Dsl 500t internal communication error. exiting

dsl 500t internal communication error. exiting

It means that TCP reset has been sent to your computer. This happens for example when web server is restarted due to configuration change. error messages for the motor feedback system and indications of the signal strength on the DSL connection. As a "short message" transaction. Explanation As a normal part of the process of stopping the CMI service, open threads are closed (killed). This alarm indicates that a timeout.

Accept. opinion: Dsl 500t internal communication error. exiting

Mp 280 5200 error
Dsl 500t internal communication error. exiting
Essbase error - 1042017 - network error

Dsl 500t internal communication error. exiting - thanks

pattern>

Disable monitoring of the named service. The name is a service entry name from the monitrc file. Monit will also disable monitoring of all services that depends on this service. You can use a regex pattern too (note that it is case insensitive).

status [name guest total]

Report services state. The output can easily be parsed by scripts. Without options, prints a short overview of the state of all services managed by Monit. The option, up prints the number of all services in this state, down likewise and so on.

reload

Reinitialise a running Monit daemon, the daemon will reread its configuration, close and reopen log files.

quit

Kill the Monit daemon process

validate

Check all services listed in the control file. This action is also the default behaviour when Monit runs in daemon mode.

procmatch <regex>

Allows for easy testing of pattern for process match check. The command takes regular expression as an argument and displays all running processes matching the pattern.

Monit is configured and controlled via a control file called monitrc. The default location for this file is ~/.monitrc. If this file does not exist, Monit will try /etc/monitrc, then @[email protected]/monitrc and finally ./monitrc. If you build Monit from source, the value of @[email protected] can be given at configure time as ./configure --sysconfdir. For instance, using ./configure --sysconfdir /var/monit/etc will make Monit search for monitrc in /var/monit/etc

To protect the security of your control file and passwords the control file must have read-write permissions no more than 0700 (u=xrw,g=,o=); Monit will complain and exit otherwise.

When there is a conflict between the command-line arguments and the arguments in this file, the command-line arguments takes precedence.

Monit uses its own Domain Specific Language (DSL); The control file consists of a series of service entries and global option statements.

Comments begin with a and extend through the end of the line. Otherwise the file consists of a series of service entries or global option statements in a free-format, token-oriented syntax.

You can use noise keywords like , , , , , , , , anywhere in an entry to make it resemble English. They're ignored, but can make entries much easier to read at a glance. Keywords are case insensitive.

There are three kinds of tokens: grammar, numbers (i.e. decimal digit sequences) and strings. Strings can be either quoted or unquoted. A quoted string is bounded by double quotes and may contain whitespace (and quoted digits are treated as a string). An unquoted string is any whitespace-delimited token, containing characters and/or numbers.

On a semantic level, the control file consists of three types of entries:

1. Global set-statements

A global set-statement starts with the keyword and the item to configure.

2. Global include-statement

The include statement consists of the keyword and a glob string. This statement is used to include configure directives from separate files.

3. One or more service entry statements.

Service checks

Each service entry consists of the keywords , followed by the service type. Each entry requires a unique descriptive name, which may be freely chosen. This name is used by Monit to refer to the service internally and in all interactions with the user. The name is case insensitive.

Currently, nine types of check statements are supported:

Process

<path> is the absolute path to the program's pid-file. A pid-file is a file, containing a Process's unique ID. If the pid-file does not exist or does not contain the PID number of a running process, Monit will call the entry's start method if defined.

<regex> is an alternative to using PID files and uses process name pattern matching to find the process to monitor. The top-most matching parent with highest uptime is selected, so this form of check is most useful if the process name is unique. Pid-file should be used where possible as it defines expected PID exactly. You can test if a process match a pattern from the command-line using . This will lists all processes matching or not, the regex-pattern.

File

<path> is the absolute path to the file. If the file does not exist, Monit will call the entry's start method if defined, if <path> does not point to a regular file type (for instance a directory), Monit will disable monitoring of this entry. If Monit runs in passive mode or the start method is not defined, Monit will just send an alert on error.

Fifo

<path> is the absolute path to the fifo. If the fifo does not exist, Monit will call the entry's start method if defined, if <path> does not point to a fifo type (for instance a directory), Monit will disable monitoring of this entry. If Monit runs in passive mode or the start method is not defined, Monit will just send an alert on error.

Filesystem

<path> is the path to the device/disk, mount point or NFS/CIFS/FUSE connection string. If the filesystem becomes unavailable, Monit will call the service's start method if defined. If Monit runs in passive mode or the start method is not defined, Monit will just send an alert on error.

Directory

<path> is the absolute path to the directory. If the directory does not exist, Monit will call the entry's start method if defined. If <path> does not point to a directory, monit will disable monitoring of this entry. If Monit runs in passive mode or the start methods is not defined, Monit will just send an alert on error.

