Error conflicts with the installed package nvidia-glx

error conflicts with the installed package nvidia-glx

I'm trying to get EVE Online working on WINE in Debian Wheezy. I get the following error when I try to run sprers.eu Error: nvidia-driver-latest-dkms-libs conflicts with installed nvidia drivers, and searched in the rpm packages and file system. No updates were performed as there is a conflict between libglvnd0-nvidia and libglvnd0. A dist-upgrade would cause a large number of packages.

Error conflicts with the installed package nvidia-glx - with you

NvidiaManual

IconsPage/sprers.euThis is not the recommended way to install the NVIDIA drivers - please see BinaryDriverHowto/Nvidia for the supported method. Any problems that occur after using the following instructions should not be reported to the launchpad bug area. If the drivers were downloaded from the NVIDIA web site then the NVIDIA Linux web forum is an appropriate place to report issues. Other places for binary driver manual installation support can be found on the Community Support page.

IconsPage/sprers.eu Sometimes using the drivers in the Ubuntu repositories is not the best option. Here are some reasons to install the NVIDIA restricted drivers manually:

  • your card is too new, and is not supported by the Ubuntu provided binary packages.
  • bugs are present in provided packages that are fixed in later drivers not yet distributed by Ubuntu.
  • newer drivers provide a new feature not yet available in the Ubuntu packages.

The purpose of this page is to detail the necessary work to install the official NVIDIA Linux driver from sprers.eu Note that this will not fix resolution problems, for that you need to see the FixVideoResolutionHowto.

IconsPage/sprers.eu

When using manually installed NVIDIA binary drivers you will need to redo some of the following steps every time packages related to or are updated (see the Kernel and Mesa Updates section for details). Attempts to revert to the Ubuntu provided NVIDIA binary drivers may prove troublesome and upgrades to the next Ubuntu release (e.g. from Ubuntu to ) may fail unless the manual install is correctly uninstalled first.

Obtaining Needed Software

IconsPage/sprers.eu

Before you begin, it is strongly advised that your already have Xorg working acceptably with the 'nv' drivers included.

First, make sure that your is backed up.

sudo cp /etc/X11/sprers.eu /etc/X11/sprers.eu

Next, download the right drivers for your platform from the driver download page or the NVIDIA Unix Driver portal and save them to your home directory.

Open a terminal, and run the following command:

sudo apt-get install build-essential linux-headers-`uname -r`

If you receive the "Unable to locate package" error, run the command:

uname -r

and insert the output into the "uname -r" portion of the former command.

It should then look something like this:

sudo apt-get install build-essential linux-headersgeneric

Or you can use simply run this:

sudo apt-get install build-essential linux-headers-"$(uname -r)"

IconsPage/sprers.eu

This next step is optional. Most people will not need it, and it takes a fair amount of bandwidth and diskspace. It installs the Linux kernel source. If later steps fail, consider this a last resort.

sudo apt-get install linux-source-`uname -r` cd /usr/src sudo tar xvjf linux-source-`uname -r` sudo ln -s linux-source-`uname -r` /usr/src/linux

The above command might print an error similar to the following:

E: Couldn't find package linux-source

In such case you could try following

sudo apt-get install linux-source

The following command will then probably need adjustment also.

Disable Conflicting Software

Using Synaptic or apt-get, uninstall , , and if they are installed.

Open or create the file with an editor, in Ubuntu use

gksudo gedit /etc/default/linux-restricted-modules-common

and in Kubuntu use

kdesu kate /etc/default/linux-restricted-modules-common

and find the line:

DISABLED_MODULES=""

replace it with:

DISABLED_MODULES="nv nvidia_new"

Note: In Ubuntu the is explicitly required in addition to on the line. See this launchpad bug about lrm-manager failing to disable the nvidia_new module when nv is specified alone. Additionally you may need to manually remove the hidden file.

IconsPage/sprers.eu

Warning: Be wary of uninstalling or packages starting with the name . Doing so will cause all restricted drivers to be uninstalled which may result in other hardware (e.g. certain wireless cards) or other software (e.g. VMware) failing to work after a reboot/kernel update. If you revert to use Jockey, reinstalling DKMS is needed to get all relevant drivers to be available by Jockey.

Prepare Configuration Files

The next step is to edit your sprers.eu file. This may not be needed in Hardy Heron and newer, but check anyway, esp. if you have upgraded from older versions of Ubuntu.

