Cpu over voltage error i3

cpu over voltage error i3

If the test ran without error, raise the bclock by 10MHz, reboot into your OS and run the test again. If the test failed. where it needs more voltage/cooling for each cpu multi step prime95 error'd and wont start the stress test, not sure why but i cant use. quick reference guide including specifications, features, pricing, compatibility, design documentation, ordering codes, spec codes and more.

Related Videos

CPU over voltage error, any way to fix? (Tell me in the comments).fixed now

Read these next.

I have the a problem with my PC:

The PSU is FSP Hydro+ 650W .

The Voltages of CPU is seem bad.


  • I have change to new PSU but the same problem

  • Is it the same PSU model? If so try a different maker. Are you checking these voltages with all cpu over voltage error i3 hardware installed or is the PSU unloaded. If you are doing this unloaded, the PSU may be detecting an unloaded condition and is reducing the power to keep from burning up.

  • No, different model.the result is from running PC not unloaded PSU

  • What issue do you think you have, you're not showing any errors cpu over voltage error i3 I dont think you've actually explain the issue, just that you believe the CPU voltages are low - I expect you mean wrong for what you expect.

    Are you taking in to consideration Speedstep or low power mode in your BIOS/UEFI/OS, they can lower voltages to use less power when the CPU isnt working hard, so if your concern is you expected 3.3V and you see 1.5v then you may be looking for an issue that does not exist.

    So please can you explain the issue you face, not what you think the cause is.

  • Yeah,

    The problem that it showing bad voltages for all input. My PC hang randomly sometime per day.

    I tried to replace the new PSU but still have this problem

  • So you think because the Tidicmpclient socket error # 10065 hangs you issue is voltage?

    Have you looked in event logs to see what it says?

    Where are you seeing bad voltages

  • Yes,

    It seem windows does not have log for this.

    You can see the 3.3V,5V and 12V on mainboard are incorrect

  • Have you been trying to overclock or bee changing settings in the BIOS?

    Have you considered the CPU or Motherboard may be the issue if you have not? What happened before you started to look at this to cause it to hang, any power failures, storms, shorts?

  • Any time 1c error 1275 PC hang, the mainboard(Coloful Igame Z270) alway so E1 error code.

    There are too many factors can cause this.

    The PSU still running, the LED still light

  • In my experience, bad voltage on a PSU would not cause a machine to just hang. It would cause it to shutdown instantly or to cpu over voltage error i3. in either case, there would be a message in the eventlog saying previous shutdown was caused by a power event.

  • This could be the slate issue itself.
    Try the same psu with some other pc to verify voltage.

  • jamerencher wrote:

    Any time when PC hang, the mainboard(Coloful Igame Z270) alway so E1 error code.

    There are too many factors can cause this.

    Like what factors?

    The web is a wonderful place to find answers, but that motherboard, I can't even find a manual, let alone what E1 means.

    Are you able to test your CPU on another MB?

    I would guess either something is wrong with the board or something needs connecting that has been missed, for example the 4 PIN CPU specific connection.

  • Just my 2 cents.any firmware updates for mobo nero vision sense key 0x03 key_medium_error mobo software ? 

    Then rather then using 3rd party software, cpu over voltage error i3, do you have readings from the manufacturer software or monitoring tool ?

  • If the board is any good there will be points near the power plug to read the actual voltages with a multi-meter. 

    Before going off on weird tangents over whats written on a PC app. I would be checking the event logs and testing hard drive memory and CPU for stability. Then going to firmware updates and drivers.

  • The board he has seems to be this one:

    https://en.colorful.cn/contents/352/692.html

    Someone over on Toms Hardware pointed to the voltages

    https://forums.tomshardware.com/threads/pc-keep-hang-3-time-per-day.3517674/

    I'd be more inclined to ask if you have any other computers to test, cpu over voltage error i3, it's been a while since I've looked but the RAM/CPU voltages can differ wildly from the set 3/5/12 when reported through software as you don't know what is being reported.

    A quick look around for an i5 CPU stock voltage turns up

    https://forums.tomshardware.com/threads/core-i5-750-stock-vcore-voltage.332278/

    https://www.masterslair.com/vcore-vtt-dram-pll-pch-voltages-explained-core-i7-i5-i3

    If I download the tool you are using and run it it tells me all my voltages are 0 or 0.9 which sounds daft, so I wouldn't worry too much and concentrate of the other areas, temperature/air flow, do a chkdsk, remove random junk running in the background, check the event log and update drivers/AV software.

  • Snap! Azure outage, malware in JWST images, floppy disks, Voyager 1, & more

    Snap! Azure outage, malware in JWST images, floppy disks, cpu over voltage error i3, Voyager 1, cpu over voltage error i3, & more

    Spiceworks Originals

    Your daily dose of tech news, in brief. While the month may be ending, we're halfway through the week. Let's jump into today's Snap! and see some of the things going on in the world. You need to hear this. Microsoft Azure outage knocks Ubuntu.

  • Monitor our Weblogs

    Monitor our Weblogs

    Security

    Hi,I would like to ask for your recommendations on how I can capture the websites our end users access during office hours.our current firewall doesnt support it as it only logs HTTP connections and we all know that almost all of the websites now are usin.

  • How to keep a record on my phone: of my own calls I will fix or need to fix

    How to keep a record on my phone: of my own calls I will fix or need to fix

    IT & Tech Careers

    I am the sole I.T. guy for a company.That has Servers/ NAS, I manage the PIX firewall. take full responsibility of all data including accounting Backups on NAS, Servers, Camera ( recordings).Do Cabling/Crimping as needed ,Set up VPN for remote folks,  Pur.

  • Spark! Pro series - 31st August 2022 - The Bacon Day Edition

    Spark! Pro series - 31st August 2022 - The Bacon Day Edition

    Spiceworks Originals

    Today in History: 1142 Possible date for establishment of the Iroquois (Haudenosaunee) LeagueCenturies before the creation of the United States and its Constitution, democracy had already taken root in North America—among a handful of Indigenous nations. .

  • Showing End Users How The Sausage Is Made

    Showing End Users How The Sausage Is Made

    Best Practices & General IT

    Basic scenario is this1 - End user submits issue via email2 - IT investigates and proves issue is with external vendor3 - IT emails vendor4 - Vendor emails back5 - repeat 3+4 until issue is fixed6 - IT emails end user to say it's fixed, or details how to .

Also critical to today’s story is the understanding of what a “safe voltage” is. When manufacturers, media, and overclockers provide guidance of “safe voltages” for 24/7 use, they may be referencing different numbers. For instance, suppose GN recommends a safe Vcore of 1.4V for 24/7 on Processor X. In this instance, we have not clarified what “1.4V” means – it could mean 1.4V going into the CPU, period, as measured in the most accurate way possible (e.g. DMM to the socket). It could also mean 1.4V input into BIOS or UEFI. We might mean 1.4V as read through HWINFO or AIDA. Without that specificity, the best to hope for is that all of these numbers are reasonably close. That’s partly on motherboard makers to achieve through LLC tables, cpu over voltage error i3, but there will always be some disparity. What matters most is that the disparity between actual Vcore (in this example) and input Vcore isn’t great enough to seriously damage anything.

When we talk damage with parts, we’re talking long-term degradation. Some easy examples would be the System Agent voltage for Intel CPUs (VCCSA); increasing VCCSA to, for example, 1.4V is inadvisable for modern platforms, and will inevitably damage the IMC. For AMD, we might instead talk about SOC voltage – that’s our topic today. Increasing SOC voltage beyond recommended settings, discussed below, would have the effect of damaging the IMC and the APU GFX component’s overclocking ability.

Over time, a degrading IMC may require more voltage to keep the same memory/GFX frequencies, or it might just lose that frequency altogether, forcing the user to downclock. Outright failure doesn’t happen at voltages close to reason, but will instead manifest over a period of months.

Of course, the other side of this is the ability to kill a motherboard, which we already demonstrated here.

General Notes 

  1. From speaking with numerous contacts at motherboard makers, AMD, and XOCers, general advisement on unsafe SOC voltages is that it begins beyond 1.3V. Conventional wisdom (starting with Ryzen) is that 1.2V is a safe SOC voltage, but we’ve been told by some vendors that Raven Ridge CPUs can reasonably take up to 1.3V, but the suggested input number tends to be 1.2V; this is cpu over voltage error i3, again, the user-configured number and the actual voltage aren’t necessarily equal. Going significantly beyond 1.3V for sustained periods, e.g. 1.34, will likely result in degradation of the IMC over time.
  2. Although AMD may suggest that 1.3V is “safe,” keep in mind that typing in “1.3” and actual 1.3V to SOC are very different things, especially when you consider that software often underreports voltage.
  3. Vdroop can require higher LLC levels to stabilize the input voltage closer to the configured number.
  4. LLC tables on some boards can cause undesired spikes in voltage that can be deadly to the SOC or IMC. We have a separate video on how LLC works.
  5. VDDCR SOC Power represents uncore and GPU domain power draw or voltage configuration.
  6. SETTING 1.3 DOES NOT MEAN IT WILL NECESSARILY BE 1.3V FLAT. Voltages are not static. For example, in some of our tests, setting 1.3V with auto LLC could result in sustained SOC voltages of 1.39V, which will degrade your IMC in a matter of months. On Raven Ridge, this will also affect graphics performance.
  7. APU GFX and SOC GFX cpu over voltage error i3 go through the SOC. They all go through the SOC VRM. If you adjust one, you are essentially adjusting both.

Test Methodology

For testing, we first determined where to cpu over voltage error i3 socket measurements by finding a corresponding capacitor to the SOC VRM. We then took live measurements of the SOC voltage at the back of the socket, which we compared versus HWINFO and Ryzen Master or BIOS settings. Some of this is shown in the video.

ASUS B350M-E Prime SOC Voltage Table

ASUS B350M-ELLCFrequency InputSOC InputGFX InputDMM OutputHWI OutputPass/Fail
3DMark FS LoopAuto13001.11.1DNFDNFFail
VIDEO_TDR_FAILURE
3DMark FS LoopHigh13001.11.11.118-1.1271.056-1.081Pass
3DMark FS LoopExtreme13001.11.11.1471.087-1.106Pass
3DMark FS LoopAuto15001.1 (Auto)1.21.17-1.1731.0-1.144Pass
3DMark FS LoopHigh15001.1 (Auto)1.21.2231.15-1.181Pass
3DMark FS LoopAuto15501.1 (Auto)1.2DNFDNFFail
VIDEO_TDR_FAILURE
3DMark FS LoopHigh15501.1 (Auto)1.21.2231.144-1.181 
3DMark FS LoopHigh16001.1 (Auto)1.21.2231.144-1.181Fail
VIDEO_TDR_FAILURE
3DMark FS LoopExtreme16001.1 (Auto)1.2DNFDNFFail
VIDEO_TDR_FAILURE
3DMark FS LoopExtreme16001.21.21.35-1.361.29-1.3Pass
3DMark FS LoopAUTO16501.21.31.36-1.3721.25-1.306Pass

Here’s a table of our ASUS SOC checks, cpu over voltage error i3. The color coding (in the video) is based on frequencies; when we changed frequency, we changed row color. At 1.1V SOC and 1.1V APU GFX input, we were measuring 1.12-1.13V with a multimeter, or 1.056 to 1.081 with HWINFO. This was with a low 1300MHz frequency. Going to 1550MHz had 1.1V SOC and 1.2V GFX reading out as 1.223V via DMM, or 1.15-1.181V via HWINFO. That’s with 10053 socket error fix LLC, which was required for stability.

