Current pending errors count 199

current pending errors count 199

Your Current Pending Sector Count (2163) is higher than the Reallocation Sector Count (252). This means that failing sectors can no longer be. You can't clear the current pending sector count. Generally, a few sectors may be marked as bad even before the drive leaves the factory. (Attribute 199 is one that I question about being on this list as it is not a disk related failure. It is a count of the number of times that.

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sdauth
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PostPosted: Sat Feb 19, 2022 8:00 pm    Post subject: HDD current pending sector back to 0 after random passReply with quote

Hi,

A couple of days ago, one of my old (2012) 3.5" HDD smart status shown 4 "current pending sector". I quickly replaced it with a new one. Today, I decided to check again the old disk with a short smart test, which quicky current pending errors count 199 at the same LBA.
Then, I ran a full /dev/random pass to erase it and put in my dead HDD box.
But with much surprise, after the random pass, I noticed the smart value for current pending sector was back to 0. So Current pending errors count 199 ran a full smart test this time, and it finished without error.
What could explain this behaviour ? Or maybe is it expected ? I always assumed that when that value was going up (as with "Reallocated Sector Count or Uncorrectable Error Count) then the HDD was heading to the grave.

Last edited by sdauth on Sat Feb 19, 2022 10:38 pm; edited 1 time in total
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PostPosted: Sat Feb 19, 2022 9:20 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I can only guess.

A HDD can remap faulty current pending errors count 199. In order to remap a faulty sector, the drive must read the sector. After that, it can write the data to a spare sector. If the drive can't read a sector to be remapped, it will increase the number of current pending sectors.

If you send a write command to the sector that needs to be remapped, the HDD can skip reading the faulty sector. It will write the new contents directly to the spare sector. After that, it will decrease the number of current pending sectors.

I'm not surprised the number of current pending sectors went down to zero after you copied /dev/random to your disk.

See: https://harddrivegeek.com/current-pending-sector-count/, section "Can You Fix/Lower Your Pending Sectors Count?"
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PostPosted: Sat Feb 19, 2022 10:47 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Thanks for the explanation, appreciated. From your link : "Pending sectors are the precursor to reallocated sectors which can be a strong indicator of a dead hard drive on the horizon."
For now that value is at 0 so all good but from now on, I will only use that disk for cold storage and monitor closely smart values when I power it on. :wink: At least, I can still use it to store some files.
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PostPosted: Sun Feb 20, 2022 5:28 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I have an over 10 years uptime 500 GB WDC WD5000AAKS-00UU3A0 that has been reporting
Code:
Device: /dev/sda, 4 Currently unreadable (pending) sectors

and
Code:
Device: /dev/sda, current pending errors count 199 Offline current pending errors count 199 sectors

for now many years. Actually, sometimes the unreadable is 2 or 3 or 4 and uncorrectable is 1 or 2, going back and forth. I'm not sure how smart SMART is sometimes.

The drive was one of a pair; the other having failed last year catastrophically with no warning. Everything was currently backed up. The computer is a remote to me server primarily for storing redundant backups and has no active user, just me, the system administrator. There is a man on-site who can do drive swaps and other hands-on maintenance.

I've got those sectors isolated into a small partition that isn't used. It's kind of an irritant but I chose to watch it until it fails. I get regular smartd daemon error reports by email. Probably not my smartest decision. If it was a user's desktop computer, I would have swapped the drive immediately.
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PostPosted: Sun Feb 20, 2022 5:31 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

figueroa wrote:
I've got those sectors isolated into a small partition that isn't used. It's kind of an irritant but I chose to watch it until it fails. I get regular smartd daemon error reports by email. Probably not my smartest decision. If it was a user's desktop computer, I would have swapped the drive immediately.
If you forcibly current pending errors count 199 every sector in the scrap partition with zeroes, does the drive raise errors (and fail the write) or does it remap error 50040 activation the bad sectors? If the latter, that might calm the SMART complaints.
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PostPosted: Tue Mar 01, 2022 3:03 am    Post subject: Reply with quote
orange jim root terror colspan="2">As long as it still has spares in the same replacement zone as the pending sectors, a write to that failed sector will cause a remap and clear that pending sector. Copying /dev/zero or anything (including a sequential rebuild in a RAID) to a hard disk to erase or rewrite it, by that virtue, will clear out every pending sector and attempt to remap current pending errors count 199.

Usually there shouldn't be error c2264 myapp myapp SMART error on BIOS boot or smartd for just having a few bad sectors. Only if you have a SMART condition alert where WORST < THRESHOLD will a SMART warning flag. Bad sectors don't count. yet.

I have a 2TB disk with 150 pending sectors, 15 offline uncorrectables, 364 reallocations already occurred in the past, and 408 rellocated sectors so far. current pending errors count 199 This is called a slow drupal ecommerce an ajax http error occurred train wreck as I keep on forcing reallocates and new ones pop up. The reallocations already tipped off SMART that this disk is on the verge of failing as it set WORST to 1 for this field. TBH, this disk is effectively dead already. It's unfortunate, I could use another 2TB of disk space.
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PostPosted: Tue Mar 01, 2022 4:42 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

The only reason that I haven't yet acted on Current pending errors count 199 suggestion is time to do it, and the need to be careful as this is a remote server. Although that drive has 4 pending and 2 offline uncorrectable sectors, the reallocated sector count is zero. Current pending errors count 199 the other hand, your (eccerr0r) 2TB drive should be demoted to toy status.
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PostPosted: Tue Mar 01, current pending errors count 199, 2022 4:58 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

It's tough to fix sectors when the drive is mounted read/write, really need to make sure the filesystem knows about what you're doing in case it has a write pending from an open file to that sector. On the other hand the data is already lost, it might be enough to just try to find out what file (or directory or metadata) contains the bad sector.
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PostPosted: Fri Jul 29, 2022 3:06 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

So I just powered checksum error biostar on today since I need more storage for some backups. I made a short smart test (via USB adapter) and it seems ok.
Would you use it ? :o

Code:
smartctl 7.3 2022-02-28 r5338 [x86_64-linux-5.15.57-gentoo-gnu-x200] (local build)
Copyright (C) 2002-22, Bruce Allen, Christian Franke, www.smartmontools.org

=== START OF INFORMATION SECTION ===
Model Family:     Western Digital Green
Device Model:     WDC WD30EZRX-00DC0B0
Serial Number:   
LU WWN Device Id: 5 0014ee 603750894
Firmware Version: 80.00A80
User Capacity:    3 000 592 982 016 bytes [3,00 TB]
Sector Sizes:     512 bytes logical, 4096 bytes physical
Device is:        In smartctl database 7.3/5387
ATA Version is:   ACS-2 (minor revision not indicated)
SATA Version is:  SATA 3.0, 6.0 Gb/s (current: 6.0 Gb/s)
Local Time is:    Fri Jul 29 17:00:31 2022 CEST
SMART support is: Available - device has SMART capability.
SMART support is: Enabled

=== START OF READ SMART DATA SECTION ===
SMART overall-health self-assessment test result: PASSED

General SMART Values:
Offline data collection status:  (0x82)   Offline data collection activity
               was completed without error.
               Auto Offline Data Collection: Enabled.
Self-test execution status:      (   0)   The previous self-test routine completed
               without error or no self-test has ever
               been run, current pending errors count 199.
Total time to complete Offline
data collection:       (38880) seconds.
Offline data collection
capabilities:           (0x7b) SMART execute Offline immediate.
               Auto Offline data collection on/off support.
               Suspend Offline collection upon new
               command.
               Offline surface scan supported.
               Self-test supported.
               Conveyance Self-test supported.
               Selective Self-test supported.
SMART capabilities:            (0x0003)   Saves SMART data before entering
               power-saving mode.
               Supports SMART auto save timer.
Error logging capability:        (0x01)   Error logging supported.
               General Current pending errors count 199 Logging supported.
Short self-test routine
recommended polling time:     (   2) minutes.
Extended self-test routine
recommended polling time:     ( 390) minutes.
Conveyance self-test routine
recommended system error 1003 event id time:     (   5) minutes.
SCT capabilities:           (0x70b5)   SCT Status supported.
               SCT Feature Control supported.
               SCT Data Table supported.

