Error 22 mounting ext3

error 22 mounting ext3

Hi. I need your help. My Red Hat 7.2 doesn't boot. Following is the message it gives me instead. === msg start === RAMDISK: Compressed image found at. access.redhat.com › solutions. mount: error 6 mounting ext3 mount: error 2 mounting none switchroot: mount failed: 22 umount /initrd/dev failed: 2 (see pic for more. error 22 mounting ext3

Error 22 mounting ext3 - think

” Kernel panic – not syncing: Attempted to kill init! ” Error

Posted by spicehead-e87myasa
hi, I have installd new RAM of 1 GB I installd RHEL4.0 on SATA HD with disk druid ystrday but after rebooting it showed this error--> mkrootdev: label / not found Mounting root filesystem mount: error 2 mounting ext3 mount: error 2 mounting none Switching to new root switchroot: mount failed: 22 umount /initrd/dev failed: 2 Kernel panic - not syncing: Attempted to kill init! i tried 2 figure out that maybe the boot loader wasnt finding the MBR to boot from. while installing the options presented to me were: ""YOUR BOOT LOADER WILL BE INSTALLED ON /dev/hdi (which is my IDE HD)"" will this mean that my WinXP wll be replaced by RHEL's KERNEL? i did not take a chance & removed the power cable of my IDE HD & tried installing a fresh copy of Linux 4 onto the primary partion but after all the long installation process & reboot, ""KERNEL PANIC"" error again. but my colleagues seem to instal it successfully... my SATA HD is Seagate /dev/hdg & IDE HD is samsung /dev/hdi while manual partitioning i have done the follwng: / (system root) 6gb primary partition /boot 500mb prim partition /swap 2gb (twice my ram) /vfat 2gb 1st i chose / as location of grub boot loader--> same error next i chose /boot as location grub boot loader--> same error next i connected the powr cable back to my ide hd & chose the default /dev/hdi (ide hd) as my location for boot loader while booting it shows 3 OS choices: 1 RHEL smp --> KERNEL PANIC 2 RHEL up ro root (or something) --> KERNEL PANIC 3 Other (Win XP) which boots fine after it is selected Do i have to manually modify Grub? can any1 tel me JUST WHERE am i going wrong? pls help.

  • Hi Sucheta,
    Follow the following steps.
    1. Once you are at the grub screen, press c for command line.
    2. On command line execute the following commands.
    find /grub/stage2
    find /etc/hosts
    This will provide you the boot partition & the root partition nos. in the format (hd0,2) etc
    If the root partition & boot partitions are same then execute the following commands.
    root (hd0,2)
    kernel /boot/vmlinuz-kernel version ro root=/dev/hda3
    initrd /boot/initrd-version
    boot
    if the boot & root partitions are different then replace the root=/dev/hda3 with the value you get for root partition i.e. if you get (hd0,5) then replace the value with /dev/hda6.
    If you still get the kernel panic message, recreate the initrd image using the mkinitrd command.

    Hope this will work.
    -Vaibhav
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Cannot mount USB External HD with ext3, possible hardware failure

I'm a Software Engineer with limited SysEng experience. I have a few weeks old "WD 4 TB Elements Portable External Hard Drive", that is a USB 4 TB External HD. I've installed it on Raspberry PI, and created a unique ext3 partition.

The HD was almost full when last night when, during an , it stopped working.

I tried a quick reboot, after which I could not mount it. The drive, when on, makes a non encouraging "clank" noise periodically.

This is the error when mounting:

I've googled a bit and here below some commands I've run against the drive:

From dmesg

More from dmesg

From tune2fs

I tried fsck but I got no significant output after one night, so stopped and rebooted.

The HD is obviosly experiencing an hardware failure and I guess there are ton of bad sectors. Luckily the content of the HD are thousands of small files, and my hope is to recover as many of them as possible.

Can someone point me in the right direction? What can I do to investigate the issue further and try to restore access to whatever is still stored on healthy sectors?