In Ubuntu:

gksudo gedit /etc/X11/sprers.eu

Or in Kubuntu:

kdesu kate /etc/X11/sprers.eu

Find the section and comment out DRI using the # symbol, such as in the following example.

Section "Module" Load "bitmap" Load "dbe" Load "ddc" # Load "dri" < this is 'commented' Load "extmod" Load "freetype" Load "glx" Load "int10" Load "record" Load "type1" Load "vbe" EndSection

Now find the section , and change the Driver from nv (or vesa, fb, etc) to nvidia, as in the following example, and then save it.

Section "Device" Identifier "Card0" Driver "nvidia" #This is where you change it EndSection

Now that your sprers.eu is saved, we need to shutdown the X11 server so that we can install the new drivers. To do this, save your work and press , and log in. Then run the following command to shutdown X Make sure your work is saved, Gnome/KDE is going to shutdown too.

For Ubuntu or lower:

sudo /etc/init.d/gdm stop

For Ubuntu or higher:

sudo /etc/init.d/lightdm stop

For Kubuntu:

sudo /etc/init.d/kdm stop

Install the Driver

IconsPage/sprers.eu Useful tip, typing the first few letters and hitting the key will auto-complete the name, saving you from using wildcards like *

First navigate from the tty to the directory where you saved the install file (I will use ), then set executable permissions on it:

cd /path/to/installer sudo chmod +x NVIDIA*

You can start the install script with the following command:

sudo sh NVIDIA*

The installer will now walk you through the steps required. Assuming success, you can now restart your X11 server using:

For Ubuntu or lower:

sudo /etc/init.d/gdm start

For Ubuntu or higher:

sudo /etc/init.d/lightdm start

For Kubuntu:

sudo /etc/init.d/kdm start

Configure

You can now change settings for your video setup. In Ubuntu, go to Applications->System Tools->NVIDIA X Server Settings (or sometimes System->Administration->NVIDIA X Server Settings depending on the driver and/or install method). Alternatively, use the terminal:

For Ubuntu:

gksudo nvidia-settings

For Kubuntu:

kdesu nvidia-settings

For setting up dual head, see NvidiaMultiMonitors.

Load driver on boot

The X server will start in low-resolution if the nvidia driver is not loaded on boot, so

$ sudo gedit /etc/modules and add a line containing nvidia

Kernel and Mesa Updates

Every time a new kernel comes out you will probably have to manually rebuild the NVIDIA binary driver kernel module. This can be done by booting to the new kernel and then running:

sudo sh NVIDIA* -K

on the previously downloaded NVIDIA installer file.

Additionally, any time that the mesa packages are updated you will have to reinstall the NVIDIA .pkg again.

Uninstalling the Driver

Sometimes it is necessary to uninstall the driver, like before a version upgrade of Ubuntu or if the installation fails or is no longer needed. For a manual install, you can remove the driver using the installer file:

sudo sh NVIDIA* --uninstall

You will probably be asked to reboot the computer.

It didn't work! (Troubleshooting)

When trying to start X, if you get an error about nvidiactl (you will need to see the X log), try the following:

  • sudo update-rc.d -f nvidia-kernel remove

If you want to go back to the Restricted Manager method after performing the above instructions, do this

  • sudo update-rc.d nvidia-kernel defaults

If the installer fails, go through the following checklist

  • Was Xorg already properly configured for the driver?

  • Did you disable the loading of Ubuntu provided NVIDIA drivers using in ? This is a common cause of driver mismatch errors on manual installations due to conflicts with the Ubuntu provided NVIDIA binary driver.

  • You may need to remove the file

  • Did you remove the and packages?

  • Did you read the log found in for errors that can guide you?

  • Did you check the output of ?

  • Did you install the kernel headers (and possibly source package)?
  • Did you check the NVIDIA readme found on their site to make sure your card is supported with that version of driver?
  • Did you check the NVIDIA Linux Forums for any current 'known issues' with the latest drivers?

  • Did you ask in #ubuntu on sprers.eu or any of the other places mentioned on sprers.eu ?

Hardy Heron and newer use EnvyNG, older versions of Ubuntu use Envy Legacy - both can be found at sprers.eu

  • directions are provided on that site for installing the correct version of Envy, as well as some general troubleshooting tips.