Here’s the dangerous one: At 1600MHz and with Extreme LLC, we configured 1.2V SOC and 1.2V GFX, and read out 1.35V SOC via DMM. If you were relying on HWINFO, you’d think you were only at 1.29 to 1.3V, which are sort of acceptable, though pushing it. Not really acceptable on this motherboard, mind you, but conventional wisdom would suggest that 1.25V is OK for most APUs, according to some of our motherboard contacts. This board isn’t really meant to push this high, cpu over voltage error i3, but that’s beside the point. The point is that these voltages – 1.2 on each – degrade the IMC over time. That was with Extreme LLC, though. Let’s dial back to auto, since that’s what most people use. Even with Auto LLC, cpu over voltage error i3, cpu over voltage error i3 1650MHz clock was held with a 1.2V SOC and 1.3V GFX voltage. In reality, these numbers equaled 1.37V and up. In other words, cpu over voltage error i3 you don’t need a memory controller for very long.

MSI B350 Tomahawk SOC Voltage Table

MSI B350 TomahawkLLCFrequency InputSOC InputGFX InputDMM OutputHWI OutputPass/Fail
3DMark FS LoopAuto15001.1 (Auto)1.21.185-1.1911.125-1.15Pass
3DMark FS LoopLevel 1/815001.1 (Auto)1.21.195-1.21.137-1.162Pass
3DMark FS LoopLevel 8/815001.1 (Auto)1.21.1351.07-1.1Pass
3DMark FS LoopAuto15501.1 (Auto)1.21.187-1.191.119-1.15Fail
Eventual FS crash
3DMark FS LoopAuto15501.21.21.169-1.21.234-1.24Fail
Eventual FS crash
3DMark FS LoopLevel 1/815501.21.21.24-1.2471.194-1.232Pass
3DMark FS LoopAuto16001.21.21.244-1.2451.175-1.206Pass
3DMark FS LoopAuto16001.21.31.244-1.2451.169-1.206Pass
3DMark FS LoopAuto16501.2Does
nothing
1.244-1.2451.169-1.206Fail
FireStrike Crash
3DMark FS LoopAuto16501.3Does
nothing
1.3511.269-1.3Fail
Eventual FS crash

The MSI B350 Tomahawk is next. This one sometimes had Vdroop, but not always. We also noticed APU GFX Voltage didn’t seem to do anything on this board. It was all driven by normal SOC voltage. Going for 1600MHz with a 1.2V SOC and 1.2V GFX allowed the frequency to hold, using auto LLC, cpu over voltage error i3. The DMM output was 1.245V, while HWINFO reported 1.18-1.2V. Increasing GFX voltage to 1.3V did nothing, and did not change the voltage readings at all. Going to 1650MHz at 1.3V SOC had us reading 1.35 via the DMM, but HWINFO had us reading 1.27 to 1.3V.

Gigabyte X370 Gaming K5 SOC Voltage Table

GBT Gaming K5LLCFrequency InputSOC InputGFX InputDMM OutputHWI OutputPass/Fail
3DMark FS LoopAuto15001.1 (Auto)1.21.31.063-1.119Pass
3DMark FS LoopAuto15001.1 (Auto)1.31.3961.18Pass
3DMark FS LoopAuto15001.1 (Auto)1.151.253-1.2561.012-1.063Pass
3DMark FS LoopAuto15001.1 (Auto)1.1251.230.987-1.03Pass
3DMark FS LoopAuto15501.1 (Auto)1.1251.230.984-0.997Pass
3DMark FS LoopAuto16001.1 (Auto)1.1251.228-1.2320.987-1.03Fail
Firestrike crash
3DMark FS LoopAuto16001.1 (Auto)1.151.25-1.2561.012-1.075Pass
3DMark FS LoopAuto16501.1 (Auto)1.1631.264-1.271.031-1.087Fail
Firestrike crash
3DMark FS LoopAuto16501.1 (Auto)1.181251.283-1.2871.087-1.1Pass
3DMark FS LoopAuto17001.1 (Auto)1.19375DNFDNFFail
Firestrike crash

Finally, the Gigabyte Gaming K5 seems to push voltage more heavily than other boards. This isn’t inherently a fault with Gigabyte’s motherboard, it’s just that users need to be aware that the behavior on this board is different from the MSI and ASUS boards, which means that following a guide for a different motherboard could easily have you inputting unsafe voltages.

At 1500MHz and with a 1.1V SOC, 1.2V GFX via BIOS, we measured a 1.3V output via DMM. HWINFO read 1.1V. Going to 1.1V SOC and 1.3V GFX gave us 1.39 to 1.4V SOC, which is dangerous to the health of the IMC.

This is where we realized that Gigabyte was being more aggressive than MSI – again, that’s not a fault of either, just a behavior. We dropped to 1.15V GFX input voltage, which resulted in a 1.25V DMM reading. As you can see in this table, 1650MHz was held with an input number of 1.1V SOC and 1.18125V GFX, resulting in a 1.28V SOC voltage as measured at the socket, but 1.1V via HWINFO. The takeaway here is that the Gigabyte board only required us to input 1.18V for GFX to get 1.3V out, whereas the MSI board would require a 1.3V input to get roughly the same out. The ASUS board would require 1.2-1.25V to get 1.3V out. These are behaviors that you need to be aware of on the motherboards, and they are somewhat unique to each board.

Conclusion

The main take-away here is that establishing a “safety” voltage is important, but ensuring that the voltage provision actually equates the safety input is more important. If we’ve decided that “1.3” is safe for SOC, it’s not good enough to just stop incrementing voltage once BIOS reads “1.3.” There needs to be another cpu over voltage error i3 speaking with various contacts, we’ve heard a few conflicting (but generally converging) guidelines for safe voltages:

  • Our understanding is that an AMD-made overclocking video for Ryzen (not Raven Ridge) suggested a 1.2V SOC voltage. This was at Ryzen’s launch, so is potentially outdated.
  • ASUS once recommended 1.25V SOC maximally.
  • Gigabyte has suggested that up to 1.3V should be OK, but spiking or maintaining spikes beyond 1.3V could be damaging to the SOC.
  • Buildzoid has suggested a safety of 1.2V, which also aligns with what most early Ryzen overclocking guidelines suggested; note that this is specifically for Ryzen, not necessarily for Raven Ridge.
  • Other contacts have suggested between 1.2V and 1.3V.

If you ask us, we think decent overclocks are achievable with 1.2-1.25V SOC going into the socket, and that more than that isn’t really necessary, anyway.

For additional information on this topic, please check the embedded video above.

Editorial: Steve Burke
Video: Andrew Coleman

Thread: [HELP] CPU Input Voltage High and Stuck at 4.080V - RED - Maximus VII Genie -

  • 06-30-2015 01:19 AM#1

    PresidentSkroob no está en línea
    ROG Member Array

    [HELP] CPU Input Voltage High and Stuck at 4.080V - RED - Maximus VII Genie -

    As you can see from the screenshot, cpu over voltage error i3, "Dual Intelligent Processors 5" AISuite 3 apps is reporting that the CPU Input Voltage is 4.080 V and is highlighted in red. This value also appears in the BIOS.

    Despite my efforts trying to manually override the CPU Input Voltage, either in the BIOS or in the AISuite app, the 4.080 V reading remains.

    I started getting some nasty reboots of late and am concerned my CPU has been damaged by this high voltage. I swapped in an old i3 and it is running fine again with no reboots. However, the high CPU Input Voltage of 4.080 V persists.

    In trying to isolate the problem, I also tried swapping in a second PSU and removing all internal peripherals - nothing fixes the 4.080 V reading.

    I have flashed the BIOS to the latest version and am running Windows 8.1.

    BIOS settings have been set to Optimized Defaults.

    Is my motherboard the problem? It is cron bus error under warranty, thank you!

    Click image for larger version.  Name:	Untitled-1.jpg  Views:	13  Size:	102.2 KB  ID:	50191

    Last edited by PresidentSkroob; 06-30-2015 at 01:25 AM.


  • 06-30-2015 05:50 AM#2

    FZero no está en línea
    ROG Guru: White Belt ArrayFZero PC Specs
    FZero PC Specs
    MotherboardAsus Maximus Hero X (Wi-Fi AC)
    ProcessorIntel Core I7-8700K
    Memory (part number)G.Skill TridentZ RGB 2x8 Gb 4000 Mhz DDR 4
    Graphics Card #1Gigabyte GeForce GTX 1070 G1 Gaming
    Sound CardOnboard
    MonitorBenQ GL2450H
    Storage #1Samsung SSD 850 EVO 500 Gb
    Storage #2WD Blue 4Tb/2TB
    CPU CoolerArctic Liquid Freezer 240/4x Arctic F12 PWM
    CaseNZXT S340
    Power SupplyXFX TS 550W
    Keyboard Genius KB-G235
    Mouse Logitech G402 Hyperion Fury
    Mouse Pad Cooler Master Swift-RX XL
    Headset/Speakers Logitech Z906
    OS Windows 10 Pro
    Network RouterSpeedport W724v
    Accessory #1 LC-CF-RGB-COMBO
    Accessory #2 Logitech G29 Driving Force Logitech Driving Force Shifter
    Accessory #3 Sony Bravia KD-55XE8096 4K
    FZero's Avatar

    Hey PresidentSkroob and welcome to the forum.

    I know this will sound stupid but did you remember to save settings after you changed them in Bios ?
    I don't know if you mentioned it but if you have 2 sticks of memory try taking 1 module out and try again in a different spot.

    Could we get a screenshot from your Bios to see what is happening ?
    You can save a screenshot in Bios using a USB stick and pressing F12 in Bios.

    Last edited by FZero; 06-30-2015 at 05:55 AM.


