructions are optional, but you can use them to change the operations that the server performs during POST testing.


    procedure icon  To Change the POST Options

    1. Initialize the BIOS Setup Utility by pressing the F2 key while the system is performing the power-on self-test (POST).

    The BIOS Main Menu screen appears.

    2. Select the Boot menu.

    The Boot Settings screen appears.

    3. Select Boot Settings Configuration.

    The Boot Settings Configuration screen appears.

    4. On the Boot Settings Configuration screen, there are several options that you can enable or disable:

    • Retry Boot List: Automatically retries the boot list when all devices have failed. This option is enabled by default.
    • Quick Boot: This option is enabled by default. The BIOS skips certain tests while booting, such as the extensive memory test. This decreases the time it takes for the system to boot.
    • Quiet Boot: This option is disabled by default. If you enable this option, the Sun Microsystems logo appears instead of POST codes.
    • Wait for F1 if Error: This option is enabled by default. The system pauses if an error is found during POST and only resumes when you press the F1 key.
    • On-board IB gPXE Boot First: Sets the on-board infiniband gPXE to always boot first. This option is disabled by default.

    POST Codes

    TABLE 8-1 contains descriptions of each of the POST codes, listed in the same order in which they are generated. These POST codes appear at the bottom right of the BIOS screen as a four-digit string that is a combination of two-digit output from primary I/O port 80 and two-digit output from secondary I/O port 81. In the POST codes listed in TABLE 8-1, the first two digits are from port 81 and the last two digits are from port 80.

    You can see some of the POST codes from primary I/O port 80 on LEDs inside the front panel of your server node (see POST Code LEDs).

    The Response column describes the action taken by the system on encountering the corresponding error. The actions are:

    • Warning or Not an Error - The message appears on the screen. An error record is logged to the system event log (SEL). The system continues booting with a degraded state. The user might want to replace the unit.
    • Pause - The message appears on the screen, an error is logged to the SEL, and user input is required to continue. The user can take immediate corrective action or choose to continue booting.
    • Halt - The message appears on the screen, an error is logged to the SEL, and the system cannot boot unless the error is resolved. The user needs to replace the faulty part and restart the system.

    • Error Code

      Error Message

      Response

      0000

      Timer Error

      Pause

      0003

      CMOS Battery Low

      Pause

      0004

      CMOS Settings Wrong

      Pause

      0005

      CMOS Checksum Bad

      Pause

      000B

      CMOS Memory Size Wrong

      Pause

      000C

      RAM R/W Test Failed

      Pause

      000E

      A: Drive Error

      Pause

      000F

      B: Drive Error

      Pause

      0012

      CMOS Date/Time Not Set

      Pause

      0040

      Refresh Timer Test Failed

      Halt

      0041

      Display Memory Test Failed

      Pause

      0042

      CMOS Display Type Wrong

      Pause

      0043

      ~<INS> Pressed

      Pause

      0044

      DMA Controller Error

      Halt

      0045

      DMA-1 Error

      Halt

      0046

      DMA-2 Error

      Halt

      0047

      Unknown BIOS error. Error code = 0047

      Halt

      0048

      Password Check Failed

      Halt

      0049

      Unknown BIOS error. Error code = 0049

      Halt

      004A

      Unknown BIOS error. Error code = 004A

      Pause

      004B

      Unknown BIOS error. Error code = 004B

      Pause

      004C

      Keyboard/Interface Error

       

      005D

      S.M.A.R.T. Command Failed

       

      005E

      Password Check Failed

      Pause

      0101

      Warning! This system board does not support the power requirements of the installed processor. The processor will be run at a reduced frequency, which will impact system performance.

      Pause

      0102

      Error! The CPU Core to Bus ratio or VID configuration has failed! Please enter BIOS Setup and re-config it.

      Pause

      0103

      ERROR! CPU MTRRs configuration failed!

      Uncacheable memory hole or PCI space too complicated.

       

      0120

      Thermal Trip Failure

      Pause

      0121

      Thermal Trip Failure

      Pause

      0122

      Thermal Trip Failure

      Pause

      0123

      Thermal Trip Failure

      Pause

      0124

      Thermal Trip Failure

      Pause

      0125

      Thermal Trip Failure

      Pause

      0126

      Thermal Trip Failure

      Pause

      0127

      Thermal Trip Failure

      Pause

      0128

      Thermal Trip Failure

       

      0129

      Thermal Trip Failure

       

      012A

      Thermal Trip Failure

       

      012B

      Thermal Trip Failure

       

      012C

      Thermal Trip Failure

       

      012D

      Thermal Trip Failure

       

      012E

      Thermal Trip Failure

       

      012F

      Thermal Trip Failure

       

      0150

      Processor Failed BIST

      Pause

      0151

      Processor Failed BIST

      Pause

      0152

      Processor Failed BIST

      Pause

      0153

      Processor Failed BIST

      Pause

      0154

      Processor Failed BIST

      Pause

      0155

      Processor Failed BIST

      Pause

      0156

      Processor Failed BIST

      Pause

      0157

      Processor Failed BIST

      Pause

      0158

      Processor Failed BIST

       

      0159

      Processor Failed BIST

       

      015A

      Processor Failed BIST

       

      015B

      Processor Failed BIST

       

      015C

      Processor Failed BIST

       

      015D

      Processor Failed BIST

       

      015E

      Processor Failed BIST

       

      015F

      Processor Failed BIST

       

      0160

      Processor missing microcode

      Pause

      0161

      Processor missing microcode

      Pause

      0162

      Processor missing microcode

      Pause

      0163

      Processor missing microcode

      Pause

      0164

      Processor missing microcode

      Pause

      0165

      Processor missing microcode

      Pause

      0166

      Processor missing microcode

      Pause

      0167

      Processor missing microcode

      Pause

      0168

      Processor missing microcode

       

      0169

      Processor missing microcode

       

      016A

      Processor missing microcode

       

      016B

      Processor missing microcode

       

      016C

      Processor missing microcode

       

      016D

      Processor missing microcode

       

      016E

      Processor missing microcode

       

      016F

      Processor missing microcode

       

      0180

      BIOS does not support current stepping

      Pause

      0181

      BIOS does not support current stepping

      Pause

      0182

      BIOS does not support current stepping

      Pause

      0183

      BIOS does not support current stepping

      Pause

      0184

      BIOS does not support current stepping

      Pause

      0185

      BIOS does not support current stepping

      Pause

      0186

      BIOS does not support current stepping

      Pause

      0187

      BIOS does not support current stepping

      Pause

      0188

      BIOS does not support current stepping

       

      0189

      BIOS does not support current stepping

       

      018A

      BIOS does not support current stepping

       

      018B

      BIOS does not support current stepping

       

      018C

      BIOS does not support current stepping

       

      018D

      BIOS does not support current stepping

       

      018E

      BIOS does not support current stepping

       

      018F

      BIOS does not support current stepping

       

      0192

      L2 cache size mismatch.

       

      0193

      CPUID, Processor stepping are different.

       

      0194

      CPUID, Processor family are different.

      Pause

      0195

      Front side bus mismatch. System halted.

       

      0196

      CPUID, Processor Model are different.

      Pause

      0197

      Processor speeds mismatched.

      Pause

      5120

      CMOS cleared by jumper.

      Pause

      5121

      Password cleared by jumper.

      Pause

      5125

      Not enough conventional memory to copy PCI Option ROM.