Thanks in advance. Giovanni

asked Feb 27 at 8:38

user avatar

FedoraForum.org > Other Versions > EOL (End Of Life) Versions > can't boot FC3 after restart (error 22 mounting ext3)


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View Full Version : can't boot FC3 after restart (error 22 mounting ext3)



Parastic

2nd March 2005, 02:15 PM

hi,

after a restart, i can't boot linux anymore,

the system hangs after following error message:

VFS: Can't find ext3 filesystem on dev dm-0
mount: error 22 mounting ext3
mount: error 2 mounting none
switchroot: mount failed: 22
umount /initrd/dev failed: 2
Kernel panic - not syncing: Attempted to kill init!

how can i fix this? i hope it will work without a reinstall, but i need to get to my data!

TIA

Parastic


sibarbey

2nd March 2005, 02:27 PM

Did u update the package dmraid with dmraid-1.0.0.rc6-1_FC3.i386.rpm ? Cause i updated it, but as I dont have any raid device, everything is ok for me...

If yes, I suggest that u read the change they have made...

Hope this will help !


Parastic

2nd March 2005, 02:41 PM

hi,

i don't have a raid system, so i don't think i have updated the package.


mjman

2nd March 2005, 10:14 PM

boot with the fedora core cd #1, and pass linux rescue at the prompt. if you can successfuly mount your root and boot partitions, post the output of fdisk -l, cat /boot/grub/grub.conf, and cat /etc/fstab.


Parastic

2nd March 2005, 10:35 PM

the fedora rescue mode can't find my partitions, i can only mount the boot partition manualy.

fdisk -l:

Platte /dev/hde: 60.0 GByte, 60022480896 Byte
255 Köpfe, 63 Sektoren/Spuren, 7297 Zylinder
Einheiten = Zylinder von 16065 * 512 = 8225280 Bytes

Gerät Boot Start End Blocks Id System
/dev/hde1 * 1 13 104391 83 Linux
/dev/hde2 14 7297 58508730 8e Linux LVM

grub.conf:

# grub.conf generated by anaconda
#
# Note that you do not have to rerun grub after making changes to this file
# NOTICE: You have a /boot partition. This means that
# all kernel and initrd paths are relative to /boot/, eg.
# root (hd0,0)
# kernel /vmlinuz-version ro root=/dev/VolGroup00/LogVol00
# initrd /initrd-version.img
#boot=/dev/hde
default=0
timeout=5
splashimage=(hd0,0)/grub/splash.xpm.gz
hiddenmenu
title Fedora Core (2.6.10-1.766_FC3)
root (hd0,0)
kernel /vmlinuz-2.6.10-1.766_FC3 ro root=/dev/VolGroup00/LogVol00 rhgbquiet
initrd /initrd-2.6.10-1.766_FC3.img
title Fedora Core (2.6.10-1.760_FC3)
root (hd0,0)
kernel /vmlinuz-2.6.10-1.760_FC3 ro root=/dev/VolGroup00/LogVol00 rhgbquiet
initrd /initrd-2.6.10-1.760_FC3.img
title Fedora Core (2.6.10-1.741_FC3)
root (hd0,0)
kernel /vmlinuz-2.6.10-1.741_FC3 ro root=/dev/VolGroup00/LogVol00 rhgbquiet
initrd /initrd-2.6.10-1.741_FC3.img
title Fedora Core (2.6.10-1.737_FC3)
root (hd0,0)
kernel /vmlinuz-2.6.10-1.737_FC3 ro root=/dev/VolGroup00/LogVol00 rhgbquiet
initrd /initrd-2.6.10-1.737_FC3.img
title Fedora Core (2.6.9-1.681_FC3)
root (hd0,0)
kernel /vmlinuz-2.6.9-1.681_FC3 ro root=/dev/VolGroup00/LogVol00 rhgb quiet
initrd /initrd-2.6.9-1.681_FC3.img
title Fedora Core (2.6.9-1.667)
root (hd0,0)
kernel /vmlinuz-2.6.9-1.667 ro root=/dev/VolGroup00/LogVol00 rhgb quiet
initrd /initrd-2.6.9-1.667.img

can't get to /etc/fstab


mjman

2nd March 2005, 11:10 PM

hm. I don't really have much experience with LVM, and I suspect the problem has something to do with it. Have you tried booting with an older kernel? I suspect that somehow, your initrd is not properly initializing LVM. Or possibly the root partition filesystem is corrupted...