SMART Attributes Data Structure revision number: 16
Vendor Specific SMART Attributes with Thresholds:
ID# ATTRIBUTE_NAME          FLAG     VALUE WORST THRESH TYPE      UPDATED  WHEN_FAILED RAW_VALUE
  1 Raw_Read_Error_Rate     0x002f   200   200   051    Pre-fail  Always       -       76
  3 Spin_Up_Time            0x0027   183   175   021    Pre-fail  Always       -       5833
  4 Start_Stop_Count        0x0032   097   097   000  current pending errors count 199 Old_age   Always       -       3127
  5 Reallocated_Sector_Ct   0x0033   200   200   140    Pre-fail  Always       -       0
  7 Seek_Error_Rate         0x002e   200   200   000    Old_age   Always       -       0
  9 Power_On_Hours          0x0032   077   077   000    Old_age   Always       -       17043
 10 Spin_Retry_Count        0x0032   100   100   000    Old_age   Always       -       0
 11 Calibration_Retry_Count 0x0032   100   100   000    Old_age   Always       -       0
 12 Power_Cycle_Count       0x0032   098   098   000    Old_age   Always       -       2940
192 Power-Off_Retract_Count 0x0032   197   197   000    Old_age   Always       -       2511
193 Load_Cycle_Count        0x0032   200   200   000    Old_age   Always       -       621
194 Temperature_Celsius     0x0022   121   101   000    Old_age   Always       -       29
196 Reallocated_Event_Count 0x0032   200   200   000    Old_age   Always       -       0
197 Current_Pending_Sector  0x0032   200   200   000    Old_age   Always       -       0
198 Offline_Uncorrectable   0x0030   200   200   000    Old_age   Offline      -       0
199 UDMA_CRC_Error_Count    0x0032   200   200   000    Old_age   Always       -       0
200 Multi_Zone_Error_Rate   0x0008   200   200   000    Old_age   Offline      -       0

SMART Error Log Version: 1
ATA Error Count: 436 (device log contains only the most recent five errors) current pending errors count 199    CR = Command Register [HEX]
   FR = Features Register [HEX]
   SC = Sector Count Register [HEX]
   SN = Sector Number Register [HEX]
   CL = Cylinder Low Register [HEX]
   CH = Cylinder High Register [HEX]
   DH = Device/Head Register [HEX]
   DC = Device Command Register [HEX]
   ER = Error register [HEX]
   ST = Status register [HEX]
Powered_Up_Time is measured from power on, and printed as
DDd+hh:mm:SS.sss where DD=days, hh=hours, mm=minutes,
SS=sec, and sss=millisec, current pending errors count 199. It "wraps" after 49.710 days.

Error 436 occurred at disk power-on lifetime: 7807 hours (325 days + 7 hours)
  When the command that caused the error occurred, the device was active or idle.

  After command completion occurred, registers were:
  ER ST SC SN CL CH DH
  -- -- -- -- -- -- --
  04 61 46 88 40 41 00  Device Fault; Error: ABRT

  Commands leading to the command that caused the error were:
  CR FR SC SN CL Current pending errors count 199 DH DC   Powered_Up_Time  Command/Feature_Name
  -- -- -- -- -- -- -- --  ----------------  --------------------
  ef 03 46 88 40 41 00 00      00:08:36.869  SET FEATURES [Set transfer mode]
  ef 03 0c 88 40 41 00 00      00:08:36.869  SET FEATURES [Set transfer mode]
  ec 03 68 88 40 41 00 00      00:08:36.869  IDENTIFY DEVICE
  ef 03 46 00 08 84 00 00      00:08:36.862  SET FEATURES [Set transfer mode]

Error 435 occurred at disk power-on lifetime: 7807 hours (325 days + 7 cant start driver error 1056
  When the command that caused the error occurred, the device was active or idle.

  After command completion occurred, registers were:
  ER ST SC SN CL CH DH
  -- -- -- -- -- -- --
  04 61 0c 88 40 41 00  Device Fault; Error: ABRT

  Commands leading to the command that caused the error were:
  CR FR SC SN CL CH DH DC   Powered_Up_Time  Command/Feature_Name
  -- -- -- -- -- -- -- --  ----------------  --------------------
  ef 03 0c 88 40 41 00 00      00:08:36.869  SET FEATURES [Set transfer mode]
  ec 03 68 88 40 41 00 00      00:08:36.869  IDENTIFY Ruu htc error 155
  ef 03 46 00 08 84 00 00      00:08:36.862  SET FEATURES [Set transfer mode]
  ef 03 0c 00 08 84 00 00      00:08:36.862  SET FEATURES [Set transfer mode]

Error 434 occurred at disk power-on lifetime: 7807 hours (325 days + 7 hours)
  When the command that caused the error occurred, the device was active or idle.

  After command completion occurred, registers were:
  ER ST SC SN CL CH DH
  -- -- -- -- -- -- --
  04 61 46 00 08 84 00  Device Fault; Error: ABRT

  Commands leading to the command that caused the error were:
  CR FR SC SN CL CH DH DC   Powered_Up_Time  Command/Feature_Name
  -- -- -- -- -- -- -- --  ----------------  --------------------
  ef 03 46 00 08 84 00 00      00:08:36.862  SET FEATURES [Set transfer mode]
  ef 03 0c 00 08 84 00 00      00:08:36.862  SET FEATURES [Set transfer mode]
  ec 03 08 00 08 84 00 00      00:08:36.861  IDENTIFY DEVICE
  ef 03 46 d8 b2 84 00 00      00:08:05.538  SET FEATURES [Set transfer mode]

Error 433 occurred at disk power-on lifetime: 7807 hours (325 days + 7 hours)
  When the command that caused the error occurred, the device was active or idle.

  After command completion occurred, registers were:
  ER ST SC SN CL CH DH
  -- -- -- -- -- -- --
  04 61 0c 00 08 84 00  Device Fault; Error: ABRT

  Commands leading to the command that caused the error were:
  CR FR SC SN CL CH DH DC   Powered_Up_Time  Command/Feature_Name
  -- -- -- -- -- -- -- canon pixma mp500 error 6500 ----------------  --------------------
  ef 03 0c 00 08 84 00 00      00:08:36.862  SET FEATURES [Set transfer mode]
  ec 03 08 00 08 84 00 00      00:08:36.861  IDENTIFY DEVICE
  ef 03 46 d8 b2 84 00 00      00:08:05.538  SET FEATURES [Set transfer mode]
  ef 03 0c d8 b2 84 00 00      00:08:05.538  SET FEATURES [Set transfer mode]

Error 432 occurred at disk power-on lifetime: 7807 hours (325 days + 7 hours)
  When the command that caused the error occurred, current pending errors count 199, the device was active or idle.

  After command completion occurred, registers were:
  ER ST SC SN CL CH DH
  -- -- -- -- -- -- --
  04 61 46 d8 b2 84 00  Device Fault; Error: ABRT

  Commands leading to the command that caused the error were:
  CR FR SC SN CL CH DH DC   Powered_Up_Time  Command/Feature_Name
  -- -- -- -- -- -- -- --  ----------------  --------------------
  ef 03 46 d8 b2 84 00 00      00:08:05.538  SET FEATURES [Set transfer mode]
  ef 03 0c d8 b2 84 00 00      00:08:05.538  SET FEATURES [Set transfer mode]
  ec 03 e0 d8 b2 84 00 00      00:08:05.538  IDENTIFY DEVICE
  ef 03 46 b0 f9 02 00 00      00:08:05.525  SET FEATURES [Set transfer mode]

Current pending errors count 199 Self-test log structure revision number 1
Num  Test_Description    Status                  Remaining  LifeTime(hours)  LBA_of_first_error
# 1  Short offline       Completed without error       00%     17043         -
# 2  Extended offline    Completed without error       00%     17043         -
# 3  Short offline       Completed: read failure       90%     16997         1228116656
# 4  Short offline       Completed: read failure       90%     16997         1228116657
# 5  Extended offline    Completed without error       00%     16869         -
# 6  Short offline       Completed without error       00%     16832         -
# 7  Short offline       Completed without error       00%     16494         -
# 8  Extended offline    Completed without error       00%     16470         -
# 9  Extended offline    Completed without error       00%     16410         -
#10  Extended offline    Completed without error       00%     15640         -
#11  Short offline       Completed without error       00%     15590         -
#12  Short offline       Completed without error       00%     15441         -
#13  Short offline       Completed without error       00%     15430         -
#14  Short offline       Completed without error       00%     15426         -
#15  Short offline       Completed without error       00%     15415         -
#16  Extended offline    Completed without error       00%     15177         -
#17  Extended offline    Completed without error       00%     14232         -
#18  Extended offline    Completed without error       00%     14195         -
#19  Extended offline    Completed without error       00%     12773         -
#20  Short offline    cisco dial-peer error could not add peer  Completed without error       00%  current pending errors count 199  12766         -
#21  Extended offline    Completed without error       00%     10310         -
2 of 2 failed self-tests are outdated by newer successful extended offline self-test # 2

SMART Selective self-test log data structure revision number 1
 SPAN  MIN_LBA  MAX_LBA  CURRENT_TEST_STATUS
    1        0        0  Not_testing
    2        0        0  Not_testing
    3        0        0  Not_testing
    4        0        0  Not_testing
    5        0        0  Not_testing
Selective self-test flags (0x0):
  After scanning selected spans, do NOT read-scan remainder of disk.
If Selective self-test is pending on power-up, resume after 0 minute delay.
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PostPosted: Fri Jul 29, 2022 4:42 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

sdauth wrote:
Would you use it ?
How important is the data, or how difficult would replacing the data be in the event of hardware failure?
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PostPosted: Fri Jul 29, 2022 5:13 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

sdauth,

Code:
=== START OF Current pending errors count 199 SECTION ===
Model Family:     Western Digital Green


That says it all really.

Code:
ID# ATTRIBUTE_NAME          FLAG     VALUE WORST THRESH TYPE      UPDATED  WHEN_FAILED RAW_VALUE
  5 Reallocated_Sector_Ct   0x0033   200   200   140    Pre-fail  Always       -       0
196 Reallocated_Event_Count 0x0032   200   200   000    Old_age   Always       -       0
197 Current_Pending_Sector  0x0032   200   200   000    Old_age   Always       -       0


Whatever was wrong just fixed itself in place. There are no reallocated sectors.
The faulty sectors became good by magic.

The short test is almost worthless. Don't even think about anything less than the long test.