  • 06-30-2015 07:17 AM#3

    Nate152 no está en línea
    ModeratorArrayNate152 PC Specs
    Nate152 PC Specs
    MotherboardROG Strix Z690-F Gaming WiFi
    Processori7-12700KF
    Memory (part number)Kingston Fury Beast 16GB (2x8GB) 6000MT/s (KF560C40B)
    Graphics Card #1ROG Strix 3090 Ti LC OC
    Sound CardROG SupremeFX
    MonitorHP ZR30w
    Storage #1Seagate Firecuda 530 1TB
    CPU CoolerEK Quantum Velocity2
    CaseThermaltake Tower 900
    Power SupplyEVGA Supernova 1600 T2
    Keyboard ROG Falchion NX / Strix Flare II
    Mouse ROG Chakram X/Chakram Core/Spatha X
    Headset ROG Delta S Animate
    Mouse Pad Steelseries Prism XL + ROG Scabbard II
    OS Windows 11 Home
    Accessory #1 cpu over voltage error i3 Swiftech Maelstrom X300 D5 V2
    Accessory #2 2x Hardware Labs SR2 560 MP radiators
    Accessory #3 Lamptron FC-5 V3 fan controller
    runtime error 6 overflow visual basic Avatar">

    hello PresidentSkroob

    The voltage reading is wrong, your cpu would be toast before it even got close to 4.08v.

    You could try uninstalling ai suite and flashing the bios again or to a different version.

    Uninstall ai suite in your programs then run this cleaner.

    http://rog.asus.com/forum/showthread.te-III-Cleaner

    Here is a guide you can follow to flash the bios.

    http://rog.asus.com/forum/showthread.BIOS-Flashback


  • 06-30-2015 08:12 AM#4

    FZero no está en línea
    ROG Guru: White Belt ArrayFZero PC Specs
    FZero PC Specs
    MotherboardAsus Maximus Hero X (Wi-Fi AC)
    ProcessorIntel Core I7-8700K
    Memory (part number)G.Skill TridentZ RGB 2x8 Gb 4000 Mhz DDR 4
    Graphics Card #1Gigabyte GeForce GTX 1070 G1 Gaming
    Sound CardOnboard
    MonitorBenQ GL2450H
    Storage #1Samsung SSD 850 EVO 500 Gb
    Storage #2WD Blue 4Tb/2TB
    CPU CoolerArctic Liquid Freezer 240/4x Arctic F12 PWM
    CaseNZXT S340
    Power SupplyXFX TS 550W
    Keyboard Genius KB-G235
    Mouse Logitech G402 Hyperion Fury
    Mouse Pad Cooler Master Swift-RX XL
    Headset/Speakers Logitech Z906
    OS Windows 10 Pro
    Network RouterSpeedport W724v
    Accessory #1 LC-CF-RGB-COMBO
    Accessory #2 Logitech G29 Driving Force Logitech Driving Force Shifter
    Accessory #3 Sony Bravia KD-55XE8096 4K
    FZero's Avatar

    [QUOTE=Nate152;516675]hello PresidentSkroob

    The voltage reading is wrong, your cpu would be toast before it even got close to 4.08v, cpu over voltage error i3.

    I thought the same thing but i wondered why would he getting reboots and as he says : This value also appears in the BIOS. That is why i asked him to show us a screenshot of the Bios.

    Of course i realize the reboots could be some other problem. I'm really interested to see what the Bios says.

    Last edited by FZero; 06-30-2015 at 08:14 AM.


  • 06-30-2015 02:33 PM#5

    NemesisChild no está en línea
    ROG Guru: Brown Belt ArrayNemesisChild PC Specs
    NemesisChild PC Specs
    MotherboardASUS ROG STRIK Z490-E
    ProcessorIntel i9 10850K
    Memory (part number)G.Skill F4-3200C14D-32GTZR
    Graphics Card #1EVGA 3090 Ti FTW3 Ultra
    MonitorASUS TUF Gaming VG27AQL 1A
    Storage #1WD Black SN850 1TB NVMe M.2
    Storage #2WD Blue SN550 2TB NVMe M.2
    CPU CoolerCorsair H115i Pro XT
    CaseASUS ROG Strix Helios GX601
    Power SupplyEVGA SuperNova 1200 P2
    Keyboard ROG Strix Scope NX Deluxe
    Mouse Logitech G703 Wireless
    Headset Logitech G Pro
    Mouse Pad SteelSeries
    OS Windows 11 Home
    Network RouterASUS RIG STRIK GS-AX5400
    NemesisChild's Avatar

    Yet another reason not to use AI Suite.

    Intel i9 [email protected] 5.3GHz
    ASUS ROG Strix Z490-E
    Corsair H115i Pro XT
    G.Skill [email protected] 3600MHz CL14 2x16GB
    EVGA RTX 3090 Ti FWT3 Ultra
    OS: WD Black SN850 1TB NVMe M.2
    Storage: WD Blue SN550 2TB NVMe M.2
    EVGA SuperNova 1200 P2
    ASUS ROG Strix Helios GX601


  • 07-01-2015 12:13 AM#6

    PresidentSkroob no está en línea
    ROG Member Array
    I've removed AI Suite and ran the removal tool as well.

    Will try the BIOS flash method linked. Seems according to the screenshot that BIOS is not currently up to date despite my assumption it was. I used MAXIMUS VII GENE BIOS 2702, maybe it didn't flash properly. odd.

    Click image for larger version.  Name:	3.jpg  Views:	1  Size:	153.7 KB  ID:	50230

    Click image for larger version.  Name:	150630171024.jpg  Views:	4  Size:	131.2 KB  ID:	50231
    Trying cpu over voltage error i3 override the value

    Click image for larger version.  Name:	3.jpg  Views:	1  Size:	153.7 KB  ID:	50230

    Last edited by PresidentSkroob; 07-01-2015 at 12:20 AM.


  • 07-01-2015 01:29 AM#7

    Nate152 no está en línea
    ModeratorArrayNate152 PC Specs
    Nate152 PC Specs
    MotherboardROG Strix Z690-F Gaming WiFi
    Processori7-12700KF
    Memory (part number)Kingston Fury Beast 16GB (2x8GB) 6000MT/s (KF560C40B)
    Graphics Card #1ROG Strix 3090 Ti LC OC
    Sound CardROG SupremeFX
    MonitorHP ZR30w
    Storage #1Seagate Firecuda 530 1TB
    CPU CoolerEK Quantum Velocity2
    CaseThermaltake Tower 900
    Power SupplyEVGA Supernova 1600 T2
    Keyboard ROG Falchion NX / Strix Flare II
    Mouse ROG Chakram X/Chakram Core/Spatha X
    Headset ROG Delta S Animate
    Mouse Cpu over voltage error i3 Steelseries Prism XL + ROG Scabbard II
    OS Windows 11 Home
    Accessory #1 2x Swiftech Maelstrom X300 D5 V2
    Accessory #2 2x Hardware Labs SR2 560 MP radiators
    Accessory #3 Lamptron FC-5 V3 fan controller
    Nate152's Avatar

  • 07-02-2015 12:35 AM#8

    PresidentSkroob no está en línea
    ROG Member Array
    I flash the BIOS again using MAXIMUS VII GENE Cpu over voltage error i3 2702 found on this page:
    http://www.asus.com/us/Motherboards/.Desk_Download/

    Still stuck at 4.080V =\

    I find it confusing that the download is marked 2702 with a date of 2015/05/27. Yet the screenshot shows the version of the BIOS at 2.16.1240, but maybe this value just represents the BIOS Utility and not the BIOS itself.? Or maybe I am not correctly flashing.

    I tried to use the ROG connect method but it did not work despite follow directions.

    So I flashed the BIOS from within the BIOS Utility.

    Click image for larger version.  Name:	150701173400.jpg  Views:	3  Size:	175.1 KB  ID:	50251

    Last edited by PresidentSkroob; 07-02-2015 at 12:37 AM.


  • 07-02-2015 12:38 AM#9

    Nate152 no está en línea
    ModeratorArrayNate152 PC Specs
    Nate152 PC Specs
    MotherboardROG Strix Z690-F Gaming WiFi
    Processori7-12700KF
    Memory (part number)Kingston Fury Beast 16GB (2x8GB) 6000MT/s (KF560C40B)
    Graphics Card #1ROG Strix 3090 Ti LC OC
    Sound CardROG Cpu over voltage error i3 ZR30w
    Storage #1Seagate Firecuda 530 1TB
    CPU CoolerEK Quantum Velocity2
    CaseThermaltake Tower 900
    Power SupplyEVGA Supernova 1600 T2
    Keyboard ROG Falchion NX / Strix Flare II
    Mouse ROG Chakram X/Chakram Core/Spatha X
    Headset ROG Delta S Animate
    Mouse Pad Steelseries Prism XL + ROG Scabbard II
    OS Windows 11 Home
    Accessory #1 2x Swiftech Maelstrom X300 D5 V2
    Accessory #2 2x Hardware Labs SR2 560 MP radiators
    Accessory #3 Lamptron FC-5 V3 fan controller
    Nate152's Avatar

    That's the strangest thing.

    Install ROG cpu-z and see what the cpu core voltage is showing.

    http://www.softpedia.com/get/System/.PU-Z-ROG.shtml

    EDIT: Never mind that is a different voltage I see the vcore is at 1.152v and temp is 32c.

    The Initial cpu input voltage should be around 1.70v


  • 07-02-2015 01:49 AM#10

    PresidentSkroob no está en línea
    ROG Member Array
    Sorry i forgot to upload both screencaps, as you can see it's showing 4.080V

    I'm going to try CPU-z

    Click image for larger version.  Name:	150701185359.jpg  Views:	2  Size:	152.5 KB  ID:	50252

  • Launch Date

    The date the product was first introduced.

    Lithography

    Lithography refers to the semiconductor technology used to manufacture an integrated circuit, and is reported in nanometer (nm), indicative of the size of features built on the semiconductor.

    Total Cores

    Cores is a hardware term that describes the number of independent central processing units in a single computing component (die or chip).

    Total Threads

    Where applicable, Intel® Hyper-Threading Technology is only available on Performance-cores.

    Processor Base Frequency

    Processor Base Frequency describes the rate at which the processor's transistors open and close. The processor base frequency is the operating point where TDP is defined. Frequency is typically measured in gigahertz (GHz), or billion cycles per second.

    Cache

    CPU Cache is an area of fast memory located on the processor. Intel® Smart Cache refers to the architecture that allows all cores to dynamically share access to the last level cache.

    Bus Speed

    A bus is a subsystem that transfers data between computer components or between computers. Types include front-side bus (FSB), which carries data between the CPU and memory controller hub; direct media interface (DMI), which is a point-to-point interconnection between an Intel integrated memory controller and an Intel I/O controller hub on the computer’s motherboard; and Quick Path Interconnect (QPI), which is a point-to-point interconnect between the CPU and the integrated memory controller.