Parastic

3rd March 2005, 12:28 PM

anyone knows how i can get to my data, when the LVM filesystem is broken ?


mjman

3rd March 2005, 05:38 PM

if you have access to another linux box, pop in the drive, and try to import the volume group using vgimport. check out this site for lots of good info on LVM: http://www.tldp.org/HOWTO/LVM-HOWTO/
there is a section in there on Moving a volume group to another system


Parastic

4th March 2005, 07:53 AM

can't get to my volume :(

[[email protected] /]# pvscan
PV /dev/hdb2 lvm2 [55,78 GB]
Total: 1 [55,78 GB] / in use: 0 [0 ] / in no VG: 1 [55,78 GB]

[[email protected] /]# pvdisplay
--- NEW Physical volume ---
PV Name /dev/hdb2
VG Name
PV Size 55,78 GB
Allocatable NO
PE Size (KByte) 0
Total PE 0
Free PE 0
Allocated PE 0
PV UUID NdoPKM-wkUs-3mKB-1zF8-Y9V3-d87g-sNNXsJ

[[email protected] /]# pvchange /dev/hdb2 -x y
Allocatability not supported by orphan lvm2 format PV /dev/hdb2
0 physical volumes changed / 1 physical volume not changed

[[email protected] /]# vgscan
Reading all physical volumes. This may take a while...
[[email protected] /]#


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As @Blender mentioned in his comment this sounds like a hard drive failure. As you don't know Linux very well, I would suggest your first port of call would be to find someone who does as fixing this sort of issue (or even understanding fully) can be hard if you don't know some of the intricacies of Linux.

First use either a Live CD or Live USB stick (see Knoppix as an example or Ubuntu) to boot the machine and see if it can mount the disk(s). If it can, copy the important data off (you should be backing this stuff up anyway but that is a separate issue) and then try and track down what hardware failed. If it is an hard disk then replace it.

You can also look at the logs to try and track down what the issue was in the first place. For hardware I'd check . Depending on the type of drive (and version of the kernel etc.) you'll see different messages. When the drive is connected to a SCSI/Raid controller you may see messages relating to SCSI commands being corrupt or not being responded to. You may also see messages saying writes have timed out (as another example). It is hard to say what you might see as it depends on hardware and kernel versions.

You can use to check on the SMART information. This is built into the hard drive and is the way that the disk can tell you how sound it is.

The JBD error you see is because the EXT3 journal is mangled. If the Live USB/CD distro can't mount the partition because of this you can mount ext3 partitions as ext2 (which ignores the journal) to get the data off. But again, this is something you may need to be a little more seasoned at using Unix to be able to pull off. However, you can do a Google for this procedure and see if you can perform it while booted off the Live USB/CD to allow you to mount the partition.

Connectrix MDS: EXT3-fs Error (device sdc1): ext3_readdir: directory #2 contains a hole at offset 0 - kernel

Article Content


Symptoms

Connectrix MDS switch streaming the following error:
%KERN-2-SYSTEM_MSG: [63661120.723386] EXT3-fs error (device sdc1): ext3_readdir: directory #2 contains a hole at offset 0 - kernel

The below is seen in the show logging output:
2016 Jul 26 19:54:22 Switch Jul 26 19:54:21 %KERN-2-SYSTEM_MSG: [63661120.680361] EXT3-fs error (device sdc1): ext3_readdir: directory #2 contains a hole at offset 0 - kernel 2016 Jul 26 19:54:22 Switch Jul 26 19:54:21 %KERN-2-SYSTEM_MSG: [63661120.702907] EXT3-fs error (device sdc1): ext3_readdir: directory #2 contains a hole at offset 0 - kernel 2016 Jul 26 19:54:22 Switch Jul 26 19:54:21 %KERN-2-SYSTEM_MSG: [63661120.723386] EXT3-fs error (device sdc1): ext3_readdir: directory #2 contains a hole at offset 0 - kernel

The below is seen in the show system internal flash:
1.1.