The error log does not suggest media errors but the self test log suggests internal drive problems.
Code:
SMART Self-test log structure revision number 1
Num  Test_Description    Status                  Remaining  LifeTime(hours)  LBA_of_first_error       -
# 3  Short offline       Completed: read failure       90%     16997         1228116656
# 4  Short current pending errors count 199      Completed: read failure       90%     16997         1228116657


I wouldn't trust it.
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PostPosted: Fri Jul 29, 2022 5:47 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

pjp wrote:
sdauth wrote:
Would you use it ?
How important is the data, or how difficult would replacing the data be in the event of hardware failure?

It is an archive of my DVD stored in *.iso format. Well, it would be fairly easy to replace since I still have the disks in the basement although it would still take a while to dump again. Overall, current pending errors count 199, not critical but painful.

NeddySeagoon wrote:
Whatever was wrong just fixed itself in place. There are no reallocated sectors, current pending errors count 199.
The faulty sectors became good by magic.

The short test is almost worthless. Don't even think about anything less than the long test.
I wouldn't trust it.


Alright. Well, the latest long test (made when I opened up this thread) returned the same value, current pending errors count 199.
I'm currently filling it up with the files and will do a fresh extended long test later. Would it make any difference if I connect it directly to a SATA port ?
Anyway, after that, it will only mounted read-only.
It's not ideal but I really need current pending errors count 199 get back those precious TB on my main desktop and after all I can still get the data back if it croaks.
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PostPosted: Fri Jul 29, 2022 6:51 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

sdauth,

A non zero Current_Pending_Sector count is a count of the sectors that the drive has tried to read but failed.
It would therefore current pending errors count 199 them, if only it could read ream.
In short, the drive cannot read its own writing.
Its grounds for a warranty return unless the warranty has expired.

Its no quite that simple. Every time the drive goes to read a sector, it also gets a 'measure of difficulty' associated with the read.
At some threshold, difficult to read sectors are reallocated and the originals abandoned, with the data still in them.

Sometimes a read fails and the sector added to the Current_Pending_Sector count. Then a subsequent read works and its below the relocation threshold, so the sector is removed from the Current_Pending_Sector list without being relocated. This is what happened to you.

The Current_Pending_Sector count is only the sectors the drive has tried to read and failed.
There may be many more that its not tried to read yet, so are unknown.
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pjp
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PostPosted: Fri Jul 29, 2022 7:07 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

sdauth wrote:
I'm currently filling it up with the files
Sounds like an opportunity to shop for a replacement ;)
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sdauth
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PostPosted: Fri Jul 29, 2022 8:57 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

sdauth,

As long as you build the hash from the sources and don't save it is the failed drive, maybe.
All hash functions have a finite length. That means that there must be collisions in the hash space.
(Several different inputs will have the same hash value)

You will notice bad blocks in your media collection, the application will stop playback.
A hash is not required.

How will you know if the media collection is bad or the hash is bad if there is a mismatch in future?
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Current pending errors count 199

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S.M.A.R.T, current pending errors count 199. Status service

The S.M.A.R.T. Status service monitors the S.M.A.R.T. monitoring system on computer drives.

Service TypeWMI
Instances on a Device100
Supported Systems/Applications

Any WMI-enabled Server - Windows or workstation with S.M.A.R.T. installed.

Device ClassLaptop - Windows, Server - Windows, Workstation - Windows
Monitored ByLocal agent
Scan Interval120 minutes
Disk NameThe Instance Name of the disk to be monitored. You can obtain the Instance Name from WMI under the namespace rootwmi under the class .

Properties queried and calculations performed

Namespaceroot\wmi
WMI ClassMSStorageDriver_FailurePredictStatus
WMI Property 0PredictFailure
WMI Property 1Reason

Status details

Failure Predicted - Indicates whether or not imminent failure of the drive is predicted as either or .

Reason Code - Indicates the reason for the predicted failure mapped as:

  • 1 = Raw Read Error Rate
  • 2 = Throughput Performance
  • 3 = Spin Up Time
  • 4 = Start/Stop Count
  • 5 = Reallocated Sector Count
  • 6 = Read Channel Margin
  • 7 = Seek Error Rate
  • 8 = Seek Time Performance
  • 9 = Power On Hours
  • 10 = Spin Retry Count
  • 11 = Calibration Retry Count
  • 12 = Power Cycle Count
  • 13 = Soft Read Error Rate
  • 170 = Available Reserved Space
  • 171 = SSD Program Fail Count
  • 172 = SSD Erase Fail Count
  • 174 = Unexpected Power Loss Count
  • 175 = Power Loss Protection Failure
  • 177 = Wear Range Delta
  • 179 = Used Reserved Block Count Total
  • 180 = Unused Reserved Block Count Total
  • 181 = Program Fail Count Total or Non-4K Aligned Access Count
  • 182 = Erase Fail Count
  • 183 = SATA Downshift Error Count or Runtime Bad Block
  • 184 = End-to-End error/IOEDC
  • 185 = Head Stability
  • 186 = Induced Op-Vibration Detection
  • 187 = Reported Uncorrectable Errors
  • 188 = Command Timeout
  • 189 = High Fly Writes
  • 190 = Airflow Temperature (WDC) resp. Airflow Temperature Celsius (HP)
  • 191 = G-sense Error Rate
  • 192 = Power-off Retract Count
  • 193 = Load Cycle Count
  • 194 = Temperature
  • 196 = Reallocation Event Count
  • 197 = Current Pending Sector Count
  • 198 = Off-line Scan Uncorrectable Sector Count
  • 199 = Ultra DMA CRC Error Count
  • 201 = Soft Read Error Rate
  • 202 = Data Address Mark Errors
  • 203 = Run Out Cancel
  • 204 = Soft ECC Correction
  • 205 = Thermal Asperity Rate (TAR)
  • 206 = Flying Height
  • 207 = Spin High Current
  • 208 = Spin Buzz
  • 209 = Offline Seek Performance
  • 210 = Vibration During Write (Maxtor)
  • 211 = Vibration During Write
  • 212 = Shock During Write
  • 220 = Disk Shift
  • 221 = G-Sense Error Rate
  • 222 = Loaded Hours
  • 223 = Load/Unload Retry Count
  • 224 = Load Friction
  • 225 = Load/Unload Cycle Count
  • 226 = Load 'In'-time
  • 227 = Torque Amplification Count
  • 228 = Power-Off Retract Cycle
  • 230 = GMR Head Amplitude or Drive Life Protection Status
  • 231 = Temperature or SSD Life Left
  • 232 = Endurance Remaining or Available Reserved Space
  • 233 = Power-On Hours or Media Wearout Indicator
  • 234 = Average erase count AND Maximum Erase Count
  • 235 = Good Block Count AND System(Free) Block Count
  • 240 = Head Flying Hours or Transfer Error Rate (Fujitsu)
  • 241 = Total LBAs Written
  • 242 = Total LBAs Read
  • 249 = NAND_Writes_1GiB
  • 250 = Read Error Retry Rate
  • 254 = Free Fall Protection

Failure codes are vendor-specific and may differ from the list above. For more information, refer to http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/S.M.A.R.T.

Current Pending Sector Count Warning: What You Need To Know

CrystalDiskInfo showing a caution warning for you drive and highlighting ID C5 Current Pending Sector Count? Here’s what you need to know about this S.M.A.R.T attribute:

What does Current Pending Sector Count mean?

Current Pending Sector Count is a S.M.A.R.T parameter that shows the current count of unstable sectors on your disk that current pending errors count 199 waiting to be remapped. If these sectors are later read successfully the count will decrease, current pending errors count 199. If the drive attempts to read the data on the impacted sectors again unsuccessfully, these sectors will be reallocated to spare drive space. Once a sector is reallocated the Current Pending Sector Count will current pending errors count 199, and the Reallocated Sectors Count will increase.

How Important Is A Current Pending Sector Count Warning?

Pretty serious. This is a critical S.M.A.R.T parameter and if the count increases it may indicate that a drive failure is imminent. Pending sectors are the precursor to reallocated sectors which can be a strong indicator of a dead hard drive on the horizon. You can learn more on the post I did about the reallocated sector count warning.

While a few pending sectors may not be anything to worry about if they stay at roughly the same number, or are transferred to reallocated sectors and do not drastically increase. Pending sectors turn to reallocated sectors, which re-map the data to spare sectors on the disk. As long as this number is fairly low and does not increase drastically, your hard drive may continue to function as normal.

Should I Replace My Hard Drive If It Has Pending Sectors?

Really depends on how much you value your data and how well you can handle downtime in the event of a disk failure. Personally I consider a drive with pending or reallocated sectors as a drive no longer fit for production and my uses. If I see pending or reallocated sectors climbing, I immediately purchase a new hard drive and move this drive to non-critical functions or use it for testing in other machines I own.

If you’re using this drive for a non-critical purpose and have a backup of all data on the drive (or the data isn’t very important) you can continue to use the drive until it dies. If your primary boot drive or media storage drive has pending sectors I would strongly suggest backing up any important data on the disk and replacing it as soon as possible.

Backup Your Data

This is good advice to take at all times, but if error loading dlls dll drive is indicating an increase in pending sectors I would suggest immediately backing up any important data on the drive to another hard drive or cloud backup provider. While the drive may continue to function fine, I tend to be a bit cautious and suggest you immediately back everything up in the event that it does randomly fail.

Hard drive failures occur suddenly and the S.M.A.R.T data is there as a warning system of potential failures. Take this sign from the drive as a good time to backup data and consider your options for replacing it.