    TDP

    Thermal Design Power (TDP) represents the average power, in watts, the processor dissipates when operating at Base Frequency with all cores active under an Intel-defined, high-complexity workload. Refer to Datasheet for thermal solution requirements.

    Embedded Options Available

    Embedded Options Available indicates products that offer extended purchase availability for intelligent systems and embedded solutions. Product certification and use condition applications can be found in the Production Release Qualification (PRQ) report. See your Intel representative for details.

    Max Memory Size (dependent on memory type)

    Max memory size refers to the maximum memory capacity supported by the processor.

    Memory Types

    Intel® processors come in four different types: Single Channel, Dual Channel, Triple Channel, and Flex Mode. Maximum supported memory speed may be lower when populating multiple DIMMs per channel on products that support multiple memory channels.

    Max # of Memory Channels

    The number of memory channels refers to the bandwidth operation for real world application.

    Max Memory Bandwidth

    Max Memory bandwidth is the maximum rate at which data can be read from or stored into a semiconductor memory by the processor (in GB/s).

    ECC Memory Supported

    ECC Memory Supported indicates processor support for Error-Correcting Code memory. ECC memory is a type of system memory that can detect and correct common kinds of internal data corruption. Note that ECC memory support requires both processor and chipset support.

    Processor Graphics

    Processor Graphics indicates graphics processing circuitry integrated into the processor, providing the graphics, compute, media, and display capabilities. Processor graphics brands include Intel® Iris® Xe Graphics, Intel® UHD Graphics, Intel® HD Graphics, Iris® Graphics, Iris® Plus Graphics, and Iris® Pro Graphics. See the Intel® Graphics Technology for more information.

    Intel® Iris® Xe Graphics only: to use the Intel® Iris® Xe brand, the system must be populated with 128-bit (dual channel) memory, cpu over voltage error i3. Otherwise, use the Intel® UHD brand.

    Graphics Base Frequency

    Graphics Base frequency refers to the rated/guaranteed graphics render clock frequency in MHz.

    Graphics Max Dynamic Frequency

    Graphics max dynamic frequency refers to the maximum opportunistic graphics render clock frequency (in MHz) that can be supported using Intel® HD Graphics with Dynamic Frequency feature.

    Graphics Video Max Memory

    The maximum amount of memory accessible to processor graphics. Processor graphics operates on the same physical memory as the CPU (subject to OS, driver, and other system limitations).

    Graphics Output

    Graphics Output defines the interfaces available to communicate with display devices.

    4K Support

    4K support indicates the product's support of 4K resolution, cpu over voltage error i3, defined here as minimum 3840 x 2160.

    Max Resolution (HDMI)

    Max Resolution (HDMI) is the maximum resolution supported by the processor via the HDMI interface (24bits per pixel & 60Hz). System or device printer error 49. 4c02 service error resolution is dependent on multiple system design factors; actual resolution may be lower on your system.

    Max Resolution (DP)‡

    Max Resolution (DP) is the maximum resolution supported by the processor via the DP interface (24bits per pixel & 60Hz). System or device display resolution is dependent on multiple system design factors; actual resolution may be lower on your system.

    Max Resolution (eDP - Integrated Flat Panel)‡

    Max Resolution (Integrated Flat Panel) is the maximum resolution supported by the processor for a device with an integrated flat panel (24bits per pixel & 60Hz). System or device display resolution is dependent on multiple system design factors; actual resolution may be lower on your device.

    DirectX* Support

    DirectX* Support indicates support for a specific version of Microsoft’s collection of APIs (Application Programming Interfaces) for handling multimedia compute tasks.

    OpenGL* Support

    OpenGL (Open Graphics Library) is a cross-language, multi-platform API (Application Programming Interface) for rendering 2D and 3D vector graphics.

    Intel® Quick Sync Video

    Intel® Quick Sync Video delivers fast conversion of video for portable media players, online sharing, and video editing and authoring.

    Intel® InTru™ 3D Technology

    Intel® InTru™ 3D Technology provides stereoscopic 3-D Blu-ray* playback in full 1080p resolution over HDMI* 1.4 and premium audio.

    Intel® Clear Video HD Technology

    Intel® Clear Video HD Technology, like its predecessor, Intel® Clear Video Technology, is a suite of image decode and processing technologies built into the integrated processor graphics that improve video playback, delivering cleaner, sharper images, more natural, accurate, and vivid colors, and a clear and stable video picture. Intel® Clear Video HD Technology adds video quality enhancements for richer color and more realistic skin tones.

    Intel® Clear Video Technology

    Intel® Clear Video Technology is a suite of image decode and processing technologies built into the integrated processor graphics that improve video playback, delivering cleaner, sharper images, more natural, accurate, and vivid colors, and a clear and stable video picture.

    PCI Express Revision

    PCI Express Revision is the supported version of the PCI Express standard. Peripheral Component Interconnect Express (or PCIe) is a high-speed serial cpu over voltage error i3 expansion bus standard for attaching hardware devices to a computer. The different PCI Express versions support different data rates.

    PCI Express Configurations

    PCI Express (PCIe) Configurations describe the available PCIe lane configurations that can be used to link to PCIe devices.

    Max # of PCI Express Lanes

    A PCI Express (PCIe) lane consists of two differential signaling pairs, one for receiving data, one for transmitting data, and is the basic unit of the PCIe bus. Max # of PCI Express Lanes is the total number of supported lanes.

    Sockets Supported

    The socket is the component that provides cpu over voltage error i3 mechanical and electrical connections between the processor and motherboard.

    TJUNCTION

    Junction Temperature is the maximum temperature allowed at the processor die.

    Intel® Speed Shift Technology

    Intel® Speed Shift Technology uses hardware-controlled P-states to deliver dramatically quicker cpu over voltage error i3 with single-threaded, transient (short duration) workloads, such as web browsing, by allowing the processor to more quickly select its best operating frequency and voltage for optimal performance and power efficiency.

    Intel® Turbo Boost Technology

    Intel® Turbo Boost Technology dynamically increases the processor's frequency as needed by taking advantage of thermal and power headroom to give you a burst of speed when you need it, and increased energy efficiency when you don’t.

    Intel® Hyper-Threading Technology

    Intel® Hyper-Threading Technology (Intel® HT Technology) delivers two processing threads per physical core. Highly threaded applications can get more work done in parallel, completing tasks sooner.

    Intel® Transactional Synchronization Extensions

    Intel® Transactional Synchronization Extensions (Intel® TSX) are a set of instructions that add hardware transactional memory support to improve performance of multi-threaded software.

    Intel® 64

    Intel® 64 architecture delivers 64-bit computing on server, workstation, desktop and mobile platforms when combined with supporting software.¹ Intel 64 architecture improves performance by allowing systems to address more than 4 GB of both virtual and physical memory.

    Instruction Set

    An instruction set refers to the basic set of commands and instructions that a microprocessor understands and can carry out. The value shown represents which Intel’s instruction set this processor is compatible with.

    Instruction Set Extensions

    Instruction Set Extensions are additional instructions which can increase performance when the same operations are performed on multiple cpu over voltage error i3 objects. These can include SSE (Streaming SIMD Extensions) and AVX (Advanced Vector Extensions).

    Idle States

    Idle States (C-states) are used to save power when the processor is idle. C0 is the operational state, meaning that the CPU is doing useful work. C1 is the first idle state, C2 the second, and so on, where more power saving actions are taken for numerically higher C-states.

    Enhanced Intel SpeedStep® Technology

    Enhanced Intel SpeedStep® Technology is an advanced means of enabling high performance while meeting the power-conservation needs of mobile systems. Conventional Intel SpeedStep® Technology switches both voltage and frequency in tandem between high and low levels in cpu over voltage error i3 to processor load, cpu over voltage error i3. Enhanced Intel SpeedStep® Technology builds upon that architecture using design strategies such as Separation between Voltage and Frequency Changes, and Clock Partitioning and Recovery.

    Thermal Monitoring Technologies

    Thermal Monitoring Technologies protect the processor package and the system from thermal failure through several thermal management features. An on-die Digital Thermal Sensor (DTS) detects the core's temperature, and the thermal management features reduce package power consumption and thereby temperature when required in order to remain within normal operating limits.

    Intel® Flex Memory Access

    Intel® Flex Memory Access facilitates easier upgrades by allowing different memory sizes to be populated and remain in dual-channel mode.

    Intel® Identity Protection Technology

    Intel® Identity Protection Technology is a built-in security token technology that helps provide a simple, tamper-resistant method for protecting access to your online customer and business data from threats and fraud. Intel® IPT provides a hardware-based proof of a unique user’s PC to websites, cpu over voltage error i3, financial institutions, and network services; providing verification that it is not malware attempting to login. Intel® IPT can be a key component in two-factor authentication solutions to protect your information at websites and business log-ins.

    Intel® Smart Response Technology

    Intel® Smart Response Technology combines the fast performance of a small solid state drive with the large capacity of a hard disk drive.

    Intel® My WiFi Technology

    Intel® My WiFi Technology enables wireless connection of an UltrabookTM or laptop to WiFi-enabled devices such as printers, stereos, etc.

    Intel vPro® Platform Eligibility

    The Intel vPro® platform is a set of hardware and technologies used to build business computing endpoints with premium performance, built-in security, modern manageability and platform stability.
    Learn more about Intel vPro®

    Intel® AES New Instructions

    Intel® AES New Instructions (Intel® AES-NI) are a set of instructions that enable fast and secure data encryption and decryption. AES-NI are valuable for a wide range of cryptographic applications, for example: applications that perform bulk encryption/decryption, authentication, random number generation, and authenticated encryption.

    Secure Key

    Intel® Secure Key consists of a digital random number generator that creates truly random numbers to strengthen encryption algorithms.

    Intel® Software Guard Extensions (Intel® SGX)

    Intel® Software Guard Extensions (Intel® SGX) provide applications the ability to create hardware enforced trusted execution protection for their applications’ sensitive routines and data. Intel® SGX provides developers a way to partition their code and data into CPU hardened trusted execution environments (TEE’s).

    Intel® Memory Protection Extensions (Intel® MPX)

    Intel® Memory Protection Extensions (Intel® MPX) provides a set of hardware features that can be used by software in conjunction with compiler changes to check that memory references intended at compile time do not become unsafe at runtime due to buffer overflow or underflow.

    Intel® Trusted Execution Technology

    Intel® Trusted Execution Technology for safer computing is a versatile set of hardware extensions to Intel® processors and chipsets that enhance the digital office platform with security capabilities such as measured launch and protected execution. It enables an environment where applications can run within their own space, protected from all other software on the system.

    Execute Disable Bit

    Execute Disable Bit is a hardware-based security feature that can reduce exposure to viruses and malicious-code attacks and prevent harmful software from executing and propagating on the server or network.