Cause

The flash storage device is not mounted as per Cisco issue CSCuv67115.

This issue initially occurs only on supervisors in standby state. The issue is not corrected by an ISSU/D, system switchover or reload, and is observed on a supervisor in an active state.

Logflash is used only to store the output of debug commands. It is not required for stable system operation.

Resolution

Workaround:
Power cycle the affected supervisor.
In dual supervisor systems, this is done by powering down the supervisor with the out-of-service module command and powering it back up with the no poweroff module command. Ensure that the supervisor is in standby mode so that the recovery does not affect the stability of the system. 

It is not sufficient to reboot the module with the reload or system switchover commands.

Example:
Commands:
  1. Confirm that standby supervisor is in HA Standby:
    • show system redundancy status
  2. Power down the standby supervisor module:
    • out-of-service module <standby sup>
  3. Power up the standby supervisor:
    • no poweroff <standby sup>
  4. Wait for HA Standby:
    • show system redundancy status

Monitor the switch show logging output to see if the EXT3-fs error message is still logging on the switch. If the error is still logging, switchover to the standby supervisor and repeat steps 1-4 above.

Article Properties


Affected Product

Connectrix MDS-Series Hardware

Product

Connectrix MDS-9706, Connectrix MDS-9710, Connectrix MDS-9718, Connectrix MDS-Series Hardware

Last Published Date

13 May 2022

Version

3

Article Type

Solution

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Most of the Linux file systems, including ext3, support file system journaling and thus are less prone to corruption. But as all problems can’t always be ruled out, a Linux volume can get corrupt for multitude of reasons. Though you can delete the corrupted volume and resolve such issues, but Linux Data Recovery is always a primary concern for all data preserving users.
Here is one of the problems that a Linux user can experience when mounting a volume. Consider you are a Linux user. You successfully shutdown your computer, but the next time when you try to boot the computer, it doesn’t boot and shows the below error report on the screen:
.EXT3-fs error (device dm-0) ext3_check_descriptor: Block bitmap for
group 0 not in group (block 41471)
EXT3-fs group descriptors corrupted
mount: error 22 mounting ext3
mount: error 2 mounting none
switchroot: /initrd/dev failed: 2
Kernel panic not syncing: Attempt to kill init
This error report is preceded with the general information of mounting the volume.
Cause
The aforementioned error most likely occurs because of journal file corruption in ext3 logical volume.
Ext3 is a journaled file system that keeps a record of all the changes in a file called journal file. This file is helpful in bringing the file system back to its original state post any power failure or system crash. Damage to journal file can cause serious consequences, such as above.
Solution
In order to resolve the discussed issue, you should follow the below mentioned steps:
•    Since the computer is unable to boot, you should get a System Rescue CD to boot the computer
•    After booting the computer, you can run fsck.ext3 command to repair the corrupted ext3 volume
However, if the problem persists, the only solution is to recreate the volume and restore lost data from the last available backup.
There are situations when data backup is found as corrupted or incomplete for some reasons. To deal with such problems, you can use Ext3 Recovery software. These are perfect Linux Data Recovery tools designed to scan a corrupted or deleted Linux volume and extract possible data to a safe location.

 

For more Info about Ext3 Recovery  Do visit     http://ext3-file-recovery.data-recovery-linux.com/

Unable to Delete Differential Disks from LVM and ext3 Storages with Error Displayed on XenCenter

Symptoms or Error

Unable to delete differential disks from Logical Volume Manager (LVM) or ext3 storages. The error message is displayed on XenCenter as "Vdi_delete: EXCEPTION SR.SROSError, Failed to mark VDI hidden [opterr=error 22] or attempt to mark VDI as hidden failed."