Can You Fix/Lower Your Pending Sectors Count?

It is possible that the drive misread the sector and the count may lower on it’s own after a future attempt and successful read of the sector. One of the only ways to force a drive into re-reading these pending sectors is by zero’ing the drive, meaning: wiping the drive completely and writing every sectors with zeros. You can do this in most operating systems by performing a ‘Secure Erase’ of the drive.

Please note that zero’ing the drive will destroy all data on the drive and essentially give you a fresh, blank hard drive. So do not zero your drive unless you have additional copies of your data backed up and are fine reinstalling everything onto the drive again.

After you’ve zeroed the drive you should be able to re-check the errors and see whether or not the sectors are still pending. If the pending sector count has dropped, be sure to check the reallocated sector count and ensure it has not also increased, current pending errors count 199. If you reallocated sector count increases then I’d strongly suggest replacing the drive.

RMA’ing A Drive With Pending Sectors

If your drive is still under warranty from the manufacturer, or if you’re using a pre-built system from a major manufacturer that is still under warranty, current pending errors count 199, you may consider RMA’ing the drive (initiating a warranty return process). You can check your current status for your hard drive through the manufacturer’s site, I’ve included a few links to popular hard drive makers’ current pending errors count 199 check pages below. If your vendor isn’t listed you’ll just need to do a quick Google search for <hard drive maker> + “warranty status”.

To check the warranty status of a drive you’ll need the serial number which can be found inside of CrystalDiskInfo or printed on the top of the hard drive.

Check Your Warranty Status:

If you warranty your drive please know that you will not get the same drive or your data back. You must make a backup before you ship your drive as the manufacturer will send you a refurbished (or sometimes new – but it’s unlikely) drive from their RMA stock. This will be a completely empty drive, they will not copy over any of your data nor will they return your original drive to you if you forget to save a copy of your data. So back it up before you send it!

How To Check Your Current Pending Sectors Count

Windows

You can use the free CrystalDiskInfo software on Windows to check your current pending sector count. It can be downloaded from the CrystalMark website.

CrystalDiskInfo ID C5 Current Pending Sector Count 100
Many people tend to misread CrystalDiskInfo data on first glance. The column you want to pay attention to is the “Raw Value” column to get the actual count of pending sectors. If this is is in hexadecimal characters you can switch it to decimal by clicking on Function -> Advanced Features -> Raw Values and setting it to ’10 DEC’.

Mac

To check specific S.M.A.R.T data like the current pending sector count on a Mac you will need a third party piece of software like DriveDx ($19.99, Free Trial Available), current pending errors count 199. It is a paid piece of software but the free trial time should be enough to quickly check your current pending sectors.

Talk:S.M.A.R.T.

Reallocated Sectors Count - mess[edit]

Whoever wrote this has mixed in a bunch of out-of-context explanations which together are non-sensical or contradictory. For instance - the drive itself has no concept of partitions. Or, "failure of boot sector" - obviously this makes no difference after it's reallocated - but antique info from the days of floppy disks has crept into the explanation. —Preceding unsigned comment added by 203.45.103.88 (talk) 23:16, 9 February 2011 (UTC)Reply[reply]

SMART Attributes List[edit]

Some descriptions of the SMART attributes are clearly incorrect. "Load" refers to the operation and number of times the heads move from parked to unparked, not when the drive is seeking. GMR head amplitude refers to the signal from the read head, not any movement. "Read Channel Margin" description is content-free.

AAM and APM should be listed as follows:

AAM = Automatic Acoustic Management, APM = Automatic Power Management

Spin Retry Count[edit]

This description does not appear to correspond to actual data values in Western Digital and Seagate drives (recent models). Seagate posts 100-100-97-0-OK with HDTune marking it yellow (warning) bar, and WD posts 100-100-51-0-OK with HDTune with no marking color, current pending errors count 199. (Values correspond to Current-Worst-Threshold-Data-Status). With respect to these two manufacturers, the description makes no sense. —The preceding unsigned comment was added by FUBARinSFO (talk • contribs) 00:39, 2 May 2007 (UTC).Reply[reply]

Reallocated sectors[edit]

Please make it easier for me to **use** this information. Please enhance the Table entries.

Could we get practical and say, This is a down-counter, and, when zero, current pending errors count 199, there is no way to deal with additional sectors whose read errors are too severe to be fixed with Error Correction Codes.

In the discussion above the Table, tell me, if there is no more space to absorb a sector needing reallocation, does my drive now pass errors up to the opsys file system, which reports read errors and/or other file unavailability?

In the table, you can make room by erasing: "the more sectors that are reallocated, the more read/write speed will decrease". This is true. However, it hardly matters to a user who is suffering data loss, possible data corruption, and potential boot failure, which blocks access to everything.

My SMARTCTRL under WinXP or Knoppix shows
Reallocated_Sector_Ct
VALUE 1
WORST 1
THRESHOLD 63 (Please confirm that a number less than 63 is bad -- but which number?)
This "pre-failure" category of parameter is UPDATED "always".
WHEN_FAILED is "FAILING_NOW". How can I tell? Because VALUE 1 is less than THRESHOLD 63?
The "RA" column (I do not know what this is. Do you? RAW counts?) is 12. 12 is not 1 and 12 is not 63. I wonder what 12 is.

This page has not yet evolved into a current pending errors count 199 guide and it still lacks an accessible exposition of the topic's salient points. Nevertheless, current pending errors count 199, and IMHO, it is already far ahead of most pages and posts on the Internet. So let's not stop now ! Jerry-va 01:27, 29 May 2006 (UTC)jerry-vaReply[reply]

The final column is RAW_VALUE, and 12 for the Reallocated_Sector_Ct attribute means that 12 bad sectors have been remapped. You should replace this disk soon, as that number will only rise, and the higher it gets, the more data you're going to lose. --Error28 12:03, 4 September 2006 (UTC)Reply[reply]

It comes down to money. If you have reallocated sectors you should replace your disk. In my experience you can go much longer with reallocated sectors on desktop drives, once reallocated sectors show up in laptops they increase fast.Josiah 20:02, 12 October 2007 (UTC)Reply[reply]

"This is why, on modern hard disks, "bad blocks" cannot be found while testing the surface — all bad blocks are hidden in reallocated sectors. " I don't think that's quite accurate, based on my understanding. When you write to a bad sector, sure, it gets silently reallocated. If you read the sector and the data is bad but corrected by ECC, the drive should correct it and copy it to a reallocated sector. But if the data is uncorrectable, an error must be returned, since it would be unacceptable to return bogus data. Moreover, it must continue to give an error on a future read, until the sector is rewritten. So you can sometimes find bad sectors by reading the entire disk. "Testing the surface" is confusingly vague. 76.254.84.64 07:30, 31 October 2007 (UTC)Reply[reply]

I find this table entry confusing as well -- It says in the table "A decrease in the attribute value indicates bad sectors", *but* the 'Better' column indicates that a decrease in this number is a *good* thing?? It seems like the arrow should be changed for this table entry. If this is really an indicator of the number of sectors potentially available for reallocation (in the event of a bad sector being detected), then it would make sense that a higher number is better, a decrease is bad. When using applications such as HD Tune, current pending errors count 199, under the 'Health' tab it tells me that my particular drive has 100 as the current count for this field, and that 36 is the threshold. It does not seem to see any problem with this and it is telling me that it is OK -- so it seems to coincide. ChrisTracy (talk) 18:09, 15 May 2008 (UTC)Reply[reply]

Temperature sensor[edit]

the section on temperature and temperature sensors is opiniated and somewhat incorrect / not up to date. all the hard drives current pending errors count 199 1998+ include a temperature sensor. the reason: all modern hard drives use GMR heads (Giant Magneto Resistive heads), which requires very accurate temperature measurement to be able to read the data back (the difference between a 0 and a 1 readback is about the same order of magnitude as a 0.1 degrees Celsius change in the GMR head).

also, the temperature failure mode is not necessarily cumulative.

my samsung 1999 drive (8 gb) may or may not have a T sensor, in any case it does not report about it in SMART. --145.253.2.236 (talk) 12:57, 12 July 2008 (UTC)Reply[reply]

Curious sentence[edit]

<partsunkn> SMART is a system used to kill the drive when the warranty is up —Clarknova 03:35, 28 February 2006 (UTC)Reply[reply]

Removed the following curious sentence from "working modality".

Manufacturing companies which claim to support S.M.A.R.T. but withhold specific sensor information on individual products include Seagate, current pending errors count 199, [.]

[.], indeed! What the frip. - 194.89.3.244 17:56, 28 February 2006 (UTC)Reply[reply]

But it's true. They specifically withhold the information. Do the research.

Read Error Rate description incorrect[edit]

Elsewhere I have read that a high value for Read Error Rate is good, and the attribute value decreases as read error rate increase.

That is simply incorrect. It's saying that the more errors the better. That's nonsense. —Preceding unsigned comment added by 90.5.11.225 (talk) 22:42, 1 November 2008 (UTC)Reply[reply]

Consistent with this, the two SMART monitoring tools I have used alert the user when the Read Error Rate attribute value falls below a threshold.

This description deserves accuracy and careful explanation perhaps more than any other, since this attribute is so critical.

-- I think it means 'time between read errors'; the smaller the number, the higher the rate, but whether it's seconds, hours, or fortnights, I couldn't begin to guess.