    Intel® Boot Guard

    Intel® Device Protection Technology with Boot Guard helps protect the system’s pre-OS environment from viruses and malicious software attacks.

    Intel® Stable IT Platform Program (SIPP)

    The Intel® Stable IT Platform Program (Intel® SIPP) aims for zero changes to key platform components and drivers for at least 15 months or until the next generational release, reducing complexity for IT to effectively manage their computing endpoints. cpu over voltage error i3 more about Intel® SIPP

    Intel® Virtualization Technology (VT-x)

    Intel® Virtualization Technology (VT-x) allows one hardware platform to function as multiple “virtual” platforms. It offers improved manageability by limiting downtime and maintaining productivity by isolating computing activities into separate partitions.

    Intel® Virtualization Technology for Directed I/O (VT-d)

    Intel® Virtualization Technology for Directed I/O (VT-d) continues from the existing support for IA-32 (VT-x) and Itanium® processor (VT-i) virtualization adding new support for I/O-device virtualization. Intel VT-d can help end users improve security and reliability of the systems and also improve performance of I/O devices in virtualized environments.

    Intel® VT-x with Extended Page Tables (EPT)

    Intel® VT-x with Extended Page Tables (EPT), also known as Second Level Address Translation (SLAT), provides acceleration for memory intensive virtualized applications. Extended Page Tables in Intel® Virtualization Technology platforms reduces the memory and power overhead costs and increases battery life through hardware optimization of page table management.

    MeanMachine41 said:

    The Corsair CX600 was a bronze rated budget PSU of questionable quality and efficiency. I think you should either cpu over voltage error i3 it tested or replaced. 4years is a good run for that unit. The PSU is the lifeblood of any system and not to be underestimated. A failing PSU can do damage to other hardware especially the CPU.

    If you have run your system without Turbo Mode and it freezes then definitely swap the unit out to test

    Dust can indeed build up and bad things can happen however,it would have to be really bad. You should give your whole system a good clean as pockets of dust can cause major issues, cpu over voltage error i3. With the system fully powered down, Initially vacuum carefully any bad buildups then use Compressed air from a cylinder. Follow a good guide.

    Click to expand.

    Thank you once again. I just cleaned it, it took me a long time but it cpu over voltage error i3 hard. It was full of dust. Everywhere.

    I think you're misunderstanding a bit about the turbo mode:
    With turbo mode on, it freezes the whole system sometimes and I have to reboot Windows so I can use it again.
    But with turbo mode off, everything works perfectly fine without freezes.

    I read here

    https://community.intel.com/t5/Processors/Intel-Turbo-Boost-causing-crashes-blue-screens/td-p/698571/page/2

    that this crashes happening with turbo mode on might be due to hardware compatibility. Maybe cpu over voltage error i3 is the case?

    Or do you really think I should replace my PSU? If so, which one do you recommend? One that's good but not expensive, if it's possible? Thanks once again.

     

    Cpu over voltage error i3 - sorry

    MeanMachine41 said:

    The Corsair CX600 was a bronze rated budget PSU of questionable quality and efficiency. I think you should either have it tested or replaced. 4years is a good run for that unit. The PSU is the lifeblood of any system and not to be underestimated. A failing PSU can do damage to other hardware especially the CPU.

    If you have run your system without Turbo Mode and it freezes then definitely swap the unit out to test

    Dust can indeed build up and bad things can happen however,it would have to be really bad. You should give your whole system a good clean as pockets of dust can cause major issues. With the system fully powered down, Initially vacuum carefully any bad buildups then use Compressed air from a cylinder. Follow a good guide .

    Click to expand...

    Thank you once again. I just cleaned it, it took me a long time but it wasn't hard. It was full of dust. Everywhere.

    I think you're misunderstanding a bit about the turbo mode:
    With turbo mode on, it freezes the whole system sometimes and I have to reboot Windows so I can use it again.
    But with turbo mode off, everything works perfectly fine without freezes.

    I read here

    https://community.intel.com/t5/Processors/Intel-Turbo-Boost-causing-crashes-blue-screens/td-p/698571/page/2

    that this crashes happening with turbo mode on might be due to hardware compatibility. Maybe this is the case?

    Or do you really think I should replace my PSU? If so, which one do you recommend? One that's good but not expensive, if it's possible? Thanks once again.

     

    Launch Date

    The date the product was first introduced.

    Lithography

    Lithography refers to the semiconductor technology used to manufacture an integrated circuit, and is reported in nanometer (nm), indicative of the size of features built on the semiconductor.

    Total Cores

    Cores is a hardware term that describes the number of independent central processing units in a single computing component (die or chip).

    Total Threads

    Where applicable, Intel® Hyper-Threading Technology is only available on Performance-cores.

    Processor Base Frequency

    Processor Base Frequency describes the rate at which the processor's transistors open and close. The processor base frequency is the operating point where TDP is defined. Frequency is typically measured in gigahertz (GHz), or billion cycles per second.

    Cache

    CPU Cache is an area of fast memory located on the processor. Intel® Smart Cache refers to the architecture that allows all cores to dynamically share access to the last level cache.

    Bus Speed

    A bus is a subsystem that transfers data between computer components or between computers. Types include front-side bus (FSB), which carries data between the CPU and memory controller hub; direct media interface (DMI), which is a point-to-point interconnection between an Intel integrated memory controller and an Intel I/O controller hub on the computer’s motherboard; and Quick Path Interconnect (QPI), which is a point-to-point interconnect between the CPU and the integrated memory controller.

    TDP

    Thermal Design Power (TDP) represents the average power, in watts, the processor dissipates when operating at Base Frequency with all cores active under an Intel-defined, high-complexity workload. Refer to Datasheet for thermal solution requirements.

    Embedded Options Available

    Embedded Options Available indicates products that offer extended purchase availability for intelligent systems and embedded solutions. Product certification and use condition applications can be found in the Production Release Qualification (PRQ) report. See your Intel representative for details.

    Max Memory Size (dependent on memory type)

    Max memory size refers to the maximum memory capacity supported by the processor.

    Memory Types

    Intel® processors come in four different types: Single Channel, Dual Channel, Triple Channel, and Flex Mode. Maximum supported memory speed may be lower when populating multiple DIMMs per channel on products that support multiple memory channels.

    Max # of Memory Channels

    The number of memory channels refers to the bandwidth operation for real world application.

    Max Memory Bandwidth

    Max Memory bandwidth is the maximum rate at which data can be read from or stored into a semiconductor memory by the processor (in GB/s).

    ECC Memory Supported

    ECC Memory Supported indicates processor support for Error-Correcting Code memory. ECC memory is a type of system memory that can detect and correct common kinds of internal data corruption. Note that ECC memory support requires both processor and chipset support.

    Processor Graphics

    Processor Graphics indicates graphics processing circuitry integrated into the processor, providing the graphics, compute, media, and display capabilities. Processor graphics brands include Intel® Iris® Xe Graphics, Intel® UHD Graphics, Intel® HD Graphics, Iris® Graphics, Iris® Plus Graphics, and Iris® Pro Graphics. See the Intel® Graphics Technology for more information.

    Intel® Iris® Xe Graphics only: to use the Intel® Iris® Xe brand, the system must be populated with 128-bit (dual channel) memory. Otherwise, use the Intel® UHD brand.

    Graphics Base Frequency

    Graphics Base frequency refers to the rated/guaranteed graphics render clock frequency in MHz.

    Graphics Max Dynamic Frequency

    Graphics max dynamic frequency refers to the maximum opportunistic graphics render clock frequency (in MHz) that can be supported using Intel® HD Graphics with Dynamic Frequency feature.

    Graphics Video Max Memory

    The maximum amount of memory accessible to processor graphics. Processor graphics operates on the same physical memory as the CPU (subject to OS, driver, and other system limitations).

    Graphics Output

    Graphics Output defines the interfaces available to communicate with display devices.

    4K Support

    4K support indicates the product's support of 4K resolution, defined here as minimum 3840 x 2160.

    Max Resolution (HDMI)

    Max Resolution (HDMI) is the maximum resolution supported by the processor via the HDMI interface (24bits per pixel & 60Hz). System or device display resolution is dependent on multiple system design factors; actual resolution may be lower on your system.

    Max Resolution (DP)‡

    Max Resolution (DP) is the maximum resolution supported by the processor via the DP interface (24bits per pixel & 60Hz). System or device display resolution is dependent on multiple system design factors; actual resolution may be lower on your system.

    Max Resolution (eDP - Integrated Flat Panel)‡

    Max Resolution (Integrated Flat Panel) is the maximum resolution supported by the processor for a device with an integrated flat panel (24bits per pixel & 60Hz). System or device display resolution is dependent on multiple system design factors; actual resolution may be lower on your device.

    DirectX* Support

    DirectX* Support indicates support for a specific version of Microsoft’s collection of APIs (Application Programming Interfaces) for handling multimedia compute tasks.

    OpenGL* Support

    OpenGL (Open Graphics Library) is a cross-language, multi-platform API (Application Programming Interface) for rendering 2D and 3D vector graphics.

    Intel® Quick Sync Video

    Intel® Quick Sync Video delivers fast conversion of video for portable media players, online sharing, and video editing and authoring.

    Intel® InTru™ 3D Technology

    Intel® InTru™ 3D Technology provides stereoscopic 3-D Blu-ray* playback in full 1080p resolution over HDMI* 1.4 and premium audio.

    Intel® Clear Video HD Technology

    Intel® Clear Video HD Technology, like its predecessor, Intel® Clear Video Technology, is a suite of image decode and processing technologies built into the integrated processor graphics that improve video playback, delivering cleaner, sharper images, more natural, accurate, and vivid colors, and a clear and stable video picture. Intel® Clear Video HD Technology adds video quality enhancements for richer color and more realistic skin tones.

    Intel® Clear Video Technology

    Intel® Clear Video Technology is a suite of image decode and processing technologies built into the integrated processor graphics that improve video playback, delivering cleaner, sharper images, more natural, accurate, and vivid colors, and a clear and stable video picture.

    PCI Express Revision

    PCI Express Revision is the supported version of the PCI Express standard. Peripheral Component Interconnect Express (or PCIe) is a high-speed serial computer expansion bus standard for attaching hardware devices to a computer. The different PCI Express versions support different data rates.

    PCI Express Configurations

    PCI Express (PCIe) Configurations describe the available PCIe lane configurations that can be used to link to PCIe devices.

    Max # of PCI Express Lanes

    A PCI Express (PCIe) lane consists of two differential signaling pairs, one for receiving data, one for transmitting data, and is the basic unit of the PCIe bus. Max # of PCI Express Lanes is the total number of supported lanes.

    Sockets Supported

    The socket is the component that provides the mechanical and electrical connections between the processor and motherboard.