       

      5180

      Unsupported Memory Vendor : DIMM_A0

      Warning

      5181

      Unsupported Memory Vendor : DIMM_A1

      Warning

      5182

      Unsupported Memory Vendor : DIMM_A2

      Warning

      5183

      Unsupported Memory Vendor : DIMM_A3

      Warning

      5184

      Unsupported Memory Vendor : DIMM_A4

       

      5185

      Unsupported Memory Vendor : DIMM_B0

      Warning

      5186

      Unsupported Memory Vendor : DIMM_B1

      Warning

      5187

      Unsupported Memory Vendor : DIMM_B2

      Warning

      5188

      Unsupported Memory Vendor : DIMM_B3

      Warning

      5189

      Unsupported Memory Vendor : DIMM_B4

      Warning

      518A

      Unsupported Memory Vendor : DIMM_B5

      Warning

      518B

      Unsupported Memory Vendor : DIMM_C0

      Warning

      518C

      Unsupported Memory Vendor : DIMM_C1

      Warning

      518D

      Unsupported Memory Vendor : DIMM_C2

      Warning

      518F

      Unsupported Memory Vendor : DIMM_C3

      Warning

      5190

      Unsupported Memory Vendor : DIMM_C4

      Warning

      5191

      Unsupported Memory Vendor : DIMM_C5

      Warning

      5192

      Unsupported Memory Vendor : DIMM_D0

      Warning

      5193

      Unsupported Memory Vendor : DIMM_D1

      Warning

      5194

      Unsupported Memory Vendor : DIMM_D2

      Warning

      5195

      Unsupported Memory Vendor : DIMM_D3

      Warning

      5196

      Unsupported Memory Vendor : DIMM_D4

      Warning

      5197

      Unsupported Memory Vendor : DIMM_D5

      Warning

      51A0

      Unsupported AMB Vendor : DIMM_A0

      Warning

      51A1

      Unsupported AMB Vendor : DIMM_A1

      Warning

      51A2

      Unsupported AMB Vendor : DIMM_A2

      Warning

      51A3

      Unsupported AMB Vendor : DIMM_A3

      Warning

      51A4

      Unsupported AMB Vendor : DIMM_A4

      Warning

      51A5

      Unsupported AMB Vendor : DIMM_A5

      Warning

      51A6

      Unsupported AMB Vendor : DIMM_B0

      Warning

      51A7

      Unsupported AMB Vendor : DIMM_B1

      Warning

      51A8

      Unsupported AMB Vendor : DIMM_B2

      Pause

      51A9

      Unsupported AMB Vendor : DIMM_B3

      Warning

      51AA

      Unsupported AMB Vendor : DIMM_B4

      Warning

      51AB

      Unsupported AMB Vendor : DIMM_B5

      Warning

      51AC

      Unsupported AMB Vendor : DIMM_C0

      Warning

      51AD

      Unsupported AMB Vendor : DIMM_C1

      Pause

      51AE

      Unsupported AMB Vendor : DIMM_C2

      Warning

      51AF

      Unsupported AMB Vendor : DIMM_C3

      Pause

      51B0

      Unsupported AMB Vendor : DIMM_C4

      Pause

      51B1

      Unsupported AMB Vendor : DIMM_C5

      Pause

      51B2

      Unsupported AMB Vendor : DIMM_D0

       

      51B3

      Unsupported AMB Vendor : DIMM_D1

       

      51B4

      Unsupported AMB Vendor : DIMM_D2

       

      51B5

      Unsupported AMB Vendor : DIMM_D3

       

      51B6

      Unsupported AMB Vendor : DIMM_D4

       

      51B7

      Unsupported AMB Vendor : DIMM_D5

       

      51C0

      Memory Configuration Error.

       

      8101

      Warning! USB Host Controller not found at the specified address!!!

       

      8102

      Error! USB device failed to initialize!!!

       

      8104

      Warning! Port 60h/64h emulation is not supported by this USB Host Controller!!!

       

      8105

      Warning! EHCI controller disabled. It requires 64bit data support in the BIOS.

       

      8301

      Not enough space in runtime area. SMBIOS data will not be available.

       

      8302

      Not enough space in runtime area. SMBIOS data will not be available.

       

      8601

      Error: BMC Not Responding

       

      8701

      Insufficient Runtime space for MPS data.!.

      System may operate in PIC or Non-MPS mode.

       


    POST Code LEDs

    Two LEDs inside the front cover of your server node display the same two-digit POST code output from primary I/O port 80 that is shown on the BIOS screen (the right-most two digits on the lower right of the BIOS screen are the POST code from primary I/O port 80).

    In general, the POST codes change so rapidly that you cannot distinguish individual digits. Some POST tests take enough time (or pause or stop), however, so that they might be readable if you look at the LEDs through the front panel. Such codes are listed in TABLE 8-2.

     


    Code

    Meaning

    4F

    Initializing IPMI BT interface.

    D4

    Testing base memory; system might hang if test fails.

    D5

    Copying Boot Block to RAM and transferring control to RAM.

    38

    Initializing different devices through DIM (Device Initialization Manager). For example, USB controllers are initialized at this point.

    75

    Initializing Int-13 and preparing for IPL detection.

    78

    Initializing IPL devices controlled by BIOS and option ROMs.

    85

    Displaying errors to the user and getting the user response for error.

    87

    Executing BIOS setup if needed / requested. Checking boot password if installed.

    00

    Passing control to OS Loader (typically INT19h).

    FF

    The flash has been updated successfully. Making flash write disabled. Disabling ATAPI hardware. Restoring CPUID value back into register. Giving control to F000 ROM at F000:FFF0h.




    Note - For each cold boot (such as when a blade is re-seated into the chassis), POST testing begins to run and detects system resources for a short while. After just a few POST codes, the node is turned off or restarted depending on the selected state in the BIOS for AC Power Loss (Always On, Always Off, or Last State).


    Copyright © 2009 Sun Microsystems, Inc. All rights reserved.

    Fixing Windows Devices That Can't Start

    This chapter is from the book 

    BIOS Startup Error Messages and Solutions

    When a system has problems starting, it might display error messages at startup. These messages might come from the system BIOS (ROM BIOS or UEFI firmware) or might be generated by Windows. Typical error messages displayed by the BIOS include the following:

    • Invalid system disk
    • Boot failure
    • Hard disk error
    • NT boot loader missing
    • Missing operating system

    These and similar messages indicate that the BIOS or UEFI firmware chip on the motherboard cannot locate startup files for your operating system. Possible reasons can include the following:

    • A nonbootable drive containing media is listed first in the boot order (BIOS/UEFI).
    • The computer’s system drive is not properly identified (BIOS/UEFI).
    • Data or power cables from the internal hard disk to the motherboard are loose or have failed (hardware).
    • The drive has failed (hardware).

    These are listed in order of likelihood. As always, start with the simplest possibility: You’ve left a USB thumb drive plugged into your computer.

    Disconnecting USB Drives

    If your system is configured to use USB drives as the first bootable device and you leave a nonbootable USB flash drive plugged into your system (either directly or into a USB hub connected to your system), your system won’t boot. Solution? Unplug the drive and restart your system.

    If your system restarts correctly, you have a couple of choices:

    • Don’t leave USB flash drives plugged into your system when you shut down the computer.
    • Change your BIOS or UEFI firmware settings to skip USB drives as bootable devices.

    Checking and Changing Drive Boot Order

    Should you change the boot order? It depends. More and more diagnostic programs can be run from bootable USB flash drives, and you can also install new operating systems from bootable USB flash drives. However, you can also use your system’s DVD or BD (Blu-ray) drive for these tasks. So, it’s up to you.

    We recommend changing the boot order on Windows 7 computers if

    • You use USB flash drives to speed up your system using the Windows ReadyBoost feature.
    • You frequently use USB flash drives to shuttle information between computers.
    • You frequently use USB flash drives for other reasons.

    However, you should leave USB flash drives at the top of the boot order if

    • You frequently run diagnostic programs from a bootable USB flash drive.
    • You install operating systems from a bootable USB flash drive.
    • You seldom or never use USB flash drives for data transfer.

    Here’s how to change the boot order in Windows 7:

    1. Click Start.
    2. Click the right arrow next to the Shut Down button.
    3. Select Restart.
    4. After your system restarts, press the key that starts the BIOS or UEFI firmware setup program (see Figure 8.3).

      Figure 8.3

      Figure 8.3 On some systems, such as this HP Pavilion DV6 laptop, you might need to press a key (ESC) to see startup options including BIOS setup (F10).

    5. Navigate to the dialog used to set the drive boot order (see Figure 8.4).

      Figure 8.4

      Figure 8.4 This system looks for USB thumb drives as the first bootable devices.

    6. Change the boot order to place the optical drive first, followed by the hard disk.
    7. Save your changes and restart your computer.

    Windows 8.1 (unlike Windows 8) does not support the creation of a CD or DVD repair disc, although you can use your Windows 8.1 distribution media as a repair disc. With Windows 8.1, if your system supports booting from a USB drive, you should create a USB recovery drive instead.

    To learn more, see http://windows.microsoft.com/en-US/windows-8/create-usb-recovery-drive.

    STOP (Blue Screen) Errors at Startup

    If you turn on your Windows computer and, instead of seeing the Windows login screen or desktop, you see a screen similar to the one shown in Figure 8.5, you have a STOP error, also known as a “Blue Screen” or BSOD (“blue screen of death) error. What happened?

