Error creating cursor handle t-sql

error creating cursor handle t-sql

Note: It is very important to DEALLOCATE a Cursor as otherwise it will stay in database and when you declare a Cursor with same name again, SQL Server will. I have a query, which are supposed to update all the entries in a table. The tablename is brukertb and is a Paradox table. The field which I try. To handle a result set inside a stored procedure, you use a cursor. If you declare a cursor before the variable declarations, MySQL will issue an error. 33.33

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'Error Creating Cursor Handle'

'Error Creating Cursor Handle'

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'Error Creating Cursor Handle'
Does anybody know what this means. Ihave a project with around 15 TQuery or TTable comps on it. everything was fine, then i added one more TQuery to do an INSERT and i getthe above error every time i try to activate it, the INSERT still works, i just get the error after. TQuerys doing insert that were added before this one still work ok and if a add a TQuery and do a SELECT that is ok. any ideas?

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DECLARE CURSOR (Transact-SQL)

  • Article
  • 13 minutes to read

Applies to: SQL Server (all supported versions) Azure SQL Database Azure SQL Managed Instance

Defines the attributes of a Transact-SQL server cursor, such as its scrolling behavior and the query used to build the result set on which error creating cursor handle t-sql cursor operates. accepts both a syntax based on the ISO standard and a syntax using a set of Transact-SQL extensions.

Topic link iconTransact-SQL Syntax Conventions

Syntax

Arguments

cursor_name
Is the name of the Transact-SQL server cursor defined. cursor_name must conform to the rules for identifiers.

INSENSITIVE
Defines a cursor that makes a temporary copy of the data to be used by the cursor. All requests to the cursor are answered from this temporary table in tempdb; therefore, modifications made to base tables are not reflected in the data returned by fetches made to this cursor, and this cursor does not allow modifications. When ISO syntax is used, error creating cursor handle t-sql, if is omitted, committed deletes and updates made to the underlying tables (by any user) are reflected in subsequent fetches.

SCROLL
Specifies that all fetch options (,, ) are available. If is not specified in an ISO is the only fetch option supported. cannot be specified if is also specified. If is not specified then only the fetch option error creating cursor handle t-sql available and the cursor becomes .

select_statement
Is a standard statement that defines the result set of the cursor. The keywordsand are not allowed within select_statement of a cursor declaration.

SQL Server implicitly converts the cursor to another type if clauses in select_statement conflict with the functionality of the requested cursor type.

READ ONLY
Prevents updates made through this cursor. The cursor cannot be referenced in a clause in an or statement. This option overrides the default capability of a cursor to be updated.

UPDATE [OF column_name [,.n]]
Defines updatable columns within the cursor. If OF <column_name> [, <. n>] is specified, only the columns listed allow modifications. If is specified without a column list, all columns can be updated.

cursor_name
Is the name of the Transact-SQL server cursor defined. cursor_name must conform to the rules for identifiers.

LOCAL
Specifies that the scope of the cursor is local to the batch, stored procedure, or trigger in which the cursor was created. The cursor name is only valid within this scope. The cursor can be referenced by local cursor variables in the batch, stored procedure, or trigger, or a stored procedure parameter. An parameter is used to pass the local cursor back to the calling batch, stored procedure, or trigger, which can assign the parameter to a cursor variable to reference the cursor after the stored procedure terminates. Error creating cursor handle t-sql cursor is implicitly deallocated when the batch, stored procedure, or trigger terminates, unless the cursor was passed back in an parameter. If it is passed back in an parameter, the cursor is deallocated when the last variable referencing it is deallocated or goes out of scope.

GLOBAL
Specifies that the scope of the cursor is global to the connection, error creating cursor handle t-sql. The cursor name can be referenced in any stored procedure or batch executed by the connection. The cursor is only implicitly deallocated at disconnect.

Note

If neither or is specified, the default is controlled by the setting of the default to local cursor database option.