Solution

To resolve this, complete the following procedure:

  1. Ensure that you have a functional back up of your corrupted Vhd, because you need to remove the same from your shared or local storage.

  2. If the affected Virtual Disk Image (VDI) resides on Logical Volume Manager (LVM), run the following command to remove the Vhd:
    lvremove /dev/VG_XenStorage-<uuid from LUN which the VDI resides>/vhd-<uuid of affected VDI>
    Note: To get the Universally Unique Identifier (UUID) of the VM, run xe vm-list name-label=<Name of the VM>.
    Example:
    Ivremove /dev/VG_XenStorage-b0a1ad60-dbdc-92a4-eba1-e2da7803097c/VHD-71cc1048-4481-410a-9aeb-f79eb42894c3

  3. If the affected VDI resides on ext3, complete the following procedure to remove the Vhd:
    1. Change directory to the affected Storage Repository, by running the command cd /var/run/sr-mount/<uuid of the storage>.
    2. Run xe vdi-forget <uuid of the affected VDI> to forget the affected VDI.
    3. Run rm –f <uuid of the affected VDI >.vhd to remove the affected VDI.

Examples:

cd /var/run/sr-mount/b0a1ad60-dbdc-92a4-eba1-e2da7803097c
xe vdi-forget 71cc1048-4481-410a-9aeb-f79eb42894c3.vhd
rm –f 71cc1048-4481-410a-9aeb-f79eb42894c3.vhd

Common error messages seen in the logs and XenCenter

The following screen shots display the common error messages seen in the logs and XenCenter:

User-added image

User-added image


Problem Cause

This error occurs because of the corrupted VDI.


Additional Resources

CTX133465 - Possible Virtual Machine Corruption if XenServer Hotfix is not Applied


Most of the Linux file systems, including ext3, support file system journaling and thus are less prone to corruption. But as all problems can’t always be ruled out, a Linux volume can get corrupt for multitude of reasons. Though you can delete the corrupted volume and resolve such issues, but Linux Data Recovery is always a primary concern for all data preserving users.
Here is one of the problems that a Linux user can experience when mounting a volume. Consider you are a Linux user. You successfully shutdown your computer, but the next time when you try to boot the computer, it doesn’t boot and error 22 mounting ext3 the below error report on the screen:
.EXT3-fs error (device dm-0) ext3_check_descriptor: Block bitmap for
group 0 error 22 mounting ext3 in group (block 41471)
EXT3-fs group descriptors corrupted
mount: error 22 mounting ext3
mount: error 2 mounting none
switchroot: /initrd/dev failed: 2
Kernel panic not syncing: Attempt to kill init
This error report is preceded with the general information of mounting the volume.
Cause
The aforementioned error most likely occurs because of journal file corruption in ext3 logical volume.
Ext3 is a journaled file system that keeps a record of all the changes in a file called journal file. This file is helpful in bringing the file system back to its original state post any power failure or system crash. Damage to journal file can cause serious consequences, such as above.
Solution
In order to resolve the discussed issue, you should follow the below mentioned steps:
•    Since the computer is unable to boot, you should get a System Rescue CD to boot the computer
•    After booting the computer, you can run fsck.ext3 command to repair the corrupted ext3 volume
However, if the problem persists, the only solution is to recreate the volume and restore lost data from the last available backup.
There are situations when data backup is found as corrupted or incomplete for some reasons. To deal with such problems, you can use Ext3 Recovery software, error 22 mounting ext3. These are perfect Linux Data Recovery tools designed to scan a corrupted or deleted Linux volume and extract possible data to a safe location.

 

For more Info about Ext3 Recovery  Do visit     http://ext3-file-recovery.data-recovery-linux.com/

As @Blender mentioned in his comment this sounds like a hard drive failure. As you don't know Linux very well, I would suggest your first port of call would be to find someone who does as fixing this sort of issue (or even understanding fully) can be hard if you don't know some of the intricacies of Linux.