    TJUNCTION

    Junction Temperature is the maximum temperature allowed at the processor die.

    Intel® Speed Shift Technology

    Intel® Speed Shift Technology uses hardware-controlled P-states to deliver dramatically quicker responsiveness with single-threaded, transient (short duration) workloads, such as web browsing, by allowing the processor to more quickly select its best operating frequency and voltage for optimal performance and power efficiency.

    Intel® Turbo Boost Technology

    Intel® Turbo Boost Technology dynamically increases the processor's frequency as needed by taking advantage of thermal and power headroom to give you a burst of speed when you need it, and increased energy efficiency when you don’t.

    Intel® Hyper-Threading Technology

    Intel® Hyper-Threading Technology (Intel® HT Technology) delivers two processing threads per physical core. Highly threaded applications can get more work done in parallel, completing tasks sooner.

    Intel® Transactional Synchronization Extensions

    Intel® Transactional Synchronization Extensions (Intel® TSX) are a set of instructions that add hardware transactional memory support to improve performance of multi-threaded software.

    Intel® 64

    Intel® 64 architecture delivers 64-bit computing on server, workstation, desktop and mobile platforms when combined with supporting software.¹ Intel 64 architecture improves performance by allowing systems to address more than 4 GB of both virtual and physical memory.

    Instruction Set

    An instruction set refers to the basic set of commands and instructions that a microprocessor understands and can carry out. The value shown represents which Intel’s instruction set this processor is compatible with.

    Instruction Set Extensions

    Instruction Set Extensions are additional instructions which can increase performance when the same operations are performed on multiple data objects. These can include SSE (Streaming SIMD Extensions) and AVX (Advanced Vector Extensions).

    Idle States

    Idle States (C-states) are used to save power when the processor is idle. C0 is the operational state, meaning that the CPU is doing useful work. C1 is the first idle state, C2 the second, and so on, where more power saving actions are taken for numerically higher C-states.

    Enhanced Intel SpeedStep® Technology

    Enhanced Intel SpeedStep® Technology is an advanced means of enabling high performance while meeting the power-conservation needs of mobile systems. Conventional Intel SpeedStep® Technology switches both voltage and frequency in tandem between high and low levels in response to processor load. Enhanced Intel SpeedStep® Technology builds upon that architecture using design strategies such as Separation between Voltage and Frequency Changes, and Clock Partitioning and Recovery.

    Thermal Monitoring Technologies

    Thermal Monitoring Technologies protect the processor package and the system from thermal failure through several thermal management features. An on-die Digital Thermal Sensor (DTS) detects the core's temperature, and the thermal management features reduce package power consumption and thereby temperature when required in order to remain within normal operating limits.

    Intel® Flex Memory Access

    Intel® Flex Memory Access facilitates easier upgrades by allowing different memory sizes to be populated and remain in dual-channel mode.

    Intel® Identity Protection Technology

    Intel® Identity Protection Technology is a built-in security token technology that helps provide a simple, tamper-resistant method for protecting access to your online customer and business data from threats and fraud. Intel® IPT provides a hardware-based proof of a unique user’s PC to websites, financial institutions, and network services; providing verification that it is not malware attempting to login. Intel® IPT can be a key component in two-factor authentication solutions to protect your information at websites and business log-ins.

    Intel® Smart Response Technology

    Intel® Smart Response Technology combines the fast performance of a small solid state drive with the large capacity of a hard disk drive.

    Intel® My WiFi Technology

    Intel® My WiFi Technology enables wireless connection of an UltrabookTM or laptop to WiFi-enabled devices such as printers, stereos, etc.

    Intel vPro® Platform Eligibility

    The Intel vPro® platform is a set of hardware and technologies used to build business computing endpoints with premium performance, built-in security, modern manageability and platform stability.
    Learn more about Intel vPro®

    Intel® AES New Instructions

    Intel® AES New Instructions (Intel® AES-NI) are a set of instructions that enable fast and secure data encryption and decryption. AES-NI are valuable for a wide range of cryptographic applications, for example: applications that perform bulk encryption/decryption, authentication, random number generation, and authenticated encryption.

    Secure Key

    Intel® Secure Key consists of a digital random number generator that creates truly random numbers to strengthen encryption algorithms.

    Intel® Software Guard Extensions (Intel® SGX)

    Intel® Software Guard Extensions (Intel® SGX) provide applications the ability to create hardware enforced trusted execution protection for their applications’ sensitive routines and data. Intel® SGX provides developers a way to partition their code and data into CPU hardened trusted execution environments (TEE’s).

    Intel® Memory Protection Extensions (Intel® MPX)

    Intel® Memory Protection Extensions (Intel® MPX) provides a set of hardware features that can be used by software in conjunction with compiler changes to check that memory references intended at compile time do not become unsafe at runtime due to buffer overflow or underflow.

    Intel® Trusted Execution Technology

    Intel® Trusted Execution Technology for safer computing is a versatile set of hardware extensions to Intel® processors and chipsets that enhance the digital office platform with security capabilities such as measured launch and protected execution. It enables an environment where applications can run within their own space, protected from all other software on the system.

    Execute Disable Bit

    Execute Disable Bit is a hardware-based security feature that can reduce exposure to viruses and malicious-code attacks and prevent harmful software from executing and propagating on the server or network.

    Intel® Boot Guard

    Intel® Device Protection Technology with Boot Guard helps protect the system’s pre-OS environment from viruses and malicious software attacks.

    Intel® Stable IT Platform Program (SIPP)

    The Intel® Stable IT Platform Program (Intel® SIPP) aims for zero changes to key platform components and drivers for at least 15 months or until the next generational release, reducing complexity for IT to effectively manage their computing endpoints.
    Learn more about Intel® SIPP

    Intel® Virtualization Technology (VT-x)

    Intel® Virtualization Technology (VT-x) allows one hardware platform to function as multiple “virtual” platforms. It offers improved manageability by limiting downtime and maintaining productivity by isolating computing activities into separate partitions.

    Intel® Virtualization Technology for Directed I/O (VT-d)

    Intel® Virtualization Technology for Directed I/O (VT-d) continues from the existing support for IA-32 (VT-x) and Itanium® processor (VT-i) virtualization adding new support for I/O-device virtualization. Intel VT-d can help end users improve security and reliability of the systems and also improve performance of I/O devices in virtualized environments.

    Intel® VT-x with Extended Page Tables (EPT)

    Intel® VT-x with Extended Page Tables (EPT), also known as Second Level Address Translation (SLAT), provides acceleration for memory intensive virtualized applications. Extended Page Tables in Intel® Virtualization Technology platforms reduces the memory and power overhead costs and increases battery life through hardware optimization of page table management.

    Thread: [HELP] CPU Input Voltage High and Stuck at 4.080V - RED - Maximus VII Genie -

  • 06-30-2015 01:19 AM#1

    PresidentSkroob no está en línea
    ROG Member Array

    [HELP] CPU Input Voltage High and Stuck at 4.080V - RED - Maximus VII Genie -

    As you can see from the screenshot, "Dual Intelligent Processors 5" AISuite 3 apps is reporting that the CPU Input Voltage is 4.080 V and is highlighted in red. This value also appears in the BIOS.

    Despite my efforts trying to manually override the CPU Input Voltage, either in the BIOS or in the AISuite app, the 4.080 V reading remains.

    I started getting some nasty reboots of late and am concerned my CPU has been damaged by this high voltage. I swapped in an old i3 and it is running fine again with no reboots. However, the high CPU Input Voltage of 4.080 V persists.

    In trying to isolate the problem, I also tried swapping in a second PSU and removing all internal peripherals - nothing fixes the 4.080 V reading.

    I have flashed the BIOS to the latest version and am running Windows 8.1.

    BIOS settings have been set to Optimized Defaults.

    Is my motherboard the problem? It is still under warranty, thank you!

    Click image for larger version.   Name:	Untitled-1.jpg  Views:	13  Size:	102.2 KB  ID:	50191

    Last edited by PresidentSkroob; 06-30-2015 at 01:25 AM.


  • 06-30-2015 05:50 AM#2

    FZero no está en línea
    ROG Guru: White Belt ArrayFZero PC Specs
    FZero PC Specs
    MotherboardAsus Maximus Hero X (Wi-Fi AC)
    ProcessorIntel Core I7-8700K
    Memory (part number)G.Skill TridentZ RGB 2x8 Gb 4000 Mhz DDR 4
    Graphics Card #1Gigabyte GeForce GTX 1070 G1 Gaming
    Sound CardOnboard
    MonitorBenQ GL2450H
    Storage #1Samsung SSD 850 EVO 500 Gb
    Storage #2WD Blue 4Tb/2TB
    CPU CoolerArctic Liquid Freezer 240/4x Arctic F12 PWM
    CaseNZXT S340
    Power SupplyXFX TS 550W
    Keyboard Genius KB-G235
    Mouse Logitech G402 Hyperion Fury
    Mouse Pad Cooler Master Swift-RX XL
    Headset/Speakers Logitech Z906
    OS Windows 10 Pro
    Network RouterSpeedport W724v
    Accessory #1 LC-CF-RGB-COMBO
    Accessory #2 Logitech G29 Driving Force Logitech Driving Force Shifter
    Accessory #3 Sony Bravia KD-55XE8096 4K
    FZero's Avatar

    Hey PresidentSkroob and welcome to the forum.

    I know this will sound stupid but did you remember to save settings after you changed them in Bios ?
    I don't know if you mentioned it but if you have 2 sticks of memory try taking 1 module out and try again in a different spot.

    Could we get a screenshot from your Bios to see what is happening ?
    You can save a screenshot in Bios using a USB stick and pressing F12 in Bios.

    Last edited by FZero; 06-30-2015 at 05:55 AM.


  • 06-30-2015 07:17 AM#3

    Nate152 no está en línea
    ModeratorArrayNate152 PC Specs
    Nate152 PC Specs
    MotherboardROG Strix Z690-F Gaming WiFi
    Processori7-12700KF
    Memory (part number)Kingston Fury Beast 16GB (2x8GB) 6000MT/s (KF560C40B)
    Graphics Card #1ROG Strix 3090 Ti LC OC
    Sound CardROG SupremeFX
    MonitorHP ZR30w
    Storage #1Seagate Firecuda 530 1TB
    CPU CoolerEK Quantum Velocity2
    CaseThermaltake Tower 900
    Power SupplyEVGA Supernova 1600 T2
    Keyboard ROG Falchion NX / Strix Flare II
    Mouse ROG Chakram X/Chakram Core/Spatha X
    Headset ROG Delta S Animate
    Mouse Pad Steelseries Prism XL + ROG Scabbard II
    OS Windows 11 Home
    Accessory #1 2x Swiftech Maelstrom X300 D5 V2
    Accessory #2 2x Hardware Labs SR2 560 MP radiators
    Accessory #3 Lamptron FC-5 V3 fan controller
    Nate152's Avatar

    hello PresidentSkroob

    The voltage reading is wrong, your cpu would be toast before it even got close to 4.08v.