Perhaps a more logical definition would be 'no. of succesful reads between errors' ? --217.173.195.210 09:23, 14 August 2007 (UTC)Reply[reply]

I agree that the description is incorrect. The higher the value the better. This isn't a "rate" per se - it should be regarded more as a score, current pending errors count 199. All values are a max of 255 - most manufacturers see this as a 'percent good' - a value out of 100. —Preceding unsigned comment added by 64.7.157.226 (talk) 21:13, current pending errors count 199, 14 October 2009 (UTC)Reply[reply]

On quite some manufacturers, this counter is two 32bit counters concatenated into a 64bit counter, one meaning the amount of read operations, the other the amount of read errors. This means that something like "1 209 029 668" despite being quite large, is a good sign, since it means that your drive did over a billion read operations without error. "5 503 996 964" otoh is quite good too, since it means that out of over a billion read operations, there was only one error. 8720 out of over a billion could look like "37 453 323 850 788" and doesn't really mean much too. Did it all occur within the last few weeks/months? bad. Did it occur over the whole hdd lifetime? Not the best, but no real reason to worry at all. otoh "37 452 114 842 660" looks not too far away, current pending errors count 199, but means 8720 out of 21 540 reads had an error. Really a reason to get rid of that hdd. So in a sense everyone is right. The higher can mean the better, current pending errors count 199, but only when you see it from "higher than some offset that denotes actual amount of errors". So unless you know how to specifically decode that value for your hdd, don't bother making any sense out of that number at all (Who knows, it could even be bbig endian or signed)

Frustration with SMART[edit]

I'd like it if the table spelled out what the "good" and "bad" values of the attributes are.

The general rule is that higher is better than lower, except in the case of temperature. The specific thresholds of "OK" and "failing" are up to the manufacturers to specify. Most of the numbers involved are arbitrary and defined separately by the manufacturers. GreenReaper 16:07, current pending errors count 199 August 2006 (UTC)Reply[reply]
This is definitely not true, current pending errors count 199. Load cycles and such? The higher the better? If that's the case then a drive with a load count of 600,000+ that just failed for good is the healthiest drive you can have. —Preceding unsigned comment added by 90.5.11.225 (talk) 22:44, 1 November 2008 (UTC)Reply[reply]

More frustration.[edit]

I also feel that nobody tells you some useful (average, current pending errors count 199, maybe IQ 100, no IT degree) human-readable information about your harddisk. Something like "your harddisk /dev/hda is 2.8 years old the probability that it will survive this month is 98% (suggested replacement value: 96%; suggested backup value: 99%)". But I'm confused by 1000 different values. How bad are they really? Where should the values be (see comment above)? It does not really help to make a business decision to replace or not to replace the drive, current pending errors count 199. Can someone please shed some light into this? Can smartmontools developer please think of the CTO's business decision of replacing or not 403 forbidden apache error a disk? And some useful information for the home user. THANKS -- Michael Janich 09:15, 31 July 2006 (UTC)Reply[reply]

Most hard disk fail within the first two years, if it doesn't fail the within those years, it is a good idea to keep the hard disk for another 3 years.

If you can plot the failure rate of hard disk, it starts off very high, then it goes to its lowest point around two years, and then slowly climbs back up to the rate at which it started. Hope that helps Hqduong 08:10, 5 December 2006 (UTC)Reply[reply]

I question that. You are saying that most HDDs fail within two years? That's scary. What's worse: it's simply nonsense. Perhaps those that fail will most often fail within the first two years; but that is definitely not what you wrote.
Google published a study on hard disks that claimed (based on memory, not citation) that 1) only half the disks that failed had something significant in their SMART readouts, and 2) only half the disks with something significant in their SMART readings actually failed. So after all the hoopla, it current pending errors count 199 not be that useful after all. --Alvestrand 07:39, 19 March 2007 (UTC)Reply[reply]
Disraeli had something insightful to say about this.
Hard Disk Sentinel software can display information in an understandable way. It gives a textual description about the hard disks, displays the real number of problems found so you current pending errors count 199 have some ideas about the real status instead of displaying just some numbers/values. Because thresholds + value pairs and T.E.C. dates are not really able to predict hard disk failures, this software uses a completely different method to detect and display real hard disk problems found on IDE/SATA/USB/SCSI hard disks. Works under Windows, DOS, Linux. —Preceding unsigned comment added by 87.229.50.242 (talk) 08:12, 4 June 2008 (UTC)Reply[reply]

SMART and RAID[edit]

Any idea if SMART can still be used on HDD's included in a RAID array? --Evolve2k 05:06, 7 January 2007 (UTC)Reply[reply]

I have seen some motherboards with hardware RAID support/PCI RAID expansion cards that have a BIOS/firmware capable of retrieving and displaying SMART data. No idea if there's anything out there that lets you do this in software though. SMART is a very mysterious technology IMO. --86.138.51.21 08:20, 26 January 2007 (UTC)Reply[reply]
I'm building a RAID array with four Seagate ST3320620AS (7200.10 320GB) drives in it. Once I get the second pair of drives I'll let you guys know. Using NVIDIA MediaShield on a P5N32-E SLI Plus. I can also confirm that BE is definitely a temperature sensor on that drive, btw. 66.146.62.42 22:23, 10 May 2007 (UTC)Reply[reply]
Under Linux, with software RAID, the individual drives are still accessible, so their SMART data can be retrieved. Jrvz (talk) 00:00, 8 July 2008 (UTC)Reply[reply]

Merging in Threshold Exceeds Condition[edit]

Since the mergeto tag of the Threshold Exceeds Condition article says to discuss the subject here:

Background[edit]

According to the cited google study, SMART can predict about 40-60% of all drive failures, depending on the monitored attributes. The stated 30% taken from some FAQ might be too pessimistic here.

—The preceding unsigned comment was added by Michi cc (talk • contribs) 17:38, 21 April 2007 (UTC).Reply[reply]

Attribute list is confusing[edit]

Some of the arrows in the attribute list don't appear to be correct. "Power On Hours" is marked with an up arrow--I would think that a *lower* number of operating hours would be considered better, not a higher one. Same thing with calibration retries. It's also not clear in many of the descriptions whether the values being referred to are the raw values, normalized values, worst values, threshold values, or something else, making the table even more unintelligible to someone unfamiliar to SMART. All of this should be made much more clear. ::Travis Evans 11:39, 16 June 2007 (UTC)Reply[reply]

As of today, these issues now appear to be largely improved. ::Travis Evans (talk) 14:38, 16 December 2007 (UTC)Reply[reply]

Set Load/Unload cycle count with a down arrow - as when the head unloads/reloads it creates wear on the servo and the read/write head has a possibility of failiure TO load if it isn't loaded or unloaded completely —Preceding unsigned comment added by 64.228.219.208 (talk) 03:59, 11 October 2007 (UTC)Reply[reply]

Contradictory statement about higher vs lower[edit]

Note that the attribute values are always mapped to the range of 1 to 253 in a way that means higher values are better.

This is then followed by a chart which describes whether it is better to have lower or higher values, seeming to contradict the above sentence, current pending errors count 199. Can someone please clarify or correct? Ham Pastrami (talk) 19:20, 24 November 2007 (UTC)Reply[reply]

I believe that current pending errors count 199 reason for this apparent conflict is that the chart refers to the “raw” attribute values rather than the “normalized” ones. For normalized values, the statement in the article that higher numbers are “always” better is almost correct (I'll explain why I say “almost” in a moment), but the raw values can follow any rule that the drive manufacturer wants.
The biggest problem with the article, I think, current pending errors count 199, is that it doesn't explain clearly enough that there are actually several different values involved for each attribute. The chart is totally unclear about it. The chart is also problematic because some of the attributes the chart describes appear to function in a totally different (even the exact opposite) manner on certain drives.
The statement “.The attribute values are always mapped .in a way.that higher values are better” also isn't true in the strictest since, because I know of some drives (such as mine) which actually indicate the normalized temperature value directly in Celsius (e.g., a value of 40 means 40°C), which means that for this attribute, higher values are actually worse. This is likely a rare exception, though.
I may attempt to greatly clarify the article myself some time if I get a chance, but if anyone else wants to do it right now instead, feel free to go ahead and do so. ::Travis Evans (talk) 21:58, 5 December 2007 (UTC)Reply[reply]
Okay, I just edited the Attributes section in the hope that it will now make much more sense. ::Travis Evans (talk) 14:35, current pending errors count 199, current pending errors count 199 December current pending errors count 199 (UTC)Reply[reply]

More info on Selftest specifications please[edit]

A good article, current pending errors count 199. You can get SMART drives to initate either short or long self test (managed by the drive itself). But what exactly does the SMART specification reqiure a drive to do during these tests? Robin April 2008

Critical Attributes[edit]

The study at Google described in the Background section found four parameters strongly correlated with drive failure. The later table describes the SMART attributes, but even after reading the paper I don't see which attributes correspond to those four critical parameters. Here are the possibilities I see:

name in paper SMART attribute # SMART attribute name
scan errors 1 Read Error Rate
187 Reported Uncorrectable Errors
201 Soft Read Error Rate
250 Read Error Retry Rate
reallocations 5 Reallocated Sectors Count
offline reallocations 198 Offline Uncorrectable Sector Count
probational counts 197 Current Pending Sector Count

(I note that smartctl calls attribute 198 "Offline_Uncorrectable"[1][2].)