First use either a Live CD or Error 22 mounting ext3 USB stick (see Knoppix as an example or Ubuntu) to boot the machine and see if it can mount the disk(s). If it can, copy the important data off (you should be backing this stuff up anyway but that is a separate issue) and then try and track down what hardware failed. If it is an hard disk then replace it.

You can also look at the logs to try and track down what the issue was in the first place. For hardware I'd check. Depending on the type of drive (and version of the kernel etc.) you'll see different messages. When the drive is connected to a SCSI/Raid controller you may see messages relating to SCSI commands being corrupt or not being responded to. You may also see messages saying writes have timed out (as another example). It is hard to say what you might see as it depends on hardware and kernel versions.

You can use to check on the SMART information. This is built into the hard drive and is the way that the disk can tell you how sound it is.

The JBD error you see is because the EXT3 journal is mangled. If the Live USB/CD distro can't mount the partition because of this you can mount ext3 partitions as ext2 (which ignores the journal) to get the data off. But again, this is something you may need to be a little more seasoned at using Unix error sim only 3/4 metadata areas found be able to pull off. However, you can do a Google for this procedure and see if you can perform it while booted off the Live USB/CD to allow you to mount the partition.

Unable to Delete Differential Disks from LVM and ext3 Storages with Error Displayed on XenCenter

Symptoms or Error

Unable to delete differential disks from Logical Volume Manager (LVM) or ext3 storages. The error message is displayed on XenCenter as "Vdi_delete: EXCEPTION SR.SROSError, Failed to mark VDI hidden [opterr=error 22] or attempt to mark VDI as hidden failed."


Solution

To resolve this, complete the following procedure:

  1. Ensure that you have a functional back up of your corrupted Vhd, because you need to remove the same from your shared or local storage.

  2. If the affected Virtual Disk Image (VDI) resides on Logical Volume Manager (LVM), run the following command to remove the Vhd:
    lvremove /dev/VG_XenStorage-<uuid from LUN which the VDI resides>/vhd-<uuid of affected VDI>
    Note: To get the Universally Unique Identifier (UUID) of the VM, run xe vm-list name-label=<Name of the VM>.
    Example:
    Ivremove /dev/VG_XenStorage-b0a1ad60-dbdc-92a4-eba1-e2da7803097c/VHD-71cc1048-4481-410a-9aeb-f79eb42894c3

  3. If the affected VDI resides on ext3, complete the following procedure to remove the Vhd:
    1. Change directory to the affected Storage Repository, by running the command cd /var/run/sr-mount/<uuid of the storage>.
    2. Run xe vdi-forget <uuid of the affected VDI> to forget the affected VDI.
    3. Run rm –f <uuid of the affected VDI >.vhd to remove the affected VDI.

Examples:

cd /var/run/sr-mount/b0a1ad60-dbdc-92a4-eba1-e2da7803097c
xe vdi-forget 71cc1048-4481-410a-9aeb-f79eb42894c3.vhd
rm –f 71cc1048-4481-410a-9aeb-f79eb42894c3.vhd

Common error messages seen in the logs and XenCenter

The following screen shots display the common error messages seen in the logs and XenCenter:

User-added image

User-added image


Problem Cause

This error occurs because of the corrupted VDI.


Additional Resources

CTX133465 - Possible Virtual Machine Corruption if XenServer Hotfix is not Applied


Kernel panic on Linux Red Hat server

As @Blender mentioned in his comment this sounds like a hard drive failure. As you don't know Linux very well, I would suggest your first port of call would be to find someone who does as fixing this sort of issue (or even understanding fully) can be hard if you don't know some of the intricacies of Linux.

First use either a Live CD or Live USB stick (see Knoppix as an example or Ubuntu) to boot the machine and see if it can mount the disk(s). If it can, copy the important data off (you should be backing this stuff up anyway but that is a separate issue) and then try and track down what hardware failed. If it is an hard disk then replace it.