FORWARD_ONLY
Specifies that the cursor can only move forward and be scrolled from the first to the last row. is the only supported fetch option. All insert, update, and delete statements made by the current user (or committed by other users) that affect rows in the result set are visible as the rows are fetched, error creating cursor handle t-sql. Because the cursor cannot be scrolled backward, however, changes made to rows in the database after the row was fetched are not visible through the cursor. Forward-only cursors are dynamic by default, meaning that all changes are detected as the current row is processed. This provides faster cursor opening and enables the error creating cursor handle t-sql set to display updates made to the underlying tables. While forward-only cursors do not support backward scrolling, applications can return to the beginning of the result set by closing and reopening the cursor. If is specified without the, or keywords, the cursor operates as a dynamic cursor. When neither nor is specified, is the default, unless the keywords, error creating cursor handle t-sql, or are specified., and cursors default to. Unlike database APIs such as ODBC and ADO, is supported with, and Transact-SQL cursors.

STATIC
Specifies that the cursor always displays the result set as it was when the cursor was first opened, error creating cursor handle t-sql, and makes a temporary copy of the data to be used by the cursor. All requests to the cursor are answered from this temporary table in tempdb. Therefore inserts, updates, and deletes made to base tables are not reflected in the data returned by fetches made to this cursor, and this cursor does not detect changes made to the membership, order, or values of the result set after the cursor is opened. Static cursors may detect their own updates, deletes, and inserts, although they are not required to do so. For example, suppose a static cursor fetches a row, and another application error creating cursor handle t-sql updates that row. If the application refetches the row from the static cursor, the values it sees are unchanged, error creating cursor handle t-sql, despite the changes made by the other application. All types of scrolling are supported.

KEYSET
Specifies that the membership and order of rows in the cursor are fixed when the cursor is opened. The set of keys that uniquely identify the rows is built into a table in tempdb known as the keyset. This cursor provides functionality between a static and a dynamic cursor in its ability to detect changes. Like a static cursor, it does xml error cannot assign to read-only property always detect changes to the membership and order of the result set. Like a dynamic cursor, it does detect changes to the values of rows in the result set. Keyset-driven cursors are controlled by a set of unique identifiers (keys) known as the keyset. The keys are built from a set of columns that uniquely identify the rows in the result set. The keyset is the set of key values from all the rows returned by the query statement. With keyset-driven cursors, a key is built and saved for each row in the cursor and stored either on the client workstation or on the server. When you access each row, the stored key is used to fetch the current data values from the data source. In a keyset-driven cursor, result set membership is frozen when the keyset is fully populated. Thereafter, additions or updates that affect membership are not a part of the result set until it is reopened. Changes to data values (made either by the keyset owner or other processes) are visible as the user scrolls through the result set:

  • If a row is deleted, error creating cursor handle t-sql, an attempt to fetch the row returns an of -2 because the deleted row appears as a gap in the result set. The key for the row exists in the keyset, but the row no longer exists in the result set.
  • Inserts made outside the cursor (by other processes) are visible only if the cursor is closed and reopened. Inserts made from inside the cursor are visible at the end of the result set.
  • Updates of key values from outside the cursor resemble a delete of the old row followed by an insert of the new row. The row with the new values is not visible, and attempts to fetch the row with the old values return an of -2. The new values are visible if the update is done through the cursor by specifying the clause.

Note

If the query references at least one table without a unique index, the keyset cursor is converted to a static cursor.

DYNAMIC
Defines a cursor that reflects all data changes made to the rows in its result set as you scroll around the cursor and fetch a new record, error creating cursor handle t-sql, regardless of whether the changes occur from inside the cursor or by other users outside the cursor. Therefore all insert, update, and delete statements made by all users are visible through the cursor, error creating cursor handle t-sql. The data values, order, and membership of the rows can change on each fetch. The fetch option is not supported with dynamic cursors. Updates made outside the cursor are not visible until they are committed (unless the cursor transaction isolation level is set to ). For example, suppose a dynamic cursor fetches two rows and another application then updates one of those rows and deletes the other. If the dynamic cursor then fetches those rows, it will not find the deleted row, but it will display the new values for the updated row.