Remote host

The host address can be specified as a hostname string or as an IP-address string on a dotted decimal format. Such as, "tildeslash.com" or "64.87.72.95".

System

The unique name is usually the local host name, but any descriptive name can be used. If you use the variable $HOST as the name, it will expand to the hostname. This check allows one to monitor general system resources such as CPU usage, total memory usage or load average. The unique name is used as the system hostname in mail alerts and as the initial name of the host entry in M/Monit.

Program

<path> is the absolute path to the executable program or script. The status test allows one to check the program's exit status. If the program does not finish executing within <number> seconds, Monit will terminate it. The default program timeout is 300 seconds (5 minutes). The output of the program is recorded and made available in the User Interface and in alerts, by default up to 512 bytes. You can change the output limit using the set limits statement).

Network

<ipaddress> is the IPv4 or IPv6 address of the monitored network interface. It is also possible to use interface name, such as "eth0" on Linux.

Monit will log status and error messages to a file or via syslog. Use the set log statement in the monitrc control file.

To setup Monit to log to its own file, use e.g. set log /var/log/monit.log. Note, the previous set logfile statement is deprecated, but can alternatively be used.

If syslog is given as a value for the command-line switch or the keyword set log syslog is found in the control file, Monit will use the syslog system daemon to log messages with a priority assigned to each message based on the context.

To turn off logging, simply do not set the log in the control file (and of course, do not use the -l switch)

The format for an entry in the log file is:

for example:

Monit uses ANSI escape sequences to colorise important parts of the command-line output, if the terminal supports colors, and UTF-8 box characters for tabular output.

If you want to process the monit CLI output in a script, you can use either the -B option or use the following statement in the monit configuration file to disable tabular output and colors completely:

Use

to specify Monit's poll cycle length and run Monit in daemon mode. You must specify a numeric argument which is a polling interval in seconds.

In daemon mode, Monit detaches from the console, puts itself in the background and runs continuously, monitoring each specified service and then goes to sleep for the given poll interval, wakes up and start monitoring again in an endless cycle.

Alternatively, you can use the command line switch to set the poll interval, but it is strongly recommended to set the poll interval in your ~/.monitrc file, by using set daemon.

Monit will then always start in daemon mode. If you do not use this statement and do not start monit with the -d option, Monit will just run through the service checks once and then exit. This might be useful in some situations, but Monit is primarily designed to run as a daemon process.

Calling with a Monit daemon running in the background sends a wake-up signal to the daemon, forcing it to check services immediately. Calling with the quit argument will kill a running Monit daemon process instead of waking it up.

The start delay option can be used to wait (once) before Monit starts checking services after system reboot. Monit will by default start checking services immediately at startup.

The statement prevents Monit from transforming itself into a daemon process. Instead Monit will run as a foreground process. (You should still use to specify the poll cycle).

This is required to run Monit from init. Using init to start Monit is probably the best way to run Monit if you want to be certain that you always have a running Monit daemon on your system. Another option is to run Monit from crontab. In any case, you should make sure that the control file does not have any syntax errors before you start Monit from init or crontab (use to check).

To setup Monit to run from init, you can either use the statement in Monit's control file or use the option from the command line. Here is what you must add to :

After you have modified init's configuration file, you can run the following command to re-examine /etc/inittab and start Monit:

For systems without telinit:

If Monit is used to monitor services that are also started at boot time (e.g. services started via SYSV init rc scripts or via inittab) then, in some cases, a race condition could occur. That is; if a service is slow to start, Monit can assume that the service is not running and possibly try to start it and raise an alert, while, in fact the service is already about to start or already in its startup sequence. Please see the FAQ for a solution to this problem. The short version is to start Monit on a higher run-level after system processes.

The Monit control file, , can include additional configuration files. This feature helps one to organise configuration into separate files instead of having everything in one file, if you like this kind of thing. Include statements can be placed at virtually any place in though the convention is at the bottom. The syntax is the following:

The globstring is any kind of string as defined in . Thus, you can refer to a single file or you can load several files at once. If you want to use whitespace in your string the globstring needs to be embedded into quotes (') or double quotes ("). If the globstring matches a directory instead of a file, it is silently ignored.

Any include statements in an included file are parsed as in the main control file.

If the globstring matches several results, the files are included in a non sorted manner. If you need to rely on a certain order, you should avoid wild-card globbing and instead specify the full path of files included.

An example,

This will load any file matching the globstring. That is, all files in /etc/monit.d that ends with the prefix .cfg.

Up to 1024 include files are supported. If this limit is exceeded, Monit will report an error.