IconsPage/sprers.eu

According to Envy's website, EnvyNG does not support Ubuntu and newer, it is recommended to use Jockey instead.

EnvyNG is available in the Universe repository in Hardy Heron and later. Older versions of Ubuntu using Envy Legacy can download the .deb file from Envy's website.

After installing, EnvyNG can be found from Applications->System Tools->EnvyNG in Ubuntu. You will want make sure you select NVIDIA drivers, not ATI:

  • NvidiaMultiMonitors/sprers.eu

Navigate there and click Apply, and the program will do the rest. You can then configure your card as described under the complete manual install section above.

Uninstalling the Driver

Sometimes it is necessary to uninstall the driver, like before a version upgrade of Ubuntu or if the installation fails or is no longer needed. With Envy/EnvyNG, you can uninstall the driver directory from the program, see the above screenshot - it is the third choice. You will probably be asked to reboot the computer.

There is Nouveau: an open source driver with acceleration for NVIDIA cards. Currently (), there is 2D-support, and a very limited 3D support for extremely lucky developers. See sprers.eu Users that have installed the proprietary driver can help the development of Nouveau by sending information about their cards, see sprers.eu

IconsPage/sprers.eu Here are some other resources of interest:


CategoryHardwareCategoryXwindowSystem

Ubuntu Forums > The Ubuntu Forum Community > Ubuntu Official Flavours Support > Installation & Upgrades > [ubuntu] Nvidia won't install via apt-get on


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nvidiasucks

February 18th, , PM

[email protected]:~$ sudo apt-get install nvidia-glx
Reading package lists Done
Building dependency tree
Reading state information Done
The following NEW packages will be installed
nvidia-glx
0 upgraded, 1 newly installed, 0 to remove and 0 not upgraded.
Need to get 0B/MB of archives.
After this operation, MB of additional disk space will be used.
(Reading database files and directories currently installed.)
Unpacking nvidia-glx (from /nvidia-glx_ubuntu1~karmic~nvidiavdpauppa2_ideb)
dpkg: warning: obsolete option '--print-installation-architecture', please use '--print-architecture' instead.
dpkg-divert: `diversion of /usr/lib/sprers.eu1 to /usr/lib/nvidia/sprers.eumesa by nvidia-glx' clashes with `diversion of /usr/lib/sprers.eu1 to /usr/lib/nvidia/sprers.eumesa by nvidia-glx'
dpkg: error processing /var/cache/apt/archives/nvidia-glx_ubuntu1~karmic~nvidiavdpauppa2_ideb (--unpack):
subprocess new pre-installation script returned error exit status 2
Errors were encountered while processing:
/var/cache/apt/archives/nvidia-glx_ubuntu1~karmic~nvidiavdpauppa2_ideb
E: Sub-process /usr/bin/dpkg returned an error code (1)
[email protected]:~$

No idea what's going on here, dpkg is broken? :/ halp


2hot6ft2

February 18th, , PM

Have you tried installing the driver using hardware drivers?
System > Administration > Hardware Drivers


nvidiasucks

February 18th, , PM

Have you tried installing the driver using hardware drivers?
System > Administration > Hardware Drivers

Yes, The last time I did that when I had X screen access I got an error about archives or something.

I can't get back into X so I'm having to go by what the command line (putty) is telling me.


2hot6ft2

February 18th, , PM

Yes, The last time I did that when I had X screen access I got an error about archives or something.

I can't get back into X so I'm having to go by what the command line (putty) is telling me.
Ouch, I would try going to the nvidia web site and getting the right driver for your graphics card and putting it on the machines desktop
/home/username/Desktop
and running it from the command line with their installer then.
I have used the nvidia drivers from their site and installed them that way in the past and they seem to resolve conflicts during the install process very well. Not sure how that would work doing it thru PuTTy though.

The "dpkg returned an error" isn't saying anything is broken it seems to just be a conflict between the that's installed and the you're trying to install.


2hot6ft2

February 18th, , PM

Here's their instructions for running the installer from their website.
Naturally the package name will be different for yours.

Starting the Installer

After you have downloaded the file NVIDIA-Linux-xpkg#.run, change to the directory containing the downloaded file, and as the root user run the executable:

# cd yourdirectory
# sh NVIDIA-Linux-xpkg#.run


nvidiasucks

February 19th, , AM

Okay, doing that gives me X back thanks. However its now completely wiped out VDAPU support for XBMC

What VDAPU do I need for that driver you've linked to me?