FAST_FORWARD
Specifies a cursor with performance optimizations enabled. cannot be specified if or is also specified. This type of cursor does not allow data modifications from inside the cursor.

Note

Both and can be used in the same statement.

READ_ONLY
Prevents updates made through this cursor. The cursor cannot be referenced in a clause in an or statement. This option overrides the default capability of a cursor to be updated.

SCROLL_LOCKS
Specifies that positioned updates or deletes error creating cursor handle t-sql through the cursor are guaranteed to succeed. SQL Server locks the rows as they are read into the cursor to ensure their availability for later modifications. cannot be specified if or is also specified.

OPTIMISTIC
Specifies that positioned updates or deletes made through the cursor do not succeed if the row has been updated since it was read into the cursor. SQL Server does not lock rows as they are read into the cursor. It instead uses comparisons of timestamp column values, or a checksum value if the table has no timestamp column, to determine whether the row was modified after it was read into the cursor. If the row was modified, the attempted positioned update or delete fails. cannot be specified if is also specified.

TYPE_WARNING
Specifies that a warning message is sent to the client when the cursor is implicitly converted from the requested type to another.

select_statement
Is a standard SELECT statement that defines the result set of the cursor. The keywords,and are not allowed within select_statement of a cursor declaration.

Note

You can use a query hint within a cursor declaration; however, if you also use the clause, specify after .

SQL Server implicitly converts the cursor to another type if clauses in select_statement conflict with the functionality of the requested cursor type. For more information, see Implicit Cursor Conversions.

FOR UPDATE [OF column_name [,.n]]
Defines updatable columns within the cursor. If is supplied, only the columns listed allow modifications. If is specified without a column list, all columns can be updated, unless the concurrency option was specified.

defines the attributes of a Transact-SQL server cursor, such as its scrolling behavior and the query used to build the result set on which the cursor operates. The statement populates the result set, and returns a row from the result set. The statement releases the current result set associated with the cursor. The statement releases the resources used by the cursor.

The first form of the statement uses the ISO syntax for declaring cursor behaviors. The second form of uses Transact-SQL extensions that allow you to define cursors using the same cursor types used in the database API cursor functions of ODBC or ADO.

You cannot mix the two forms. If you specify the or keywords before the keyword, you cannot use any keywords between the and keywords, error creating cursor handle t-sql. If you specify any keywords between the and keywords, error creating cursor handle t-sql, you cannot specify or before the keyword.

If a using Transact-SQL syntax does not specify, orthe default is as follows:

  • If the statement does not support updates (insufficient permissions, accessing remote tables that do not support updates, and so on), the cursor is .

  • and cursors default to .

  • and cursors default to .

Cursor names can be referenced only by other Transact-SQL statements. They cannot be referenced by database API functions. For example, after declaring a cursor, the cursor name cannot be referenced from OLE DB, ODBC or ADO functions or methods. The cursor rows cannot be fetched using the fetch functions or methods of the APIs; the rows can be fetched only by Transact-SQL FETCH statements.

After a cursor has been declared, these system stored procedures can be used to determine the characteristics of the cursor.

System stored proceduresDescription
sp_cursor_listReturns a list of cursors currently visible on the connection and their attributes.
sp_describe_cursorDescribes the attributes of a cursor, such as whether it is a forward-only or scrolling cursor.
sp_describe_cursor_columnsDescribes the attributes of the columns in the cursor result set.
sp_describe_cursor_tablesDescribes the base tables accessed by the cursor.

Variables may be used as part of the select_statement that declares a cursor. Cursor variable values do not change after a cursor is declared.

Permissions

Permissions of default to any user that has permissions on the views, tables, and columns used in the cursor.

Limitations and Restrictions

You cannot use cursors or triggers on a table with a clustered columnstore index. This restriction does not apply to nonclustered columnstore indexes; you can use cursors and triggers on a table with a nonclustered columnstore index.