    Figure 8.5

    Figure 8.5 A 0x7B STOP error in Windows 7 caused by changing the SATA interface setting in the system BIOS (a). Windows 8 displays a different STOP error (b).

    Blue-screen errors can be caused by many problems. At startup, they’re typically caused by problems with hard disk device drivers. If a blue screen error appears after you have booted to the Windows desktop, it could be caused by corrupt apps, corrupt device drivers, or memory problems.

    When you see a BSOD error, be sure to record the numbers listed after the STOP message, such as STOP: 0x0000001E, or 0x1E for short. If the name of the error is displayed, such as KMODE_EXCEPTION_NOT_HANDLED, record it as well. You can then look up the error number and name on the Microsoft Support Site (http://support.microsoft.com) to find Microsoft’s suggested solutions.

    Table 8.2 lists some of the most common STOP errors and possible solutions.

    Table 8.2 Common Windows STOP Errors and Solutions

    STOP Error Number

    STOP Error Name

    Suggested Solutions

    0xA

    IRQL_NOT_LESS_OR_EQUAL

    Check device drivers or services used by backup or antivirus utilities.

    0xD1

    DRIVER_IRQL_NOT_LESS_OR_EQUAL

    Check device drivers or services used by backup or antivirus utilities.

    0x1E

    KMODE_EXCEPTION_NOT_HANDLED

    Illegal or unknown instruction; check the driver referenced in the error message.

    0x24

    NTFS_FILE SYSTEM

    Test the hard disk for errors.

    0x2E

    DATA_BUS ERROR

    Test memory modules; disable memory caching in system BIOS; check hardware configuration.

    0x50

    PAGE_FAULT_IN_NONPAGED AREA

    Check printer drivers.

    0x7B

    INACCESSIBLE_BOOT_DEVICE

    Incorrect or missing hard disk device driver; see “Fixing 0x7B Errors,” this chapter, for details.

    0x7F

    UNEXPECTED_KERNEL_MODE_TRAP

    Test hardware and RAM; check SCSI configuration if in use; make sure CPU is not overclocked.

    0x9F

    DRIVER_POWER_STATE_FAILURE

    Check power management and CD-writing software; disable power management temporarily; reinstall or upgrade CD-writing software.

    0xC21A

    STATUS_SYSTEM_PROCESS_TERMINATED

    Reinstall third-party programs; use System File Checker with the Scannow option (SFC/Scannow) to check system files.

    Unfortunately, Windows is typically configured to restart the system immediately when a STOP error is displayed, so you can’t read it. To configure Windows so that a STOP error stays onscreen so you can determine what it is and look for solutions, see “Preparing a Windows-Based Computer or Tablet for Easier Troubleshooting,” Chapter 1, p.37.

    Fixing 0x7B Errors at Startup

    If you are building a computer, have just upgraded to a new hard disk, or have just replaced the motherboard battery that maintains system settings, it’s possible that your computer has “forgotten” the correct hard disk configuration settings.

    Almost all hard disks are configured using Auto as the hard disk type. Thus, if the setup information is lost, the default (normal) setting is Auto and the drive will be properly detected.

    However, the setting for the SATA interface used by your hard disk can be a problem. There are several possible settings for the SATA interface (IDE, AHCI, and RAID), and if your system is configured using one setting, but a different setting is used in the system BIOS or UEFI firmware, your computer won’t start, displaying a 0x7B STOP error (refer to Figure 8.5).

    If you know the correct setting, follow these steps:

    1. Shut down the computer and restart it.
    2. Start the BIOS or UEFI firmware setup program.
    3. Change the SATA setting to the correct value.
    4. Save settings and restart the computer.
    5. Select Start Windows Normally if prompted.

    Switching to AHCI Mode in Windows 7 and Windows 8.x

    If your SATA drives are currently set to run in IDE mode, but you are planning to install an SSD, keep in mind that an SSD cannot provide you with faster performance unless you use AHCI mode. If the system crashes when you change SATA modes, how can you safely change from IDE to AHCI mode?

    Before you make the switch, you need to enable Windows to use AHCI drivers when necessary.

    The easiest way for Windows Vista and Windows 7 is to use the Fix-It wizard available from http://support.microsoft.com/kb/922976. This page also details manual Registry changes that make the same changes as the Fix-It Wizard.

    After you run the Fix-It Wizard or make the needed changes manually, you can safely enable AHCI mode in the system BIOS or UEFI firmware setup dialog (refer to Figure 8.8), and your system will install the appropriate drivers and run properly.

    To switch from IDE mode to AHCI mode in Windows 8.x, follow this procedure (adapted from http://superuser.com/questions/471102/change-from-ide-to-ahci-after-installing-windows-8):

    1. Search for and run msconfig.exe.
    2. Click the Boot tab.
    3. Click the empty Safe Boot box (see Figure 8.6).

      Figure 8.6

      Figure 8.6 Make sure Safe Boot is checked before you click OK.

    4. Click OK.
    5. Swipe from the right or move your mouse to the lower-right corner of the screen and click or tap Settings.
    6. Click or tap Change PC Settings.
    7. Click or tap Update and Recovery.
    8. Click or tap Recovery.
    9. Click or tap Restart Now (see Figure 8.7).

      Figure 8.7

      Figure 8.7 Restart Now enables you to change firmware (BIOS/UEFI) settings.

    10. Press the key or keys needed to enter the UEFI firmware setup program.
    11. Change the SATA mode to AHCI (see Figure 8.8).

      Figure 8.8

      Figure 8.8 Preparing to change a system configured for IDE mode to AHCI mode.

    12. Select the option to save changes and restart your computer.
    13. Search for and run msconfig.exe.
    14. Click or tap the Boot tab.
    15. Clear the Safe Boot check box.
    16. Click or tap OK.
    17. Open the Charms menu.
    18. Click or tap Settings.
    19. Click or tap Power.
    20. Click or tap Restart.

    Your computer will restart using AHCI mode for full performance of your SATA devices.

    Loose Drive Data and Power Cables

    The interior of a desktop PC is a cluttered place. Whether you had your system opened up for a memory upgrade, component replacement, or just to see what’s “under the hood,” you might have loosened or disconnected the power or data cables going to the hard disk or the data cable connecting the hard disk to the motherboard. If your system (C:) drive has disconnected or loose cables, you will see No Operating System or other similar error messages.

    Most SATA data cables do not lock into place, so it’s easy to have a loose cable on either a drive (see Figure 8.9) or the motherboard (see Figures 8.10 and 8.11).

    Figure 8.10

    Figure 8.10 An SATA motherboard host adapter with a loose data cable.

    Figure 8.11

    Figure 8.11 Some motherboards use front-mounted SATA ports, like this one, which also features a loose data cable.

    Similarly, SATA power cables can come loose from drives (see Figure 8.12).

    Figure 8.12

    Figure 8.12 The power cable on this SATA drive is not connected tightly.

    To solve problems with loose or disconnected cables:

    1. Shut down the computer.
    2. Disconnect the power supply from AC power.
    3. Open the system.
    4. Check the hard disk or SSD for loose or disconnected cable(s).
    5. Check the motherboard for loose or disconnected SATA data cables.
    6. Securely plug the cable(s) into place (see Figures 8.13, 8.14, and 8.15).

      Figure 8.13

      Figure 8.13 An SATA hard disk with properly connected power and data cables.

      Figure 8.14

      Figure 8.14 A correctly installed SATA data cable plugged into a top-facing motherboard port.

      Figure 8.15

      Figure 8.15 A correctly installed SATA data cable plugged into a front-facing motherboard port.

    7. Close the system.
    8. Reconnect the power supply to AC power.
    9. Restart the computer.

    Drive Failure

    If your hard disk is making a loud or rattling noise when it’s running, it has probably failed. If the hard disk was dropped or smacked hard, a failure is very likely.

    However, a hard disk might have failed if it is absolutely silent even when you place your ear next to it or does not get warm after the system has been on for several minutes.