You can also look at the logs to try and track down what the issue was in the first place. For hardware I'd check. Depending on the type of drive (and version of the kernel error 22 mounting ext3 you'll see different messages. When the drive is connected to a SCSI/Raid controller you may see messages relating to SCSI commands being corrupt or not being responded to, error 22 mounting ext3. You may also see messages saying writes have timed out (as another example). It is hard to say what you might see as it depends on hardware and kernel versions.

You can use to check on the SMART information. This is built into the hard drive and is the way that the disk can tell you how sound it is.

The JBD error you see is because the EXT3 journal is mangled. If the Live USB/CD distro can't mount the partition because of this you can mount ext3 partitions as ext2 (which ignores the journal) to get the data off. But again, this is something you may need to be a little more seasoned at using Unix to be able to mail php error off. However, you can do a Google for this procedure and see if you can perform it while booted off the Live USB/CD to allow you to mount the partition.

answered Feb 27, 2012 at 16:44

user avatar
webtoewebtoe

1,9461111 silver badges1212 bronze badges

FedoraForum.org > Other Versions > EOL (End Of Life) Versions > can't boot FC3 after restart (error 22 mounting ext3)


PDA

View Full Version : can't boot FC3 after restart (error 22 mounting ext3)



Parastic

2nd March 2005, 02:15 PM

hi,

after a restart, error 22 mounting ext3, i can't boot linux anymore,

the system hangs after following error message:

VFS: Can't find ext3 filesystem on dev dm-0
mount: error 22 mounting ext3
mount: error 2 mounting error 22 mounting ext3 switchroot: mount failed: 22
umount /initrd/dev failed: 2
Kernel panic - not syncing: Attempted to kill init!

how can i fix this? i hope it will work without a reinstall, but i need to get to my data!

TIA

Parastic


sibarbey

2nd March 2005, error 22 mounting ext3, 02:27 PM

Did u update the package dmraid with dmraid-1.0.0.rc6-1_FC3.i386.rpm ? Cause i updated it, but as I dont have any raid device, everything is ok for me.

If yes, I suggest that u read the change they have made.

Hope this will help !


Parastic

2nd Error 22 mounting ext3 2005, 02:41 PM

hi,

i don't have a raid system, so i don't think i have updated the package.


mjman

2nd March 2005, 10:14 PM

boot with the fedora core cd #1, and pass linux rescue at the prompt. if you can successfuly mount your root error 22 mounting ext3 boot partitions, post the output of fdisk -l, cat /boot/grub/grub.conf, error 22 mounting ext3, and cat /etc/fstab.


Parastic

2nd March 2005, 10:35 PM

the fedora rescue mode can't find my partitions, i can only mount the boot partition manualy.

fdisk -l:

Platte /dev/hde: 60.0 GByte, 60022480896 Byte
255 Köpfe, 63 Sektoren/Spuren, 7297 Zylinder
Einheiten = Zylinder von 16065 * 512 = 8225280 Bytes

Gerät Boot Start End Blocks Id System
/dev/hde1 * 1 13 104391 error 22 mounting ext3 83 Linux
/dev/hde2 14 error 22 mounting ext3 7297 58508730 8e Linux LVM

grub.conf:

# grub.conf generated by anaconda
#
# Note that you do not have to rerun grub after making changes to this file
# NOTICE: You have a /boot partition. This means that
# all kernel and initrd paths are relative to /boot/, eg.
# root (hd0,0)
# kernel /vmlinuz-version ro root=/dev/VolGroup00/LogVol00
# error 22 mounting ext3 initrd /initrd-version.img
#boot=/dev/hde
default=0
timeout=5
splashimage=(hd0,0)/grub/splash.xpm.gz
hiddenmenu
title Fedora Core (2.6.10-1.766_FC3)
root (hd0,0)
kernel /vmlinuz-2.6.10-1.766_FC3 ro root=/dev/VolGroup00/LogVol00 rhgbquiet
initrd /initrd-2.6.10-1.766_FC3.img
title Fedora Core (2.6.10-1.760_FC3)
root (hd0,0)
kernel /vmlinuz-2.6.10-1.760_FC3 ro root=/dev/VolGroup00/LogVol00 rhgbquiet
initrd /initrd-2.6.10-1.760_FC3.img
title Fedora Core (2.6.10-1.741_FC3)
root (hd0,0)
kernel /vmlinuz-2.6.10-1.741_FC3 ro root=/dev/VolGroup00/LogVol00 rhgbquiet
initrd /initrd-2.6.10-1.741_FC3.img
title Fedora Core (2.6.10-1.737_FC3)
root (hd0,0)
kernel /vmlinuz-2.6.10-1.737_FC3 ro root=/dev/VolGroup00/LogVol00 rhgbquiet
initrd /initrd-2.6.10-1.737_FC3.img
title Fedora Core (2.6.9-1.681_FC3)
root (hd0,0)
kernel /vmlinuz-2.6.9-1.681_FC3 ro root=/dev/VolGroup00/LogVol00 rhgb quiet
initrd /initrd-2.6.9-1.681_FC3.img
title Fedora Core (2.6.9-1.667)
root (hd0,0)
kernel /vmlinuz-2.6.9-1.667 ro root=/dev/VolGroup00/LogVol00 rhgb quiet
initrd /initrd-2.6.9-1.667.img

can't get to /etc/fstab


mjman

2nd March 2005, 11:10 PM

hm. I don't really have much experience with LVM, and I suspect the problem has something to do with it. Have you tried booting with an older kernel? I suspect that somehow, your initrd is not properly initializing LVM. Or possibly the root partition filesystem is corrupted.


Parastic

3rd March 2005, 12:28 PM

anyone knows how i can get to my data, when the LVM filesystem is broken ?


mjman

3rd March 2005, 05:38 PM

if you have access to another linux box, pop in the drive, and try to import the volume group using vgimport. check out this site for lots of good info on LVM: http://www.tldp.org/HOWTO/LVM-HOWTO/
there is a section in there on Moving a volume group to another system


Parastic

4th March 2005, 07:53 AM

can't get to my volume error 22 mounting ext3 [[email protected] /]# pvscan
PV /dev/hdb2 lvm2 [55,78 GB]
Total: 1 [55,78 GB] / in use: 0 [0 ] / in no VG: 1 [55,78 GB]

[[email protected] /]# pvdisplay
--- NEW Physical volume ---
PV Name error 017 undefined symbol consumingmoney /dev/hdb2
VG Name
PV Size 55,78 GB
Allocatable NO
PE Size (KByte) 0
Total PE 0
Free PE fatal error msobj100.dll 0
Allocated PE 0
PV UUID NdoPKM-wkUs-3mKB-1zF8-Y9V3-d87g-sNNXsJ

[[email protected] /]# pvchange /dev/hdb2 -x y
Allocatability not supported by orphan lvm2 format PV /dev/hdb2
0 physical volumes changed / 1 physical volume not changed

[[email protected] /]# vgscan
Reading all physical volumes. This may take a while.
[[email protected] /]#


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Cannot mount USB External HD with ext3, possible hardware failure

I'm a Software Engineer with limited SysEng experience, error 22 mounting ext3. I have a few weeks old "WD error 22 mounting ext3 TB Elements Portable External Hard Drive", that is a USB 4 TB External HD. I've installed it on Raspberry PI, and created a unique ext3 partition.

The HD was almost full when last night when, during anit stopped working.

I tried a quick reboot, after which I could not mount it. The drive, when on, makes a non encouraging "clank" noise periodically.

This is the error when mounting:

I've googled a bit and here below some commands I've run against the drive:

From dmesg

More from dmesg

From tune2fs

I tried fsck but I got no significant output after one night, so stopped and rebooted.

The HD is obviosly experiencing an hardware failure and I guess there are ton of bad sectors. Luckily the content of the HD are thousands of small files, error 22 mounting ext3, and my hope is to recover as many of them as possible.

Can someone point me in the right direction? What can I do to investigate the issue further and try to restore access to whatever is still stored on healthy sectors?

Thanks in advance. Giovanni

asked Feb 27 at 8:38

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Error 22 mounting ext3

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