Examples

A. Using simple cursor and syntax

The result set generated at the opening of this cursor includes all rows and all columns in the table. This cursor can be updated, and all updates and deletes are represented in fetches made against this cursor. is the only fetch available because the option has not been specified.

B. Using nested cursors to produce report output

The following example shows how cursors can be nested to produce complex reports. The inner cursor is declared for each vendor.

See Also

@@FETCH_STATUS (Transact-SQL)
CLOSE (Transact-SQL)
Cursors (Transact-SQL)
DEALLOCATE (Transact-SQL)
FETCH (Transact-SQL)
SELECT (Transact-SQL)
sp_configure (Transact-SQL)

ID

15.10 - Cursor Handling for Exceptions in FOR Loops - Teradata Database

The respective handling of open cursors for Failure and Error conditions are described in the following table:

 

IF this exception occurs while a FOR cursor loop is executing …

THEN all open cursors are …

FAILURE

closed as part of a transaction rollback.

ERROR

not closed.

The handler action specified by the condition handler is executed only after all the open cursors have been closed.

The following example assumes the following stored procedure:

   CREATE PROCEDURE spSample8()   BEGIN     DECLARE hNumber INTEGER;     DECLARE CONTINUE HANDLER     FOR SQLSTATE '42000'       INSERT INTO Proc_Error_Table        (:SQLSTATE, CURRENT_TIMESTAMP, 'spSample8',         'Failed to Insert Row');         SET hNumber = 1;         -- Statement_8_1     UPDATE Employee SET Salary_Amount = 10000     WHERE Employee_Number = 1001;         WHILE hNumber < 10     DO     -- Statement_8_2     INSERT INTO EmpNames Error creating cursor handle t-sql (1002, 'Thomas');     SET hNumber = hNumber + 1;     END WHILE;     -- If the EmpNames table had been dropped,     -- Statement_8_2 returns an SQLSTATE code of    
     -- '42000' that is handled.         -- Statement_8_3     UPDATE Employee       SET Salary_Amount = 10000       WHERE Employee_Number = 1003;   END;

This example assumes that the following three SQL statements are invoked interactively from BTEQ in ANSI session mode:

   INSERT INTO Department VALUES ('10', 'Development');       UPDATE Employee     SET Salary_Amount = 10000     WHERE Employee_Number = 1000;       CALL spSample8();

When the preceding three SQL statements are invoked in ANSI session mode, the following sequence of events occurs:

1 Statement_8_2 within the called stored procedure raises an error condition with SQLSTATE ‘42000’ that is handled. The statement is rolled back.

error creating cursor handle t-sql 2 The condition handler is activated. error creating cursor handle t-sql

3 Because the handler type is CONTINUE, execution resumes from the SET statement within the WHILE loop after the handler action completes, and the WHILE loop is not exited because of the exception.

4 error creating cursor handle t-sql During each iteration Statement_8_2 raises an exception which is handled, error creating cursor handle t-sql. error creating cursor handle t-sql

Statement_8_3 executes on termination of the WHILE loop.

5 The following items are not committed:

  • The first two interactive SQL statements
  • Statement_8_1
  • Action statement for the condition handler
  • Statement_8_3
  • 6 End of process.

    When stored procedure spSample8 is created in a session in Teradata session mode, the process described above applies with one difference: because every request is an implicit transaction in Teradata session mode, error creating cursor handle t-sql, the following statements are committed:

  • The first two interactive SQL statements
  • Statement_8_1
  • Action statement for the condition handler
  • Statement_8_3
  • The following example assumes the following stored procedure:

       CREATE PROCEDURE spSample9()   BEGIN     DECLARE hNumber, NumberAffected INTEGER;     DECLARE CONTINUE HANDLER      FOR SQLSTATE '22012'      INSERT INTO Proc_Error_Table       (:SQLSTATE, CURRENT_TIMESTAMP, 'spSample9',        'Failed Data Handling');         SET hNumber = 100;           -- Statement_9_1       UPDATE Employee SET Salary_Amount = 10000         WHERE Employee_Number BETWEEN 1001 AND 1010;         SET NumberAffected = ACTIVITY_COUNT;         IF hNumber/NumberAffected < 10 THEN         -- If the UPDATE in Statement_9_1 results in 0 rows     -- being affected, the IF condition raises an     -- exception with SQLSTATE '22012' that is     -- handled.         -- Statement_9_2       INSERT INTO data_table (NumberAffected, 'DATE');           SET hNumber = hNumber + 1;         END IF;         -- Statement_9_3       UPDATE Employee         SET Salary_Amount = 10000         WHERE Employee_Number = 1003;     END;

    The preceding example assumes that the following three SQL statements are invoked interactively from BTEQ in ANSI session mode:

         INSERT INTO Department VALUES ('10', 'Development');         UPDATE Employee     SET Salary_Amount = 10000     WHERE Employee_Number = 1000;         CALL spSample9();

    Consider the following sequence of events with respect to the preceding stored procedure:

    1 The IF statement in the called stored procedure raises a divide-by-zero error condition with SQLSTATE '22012' that is handled.

    2 Because the handler type is CONTINUE, execution resumes from Statement_9_3 after the handler action completes, error creating cursor handle t-sql.

    3 error creating cursor handle t-sql Statement_9_2 and the SET statement are inside the IF statement that raised the error condition, so they are not executed.

    4 The updates made by the following items remain intact in a transaction that is uncommitted:

  • Statement_9_1
  • Statement_9_3
  • 5 End of process.

    The following example illustrates the behavior of a WHILE statement when a condition in the loop raises an exception. This behavior also applies to IF and FOR statements. The example assumes the following stored procedure:

      CREATE PROCEDURE spSample8()  BEGIN     DECLARE hNumber INTEGER;     DECLARE CONTINUE HANDLER     FOR SQLSTATE '22012'      INSERT INTO Proc_Error_Table
          (:SQLSTATE,    CURRENT_TIMESTAMP, 'spSample8',      'Failed in WHILE condition');         SET hNumber = 1;     SET hNo = 0;           -- Statement_8_1     UPDATE Employee SET Salary_Amount = 10000       WHERE Employee_Number = 1001;           WHILE ((hNumber/hNo) < 10)     DO     -- Statement_8_2     INSERT INTO EmpNames VALUES (1002, 'Thomas');     SET hNumber = hNumber + 1;    END WHILE;           -- The condition in WHILE statement raises     -- an exception and returns SQLSTATE code     -- of 22012 that is handled.           -- Statement_8_3     UPDATE Employee       SET Salary_Amount = 10000       WHERE Employee_Number = 1003;  END;

    The preceding example assumes that the following three SQL statements are invoked interactively from BTEQ in ANSI session mode:

        INSERT INTO Department VALUES ('10', 'Development');        UPDATE Employee    SET Salary_Amount = 10000    WHERE Employee_Number = 1000;          CALL spSample8();

    When the preceding three SQL statements are invoked in ANSI session mode, the following sequence of events occurs:

    1 The condition in the WHILE statement within the called stored procedure raises an exception, error creating cursor handle t-sql.

    2 The condition handler is activated.

    Since the condition handler is of CONTINUE type, control passes to the next statement after the WHILE loop (statement_8_3), and execution of the stored procedure continues from statement_8_3.

    3 Statement_8_2 and the SET statement in the WHILE loop are not executed.

    4 On completion of the stored procedure execution, error creating cursor handle t-sql, the following statements are not committed:

  • The first two interactive SQL statements
  • Statement_8_1
  • Action statement for the condition handler
  • Statement_8_3
  • 5 error creating cursor handle t-sql When stored procedure spSample8 is created in a session in Teradata session mode, the process described above applies with one difference: because every request is an implicit transaction in Teradata error creating cursor handle t-sql session mode, the following statements are committed:

  • The first two interactive SQL statements
  • Statement_8_1
  • Action statement for the condition handler
  • Statement_8_3
  • 6 End of process.

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