    You could try uninstalling ai suite and flashing the bios again or to a different version.

    Uninstall ai suite in your programs then run this cleaner.

    http://rog.asus.com/forum/showthread...te-III-Cleaner

    Here is a guide you can follow to flash the bios.

    http://rog.asus.com/forum/showthread...BIOS-Flashback


  • 06-30-2015 08:12 AM#4

    FZero no está en línea
    ROG Guru: White Belt ArrayFZero PC Specs
    FZero PC Specs
    MotherboardAsus Maximus Hero X (Wi-Fi AC)
    ProcessorIntel Core I7-8700K
    Memory (part number)G.Skill TridentZ RGB 2x8 Gb 4000 Mhz DDR 4
    Graphics Card #1Gigabyte GeForce GTX 1070 G1 Gaming
    Sound CardOnboard
    MonitorBenQ GL2450H
    Storage #1Samsung SSD 850 EVO 500 Gb
    Storage #2WD Blue 4Tb/2TB
    CPU CoolerArctic Liquid Freezer 240/4x Arctic F12 PWM
    CaseNZXT S340
    Power SupplyXFX TS 550W
    Keyboard Genius KB-G235
    Mouse Logitech G402 Hyperion Fury
    Mouse Pad Cooler Master Swift-RX XL
    Headset/Speakers Logitech Z906
    OS Windows 10 Pro
    Network RouterSpeedport W724v
    Accessory #1 LC-CF-RGB-COMBO
    Accessory #2 Logitech G29 Driving Force Logitech Driving Force Shifter
    Accessory #3 Sony Bravia KD-55XE8096 4K
    FZero's Avatar

    [QUOTE=Nate152;516675]hello PresidentSkroob

    The voltage reading is wrong, your cpu would be toast before it even got close to 4.08v.

    I thought the same thing but i wondered why would he getting reboots and as he says : This value also appears in the BIOS. That is why i asked him to show us a screenshot of the Bios.

    Of course i realize the reboots could be some other problem. I'm really interested to see what the Bios says.

    Last edited by FZero; 06-30-2015 at 08:14 AM.


  • 06-30-2015 02:33 PM#5

    NemesisChild no está en línea
    ROG Guru: Brown Belt ArrayNemesisChild PC Specs
    NemesisChild PC Specs
    MotherboardASUS ROG STRIK Z490-E
    ProcessorIntel i9 10850K
    Memory (part number)G.Skill F4-3200C14D-32GTZR
    Graphics Card #1EVGA 3090 Ti FTW3 Ultra
    MonitorASUS TUF Gaming VG27AQL 1A
    Storage #1WD Black SN850 1TB NVMe M.2
    Storage #2WD Blue SN550 2TB NVMe M.2
    CPU CoolerCorsair H115i Pro XT
    CaseASUS ROG Strix Helios GX601
    Power SupplyEVGA SuperNova 1200 P2
    Keyboard ROG Strix Scope NX Deluxe
    Mouse Logitech G703 Wireless
    Headset Logitech G Pro
    Mouse Pad SteelSeries
    OS Windows 11 Home
    Network RouterASUS RIG STRIK GS-AX5400
    NemesisChild's Avatar

    Yet another reason not to use AI Suite.

    Intel i9 [email protected] 5.3GHz
    ASUS ROG Strix Z490-E
    Corsair H115i Pro XT
    G.Skill [email protected] 3600MHz CL14 2x16GB
    EVGA RTX 3090 Ti FWT3 Ultra
    OS: WD Black SN850 1TB NVMe M.2
    Storage: WD Blue SN550 2TB NVMe M.2
    EVGA SuperNova 1200 P2
    ASUS ROG Strix Helios GX601


  • 07-01-2015 12:13 AM#6

    PresidentSkroob no está en línea
    ROG Member Array
    I've removed AI Suite and ran the removal tool as well.

    Will try the BIOS flash method linked. Seems according to the screenshot that BIOS is not currently up to date despite my assumption it was. I used MAXIMUS VII GENE BIOS 2702, maybe it didn't flash properly... odd.

    Click image for larger version.   Name:	3.jpg  Views:	1  Size:	153.7 KB  ID:	50230

    Click image for larger version.   Name:	150630171024.jpg  Views:	4  Size:	131.2 KB  ID:	50231
    Trying to override the value

    Click image for larger version.   Name:	3.jpg  Views:	1  Size:	153.7 KB  ID:	50230

    Last edited by PresidentSkroob; 07-01-2015 at 12:20 AM.


  • 07-01-2015 01:29 AM#7

    Nate152 no está en línea
    ModeratorArrayNate152 PC Specs
    Nate152 PC Specs
    MotherboardROG Strix Z690-F Gaming WiFi
    Processori7-12700KF
    Memory (part number)Kingston Fury Beast 16GB (2x8GB) 6000MT/s (KF560C40B)
    Graphics Card #1ROG Strix 3090 Ti LC OC
    Sound CardROG SupremeFX
    MonitorHP ZR30w
    Storage #1Seagate Firecuda 530 1TB
    CPU CoolerEK Quantum Velocity2
    CaseThermaltake Tower 900
    Power SupplyEVGA Supernova 1600 T2
    Keyboard ROG Falchion NX / Strix Flare II
    Mouse ROG Chakram X/Chakram Core/Spatha X
    Headset ROG Delta S Animate
    Mouse Pad Steelseries Prism XL + ROG Scabbard II
    OS Windows 11 Home
    Accessory #1 2x Swiftech Maelstrom X300 D5 V2
    Accessory #2 2x Hardware Labs SR2 560 MP radiators
    Accessory #3 Lamptron FC-5 V3 fan controller
    Nate152's Avatar

  • 07-02-2015 12:35 AM#8

    PresidentSkroob no está en línea
    ROG Member Array
    I flash the BIOS again using MAXIMUS VII GENE BIOS 2702 found on this page:
    http://www.asus.com/us/Motherboards/...Desk_Download/

    Still stuck at 4.080V =\

    I find it confusing that the download is marked 2702 with a date of 2015/05/27. Yet the screenshot shows the version of the BIOS at 2.16.1240, but maybe this value just represents the BIOS Utility and not the BIOS itself...? Or maybe I am not correctly flashing.

    I tried to use the ROG connect method but it did not work despite follow directions.

    So I flashed the BIOS from within the BIOS Utility.

    Click image for larger version.   Name:	150701173400.jpg  Views:	3  Size:	175.1 KB  ID:	50251

    Last edited by PresidentSkroob; 07-02-2015 at 12:37 AM.


  • 07-02-2015 12:38 AM#9

    Nate152 no está en línea
    ModeratorArrayNate152 PC Specs
    Nate152 PC Specs
    MotherboardROG Strix Z690-F Gaming WiFi
    Processori7-12700KF
    Memory (part number)Kingston Fury Beast 16GB (2x8GB) 6000MT/s (KF560C40B)
    Graphics Card #1ROG Strix 3090 Ti LC OC
    Sound CardROG SupremeFX
    MonitorHP ZR30w
    Storage #1Seagate Firecuda 530 1TB
    CPU CoolerEK Quantum Velocity2
    CaseThermaltake Tower 900
    Power SupplyEVGA Supernova 1600 T2
    Keyboard ROG Falchion NX / Strix Flare II
    Mouse ROG Chakram X/Chakram Core/Spatha X
    Headset ROG Delta S Animate
    Mouse Pad Steelseries Prism XL + ROG Scabbard II
    OS Windows 11 Home
    Accessory #1 2x Swiftech Maelstrom X300 D5 V2
    Accessory #2 2x Hardware Labs SR2 560 MP radiators
    Accessory #3 Lamptron FC-5 V3 fan controller
    Nate152's Avatar

    That's the strangest thing.

    Install ROG cpu-z and see what the cpu core voltage is showing.

    http://www.softpedia.com/get/System/...PU-Z-ROG.shtml

    EDIT: Never mind that is a different voltage I see the vcore is at 1.152v and temp is 32c.

    The Initial cpu input voltage should be around 1.70v


  • 07-02-2015 01:49 AM#10

    PresidentSkroob no está en línea
    ROG Member Array
    Sorry i forgot to upload both screencaps, as you can see it's showing 4.080V

    I'm going to try CPU-z

    Click image for larger version.   Name:	150701185359.jpg  Views:	2  Size:	152.5 KB  ID:	50252

  • Also critical to today’s story is the understanding of what a “safe voltage” is. When manufacturers, media, and overclockers provide guidance of “safe voltages” for 24/7 use, they may be referencing different numbers. For instance, suppose GN recommends a safe Vcore of 1.4V for 24/7 on Processor X. In this instance, we have not clarified what “1.4V” means – it could mean 1.4V going into the CPU, period, as measured in the most accurate way possible (e.g. DMM to the socket). It could also mean 1.4V input into BIOS or UEFI. We might mean 1.4V as read through HWINFO or AIDA. Without that specificity, the best to hope for is that all of these numbers are reasonably close. That’s partly on motherboard makers to achieve through LLC tables, but there will always be some disparity. What matters most is that the disparity between actual Vcore (in this example) and input Vcore isn’t great enough to seriously damage anything.

    When we talk damage with parts, we’re talking long-term degradation. Some easy examples would be the System Agent voltage for Intel CPUs (VCCSA); increasing VCCSA to, for example, 1.4V is inadvisable for modern platforms, and will inevitably damage the IMC. For AMD, we might instead talk about SOC voltage – that’s our topic today. Increasing SOC voltage beyond recommended settings, discussed below, would have the effect of damaging the IMC and the APU GFX component’s overclocking ability.

    Over time, a degrading IMC may require more voltage to keep the same memory/GFX frequencies, or it might just lose that frequency altogether, forcing the user to downclock. Outright failure doesn’t happen at voltages close to reason, but will instead manifest over a period of months.

    Of course, the other side of this is the ability to kill a motherboard, which we already demonstrated here.