And also my llirc config has disappered.. What the hell has apt-get update been doing lol :/


pbrane

February 19th, , AM

You should have a backup of your original sprers.eu in /etc/X11/. The nvidia driver install should have made a backup. Next time you need to upgrade your nvidia driver don't let it configure X for you. Your existing sprers.eu will work fine.
also this link has some good info on how to have the driver re-install itself for kernel updates.
sprers.eu?t=


nvidiasucks

February 19th, , AM

X is not the problem, It's that theres no VDAPU for this new driver? Nvidia haven't included it? I'm not sure what vdapu I need to ask apt-get to install :/

vdpauinfo or nvidia-vdpau or heck maybe even vdapu1 or whatever its called.

:confused:


2hot6ft2

February 19th, , AM

Okay, doing that gives me X back thanks. However its now completely wiped out VDAPU support for XBMC

What VDAPU do I need for that driver you've linked to me?

And also my llirc config has disappered.. What the hell has apt-get update been doing lol :/

I have no idea about the VDAPU, and I didn't link to any driver.:confused:


nvidiasucks

February 19th, , AM

I have no idea about the VDAPU, and I didn't link to any driver.:confused:

I mean this : NVIDIA-Linux-x I'm wondering what VDAPU I need to use for ? :/

I gave this a go :


[email protected]:~$ sudo apt-get install nvidia-libvdpau-dev
Reading package lists Done
Building dependency tree
Reading state information Done
Note, selecting nvidialibvdpau-dev instead of nvidia-libvdpau-dev
The following packages were automatically installed and are no longer required:
nvidia-settings
Use 'apt-get autoremove' to remove them.
The following extra packages will be installed:
nvidialibvdpau nvidialibvdpau-dev
The following NEW packages will be installed
nvidialibvdpau nvidialibvdpau-dev
0 upgraded, 2 newly installed, 0 to remove and 12 not upgraded.
Need to get kB of archives.
After this operation, 1,kB of additional disk space will be used.
Do you want to continue [Y/n]? n
Abort.
[email protected]:~$ sudo apt-get install nvidialibvdpau-dev
Reading package lists Done
Building dependency tree
Reading state information Done
E: Couldn't find package nvidialibvdpau-dev
[email protected]:~$
Why is it picking ? I assumed that was uninstalled.. So confusing :(


2hot6ft2

February 19th, , AM

I mean this : NVIDIA-Linux-x I'm wondering what VDAPU I need to use for ? :/
Only one I'm seeing with that version number is 64bit
sprers.eu

The NVIDIA VDPAU search page is here (sprers.eu?cx=%3A9lekn af7r_8&cof=FORID%3A11%3BNB%3A1&ie=UTF-8&hl=en&gl=us&q=VDAPU#)

And the closest x86 one is here (sprers.eu)


nvidiasucks

February 19th, , AM

Edited my other post.. Hm. I think i'll try asking around on the XBMC forums about this issue since its more specific towards that.

I'll still be keeping an eye out on this thread if anyone has any ideas about VDPAU.

Thanks again.


2hot6ft2

February 19th, , AM

Check that last link I gave and click on the "Supported Products" tab


nvidiasucks

February 19th, , AM

Check that last link I gave and click on the "Supported Products" tab

I'm using the ION, all the recent drivers (>) seem to have support for it I think.


motsteve

February 20th, , PM

When installing the drivers or any of their drivers, you have to stop the Xserver first. I've tried all the suggestions for this from cntl-alt-backspace to gdm stop. I've tried the hardware driver menu, all that gives you is the out of date drivers. I've tried Envy and that gives you the drivers again. There is absolutely nothing on the nVidia site as far as I can tell. Now one here in this forum seems to know what to do, so what am I to do. I've got a big fancy controller and standard graphics. No wonder the average person doesn't want to switch Linux.