    Before assuming a hard disk has failed, perform this isolation test to determine whether the problem is the hard disk, its power cable, or its data cable:

    1. Shut down the computer.
    2. Disconnect the power supply from AC power.
    3. Open the system.
    4. Locate the power cable running between the hard disk and the power supply.
    5. Disconnect the power cable from the power supply.
    6. If the power cable used a splitter or converter to provide power to the drive, plug the drive directly into the power supply (if possible). If that is not possible, replace the splitter or converter and make sure it is securely plugged into the power supply lead and the drive.
    7. Reconnect the power supply to AC power.
    8. Restart the computer.
    9. If the drive is still not working, repeat steps 1 and 2.
    10. Reconnect the drive to the original power cable (and splitter or converter).
    11. Remove the data cable from the hard disk drive and the computer.
    12. Install a known-working replacement cable.
    13. Plug it into the SATA port on the motherboard and drive.
    14. Repeat steps 7 and 8.
    15. If the drive is still not working, the drive has failed. Replace it.

    On one of them, reseat the fan connector (with the PC powered off).  Then power on and see if it helps.  If not, do a CMOS memory (BIOS) reset.  But before you do the rest, note any customization you have in the BIOS as it will have to be re-entered after the reset.  To reset CMOS memory, with the PC powered off, remove the CR2032 coin cell battery on the motherboard for at least 10 minutes.  Reinstall the battery and power on and see if this fixes it.

    If not it may be the fan electronics that the BIOS senses is bad and if that's the case, a new (Dell) fan will be needed.  If you have a working system that you can spare, take the fan out of that system and install (temporarily connect to one of the PC's that has the problem and see if fixes it.

     



    I am not a Dell Employee

    Dell forum member since 2002

    Dell Inspiron 15 Gaming 5577 Laptop

    Home Built Desktop PC with Gigabyte Designare Z390,  i9 9900K CPU

    Windows 11 64 bit Pro  SSD drives. Cakewalk by BandLab and Studio One 4.6 Pro Recording Studio Software, MOTU Ultralite MK5 recording interface unit
    .

    Dell S2719DGF Monitor

    Doubt: Gigabyte halt on no errors

    Tdr 2000 directx error 0x8
    Gigabyte halt on no errors
    Gigabyte halt on no errors
    Gigabyte halt on no errors

    BIOS Power-On Self-Test (POST) Codes

    The system BIOS provides a basic power-on self-test (POST), during which the BIOS checks the basic devices required for the server to operate. The progress of the self-test is indicated by a series of POST codes. This chapter explains the BIOS POST testing, provides an alternate method for viewing the codes, gigabyte halt on no errors, describes how to change POST options, and lists the POST codes.

    This chapter contains the following sections:

    About POST

    The POST is a systematic check of basic system devices. As the testing progresses, the BIOS displays codes that you can use to interpret the status of your server. The codes appear at the bottom right corner of the system’s VGA gigabyte halt on no errors, after the self-test has progressed far enough to initialize the video monitor. Because the codes might scroll off of the screen too quickly to be read, an alternate method of displaying POST codes is to redirect the output of the console to a serial port (see Redirecting Console Output).

    You can also see some of the post codes on LEDs inside the front panel of your server node (see POST Code LEDs).

    How BIOS POST Memory Testing Works

    The BIOS POST memory testing is performed as follows:

    1. The first megabyte of DRAM is tested by the BIOS before the BIOS code is shadowed (that is, copied from ROM to DRAM).

    2. Once executing gigabyte halt on no errors of DRAM, the BIOS performs a simple memory test (a write/read of every location with the pattern ).



    Note - This memory test is performed only if Quick Boot is not enabled from the Boot Settings Configuration screen. Enabling Quick Boot causes the BIOS to skip the memory test. See Changing POST Options for more information.


    3. The BIOS polls the memory controllers for both correctable and non-correctable memory errors and logs those errors into the SP.

    4. The message appears at the end of POST.

    Redirecting Console Output

    You can access BIOS POST codes remotely using gigabyte halt on no errors web interface or the CLI.


    procedure icon  To Access BIOS POST Codes Using the Web Interface

    1. Open a browser and use the SP’s IP address as the URL.

    Refer to the Sun Integrated Lights Out Manager 2.0 User’s Guide (820-1188) for information on how to obtain the IP address of the SP.

    2. Type a user name and password as follows:

    User name: Password:

    3. The ILOM SP web interface screen appears.

    4. Click the Remote Control tab.

    5. Click the Redirection tab.

    6. Click the Start Redirection button.

    The javaRConsole window appears and prompts you for your user name and password again, then the current POST screen appears.


    procedure icon  To Access BIOS POST Codes Using the CLI

    1. Log in to the SP cli with the command SP IP address and use the command to start the serial console.

    Changing POST Options

    These instructions are optional, but you can use them to change the operations that the server performs during POST testing.


    procedure icon  To Change the POST Options

    1. Initialize the BIOS Setup Utility by pressing the F2 key while the system is performing the power-on self-test (POST).

    The BIOS Main Menu screen appears.

    2. Select the Boot menu.

    The Boot Settings screen appears.

    3. Select Boot Settings Configuration.

    The Boot Settings Configuration screen appears.

    4. On the Boot Settings Configuration screen, there are several options that you can enable or disable:

    • Retry Boot List: Automatically retries the boot list when all devices have failed. This option is enabled by default.
    • Quick Boot: This option is enabled by default. The BIOS skips certain tests while booting, such as the extensive memory test. This decreases the time it takes for the system to boot.
    • Quiet Boot: This option is disabled by default. If you enable this option, the Sun Microsystems logo oki 175 fatal error instead of POST codes.
    • Wait for F1 if Error: This option is enabled by default. The system pauses if an error is found during POST and only resumes when you press the F1 key.
    • On-board IB gPXE Boot First: Sets the on-board infiniband gPXE to always boot first. This option is disabled by default.

    POST Codes

    TABLE 8-1 contains descriptions of each of the POST codes, listed in the same order in which they are generated, gigabyte halt on no errors. These POST codes appear at the bottom 500 internal privoxy error mac of the BIOS screen as a four-digit string that is a combination of two-digit output from primary I/O port 80 and two-digit output from secondary I/O port 81. In the POST gigabyte halt on no errors listed in TABLE 8-1, gigabyte halt on no errors first two digits are from port 81 and the last two digits are from port 80.

    You can see some of the POST codes from primary I/O port 80 on LEDs inside the front video no video lineage error of your server node (see POST Code LEDs).

    The Response column describes the action taken by the system on encountering the corresponding error. The actions are:

    • Warning or Not an Error - The message appears on the screen. An error record is logged to the system event log (SEL). The system continues booting with a degraded state. The user might want to replace the unit.
    • Pause - The message appears on the screen, an error is logged to the SEL, and user input is required to continue. The user can take immediate corrective action or choose to continue booting.
    • Halt - The message appears on the screen, an error is logged to the SEL, and the system cannot boot unless the error is resolved. The user needs to replace the faulty part and restart the system.

    • Error Code

      Error Message

      Response

      0000

      Timer Error

      Pause

      0003

      CMOS Battery Low

      Pause

      0004

      CMOS Settings Wrong

      Pause

      0005

      CMOS Checksum Bad

      Pause

      000B

      CMOS Memory Size Wrong

      Pause

      000C

      RAM R/W Test Failed

      Pause

      000E

      A: Drive Error

      Pause

      000F

      B: Drive Error

      Pause

      0012

      CMOS Date/Time Not Set

      Pause

      0040

      gigabyte halt on no errors colspan="1">

      Refresh Timer Test Failed

      Halt

      0041

      Display Memory Test Failed

      Pause

      0042

      CMOS Display Type Wrong

      Pause

      0043

      ~<INS> Pressed

      Pause

      0044

      DMA Controller Error

      Halt

      0045

      DMA-1 Error

      Halt

      0046

      DMA-2 Error

      Halt

      0047

      Unknown BIOS error, gigabyte halt on no errors. Error code = 0047

      Halt

      0048

      Password Check Failed

      Halt

      0049

      Unknown BIOS error. Error code = 0049

      Halt

      004A

      Unknown BIOS error. Error code = 004A

      Pause

      004B

      Unknown BIOS error. Error code = 004B

      Pause

      004C

      Keyboard/Interface Error

       

      005D

      S.M.A.R.T. Command Failed

       

      005E

      Password Check Failed

      Pause

      codebase error 210

      Warning! This system board does not support the power requirements of the installed processor. The processor will be run at a gigabyte halt on no errors frequency, which will impact system performance.

      Pause

      0102

      Error! The CPU Core to Bus ratio or VID configuration has failed! Please enter BIOS Setup and re-config it.