Common SSL/TLS options can be set using the following statement and will apply to all SSL connections made through Monit:

VERSION set the specific SSL/TLS version to use. By default Monit uses AUTO. In AUTO mode, only TLS 1.2 and 1.3 are allowed, all other protocols are considered obsolete. If you want to use the obsolete protocol you must explicitly set the version. You can exclude the protocol using the "-" prefix. Exclude list example: set ssl { version: auto -sslv2 -sslv3 -tlsv1 -tlsv11 } Example of allowed protocols list: set ssl { version: tlsv12 tlsv13 }

VERIFY enable SSL server certificate verification. This will verify and report an error if the server certificate is not trusted, not valid or has expired. By default certificate verification is disabled, though we recommend enabling it, otherwise there is no guarantee that Monit speaks with the server you think it speaks with.

SELFSIGNED self-signed certificates are rejected by default. Use this option to allow self-signed certificates. Warning: not recommended in production for security reasons, as in such case the client cannot verify it talks to the correct server and attack types like man-in-the-middle or DNS hijacking are possible).

CIPHERS override default SSL/TLS ciphers.

PEMFILE set the path to the SSL server certificate "database-file" in PEM format. This options has effect only for the monit HTTP interface.

As an alternative to setting PEMFILE with a combined chain-key file, PEMCHAIN and PEMKEY set the path to the SSL certificate chain respectively the server private key file in PEM format. This options has effect only for the monit HTTP interface.

CLIENTPEMFILE set the path to the PEM encoded SSL client certificates database file. If set, a client certificate authentication is enabled.

CACERTIFICATEFILE set the path to the PEM encoded file containing Certificate Authority (CA) certificates. Monit uses OpenSSL's default CA certificates if this options is not used (openssl version -d can be used to get the default CA certificates). Many distributions comes with SSL and CA certificates already setup and using this option is normally not necessary.

CACERTIFICATEPATH set the path to the directory containing Certificate Authority (CA) certificates. Monit uses OpenSSL's default CA certificates if this options is not used. Many distributions comes with SSL and CA certificates already setup and using this option is normally not necessary.

The SSL options statement will globally apply to all SSL/TLS connection made through Monit. SSL options can also be set in a local check, in mailserver settings or in the mmonit statement, and will then override or extend the global settings.

To set global SSL options, put this statement near the top of your .monitrc file:

Here is an example of setting both global and local SSL options:

To enable FIPS mode (provided your OpenSSL library supports it), add this statement to Monit control file:

If specified in the control file, Monit will start with HTTP support. You can then use Monit CLI to start and stop services, disable or enable service monitoring as well as view the status of each service.

If HTTP support is enabled over TCP rather than over a Unix Socket, you can also view Monit's informative dashboard in your web browser.

Note that if HTTP support is disabled, the Monit CLI interface will have reduced functionality, as most CLI commands (such as "monit status") needs to communicate with the Monit background process via the HTTP interface. We strongly recommend having HTTP support enabled. If security is a concern, bind the HTTP interface to local host only or use Unix Socket so Monit is not accessible from the outside.

UNIX SOCKET

Syntax for Unix Socket:

Example:

UNIXSOCKET set the path to the Unix Socket Monit should bind to and listen on.

UID Socket owner (optional, defaults to the user who executes Monit)

GID Socket group (optional, defaults to primary group of the user who executes Monit)

PERMISSION Socket permissions - absolute octal mode (optional, process UMASK is applied by default)

TCP PORT

Syntax for TCP port:

PORT set the port Monit should bind to and listen on. Monit is usually setup on port 2812. Example:

You can now use http://localhost:2812/ to access Monit's web interface from a browser, after you have entered username and password as credentials. You might need to use double quotes around the password if it contains special chars such as "[email protected]:r#".

ADDRESS make Monit listen on a specific interface only. For example if you don't want to expose Monit's web interface to the network, bind it to localhost only. Monit will accept connections on any addresses if the ADDRESS option is not used:

Monit HTTP over TCP supports both IP version 4 and 6. Support is transparent and does not require any special configuration. If the bind address is not specified as in this example:

Monit will bind to and listen on port 2812 on all interfaces, both IPv4 and IPv6 if available. To force Monit HTTP to only listen on and accept connections over IP version 6, specify an IPv6 address:

Likewise, to force Monit HTTP to only listen on and accept connections over IP version 4, specify an IPv4 address:

SSL settings

SSL enable SSL/TLS for Monit's web interface. See options for full list of SSL options.

PEMFILE sets the path to the PEM encoded file, which contains the server's private key and certificate. This file should be stored in a safe place on the filesystem and should have strict permissions, no more than 0700.

As an alternative PEMCHAIN and PEMKEY sets the path to separate PEM encoded certificate chain and private key file. The key file should be stored in a safe place on the filesystem and should have strict permissions, no more than 0700.

Example for using pemfile:

Example for using separate certificate chain and key:

You can now use https://localhost:2812/ to access the Monit web server over a TLS encrypted connection.