The discussion of the study and/or the table entries should be revised so the correspondence is clear.

Also, the table has six attributes highlighted as "critical", current pending errors count 199. What's the justification for those six, current pending errors count 199, as opposed to the four parameters noted in the Google study? Jrvz (talk) 14:08, 8 July 2008 (UTC)Reply[reply]

Um, since your Q is what the Google authors used, you should probably mail them. Unfortunately, current pending errors count 199, the attributes don't even have the same meaning across disks, e.g. Seagate disks report a large value for raw read errors. Scan errors might be Attribute 7, Seek errors (this is probably related to sector/track not found problems and if nonzero, basically means the disk is mechanically dying); "Read Error Rate" is probably the number of problems found reading a sector, but in most harddisks, this should be named Serious Read Error, and it's pretty cumulative, current pending errors count 199, not a rate. Minor read errors are normal and auto-corrected, some disks tell you their number, like my Atlas reports 80k read errors every boot to smartctl. Attributes 201 and 250 aren't even remotely standard. -- "Offline" reallocations. well, it's in the smartctl man page you quoted, it's probably a sector that is dead but has not yet been remapped. Should be #198, yes. -- "Probational Counts", I am really guessing here, but it sounds either like the minor read errors or how often a sector was classified as "not so good". The number of write problems are counted in High_Fly_Writes and in Multi_Zone_Error_Rate, IIRC (don't ask me what multi zones got to do with that, current pending errors count 199, and no, it's not a rate either I think). --88.74.187.45 (talk) 10:14, 24 January 2009 (UTC)Reply[reply]

---

What is attribute 188?

smartd[2647]: Device: /dev/sda, SMART Usage Attribute: 188 Unknown_Attribute changed from 96 to 100 —Preceding unsigned comment added by 76.119.201.189 (talk) 03:44, 10 July 2008 (UTC)Reply[reply]

The "Scan Error" is not a simple "read" error, but a "reallocation sector" error, because they talk of "first reallocation". Furthermore, his raw value is normally zero. I think is #187 (Uncorrectable Sector Errors). According to Google report, Scan Error is the most critical value! Why don't you highlight it in the reference table? --93.148.74.16 (talk) 09:30, 16 February 2011 (UTC)Reply[reply]

Isn't "007 Seek_error_rate" critical?[edit]

The description seems to indicate it is, but it's not highlighted. (Love the highlighting btw, I wish smartmontools did it too). --82.134.28.194 (talk) 08:24, 30 July 2008 (UTC)Reply[reply]

Panterasoft HDD Health not 100% freeware (non-commercial only)[edit]

The main page on panterasoft claims HDD Health is freeware, but if you install it and open the help->about it explains it's only free for non-commercial use. There's a help option that takes you to:

http://www.panterasoft.com/orderlnk.php?no=25

Which redirects to a web store selling commercial-use licenses for $29.95

Feel free to verify. —Preceding unsigned comment added by 71.248.110.143 (talk) 14:58, 1 October 2008 (UTC)Reply[reply]

Split: Comparison of S.M.A.R.T. tools[edit]

This section is getting fairly big and would be easier to maintain away from the main article. If nobody disagrees I will go ahead with it. --Hm2k (talk) 00:17, 30 October 2008 (UTC)Reply[reply]

This has now taken place. Comparison of S.M.A.R.T. tools --Hm2k (talk) 16:22, 30 October 2008 (UTC)Reply[reply]

Requested move[edit]

The following is a closed discussion of the proposal. Please do not modify it. Subsequent comments should be made in a new section on the talk page. No further edits should be made to this section, current pending errors count 199.

The result of the proposal was MoveParsecboy (talk) 14:57, 7 November 2008 (UTC)Reply[reply]


As per WP:NC, "Titles should be brief without being ambiguous". This technology is almost always referred to as S.M.A.R.T. and almost never as "Self-Monitoring, Analysis, and Reporting Technology". This move would lead to a shorter, current pending errors count 199, more manageable title and less confusion for readers. --Hm2k (talk) 15:19, 30 October 2008 (UTC)Reply[reply]

The above discussion is preserved as an archive of the proposal. Please do not modify it. Subsequent comments should be made in a new section on this talk page. No further edits should be made to this section.

Start_stop current pending errors count 199 Samsung Spinpoint drive (from 1999 or 2000) counts starts AND stops in this attribute. start +=1, stop +=1, simply losing power += 0. This means this attribute is basically useless to tell you something about the usage history of the drive. A SV with Powercycle = 1000 and Start_stop = 1902 (raw) could have been subjected to a lot of spinup and spindowns (maybe from powersaving), or it could simply have had a careful owner who always parked it with the "poweroff" command. I wonder how other harddisks handle this. --92.78.30.160 (talk) 19:56, 19 January 2009 (UTC)Reply[reply]

SMART predicts 64% of failures?[edit]

The reference is this page, current pending errors count 199, but where is that data from? Is it reputable? Also that page says 30%. Family Guy Guy (talk) 15:49, 30 March 2009 (UTC)Reply[reply]

197 C5 Current Pending Sector Count[edit]

197 C5 Current Pending Sector Count

  • Number of "unstable" sectors (waiting to be remapped), current pending errors count 199. If the unstable sector is subsequently written or read successfully, this value is decreased and the sector is not remapped. Read errors on the sector will not remap the sector, it will only be remapped on a failed write attempt. This can be problematic to test because cached writes will not remap the sector, only direct I/O writes to the disk.

I am going to take out that last sentence, because I think it is wrong, and this is now getting quoted from this article, all over the internet.

I think the sentence is half-right. Only direct I/O writes let you know what happens. With a cached write, I am guessing that it will still potentially try to reallocate a sector on the "waiting" list, current pending errors count 199, but that will happen after the cached write is initiated. If the remapping fails, the write will eventually fail, current pending errors count 199, and the computer will get an error message -- but in some cases, the computer will have already assumed the write was OK.

In other words, with direct I/O you know immediately if there is a problem (as soon as you get a normal "completed" signal). With a cached write, you can't know if the proper remapping happened until after a delay, or after a "sync" or flush of the write cache.

I also question the use of the word "failed" in the previous sentence: "it will only be remapped on a failed write attempt". I question whether all drives would actually try to get a good write to a sector on the "pending" list, or just assume it is bad, and try to reallocate.

I'm just making all this up, based on a general understanding of computers. Someone who knows, and can find a good reference, should make the article more complete and accurate. -96.233.30.237 (talk) 23:02, 9 July 2009 (UTC)Reply[reply]

Seagate's Raw Seek Error Rate attribute[edit]

I believe that Seagate's raw Seek Error Rate attribute stores the number of seek buffer i/o error on device sdb1 in the uppermost 16 bits, and the number of seeks in the lower 32 bits.

A drive begins life with a cooked value of 253 until it accumulates enough current pending errors count 199 for the data to be statistically significant, after which the cooked value starts off at 60. The cooked value then increases or decrease as errors appear.

The normalised attribute appears to follow a logarithmic pattern:

90% = < 1 error per 1000 million seeks
80% = < 1 error per 100 million
70% = < 1 error per 10 million
60% = < 1 error per million
50% = 10 errors per million
40% = 100 errors per million
30% = 1000 errors per million

I don't have any official confirmation for the above information. It is the result of my analyses of numerous Current pending errors count 199 reports.

I have performed several tests in support of my hypothesis. These are described current pending errors count 199 Google's Usenet archives. I don't know whether they can be considered for inclusion in this article, possibly as references. They are certainly not authoritative, but I believe they will withstand scrutiny.

Edit: http://www.users.on.net/~fzabkar/HDD/Seagate_SER_RRER_HEC.html— Preceding unsigned comment added by 121.44.55.232 (talk) 06:54, 1 September 2012 (UTC)

121.44.138.74 (talk) 07:18, 21 August 2009 (UTC)Reply[reply]

After watching my dying ST31000340AS Barracuda 7200.11 drive, I believe that the 6 bytes long field, Seagate's Raw Seek Error Rate Attribute stores the number of seek errors in the lower [0:23] bits, and the number of seeks in the uppermost [24:47] bits, both values in Big Endian. But I could not compute meaningful 'normalized' values, similar to previous poster's values. My seek error number was really high, maybe it never gets reset?

184.99.101.172 (talk) 03:17, 15 June 2011 (UTC)Reply[reply]

Raw Read Error Rate[edit]

This Seagate forum thread discusses the meaning and behaviour of Seagate's Raw Read Error Rate attribute:

http://forums.seagate.com/stx/board/message?board.id=ata_drives&message.id=8700

It may help dispel fears about the relatively high numbers displayed by Seagate SMART reports. The RRER numbers actually reflect sector counts, not error counts.

I have verified that my Fujitsu drive interprets this attribute in a similar manner, except that its numbers are much smaller.

Edit: http://www.users.on.net/~fzabkar/HDD/Seagate_SER_RRER_HEC.html

SandForce appears to use a similar scheme for their SMART error rates:

http://hddguardian.googlecode.com/svn/docs/Kingston%20SMART%20attributes%20details.pdf

—Preceding unsigned comment added by 121.44.138.74 (talk) 07:52, 21 August 2009 (UTC) (It's amazing how far people will take spite against another manufacturer. Just so you folks know the only other drive competing with seagates are velociraptors,which are faster,but the difference is negligible.Extremely reliable drives with a rarely low failure rate,statistically irrefutable. —Preceding unsigned comment added by 24.17.18.249 (talk) 11:45, current pending errors count 199, 20 April 2010 (UTC)Reply[reply]

Seek Error Rate - thermal widening[edit]

The article refers to seek errors current pending errors count 199 the result of "thermal widening" of the platters. My understanding is that this was only an issue for stepper motor drives, or voice coil drives that had a separate servo surface. Modern drives use embedded servos, so the positioner will always be able to find a track, no matter how much the platter expands or contracts.