      Pause

      gigabyte halt on no errors colspan="1">

      0103

      ERROR! CPU MTRRs configuration failed!

      Uncacheable memory hole or PCI space too complicated.

       

      0120

      Thermal Trip Failure

      Pause

      0121

      Thermal Trip Failure

      Pause

      0122

      Thermal Trip Failure

      Pause

      0123

      Thermal Trip Failure

      Pause

      0124 gigabyte halt on no errors rowspan="1" colspan="1">

      Thermal Trip Failure

      Pause

      0125

      Thermal Trip Failure

      Pause

      0126

      Thermal Trip Failure

      Pause

      0127

      Thermal Trip Failure

      Pause

      0128

      Thermal Trip Failure

       

      0129

      Thermal Trip Failure

       

      012A

      Thermal Trip Failure

       

      012B

      Thermal Trip Failure

       

      012C

      Thermal Trip Failure

       

      012D

      Thermal Trip Failure

       

      012E

      Thermal Trip Failure

       

      012F

      Thermal Trip Failure

       

      0150

      Processor Failed BIST

      Pause

      0151

      Processor Failed BIST

      Pause

      0152

      Processor Failed BIST

      Pause

      0153

      Processor Failed BIST

      Pause

      0154

      Processor Failed BIST

      Pause

      0155

      Processor Failed BIST

      Pause

      0156

      Processor Failed BIST

      Pause

      0157

      Processor Failed BIST

      Pause

      0158

      Processor Failed BIST

       

      0159

      Processor Failed BIST

       

      015A

      Processor Failed BIST

       

      015B

      Processor Failed BIST

       

      015C

      Processor Failed BIST

       

      015D

      Processor Failed BIST

       

      015E

      Processor Failed BIST

       

      015F

      Processor Failed BIST

       

      0160

      Processor missing microcode

      Pause

      0161

      Processor missing on error vba

      Pause

      0162

      Processor missing microcode

      Pause

      0163

      Processor missing microcode

      Pause

      0164

      Processor missing microcode

      Pause

      0165

      Processor missing borland error e2141

      Pause

      0166

      Processor missing microcode

      Pause

      0167

      Processor missing microcode

      Pause

      0168

      Processor missing microcode

       

      0169

      Processor missing microcode

       

      016A

      Processor missing microcode

       

      016B

      Processor missing microcode

       

      016C

      Processor missing microcode

       

      016D

      Processor missing microcode

       

      016E

      Processor missing microcode

       

      016F

      Processor missing microcode

       

      0180

      BIOS does not support current stepping

      Pause

      0181

      BIOS does not support current stepping

      Pause

      0182

      BIOS does not support current stepping

      Pause

      0183

      BIOS does not support current stepping

      Pause

      0184

      BIOS does not support current stepping

      Pause

      0185

      BIOS does not support current stepping

      Pause

      0186

      BIOS does not support current stepping

      Pause

      0187

      BIOS does not support current stepping

      Pause

      0188

      BIOS does not support current stepping

       

      0189

      BIOS does not support current stepping

       

      018A

      BIOS does not support current stepping

       

      018B

      BIOS does not support current stepping

       

      018C

      BIOS does not support current stepping

       

      018D

      BIOS does not support current stepping

       

      018E

      BIOS does not support current stepping

       

      018F

      BIOS does not support current stepping

       

      0192

      L2 cache size mismatch.

       

      0193

      CPUID, Processor stepping are different, gigabyte halt on no errors.

       

      0194

      CPUID, Processor family are different.

      Pause

      0195

      Front side bus mismatch. System halted.

       

      0196

      CPUID, Processor Model are different.

      Pause

      0197

      Processor speeds mismatched.

      Pause

      5120

      CMOS cleared by jumper.

      Pause

      5121

      Password cleared by jumper.

      Pause

      5125

      Not enough conventional memory to copy PCI Option ROM.

       

      5180

      Unsupported Memory Vendor : DIMM_A0

      Warning

      5181

      Unsupported Memory Vendor : DIMM_A1

      Warning

      5182

      Unsupported Memory Vendor : DIMM_A2

      Warning

      5183

      Unsupported Memory Vendor : DIMM_A3

      Warning

      5184

      Unsupported Memory Vendor : DIMM_A4

       

      5185

      Unsupported Memory Vendor : DIMM_B0

      Warning

      5186

      Unsupported Memory Vendor : DIMM_B1

      Warning

      5187

      Unsupported Memory Vendor : DIMM_B2

      Warning

      5188

      Unsupported Memory Vendor : DIMM_B3

      Warning

      5189

      Unsupported Memory Vendor : DIMM_B4

      Warning

      518A

      Unsupported Memory Vendor : DIMM_B5

      Warning

      518B

      Unsupported Memory Vendor : DIMM_C0

      Warning

      518C

      Unsupported Memory Vendor : DIMM_C1

      Warning

      518D

      Unsupported Memory Vendor : DIMM_C2

      Warning

      518F

      Unsupported Memory Vendor : DIMM_C3

      Warning

      5190

      Unsupported Memory Vendor : DIMM_C4

      Warning

      5191

      Unsupported Memory Vendor : DIMM_C5

      Warning

      5192

      Unsupported Memory Vendor : DIMM_D0

      Warning

      5193

      Unsupported Memory Vendor : DIMM_D1

      Warning

      5194

      Unsupported Memory Vendor : DIMM_D2

      Warning

      5195

      Unsupported Memory Vendor : DIMM_D3

      Warning

      5196

      Unsupported Memory Vendor : DIMM_D4

      Warning

      5197

      Unsupported Memory Vendor : DIMM_D5

      Warning

      51A0

      Unsupported AMB Vendor : DIMM_A0

      Warning

      51A1

      Unsupported AMB Vendor : DIMM_A1

      Warning

      error pl/sql sql statement ignored

      Unsupported AMB Vendor : DIMM_A2

      Warning

      51A3

      Unsupported AMB Vendor : DIMM_A3

      Warning

      51A4

      Unsupported AMB Vendor : DIMM_A4

      Warning

      51A5

      Unsupported AMB Vendor : DIMM_A5

      Warning

      51A6

      Unsupported AMB Vendor : DIMM_B0

      Warning

      51A7

      Unsupported AMB Vendor : DIMM_B1

      Warning

      51A8

      Unsupported AMB Vendor : DIMM_B2

      Pause

      51A9

      Unsupported AMB Vendor : DIMM_B3

      Warning

      51AA

      Unsupported AMB Vendor : DIMM_B4

      Warning

      51AB

      Unsupported AMB Vendor : DIMM_B5

      Warning

      51AC

      Unsupported AMB Vendor : DIMM_C0

      Warning

      51AD

      Unsupported AMB Vendor : DIMM_C1

      Pause

      51AE

      Unsupported AMB Vendor : DIMM_C2

      Warning

      51AF

      Unsupported AMB Vendor : DIMM_C3

      Pause

      51B0

      Unsupported AMB Vendor : DIMM_C4

      Pause

      51B1

      Unsupported AMB Vendor : DIMM_C5

      Pause

      51B2

      Unsupported AMB Vendor : DIMM_D0

       

      51B3

      Unsupported AMB Vendor : DIMM_D1

       

      51B4

      Unsupported AMB Vendor : DIMM_D2

       

      51B5

      Unsupported AMB Vendor : DIMM_D3

       

      51B6

      Unsupported AMB Vendor : DIMM_D4

       

      51B7

      Unsupported AMB Vendor : DIMM_D5

       

      51C0

      Memory Configuration Error.

       

      8101

      Warning! USB Host Controller not found at the specified address!!!

       

      8102

      Error! USB device failed to initialize!!!

       

      8104

      Warning! Port 60h/64h emulation is not supported by this USB Host Controller!!!

       

      8105

      Warning! EHCI controller disabled. It requires 64bit data support in the BIOS.

       

      8301

      Not enough space in runtime area. SMBIOS data will not be available.

       

      8302

      gigabyte halt on no errors enough space in runtime area. SMBIOS data will not be available.

       

      8601

      Error: BMC Not Responding

       

      8701

      Insufficient Runtime space for MPS data.!.

      System may operate in PIC or Non-MPS mode.

       


    POST Code LEDs

    Two LEDs inside the front cover of your server node display the same two-digit POST code output from primary I/O port 80 that is shown on the BIOS screen (the right-most two digits on the lower right of the BIOS screen are the POST code from primary I/O port 80).