Self-signed server certificates note: The Monit CLI works on a client-server basis and uses the Monit HTTP GUI to collect status from the Monit daemon and pass commands like start/stop to it. As self-signed certificates are rejected by default for security reasons, the CLI won't work unless you explicitly allow it by using the SELFSIGNED: ALLOW option:

CLIENTPEMFILE enables a client certificate based authentication and sets the path to a PEM encoded database file, that contains a list of allowed client certificates. A connecting client has to provide a certificate known to Monit (listed in clientpemfile), otherwise it is rejected. This file must also include all necessary CA certificates. By default self-signed client certificates are rejected for security reasons, if you want to allow self-signed client certificates (recommended only for testing), you have to allow it explicitly using the SELFSIGNED: ALLOW option (see the example above). See your browser's documentation for how to import client certificate to it.

Example:

Monit version signature

SIGNATURE can be used to hide Monit version from the HTTP response header and error pages. For example:

Authentication

Access to the Monit web interface is controlled primarily via the ALLOW option which is used to specify authentication and authorise only specific clients to connect.

If the Monit command line interface is being used, at least one cleartext password is necessary (see below), otherwise the Monit command line interface will not be able to connect to the Monit web interface.

Clients that try to connect to Monit, but submit a wrong username and/or password are logged with their IP-address.

Client certificates

This authentication method is a strong authentication mechanism and employ HTTPS client certificates to verify the authenticity of a connecting client. Clients must posses a Public Key Certificate known by Monit. The client must connect to Monit over SSL and Monit will ask the client to send its certificate. Upon receiving the certificate Monit compares the certificate to certificates located in the CLIENTPEMFILE file. Access is granted if the client certificate is in this file. See SSL settings for details.

Basic Authentication

Monit supports Basic Authentication as described in RFC 2617.

In short; a server challenge a client (e.g. a Browser) to send authentication information (username and password) and if accepted, the server will allow the client access to the requested document.

The biggest weakness with Basic Authentication is that username and password is sent in clear-text over the network (i.e. base64 encoded). It is therefore recommended that you do not use this authentication method unless you run Monit with ssl support. With ssl, it is safe to use Basic Authentication since all HTTP data, including Basic Authentication headers will be encrypted.

Cleartext user and password

Monit will use Basic Authentication if an allow statement contains a username and a password separated with a single ':' character.

Note: Special characters can be used, but for non-alphanumerics the password has to be quoted.

Syntax:

Host and network allow list

Monit maintains an access-control list of hosts and networks allowed to connect. You can add as many hosts as you want to, but only hosts with a valid domain name or its IP address are allowed.

Monit will query a name server to check any hosts trying to connect. If a host (client) is trying to connect, but cannot be found in the access list or cannot be resolved, Monit will shutdown the connection to the client promptly.

Control file example:

Clients, not mentioned in the allow list and trying to connect to Monit will be denied access and are logged with their IP-address.

PAM

PAM is supported on platforms which provide PAM (such as Linux, macOS, FreeBSD, NetBSD).

Syntax:

where is the group name allowed to access Monit's web interface. Monit uses a PAM service called monit for PAM authentication, see the PAM manual page for detailed instructions on how to set the PAM service and PAM authentication plugins.

Sample PAM service for Monit on macOS (store as "/etc/pam.d/monit" file):

A config which only allows group authenticated via PAM to access the web interface:

htpasswd file

Alternatively you store credentials in a formatted file (one user:passwd entry per line), like so: allow [cleartext pattern>

Restart the named service. The name is a service entry name from the monitrc file. You can use a regex pattern too (note that it is case insensitive).

monitor all

Enable monitoring of all services listed in the control file. If the group option is set, only start monitoring of services in the named group ("all" is not required in this case).

monitor <name IPV6 . Optionally specify the IP version Monit should use when trying to connect to the port. If not used, Monit will try to connect to the first available address (IPv4 or IPv6). If multiple addresses are available and connection to one address failed, Monit will try the next address and so on until a connection succeed or until there are no more addresses left to try.

TYPE [TCP TLS] [with options {...}]. Set SSL/TLS options and override global/default SSL options. You can set the SSL/TLS version to use, whether to verify certificates, trust self-signed certificates or set the SSL client certificates database-file for client certificate authentication.

CERTIFICATE CHECKSUM [MD5 pattern]

Print a short status summary.

report [up hardirq pattern>

Restart the named service. The name is a service entry name from the monitrc file. You can use a regex pattern too (note that it is case insensitive).

monitor all

Enable monitoring of all services listed in the control file. If the group option is set, only start monitoring of services in the named group ("all" is not required in this case).

monitor <name 5min softirq

watch the thematic video

Fixed 500 Internal Server Error - HTTP

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