121.44.138.74 (talk) 08:08, 21 August 2009 (UTC)Reply[reply]

Attribute 240[edit]

The product manual for Fujitsu MHY2xxxBH series drives identifies attribute 240 as "Transfer Error Rate":

"*If the device receives the reset during transferring the data, the transfer error header error 403 php counted up."

http://www.msc-ge.com/download/itmain/datasheets/fujitsu/MHY2xxxBH.pdf121.44.98.124 (talk) 09:19, 22 September 2009 (UTC)Reply[reply]

Thank you! Reliable information about SMART values is extremely hard to come by, current pending errors count 199, this is helpful, current pending errors count 199. -- intgr[talk] 02:50, 20 January 2010 (UTC)Reply[reply]

Attributes 185 & 186 (WDC)[edit]

The following SMART attribute names were extracted from WDC's wdtler.exe. There are two attributes (185 & 186) that do not appear in the Wikipedia list.

WDTLER 1.03 Copyright (C) 2004-2006 Western Digital Corporation Western Digital Time Limit Error Recovery Utility

http://zacuke.com/files/wdtler.ZIP

Raw Read Error Rate
Throughput Performance
Spin Up Time
Start/Stop Count
Re-allocated Sector Count
Read Channel Margin
Seek Error Rate
Seek Time Performance
Power-On Hours Count
Spin Retry Count
Drive Calibration Retry Count
Drive Power Cycle Count
Soft Read Error Rate
End to End Error Count
Head Stability - attribute 185 ?
Induced Op-Vibration Detection - attribute 186 ?
Reported Uncorrectable Errors
Command Time Out
High Fly Writes
Airflow Temperature
G-Sense Error Rate
Emergency Retract Count
Load/Unload Count
HDA Temperature
Hardware ECC Recovered
Relocation Event Count
Current Pending Sector Count
Offline Uncorrectable Sector Count
UltraDMA CRC Error Rate
Multi Zone Error Rate
Soft Read Error Rate
Data Address Mark Errors
Run Out Cancel
Soft ECC Correction
Thermal Asperity Rate
Flying Height
Spin High Current
Spin Buzz
Offline Seek Performance
Disk Shift
G-Sense Error Rate
Loaded hours
Load/Unload Retry Count
Load Friction
Load/Unload Cycle Count
Load-in Time
Torque Amplification Count
Power-Off Retract Count
GMR Head Amp
Temperature
Head Flying Hours
Read Error Retry Rate

121.44.85.40 (talk) 21:33, 2 October 2009 (UTC)Reply[reply]

SMART Transmitters[edit]

I'd like to know whether SMART Transmitters used mainly in Oil and Gas plants can be categorized under this technology? I tried lately to search the internet for the meaning by SMART in such current pending errors count 199. These transmitters usually support the HART FOUNDATION. ™ fieldbus, Modbus, and/or Profibus protocols.--Email4mobile (talk) 15:14, 18 October 2009 (UTC)Reply[reply]

  • SMART's protocols appear ATA & SCSI. However, the general idea is the same. Back in the 80s, I claimed no one would have a PC (that was silly): more useful was firmware to examine & control devices, and a workstation to analyze the data; or both firmware controls & processor embedded in a clothes iron, for example, to tell current pending errors count 199 when it is fully heated & warn you when it tips over; or an automobile, so mechanics could plug in a computer & analyze the problems. My medical thermometer beeps when it's fully heated. SMART gives us the 'raw' data from specific sensors on ATA & SCSI devices (another technology lets us adjust their speed): but where is the sophisticated analysis software? Also, I had no idea it worked on flashdrives; does it work on ATA optical drive? Geologist (talk) 21:14, 10 November 2009 (UTC)Reply[reply]

More WDC SMART attributes[edit]

The following attributes were extracted from WD's wdidle3.exe utility, after unpacking it with UPX.

http://www.synology.com/support/faq_images/enu/wdidle3.zip

Raw Read Error Rate
Throughput Performance
Spin Up Time
Start/Stop Count
Re-allocated Sector Count
Read Channel Margin
Seek Error Rate
Seek Time Performance
Power-On Hours Count
Spin Retry Count
Drive Calibration Retry Count
Drive Power Cycle Count
Soft Read Error Rate
SATA Downshift Error Count
End to End Error Det/Corr Count
Head Stability
Induced Op-Vibration Detection
Reported Uncorrectable Errors
Command Time Out
High Fly Writes
Airflow Temperature
Shock Sense
Emergency Retract Cycle Count
Load/Unload Cycle Count
HDA Temperature
ECC on the Fly Count
Re-allocated Sector Event
Current Pending Sector Count
Offline Uncorrectable Sector Count
UltraDMA CRC Error Rate
Multi Zone Error Rate
Soft Read Error Rate
Data Address Mark Errors
Run Out Cancel
Soft ECC Correction
Thermal Asperity Rate
Flying Height
Spin High Current
Spin Buzz
Offline Seek Performance
Disk Shift
G-Sense Error Rate
Loaded hours
Load/Unload Retry Count
Load Friction
Load/Unload Cycle Count
Load-in Time
Torque Amplification Count
Power-Off Retract Count
GMR Head Amp
Temperature
Head Flying Edius 6.5 error code 15.0.0 Total LBAs written
Total LBAs read
Read Error Retry Rate
Free Fall Sensor

121.44.79.8 (talk) 22:35, 22 October 2009 (UTC)Reply[reply]

Implementations & Analysis[edit]

The above is a lot of information; but the value of each is just a raw datum. My Linux implementation doesn't log the rates of current pending errors count 199 in values, and it evaluates the implication of each individually: 'old', 'may fail soon'. Scientists would perform a cluster analysis of the above values, their rates, & their accelerations with time (using 'rcs', for example). Then they would examine the history of each cluster and label them 'dropped laptop', 'defective from factory', 'very old', current pending errors count 199, 'bad RAM', &c.

Instead of 'may fail soon', I'm surprised we don't have both software & analyses by companies to draw upon, allowing much more informative messages. (What are companies doing with all the above data? They wouldn't collect it if they weren't using it.) I see no reason why companies haven't done this, and administrators of large servers & company LANs don't calculate the % chance of (or mean time to) failure described nicely above.

Also, do LAN administrators write scripts that collect these data during LAN backups? How do they decide when to replace a disk? Are there papers? Are such studies as the above proprietary?

This is a fine article, but these are some of the questions that people who look it up are probably seeking to answer. Geologist (talk) 20:51, 10 November 2009 (UTC)Reply[reply]

SSD & CompactFlash SMART attributes[edit]

http://www.hsgi.jp/documents/Delkin-Solid-State-SATA-Drive-Engineering-Specification.pdf

ID Attribute 9 Power-On Hours 12 Power On Count 175 Program Fail Count (chip) 176 Erase Fail Count (chip) 177 Wear Leveling Count 178 Used Reserved Block Count (Chip) 179 Used Reserved Block Count (Total) 180 Unused Reserved Block Count (Total) 181 Program Fail Count (Total) 182 Erase Fail Count (Total) 183 Runtime Bad Block (Total) 187 Uncorrectable Error Count 195 ECC rate 198 Off-line Uncorrectable Error Count 199 CRC Error Count

http://www.arrowne.com/solid-state/pdf/STEC%20MACH4%20Datasheet.pdf

SLCFxGM4U(I)(-M) CompactFlash Card

ID Name Description Type 1 Raw Read Error Count of raw data errors while data from media, including retry errors or data error (uncorrectable) Warranty 2 Throughput Performance Internally measured average and worst data transfer rate Warranty 5 Reallocated Sector Count Count of reallocated blocks, current pending errors count 199. Advisory 188 Command Timeout Tracks the number of command time outs as defined by an active command being interrupted Advisory 194 Temperature Temperature of the base casting. Advisory 196 Reallocation Event Total number of remapping events during normal operation and offline surface scanning. Advisory 198 Offline Surface Scan # of uncorrected errors that occurred during offline scan. Advisory 199 UDMA CRC Error Number of CRC errors during UDMA mode Advisory

http://www.stec-inc.com/downloads/flash_datasheets/SLMPCIxGM4U_M_61000_05494.pdf

SLMPCIxGM4U-M mPCI-Express IDE Card

ID Name Description Type 1 Raw Read Error Count of raw data errors while data from media, including retry errors or data error (uncorrectable) Warranty 2 Throughput Performance Internally measured average and worst data transfer rate Warranty 5 Reallocated Sector Count Count of reallocated blocks. Advisory 188 Command Timeout Tracks the number of command time outs as defined by an active command being interrupted Advisory 194 Temperature Temperature of the base casting. Advisory 196 Reallocation Event Total number of remapping events during normal operation and offline surface scanning. Advisory 198 Offline Surface Scan # of uncorrected errors that occurred during offline scan. Advisory 199 UDMA CRC Error Number of CRC errors during UDMA mode Advisory

http://www.satron.at/pdf/NSSD_25_SATA.pdf

Serial ATA NSSD (NAND based Solid State Drive)

Attribute ID Numbers: Any nonzero value in the Attribute ID Number indicates an active attribute. The device supports following Attribute ID Numbers. The names marked with (*) indicate that the corresponding Attribute Values is fixed value for compatibility.