    In general, the POST codes change so rapidly that you cannot distinguish individual digits. Some POST tests take enough time (or pause or stop), however, so that they might be readable if you look at the LEDs through the front panel. Such codes are listed in TABLE 8-2.

     


    Code

    Meaning

    4F

    Initializing IPMI BT interface.

    D4

    Testing base memory; system might hang if test fails, gigabyte halt on no errors.

    D5

    Copying Boot Block to RAM and transferring control to RAM.

    38

    Initializing different devices through DIM (Device Initialization Manager). For example, USB controllers are initialized at this point.

    75

    Initializing Int-13 and preparing for IPL detection.

    78

    Initializing IPL devices controlled by BIOS and option ROMs.

    important error diagnostic methods available in dbi

    Displaying errors to the user and getting the user response for error.

    87

    Executing BIOS setup if needed / requested. Checking boot password if installed.

    00

    Passing control to OS Loader (typically INT19h).

    FF

    The flash has been updated successfully. Making flash write disabled. Disabling ATAPI hardware, gigabyte halt on no errors. Restoring CPUID value back into register. Giving control to F000 ROM at F000:FFF0h.




    Note - For each cold boot (such as when a blade is re-seated into the chassis), POST testing begins to run and detects system resources for a short while. After just a few POST codes, the node is turned off or restarted depending on the selected state in the BIOS for AC Power Loss (Always On, Always Off, or Last State).


    Copyright © 2009 Sun Microsystems, Inc. All rights reserved.

    On one of them, reseat the fan connector (with the PC powered off).  Then power on and see if it helps.  If not, do a CMOS memory (BIOS) reset.  But before you do the rest, note any customization you have in the BIOS as it will have to be re-entered after the reset.  To reset CMOS memory, gigabyte halt on no errors, with the PC powered off, remove the CR2032 coin cell battery on the pascal error 113 for at least 10 minutes.  Reinstall the battery and power on and see if this fixes it.

    If not it may be the fan electronics that the BIOS senses is bad and if that's the case, a new (Dell) fan will be needed.  If you have a working system that you can spare, take the fan out of that system and install (temporarily connect to one of the PC's that has the problem and see if fixes it.

     



    I am not a Dell Employee

    Dell forum member since 2002

    Dell Inspiron 15 Gaming 5577 Laptop

    Home Built Desktop PC with Gigabyte Designare Z390,  i9 9900K CPU

    Windows 11 64 bit Pro  SSD drives. Cakewalk by BandLab and Studio One 4.6 Pro Recording Studio Software, MOTU Ultralite MK5 recording interface unit
    .

    Dell S2719DGF Monitor

    Fixing Windows Devices That Can't Start

    This chapter is from the book 

    BIOS Startup Error Messages and Solutions

    When a system has problems starting, it might display error messages at startup. These messages might come from the system BIOS (ROM BIOS or UEFI firmware) or might be generated by Windows. Typical error messages displayed by the BIOS include the following:

    • Invalid system disk
    • Boot failure
    • Hard disk error
    • NT boot loader missing
    • Missing operating system

    These and similar messages indicate that the BIOS or UEFI firmware chip on the motherboard cannot locate startup files for your operating system. Possible reasons can include the following:

    • A nonbootable drive containing media is listed first in the boot order (BIOS/UEFI).
    • The computer’s system drive is not properly identified (BIOS/UEFI).
    • Data or power cables from the internal hard disk to the motherboard are loose or have failed (hardware).
    • The drive has failed (hardware).

    These are listed in order of likelihood. As gigabyte halt on no errors, start with the simplest possibility: You’ve left a USB thumb drive plugged into your computer.

    Disconnecting USB Drives

    If your system is configured to use USB drives as the first bootable device and you leave a nonbootable USB flash drive plugged into your system (either directly or into a USB hub connected to your system), your system won’t boot. Solution? Unplug the drive and restart your system.

    If your system restarts correctly, you have a couple of choices:

    • Don’t leave USB flash drives plugged into your system when you shut down the computer.
    • Change your BIOS or UEFI firmware settings to skip USB drives as bootable devices.

    Checking and Changing Drive Boot Order

    Should you change the boot order? It depends. Gigabyte halt on no errors and more diagnostic programs can be run from bootable USB flash drives, and you can also install new operating systems from bootable USB flash drives. However, you can also use your system’s DVD or BD (Blu-ray) drive for these tasks. So, it’s up to you.

    We recommend changing the boot order on Windows 7 computers if

    • You use USB flash drives to speed up your system using the Windows ReadyBoost feature.
    • You frequently use USB flash drives to shuttle information between computers.
    • You frequently use USB flash drives for other reasons.

    However, you should leave USB flash drives at the top of the boot order if

    • You frequently run diagnostic programs from a bootable USB flash drive.
    • You install operating systems from a bootable USB flash drive.
    • You seldom or never use USB flash drives for data transfer.

    Here’s how to change the boot order in Windows 7:

    1. Click Start.
    2. Click the right arrow next to the Shut Down button.
    3. Select Restart.
    4. After your system restarts, press the key that starts the BIOS or UEFI firmware setup program (see Figure 8.3).

      Figure 8.3

      Figure 8.3 On some systems, such as this HP Pavilion DV6 laptop, gigabyte halt on no errors, you might need to press a key (ESC) to see startup options including BIOS setup (F10).

    5. Navigate to the dialog used to set the drive boot order (see Figure 8.4).

      Figure 8.4

      Figure 8.4 This system looks for USB thumb drives as the first bootable devices.

    6. Change the boot order to place the optical drive first, followed by the hard disk.
    7. Save your changes and restart your computer.

    Windows 8.1 (unlike Windows 8) does not support the creation of a CD or DVD repair disc, although you can use your Windows 8.1 distribution media as a repair disc. With Windows 8.1, if your system supports booting from a USB drive, you should create a USB recovery drive instead.

    To learn more, see http://windows.microsoft.com/en-US/windows-8/create-usb-recovery-drive.

    STOP (Blue Screen) Errors at Startup

    If you turn on your Windows computer and, instead of seeing the Windows login screen or desktop, you see a screen similar to the one shown in Figure 8.5, you have a STOP error, also known as a “Blue Screen” or BSOD (“blue screen of death) error, gigabyte halt on no errors. What happened?

    Figure 8.5

    Figure 8.5 A 0x7B STOP error in Windows 7 caused by changing the SATA interface setting in the system BIOS (a). Windows 8 displays a different STOP error (b).

    Blue-screen errors can be caused by many problems, gigabyte halt on no errors. At startup, they’re typically caused by problems with hard disk device drivers. If a blue screen error appears after you have booted to the Windows desktop, it could be caused by corrupt apps, corrupt device drivers, or memory problems.

    When you see a BSOD error, be sure to record the numbers listed after the STOP message, such as STOP: 0x0000001E, or 0x1E for short. If the name of the error is displayed, such as KMODE_EXCEPTION_NOT_HANDLED, record it as well. You can then look up the error number and name on the Microsoft Support Site (http://support.microsoft.com) to find Microsoft’s suggested solutions.

    Table 8.2 lists some of the most common STOP errors and possible solutions.

    Table 8.2 Common Windows STOP Errors and Solutions

    STOP Error Number

    STOP Error Name

    Suggested Solutions

    0xA

    IRQL_NOT_LESS_OR_EQUAL

    Check device drivers or services used by backup or antivirus utilities.

    0xD1

    DRIVER_IRQL_NOT_LESS_OR_EQUAL

    Check device drivers or services used by backup or antivirus utilities.

    0x1E

    KMODE_EXCEPTION_NOT_HANDLED

    Illegal or unknown instruction; check the driver referenced in the error message.

    0x24

    NTFS_FILE SYSTEM

    Test the hard disk for errors.

    0x2E

    DATA_BUS ERROR

    Test memory modules; disable memory caching in system BIOS; check hardware configuration.

    0x50

    PAGE_FAULT_IN_NONPAGED AREA

    Check printer drivers.

    0x7B

    INACCESSIBLE_BOOT_DEVICE

    Incorrect or missing hard disk device driver; see “Fixing 0x7B Errors,” this chapter, for details.

    0x7F

    UNEXPECTED_KERNEL_MODE_TRAP

    Test hardware and RAM; check SCSI configuration if in use; make sure CPU is not overclocked.