Before I get flamed I've done everything from recovery mode to virtual console which only gives me hash from cntl-alt-F1 to cntl-alt-F6. /etc/init.d/gdm stop is deprecated. You're supposed to use gdm stop, but that gives you a "Failed to acquire sprers.euyManager error message. I tried some other suggestion using a Xserver command and Bash said the command didn't exist even using sudo, but there's a man page for it. There was also a way to install it via apt, but the package was missing or removed from the repository. Now what? #-o


oldos2er

February 20th, , PM

I'll still be keeping an eye out on this thread if anyone has any ideas about VDPAU.


sprers.eu~nvidia-vdpau/+archive/ppa?sprers.eu_filter=jaunty


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3D controller" VGA compatible controller: Intel Corporation Xeon E v2/3rd Gen Core processor Graphics Controller (rev 09) VGA compatible controller: NVIDIA Corporation GK [GeForce GTX ] (rev a1) 3D controller: NVIDIA Corporation GMGLM [Quadro KM / Quadro MM] (rev a2)

Then you fix it by adding it to the card's Device section in your X configuration. In my case:

/etc/X11/sprers.eud/sprers.euction "Device" Identifier "Device0" Driver "nvidia" VendorName "NVIDIA Corporation" BusID "PCI" EndSection

Note: BusID formatting is important!

In the example above is stripped to be written as , however some conversions can be more complicated. output is in hex format, but in configuration files the BusID's are in decimal format! This means that in cases where the BusID is greater than 9 you will need to convert it to decimal!

ie: from lspci becomes .

Xorg fails during boot, but otherwise starts fine

On very fast booting systems, systemd may attempt to start the display manager before the NVIDIA driver has fully initialized. You will see a message like the following in your logs only when Xorg runs during boot.

/var/log/Xorglog[ ] (EE) NVIDIA(0): Failed to initialize the NVIDIA kernel module. Please see the [ ] (EE) NVIDIA(0): system's kernel log for additional error messages and [ ] (EE) NVIDIA(0): consult the NVIDIA README for details. [ ] (EE) NVIDIA(0): *** Aborting ***

In this case you will need to establish an ordering dependency from the display manager to the DRI device. First create device units for DRI devices by creating a new udev rules file.

/etc/udev/rules.d/sprers.euCTION=="add", KERNEL=="card*", SUBSYSTEM=="drm", TAG+="systemd"

Then create dependencies from the display manager to the device(s).

/etc/systemd/system/sprers.eue.d/sprers.eu[Unit] Wants=sprers.eu After=sprers.eu

If you have additional cards needed for the desktop then list them in Wants and After seperated by spaces.

xrandr BadMatch

If you are trying to configure a WQHD monitor such as DELL UH using xrandr and gives you the error , it might be because the proprietary NVIDIA driver clips the pixel clock maximum frequency of HDMI output to MHz or lower. To set the monitor to maximum resolution you have to install nouveau drivers. You can force nouveau to use a specific pixel clock frequency by setting (or ) in your Kernel parameters.

Alternatively, it may be that your monitor's EDID is incorrect. See #Override EDID.

Another reason could be that by default current NVIDIA drivers will only allow modes explicitly reported by EDID, but sometimes refresh rates and/or resolutions are desired which are not reported by the monitor (although the EDID information is correct; it is just that current NVIDIA drivers are too restrictive).

If this happens, you may want to add an option to to allow non-EDID modes:

Section "Device" Identifier "Device0" Driver "nvidia" VendorName "NVIDIA Corporation" Option "ModeValidation" "AllowNonEdidModes" EndSection

This can be set per-output. See NVidia driver readme (Appendix B. X Config Options) for more information.

Override EDID

See Kernel mode setting#Forcing modes and EDID, Xrandr#Troubleshooting and Qnix QX#Fixing X11 with Nvidia.

Overclocking with nvidia-settings GUI not working

sprers.euThis article or section needs language, wiki syntax or style improvements. See Help:Style for reference.sprers.eu

Reason: Duplication, vague "not working" (Discuss in Talk:NVIDIA/Troubleshooting)

Workaround is to use nvidia-settings CLI to query and set certain variables after enabling overclocking (as explained in NVIDIA/Tips and tricks#Enabling overclocking, see nvidia-settings(1) for more information).