ID Attribute Name 0 Indicates that this entry in the data structure is not used * 1 Raw Read Error Rate * 3 Spin Up Time * 4 Spin Up Count * 5 Reallocated Sector Count * 7 Seek Error Rate * 8 Seek Time Performance * 9 Power-On Hours 10 Spin Retry Count * 11 LUL Retry Count * 12 Power On Count 184 Buffer CRC Count * 187 Uncorrectable Error Count 188 Command Time-out Error Count * 190 Air Flow Temperature * 191 Shock Count * 192 Emergency Retract * 193 LUL Count * 194 User Temperature * 195 ECC rate 197 Pending Sector Count * 198 Off-line Uncorrectable Error Count 199 CRC Error Count 200 Used Reserved Block Count 201 Program Fail Count 202 Erase Fail Count 203 Wear Leveling Count

121.44.19.141 (talk) 22:28, 25 October 2009 (UTC)Reply[reply]

Attributes reseting[edit]

Some attribute may be useful to be reset. The "UDMA CRC error" is due to cable issue (damaged, bad shield, bad PSU voltage .). When replaced cable or moved HDD into another computer, we should reset that attribute. "Smart" idea, isn't it?

But, seems there is no way to reset any SMART attributes as easy we would, current pending errors count 199.

1) Please add here other obvious examples on SMART attributes they are useful to be reset when working environnment change. 2) Please tell about utilities they can reset them or use other hint (updating firmware, fulling platter by zeros. .)

I insist there are bad/malhonest reasons to reset some attributes: ie the "total power on counter" and so on. I do not ask how to reset them ones.

Kind regards, LaPeche35, France —Preceding unsigned comment added by 213.56.248.115 (talk) 10:04, 18 November 2009 (UTC)

SOLVED Pending sector

Hi everyone,

For a full week now my server current pending errors count 199 been warning me of an error concerning one of my drives. Apparently one of them has "1 currently unreadable (pending) sector". I had to look up what it actually meant, from what I understand now it is a sector which has not been reallocated yet and is in the process of doing so. I thought it would resolve itself, but as of yet it still has one current pending sector. The pending sector count error 52 printing visual basic not increased, which is a good sign, current pending errors count 199, and the other SMART statistics seem healthy enough in my opinion. It is an old drive and besides the pending sector nothing suggests the drive may be close to failing.

Code:

Model Family: Western Digital Red Device Model: WDC WD30EFRX-68EUZN0 Firmware Version: 80.00A80 User Capacity: 3,000,592,982,016 bytes [3.00 TB] Sector Sizes: 512 bytes logical, 4096 bytes physical Rotation Rate: 5400 rpm Device is: In smartctl database [for details use: -P show] ATA Version is: ACS-2 (minor revision not indicated) SATA Version is: SATA 3.0, 6.0 Gb/s (current: 6.0 Gb/s) Local Time is: Sun Sep 24 14:17:43 2017 CEST SMART support is: Available - device has SMART capability. SMART support is: Enabled === START OF READ SMART DATA SECTION === SMART overall-health self-assessment test result: PASSED General SMART Values: Offline data collection status: (0x00) Offline data collection activity was never started. Auto Offline Data Collection: Disabled. Self-test execution status: ( 0) The previous self-test routine completed without error or no self-test has ever been run. Total time to complete Offline data collection: (41040) seconds. Offline data collection capabilities: (0x7b) SMART execute Offline immediate. Auto Offline data collection on/off support. Suspend Offline collection upon new command. Offline surface scan supported. Self-test supported. Conveyance Self-test supported. Selective Self-test supported. SMART capabilities: (0x0003) Saves SMART data before entering power-saving mode. Supports SMART auto save timer. Error logging capability: (0x01) Error logging supported. General Purpose Logging supported. Short self-test routine recommended polling time: ( 2) minutes. Extended self-test routine recommended polling time: ( 412) minutes. Conveyance self-test routine recommended polling time: ( 5) minutes. SCT capabilities: (0x703d) SCT Status supported. SCT Error Recovery Control supported. SCT Feature Control supported, current pending errors count 199. SCT Data Table supported. If Selective self-test is pending on power-up, resume after 0 minute delay.


I want to somehow resolve the error. I looked at some other threads here on the forums, most interesting was this one: Is this a bad sign: smartd: 1 Currently unreadable (pending) sectors.?. It was suggested that the location of the corrupted sector could be determined with a long SMART test and then that sector could be overwritten with 0's. Sounded reasonable enough, although my SMART tests always completed without error. I was never able to find the location of the corrupted Sector. I tried long and short SMART tests, I offlined the drive for a while, I tried rebooting the system and I tried scrubbing the pool, but all finished without error and did not resolve the current pending sector. I thought it was especially interesting the scrub found no errors, since I would expect it to if one of the drives had a failing sector.

I hope someone is able to explain why the pending sector stays pending and whether it is possible to resolve this. I realise an obvious solution is to replace the drive, but since current pending errors count 199 error count is not increasing I think it is to soon to discard the drive.

Thanks in advance.

 

What Does Uncorrectable Sector Count Mean & How to Fix It [MiniTool Wiki]

What Does Uncorrectable Sector Count Mean

If there are any bad sectors on your hard drive, some errors current pending errors count 199 as Windows couldn’t be installed error 0x80300024, path not found c boot may happen to you. What does uncorrectable sector count mean? Do I need to change a new drive when this happens to your drive? You may raise such a question. Here, MiniTool will tell the answers.

If you conduct a non-destructive scanning, you will not receive any serious issues or warnings. However, some disks have been marked as suspicious due to uncorrectable sectors. There’s no sector reallocations and no pending sectors. In this case, uncorrectable sector count means that your disk probably is safe.

SMART ID 198 (0xC6) Uncorrectable Pending Sector Count is an important S.M.A.R.T parameter, which indicates many uncorrectable errors when reading/writing a sector on the hard drive. The error can damage or does a permanent failure to the hard drive and lead to data loss.

Simply put, offline uncorrectable pending sector count warning implies imminent disk failure and requires immediate backup and drive replacement. Here is a full guide to fix hard drive uncorrectable sector count warning.

4 Phases to Fix Uncorrectable Sector Count Warning

Warnings like uncorrectable sector count 100, off-line uncorrectable sector count will appear when you are trying to obtain the SMART information of a disk by utilizing tools like Drive Monitor, CrystalDiskInfo, HDSentinel and so on. Hence, it is strongly recommended that you monitor the disk SMART parameter actively to prevent data loss because of impending drive.

To fix the SMART uncorrectable sector count warning, you need to know something about it.

  • SMART ID 5 (0x05):Relocated Sectors Count
  • SMART ID 187 (0xBB):Reported Uncorrectable Errors
  • SMART ID 188 (0xBC):Command Timeout
  • SMART ID 197 (0xC5):Current Pending Sector Count
  • SMART ID 198 (0xC6):Uncorrectable Sector Count

Now, you can follow the steps below of this uncorrectable sector current pending errors count 199 fix with minimum data loss.

Phase 1: Back up and Recover

If you can access the drive, please back up files immediately. If the drive turns RAW or unavailable, you can fix this issue and recover the missing data by utilizing methods from this post.

Phase 2: Perform Surface Test

You are able to test each drive sector or memory block for the read/write response during the surface test. Here, MiniTool Partition Wizard is strongly recommended for you. Its Surface Test enables you to check whether there’s any sector on your hard drive with ease.

To get detailed steps to perform surface test on MiniTool Partition Wizard, current pending errors count 199, you can read this post: Top 4 Free Hard Drive Current pending errors count 199 Tools Every Windows Users Must Know

Phase 3: Run CHKDSK

After running surface test for the drive, you should run CHKDSK to scan and repair bad sectors. Here are steps to run CHKDSK.

Step 1: Type command prompt in the search box, and then right click Command Prompt from the search results and choose Run as administrator.

run command prompt as administrator

Step 2: In this pop-up prompt window, type the command chkdsk *: /f /r (* stands for the volume that you want to check) and hit the Enter key. If there are more than one volume on the disk, please run the above command one by one.

Tip: As you have backed up data in advance, you can delete all the volumes on the disk and then run the scanning to fix SMART uncorrectable sector count warning.

Phase 4: Full Format or Erase Drive Securely

If you still see the uncorrectable sector count warning in SMART information of the disk, you can utilize a safe eraser software such as MiniTool Partition Wizard for file or format the affected drive.

Full format and safe eraser will overwrite each sector on the drive. This operation will force the drive into reading the SMART parameters and attributes including uncorrectable sector count.

Before formatting your drive, you need to know what does formatting a hard drive do. Then follow the steps below to perform a full format.

Step 1: Press Win and R keys to current pending errors count 199 the Run window, and then type diskmgmt.msc and hit the Enter to open your Windows Disk Management.  

Step 2: Right click the affected drive volume in the Disk Management page, and then select the Format option from the elevated menu.

click on format option

Step 3: Uncheck Perform a quick formatand click OK to save the change. Then the volume will be formatted automatically.

Tip: If you don’t uncheck Perform a quick format, the data can be recovered with recovery software.

uncheck Perform a quick format and click OK
current pending errors count 199

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