    0x9F

    DRIVER_POWER_STATE_FAILURE

    Check power management and CD-writing software; disable power management temporarily; reinstall or upgrade CD-writing software.

    0xC21A

    STATUS_SYSTEM_PROCESS_TERMINATED

    Reinstall third-party programs; use System File Checker with the Scannow option (SFC/Scannow) to check system files.

    Unfortunately, Windows is typically configured to restart the system immediately when a STOP error is displayed, so you can’t read it. To configure Windows so that a STOP error stays onscreen so you can determine what it is and look for solutions, see “Preparing a Windows-Based Computer or Tablet for Easier Troubleshooting,” Chapter 1, p.37.

    Fixing 0x7B Errors at Startup

    If you are building a computer, have just upgraded to a new hard disk, or have just replaced the motherboard battery that maintains system settings, smtp error 334 ugfzc3dvcmq6 possible that your computer has “forgotten” the correct hard disk configuration settings.

    Almost all hard disks are configured using Auto as the hard disk type. Thus, if the setup information is lost, the default (normal) setting is Auto and the drive will be properly detected.

    However, the setting for the SATA interface used by your hard disk can be a problem. There are several possible settings for the SATA interface (IDE, AHCI, and RAID), and if your system is configured using one setting, but a different setting is used in the system BIOS or UEFI firmware, your computer won’t start, displaying a 0x7B STOP error (refer to Figure 8.5).

    If you know the correct setting, follow these steps:

    1. Shut down the computer and restart it.
    2. Start the BIOS or UEFI firmware setup program.
    3. Change the SATA setting to the correct value.
    4. Save settings and restart the computer.
    5. Select Start Windows Normally if prompted.

    Switching to AHCI Mode in Windows 7 and Windows 8.x

    If your SATA drives are currently set to run in IDE mode, but you are planning to install an SSD, keep in mind that an SSD cannot provide you with faster performance unless you use AHCI mode. If the system crashes when you change SATA modes, how can you safely change from IDE to AHCI mode?

    Before you make the switch, you need to enable Windows to use AHCI drivers when necessary.

    The easiest way for Windows Vista and Windows 7 is to use the Fix-It wizard available from http://support.microsoft.com/kb/922976. This page also details manual Registry changes that make the same changes as the Fix-It Wizard.

    After you run the Fix-It Wizard or make the needed changes manually, you can safely enable AHCI mode in the system BIOS or UEFI firmware setup dialog (refer to Figure 8.8), and your system will install the appropriate drivers and run properly.

    To switch from IDE mode to AHCI mode in Windows 8.x, gigabyte halt on no errors, follow this procedure (adapted from http://superuser.com/questions/471102/change-from-ide-to-ahci-after-installing-windows-8):

    1. Search for and run msconfig.exe.
    2. Click the Boot tab.
    3. Click the empty Safe Boot box (see Figure 8.6).

      Figure 8.6

      Figure 8.6 Make sure Safe Boot is checked before you click OK.

    4. Click OK.
    5. Swipe from the right or move your mouse to the lower-right corner of the screen and click or tap Settings.
    6. Click or tap Change PC Settings.
    7. Click or tap Update and Recovery.
    8. Click or tap Recovery.
    9. Click or tap Restart Now (see Figure 8.7).

      Figure 8.7

      Figure 8.7 Restart Now enables you to change firmware (BIOS/UEFI) settings.

    10. Press the key or keys needed to enter the UEFI firmware setup program.
    11. Change the SATA mode to AHCI (see Figure 8.8).

      Figure 8.8

      Figure 8.8 Preparing to change a system configured for IDE mode to AHCI mode.

    12. Select the option to save changes and restart your computer.
    13. Search for and run msconfig.exe.
    14. Click or tap the Boot tab.
    15. Clear the Safe Boot check box.
    16. Click or tap OK.
    17. Open the Charms menu.
    18. Click or tap the 51 fatal business errors or tap Power.
    19. Click or tap Restart.

    Your computer gigabyte halt on no errors restart using AHCI mode for full performance of your SATA devices.

    Loose Drive Data and Power Cables

    The interior of a desktop PC is a cluttered place, gigabyte halt on no errors. Whether you had your system opened up for a memory upgrade, component replacement, gigabyte halt on no errors, or just to see what’s “under the hood,” you might have loosened or disconnected the power or data cables going to the hard disk or the data cable connecting the hard disk to the motherboard. If your system (C:) drive has disconnected or loose cables, gigabyte halt on no errors, you will see No Operating System or other similar error messages.

    Most SATA data cables do not lock into place, so it’s easy to have a loose cable on either a drive (see Figure 8.9) or the motherboard (see Figures 8.10 and 8.11).

    Figure 8.10

    Figure 8.10 An SATA motherboard host adapter with a loose data cable.

    Figure 8.11

    Figure 8.11 Some motherboards use front-mounted SATA ports, like this one, which also features a loose data cable.

    Similarly, SATA power cables can come loose from drives (see Figure 8.12).

    Figure 8.12

    Figure 8.12 The gigabyte halt on no errors cable on this SATA drive is not connected tightly.

    To solve problems with loose or disconnected cables:

    1. Shut down the computer.
    2. Disconnect the power supply from AC power.
    3. Open the system.
    4. Check the hard disk or SSD for loose or disconnected cable(s).
    5. Check the motherboard for loose or disconnected SATA data cables.
    6. Securely plug the cable(s) into place (see Figures 8.13, 8.14, and 8.15).

      Figure 8.13

      Figure 8.13 An SATA hard disk with properly connected power and data cables.

      Figure 8.14

      Figure 8.14 A correctly installed SATA data cable plugged into a top-facing motherboard port.

      Figure 8.15

      Figure 8.15 A correctly installed SATA data cable plugged into a front-facing motherboard port.

    7. Close the system.
    8. Reconnect the power supply to AC power.
    9. Restart the computer.

    Drive Failure

    If your hard disk is making a loud or rattling noise when it’s running, it has probably failed. If the hard disk was dropped or smacked hard, a failure is very likely.

    However, a hard disk might have failed if it is absolutely silent even when you place your ear next to it or does not get warm after the system has been on for several minutes.

    Before assuming a hard disk has failed, perform this isolation test to determine whether the problem is the hard disk, its power cable, or its data cable:

    1. Shut down the computer.
    2. Disconnect the power supply from AC power.
    3. Open the system.
    4. Locate error 121 wow power cable running between the hard disk and the power supply.
    5. Disconnect the power cable from the power supply.
    6. If the power cable used a splitter or converter to provide power to the drive, plug the drive directly into the power supply (if possible). If that is not possible, replace the splitter or converter and make sure it is securely plugged into the power supply lead and the drive.
    7. Reconnect the power supply to AC power.
    8. Restart the computer.
    9. If the drive is still not working, repeat steps 1 and 2.
    10. Reconnect the drive to gigabyte halt on no errors original power cable (and splitter or converter).
    11. Remove the data cable from the hard disk drive and the computer.
    12. Install a known-working replacement cable.
    13. Plug it into the SATA port on the motherboard and drive.
    14. Repeat steps 7 and 8.
    15. If the drive is still not working, the drive has failed. Replace it.

    Off with his head! (headless GA-H55M-UD2H)

    I decided to use my old Gigabyte H55M-UD2H motherboard in a NAS server I was putting together. While I was fine with using a video card to install the OS, gigabyte halt on no errors, I didn’t want the video card sucking up the extra watts while it was running.

    Turned out, getting this Gigabyte motherboard to boot headless wasn’t too terribly difficult. Before I get to the details though, note that I was using the Intel i7 860 which is one of the LGA 1156 processors that doesn’t support the on-board video the motherboard has.

    Configuring the Gigabyte BIOS for headless mode

    Consumer motherboards tend to throw an error on boot (and refuse to continue) if they don’t detect both of the following:

    Fortunately, in the Standard CMOS section of the BIOS, you’ll find debian /dev/sdb grub error Halt On setting below the list of hard drives. Change this to Halt On: No Errors.

    If that’s all you do before yanking the video card, there’s a chance that the system won’t boot and will instead flash the power light at you non-stop (which will continue blinking even if you hold the power button to shut it off).

    To solve (or avoid) that new problem, you have to make sure that the Full Screen Logo is enabled in the BIOS. Don’t ask why. I know it’s counter-intuitive, gigabyte halt on no errors am assuming it’s a firmware bug. You’ll find that setting in the Advanced BIOS section. Look for the Full Screen Logo Show option and make sure it’s Enabled.