Example to query all variables:

nvidia-settings -q all

Example to set PowerMizerMode to prefer performance mode:

nvidia-settings -a [gpu:0]/GPUPowerMizerMode=1

Example to set fan speed to fixed 21%:

nvidia-settings -a [gpu:0]/GPUFanControlState=1 -a [fan:0]/GPUTargetFanSpeed=21

Example to set multiple variables at once (overclock GPU by 50MHz, overclock video memory by 50MHz, increase GPU voltage by mV):

nvidia-settings -a GPUGraphicsClockOffsetAllPerformanceLevels=50 -a GPUMemoryTransferRateOffsetGPUGraphicsClockOffsetAllPerformanceLevels=50 -a GPUOverVoltageOffset=

Overclocking not working with Unknown Error

If you are running Xorg as a non-root user and trying to overclock your NVIDIA GPU, you will get an error similar to this one:

$ nvidia-settings -a "[gpu:0]/GPUGraphicsClockOffset[3]=10"ERROR: Error assigning value 10 to attribute 'GPUGraphicsClockOffset' (trinity-zero:1[gpu:0]) as specified in assignment '[gpu:0]/GPUGraphicsClockOffset[3]=10' (Unknown Error).

To avoid this issue, Xorg has to be run as the root user. See Xorg#Rootless Xorg for details.

System will not boot after driver was installed

If after installing the NVIDIA driver your system becomes stuck before reaching the display manager, try to disable kernel mode setting.

X fails with "Failing initialization of X screen"

If says X server fails to initialize screen

(EE) NVIDIA(G0): GPU screens are not yet supported by the NVIDIA driver (EE) NVIDIA(G0): Failing initialization of X screen

and nvidia-smi says

The solution is at first reinstall latest nvidia-utils, and then copy to , and then edit and add the line . Restart the computer. The problem will be fixed.

System does not return from suspend

What you see in the log:

kernel: nvidia-modeset: ERROR: GPU Failed detecting connected display devices kernel: nvidia-modeset: ERROR: GPU Failed detecting connected display devices kernel: nvidia-modeset: WARNING: GPU Failure processing EDID for display device DELL UM (DP-0). kernel: nvidia-modeset: WARNING: GPU Unable to read EDID for display device DELL UM (DP-0) kernel: nvidia-modeset: ERROR: GPU Failure reading maximum pixel clock value for display device DELL UM (DP-0).

A possible solution based on [3]:

Run this command to get the string:

# strings /sys/firmware/acpi/tables/DSDT

Yum update conflicts in install of mesa-filesystem with nvidia.

Hello,

I recently purchased a machine from dell with Red Hat Enterprise Linux Workstation

Since not everything in the system is up-to-date, I tried to update packages with "yum update," and got an error below.

Transaction check error:
file /usr/lib64/vdpau from install of mesa-filesystemel7.x86_64 conflicts with file from package nvidiax86_elx86_64

Other packages have no conflict. I forced update excluding mesa-filesystem, but system ended up with a failure, so I just ran factory reset to start from scratch.

I also took a search about this issue and found some related discussions (sprers.eu), but there are no same issue with me. I am pretty new to rhel so cannot make sure this solution would work for me or not.

Could anybody help me go through this problem?

Byungjin Jun
Community Member21 points
sort tail -1

Add the kernel parameter to your boot loader configuration.

Vulkan error on applications start

sprers.euThe factual accuracy of this article or section is disputed.sprers.eu

Reason: Need confirmation by other users (Discuss in Talk:NVIDIA/Troubleshooting)

On executing an application that require Vulkan acceleration, if you get this error

Vulkan call failed: -4

try to delete the or directory.

Extreme lag on Xorg

sprers.euThe factual accuracy of this article or section is disputed.sprers.eu

Reason: According to an NVIDIA developer this issue is not specific to GNOME and the rest of the comments on the issue do not mention multi-monitor setups. (Discuss in Talk:NVIDIA/Troubleshooting)

A common issue with Mutter is that animations, video playback and gaming cause extreme desktop lag on Xorg.

See NVIDIA/Tips and tricks#Preserve video memory after suspend.

This should resolve this issue, however if it did not, you are most likely out of luck. One way you can remedy this issue is by adding these options:

/etc/environmentCLUTTER_DEFAULT_FPS=YOUR_MAIN_DISPLAY_REFRESHRATE __GL_SYNC_DISPLAY_DEVICE=YOUR_MAIN_DISPLAY_OUTPUT_NAME

turning and off within NVIDIA Settings, and configuring NVIDIA Settings to launch on startup using the flag . This will still result in a laggy desktop behavior, in particular on an eventual second (or third) monitor, but it should be much better.