    An image to summarize:

     

    With both of those set and saved, shut down the computer one more time (don’t power off during the actual BIOS load – do it sometime after), pull out the video card, and your system should hopefully boot!

    Note that on the first boot after the video card has been removed, gigabyte halt on no errors, the computer will start for a few seconds, power down, and then automatically turn on again a few seconds later. This is normal when you’ve changed a piece of hardware, so don’t panic.

    Other tips/bits to keep in mind…

    1. Make sure you’ve set up a static IP address on the headless system (or have another way to find it on your network).
    2. Using a UPS is a good idea: if you get one of those multiple-flicker power outages (anything that kills power while BIOS is loading), the BIOS might fall back to fail-safe settings which you obviously won’t see on a headless system.
    3. Keep a video card and keyboard nearby in case you run into future boot issues, need to change BIOS settings, etc.

     

    스레드: code 79 then Error sending end of post message to me. System Halt.

  • 06-27-2015 09:15 PM#1

    GoNz0- no está en línea
    ROG Guru: Green Belt ArrayGoNz0- PC Specs
    GoNz0- PC Specs
    Laptop (Model)Dell XPS 9530
    MotherboardRampage V Extreme
    Processor5930
    Memory (part number)[Ripjaws 4] F4-2666C15Q-16GRR
    Graphics Card #1Asus Strix GTX980
    CPU CoolerEk Evo Supremacy
    CaseCorsair 800D
    Power SupplyEnermax 1250w revolution 85
    Keyboard Logitech 710+
    Mouse Razer Mamba 2012
    Headset Sennheiser PC350
    OS Windows 8.1 Pro
    Network RouterAsus AC68u

    code 79 then Error sending end of post message to me. System Halt.

    Updated to the new bios yesterday and all seemed ok, try to power up tonight and get stuck in a code 79 loop until it finally swapped to the other bios and booted, then it gave me the message "Error sending end of post message to me. System Halt".?

    GoNz0-; 06-27-2015이(가) 09:25 PM에 마지막으로 편집


  • 06-27-2015 09:43 PM#2

    samboy87 no está en línea
    ROG Guru: Yellow Belt Arraysamboy87 PC Specs
    samboy87 PC Specs
    Laptop (Model)Laptop? Only Desktop!
    MotherboardAsus Rampage V Extreme Bios: 3202
    ProcessorIntel i7 5930K @ 4.2ghz/3.375ghz Adaptive Vcore 1.15v/Vcache 0.98v VCCSA @ 0.846v
    Memory (part number)G.Skill F4-3000C15Q16GRR @ 3000mhz CL14-14-14-34 T1 @ 1.36v
    Graphics Card #1Gigabyte GTX 1080 FE @ Stock boost 1968mhz/5011mhz
    MonitorAsus PG278Q Swift
    Storage #12x Samsung EVO 850Pro 256GB - Win 10 Home / Games
    Storage #2Toshiba 3TB
    CPU CoolerCorsair H110i GT
    CaseCorsair Obsidian 750D
    Power SupplyCorsair HX1000i / 1000W
    Keyboard Razer Blackwiddow Chroma
    Mouse Razer Deathadder Chroma
    Headset Razer Kraken Chroma 7.1
    Mouse Pad Razer FireFly Chroma
    Headset/Speakers Bower&Wilkins 2xCM9 s2 1xCMC2 S2
    OS Windows 10
    Network RouterNetgear Nighthawk R7000
    Accessory #1 ROG OC Panel
    Accessory #2 HTC Vive

    Have you tried Loading Default settings in bios after the update?


  • 06-27-2015 10:38 PM#3

    GoNz0- no está en línea
    ROG Guru: Green Belt ArrayGoNz0- PC Specs
    gigabyte halt on no errors PC Canon mp 140 e14 error (Model)Dell XPS 9530
    MotherboardRampage V Extreme
    Processor5930
    Memory (part number)[Ripjaws 4] F4-2666C15Q-16GRR
    Graphics Card #1Asus Strix GTX980
    CPU CoolerEk Evo Supremacy
    CaseCorsair 800D
    Power SupplyEnermax 1250w revolution 85
    Keyboard Logitech 710+
    Mouse Razer Mamba 2012
    Headset Sennheiser PC350
    OS Windows 8.1 Pro
    Network RouterAsus AC68u

    I will do but it resets them after every update anyway.


  • 06-28-2015 04:14 AM#4

    Chino no está en línea
    ROG Guru: Grand Master Array

  • 06-28-2015 06:55 AM#5

    GoNz0- no está en línea
    ROG Guru: Green Belt ArrayGoNz0- PC Specs
    GoNz0- PC Specs
    Laptop (Model)Dell XPS 9530
    MotherboardRampage V Extreme
    Processor5930
    Memory (part number)[Ripjaws 4] F4-2666C15Q-16GRR
    Graphics Card #1Asus Strix GTX980
    CPU CoolerEk Evo Supremacy
    CaseCorsair 800D
    Power SupplyEnermax 1250w revolution 85
    Keyboard Logitech 710+
    Mouse Razer Mamba 2012
    Headset Sennheiser PC350
    OS Windows 8.1 Pro
    Network RouterAsus AC68u


  • 06-28-2015 05:58 PM#6

    GoNz0- no está en línea
    ROG Guru: Green Belt ArrayGoNz0- PC Specs
    GoNz0- PC Specs
    Laptop (Model)Dell XPS 9530
    MotherboardRampage V Extreme
    Processor5930
    Memory (part number)[Ripjaws error repair tool F4-2666C15Q-16GRR
    Graphics Card #1Asus Strix GTX980
    CPU CoolerEk Evo Supremacy
    CaseCorsair 800D
    Power SupplyEnermax 1250w revolution 85
    Keyboard Logitech 710+
    Mouse Razer Mamba 2012
    Headset Sennheiser PC350
    OS Windows 8.1 Pro
    Network RouterAsus AC68u

    it wiped out all 3 raid arrays after BIOS 1401 freaked out with the 78-79 code so the 1502 BIOS has somehow caused an issue preventing it posting on more than gigabyte halt on no errors occasion. Bad flash taking out a good backup BIOS, gigabyte halt on no errors, how?

    oh and bare 1 stick of ram and nothing else bar the VGA didn't improve things.

    RMA#2 coming up.


  • 06-29-2015 06:58 PM#7

    GoNz0- no está en línea
    ROG Guru: Green Belt ArrayGoNz0- PC Specs
    GoNz0- PC Specs
    Laptop (Model)Dell XPS 9530
    MotherboardRampage V Extreme
    Processor5930
    Memory (part number)[Ripjaws 4] F4-2666C15Q-16GRR
    Graphics Card #1Asus Strix GTX980
    CPU CoolerEk Evo Supremacy
    CaseCorsair 800D
    Power SupplyEnermax 1250w revolution 85
    Keyboard Logitech 710+
    Mouse Razer Mamba 2012
    Headset Sennheiser PC350
    OS Windows 8.1 Pro
    Network RouterAsus AC68u

    Let us hope this is passed back to the developers so it is pulled. Asus?


  • 06-30-2015 12:05 AM#8

    GoNz0- no está en línea
    ROG Guru: Green Belt ArrayGoNz0- PC Specs
    GoNz0- PC Specs
    Laptop (Model)Dell XPS 9530
    MotherboardRampage V Extreme
    Processor5930
    Memory (part number)[Ripjaws 4] F4-2666C15Q-16GRR
    Graphics Card #1Asus Strix GTX980
    CPU CoolerEk Evo Supremacy
    CaseCorsair 800D
    Power SupplyEnermax 1250w revolution 85
    Keyboard Logitech 710+
    Mouse Razer Mamba 2012
    Headset Sennheiser PC350
    OS Windows 8.1 Pro
    Network RouterAsus AC68u

    I have put it back on as I didn't realise I had left it on the 1502 BIOS, so for now it seems ok and I have backed up to the 2nd BIOS as swapping between the 2 seemed to cause the FUBAR, so I assume Asus didn't test for this factor as it should not be able to happen. It must be to do with the microcode (the CPU is updating message).

    If it takes a dive in the next week I will pull the drives and try to get 1402 via flashback working again or RMA the damn thing for a refund as it has been a pain in the ass.


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