    General Notes 

    1. From speaking with numerous contacts at motherboard makers, AMD, and XOCers, general advisement on unsafe SOC voltages is that it begins beyond 1.3V. Conventional wisdom (starting with Ryzen) is that 1.2V is a safe SOC voltage, but we’ve been told by some vendors that Raven Ridge CPUs can reasonably take up to 1.3V, but the suggested input number tends to be 1.2V; this is because, again, the user-configured number and the actual voltage aren’t necessarily equal. Going significantly beyond 1.3V for sustained periods, e.g. 1.34, will likely result in degradation of the IMC over time.
    2. Although AMD may suggest that 1.3V is “safe,” keep in mind that typing in “1.3” and actual 1.3V to SOC are very different things, especially when you consider that software often underreports voltage.
    3. Vdroop can require higher LLC levels to stabilize the input voltage closer to the configured number.
    4. LLC tables on some boards can cause undesired spikes in voltage that can be deadly to the SOC or IMC. We have a separate video on how LLC works.
    5. VDDCR SOC Power represents uncore and GPU domain power draw or voltage configuration.
    6. SETTING 1.3 DOES NOT MEAN IT WILL NECESSARILY BE 1.3V FLAT. Voltages are not static. For example, in some of our tests, setting 1.3V with auto LLC could result in sustained SOC voltages of 1.39V, which will degrade your IMC in a matter of months. On Raven Ridge, this will also affect graphics performance.
    7. APU GFX and SOC GFX all go through the SOC. They all go through the SOC VRM. If you adjust one, you are essentially adjusting both.

    Test Methodology

    For testing, we first determined where to take socket measurements by finding a corresponding capacitor to the SOC VRM. We then took live measurements of the SOC voltage at the back of the socket, which we compared versus HWINFO and Ryzen Master or BIOS settings. Some of this is shown in the video.

    ASUS B350M-E Prime SOC Voltage Table

    ASUS B350M-ELLCFrequency InputSOC InputGFX InputDMM OutputHWI OutputPass/Fail
    3DMark FS LoopAuto13001.11.1DNFDNFFail
    VIDEO_TDR_FAILURE
    3DMark FS LoopHigh13001.11.11.118-1.1271.056-1.081Pass
    3DMark FS LoopExtreme13001.11.11.1471.087-1.106Pass
    3DMark FS LoopAuto15001.1 (Auto)1.21.17-1.1731.0-1.144Pass
    3DMark FS LoopHigh15001.1 (Auto)1.21.2231.15-1.181Pass
    3DMark FS LoopAuto15501.1 (Auto)1.2DNFDNFFail
    VIDEO_TDR_FAILURE
    3DMark FS LoopHigh15501.1 (Auto)1.21.2231.144-1.181 
    3DMark FS LoopHigh16001.1 (Auto)1.21.2231.144-1.181Fail
    VIDEO_TDR_FAILURE
    3DMark FS LoopExtreme16001.1 (Auto)1.2DNFDNFFail
    VIDEO_TDR_FAILURE
    3DMark FS LoopExtreme16001.21.21.35-1.361.29-1.3Pass
    3DMark FS LoopAUTO16501.21.31.36-1.3721.25-1.306Pass

    Here’s a table of our ASUS SOC checks. The color coding (in the video) is based on frequencies; when we changed frequency, we changed row color. At 1.1V SOC and 1.1V APU GFX input, we were measuring 1.12-1.13V with a multimeter, or 1.056 to 1.081 with HWINFO. This was with a low 1300MHz frequency. Going to 1550MHz had 1.1V SOC and 1.2V GFX reading out as 1.223V via DMM, or 1.15-1.181V via HWINFO. That’s with High LLC, which was required for stability.

    Here’s the dangerous one: At 1600MHz and with Extreme LLC, we configured 1.2V SOC and 1.2V GFX, and read out 1.35V SOC via DMM. If you were relying on HWINFO, you’d think you were only at 1.29 to 1.3V, which are sort of acceptable, though pushing it. Not really acceptable on this motherboard, mind you, but conventional wisdom would suggest that 1.25V is OK for most APUs, according to some of our motherboard contacts. This board isn’t really meant to push this high, but that’s beside the point. The point is that these voltages – 1.2 on each – degrade the IMC over time. That was with Extreme LLC, though. Let’s dial back to auto, since that’s what most people use. Even with Auto LLC, a 1650MHz clock was held with a 1.2V SOC and 1.3V GFX voltage. In reality, these numbers equaled 1.37V and up. In other words, hope you don’t need a memory controller for very long.

    MSI B350 Tomahawk SOC Voltage Table

    MSI B350 TomahawkLLCFrequency InputSOC InputGFX InputDMM OutputHWI OutputPass/Fail
    3DMark FS LoopAuto15001.1 (Auto)1.21.185-1.1911.125-1.15Pass
    3DMark FS LoopLevel 1/815001.1 (Auto)1.21.195-1.21.137-1.162Pass
    3DMark FS LoopLevel 8/815001.1 (Auto)1.21.1351.07-1.1Pass
    3DMark FS LoopAuto15501.1 (Auto)1.21.187-1.191.119-1.15Fail
    Eventual FS crash
    3DMark FS LoopAuto15501.21.21.169-1.21.234-1.24Fail
    Eventual FS crash
    3DMark FS LoopLevel 1/815501.21.21.24-1.2471.194-1.232Pass
    3DMark FS LoopAuto16001.21.21.244-1.2451.175-1.206Pass
    3DMark FS LoopAuto16001.21.31.244-1.2451.169-1.206Pass
    3DMark FS LoopAuto16501.2Does
    nothing
    1.244-1.2451.169-1.206Fail
    FireStrike Crash
    3DMark FS LoopAuto16501.3Does
    nothing
    1.3511.269-1.3Fail
    Eventual FS crash

    The MSI B350 Tomahawk is next. This one sometimes had Vdroop, but not always. We also noticed APU GFX Voltage didn’t seem to do anything on this board. It was all driven by normal SOC voltage. Going for 1600MHz with a 1.2V SOC and 1.2V GFX allowed the frequency to hold, using auto LLC. The DMM output was 1.245V, while HWINFO reported 1.18-1.2V. Increasing GFX voltage to 1.3V did nothing, and did not change the voltage readings at all. Going to 1650MHz at 1.3V SOC had us reading 1.35 via the DMM, but HWINFO had us reading 1.27 to 1.3V.

    Gigabyte X370 Gaming K5 SOC Voltage Table

    GBT Gaming K5LLCFrequency InputSOC InputGFX InputDMM OutputHWI OutputPass/Fail
    3DMark FS LoopAuto15001.1 (Auto)1.21.31.063-1.119Pass
    3DMark FS LoopAuto15001.1 (Auto)1.31.3961.18Pass
    3DMark FS LoopAuto15001.1 (Auto)1.151.253-1.2561.012-1.063Pass
    3DMark FS LoopAuto15001.1 (Auto)1.1251.230.987-1.03Pass
    3DMark FS LoopAuto15501.1 (Auto)1.1251.230.984-0.997Pass
    3DMark FS LoopAuto16001.1 (Auto)1.1251.228-1.2320.987-1.03Fail
    Firestrike crash
    3DMark FS LoopAuto16001.1 (Auto)1.151.25-1.2561.012-1.075Pass
    3DMark FS LoopAuto16501.1 (Auto)1.1631.264-1.271.031-1.087Fail
    Firestrike crash
    3DMark FS LoopAuto16501.1 (Auto)1.181251.283-1.2871.087-1.1Pass
    3DMark FS LoopAuto17001.1 (Auto)1.19375DNFDNFFail
    Firestrike crash

    Finally, the Gigabyte Gaming K5 seems to push voltage more heavily than other boards. This isn’t inherently a fault with Gigabyte’s motherboard, it’s just that users need to be aware that the behavior on this board is different from the MSI and ASUS boards, which means that following a guide for a different motherboard could easily have you inputting unsafe voltages.

    At 1500MHz and with a 1.1V SOC, 1.2V GFX via BIOS, we measured a 1.3V output via DMM. HWINFO read 1.1V. Going to 1.1V SOC and 1.3V GFX gave us 1.39 to 1.4V SOC, which is dangerous to the health of the IMC.

    This is where we realized that Gigabyte was being more aggressive than MSI – again, that’s not a fault of either, just a behavior. We dropped to 1.15V GFX input voltage, which resulted in a 1.25V DMM reading. As you can see in this table, 1650MHz was held with an input number of 1.1V SOC and 1.18125V GFX, resulting in a 1.28V SOC voltage as measured at the socket, but 1.1V via HWINFO. The takeaway here is that the Gigabyte board only required us to input 1.18V for GFX to get 1.3V out, whereas the MSI board would require a 1.3V input to get roughly the same out. The ASUS board would require 1.2-1.25V to get 1.3V out. These are behaviors that you need to be aware of on the motherboards, and they are somewhat unique to each board.

    Conclusion

    The main take-away here is that establishing a “safety” voltage is important, but ensuring that the voltage provision actually equates the safety input is more important. If we’ve decided that “1.3” is safe for SOC, it’s not good enough to just stop incrementing voltage once BIOS reads “1.3.” There needs to be another check.

    In speaking with various contacts, we’ve heard a few conflicting (but generally converging) guidelines for safe voltages:

    • Our understanding is that an AMD-made overclocking video for Ryzen (not Raven Ridge) suggested a 1.2V SOC voltage. This was at Ryzen’s launch, so is potentially outdated.
    • ASUS once recommended 1.25V SOC maximally.
    • Gigabyte has suggested that up to 1.3V should be OK, but spiking or maintaining spikes beyond 1.3V could be damaging to the SOC.
    • Buildzoid has suggested a safety of 1.2V, which also aligns with what most early Ryzen overclocking guidelines suggested; note that this is specifically for Ryzen, not necessarily for Raven Ridge.
    • Other contacts have suggested between 1.2V and 1.3V.

    If you ask us, we think decent overclocks are achievable with 1.2-1.25V SOC going into the socket, and that more than that isn’t really necessary, anyway.

    For additional information on this topic, please check the embedded video above.

    Editorial: Steve Burke
    Video: Andrew Coleman

    Read these next...

    I have the a problem with my PC:

    The PSU is FSP Hydro+ 650W .

    The Voltages of CPU is seem bad.


    • I have change to new PSU but the same problem

    • Is it the same PSU model? If so try a different maker. Are you checking these voltages with all the hardware installed or is the PSU unloaded. If you are doing this unloaded, the PSU may be detecting an unloaded condition and is reducing the power to keep from burning up.

    • No, different model.the result is from running PC not unloaded PSU

    • What issue do you think you have, you're not showing any errors and I dont think you've actually explain the issue, just that you believe the CPU voltages are low - I expect you mean wrong for what you expect.

      Are you taking in to consideration Speedstep or low power mode in your BIOS/UEFI/OS, they can lower voltages to use less power when the CPU isnt working hard, so if your concern is you expected 3.3V and you see 1.5v then you may be looking for an issue that does not exist.

      So please can you explain the issue you face, not what you think the cause is.

    • Yeah,

      The problem that it showing bad voltages for all input. My PC hang randomly sometime per day.

      I tried to replace the new PSU but still have this problem

    • So you think because the PC hangs you issue is voltage?

      Have you looked in event logs to see what it says?

      Where are you seeing bad voltages

    • Yes,

      It seem windows does not have log for this.

      You can see the 3.3V,5V and 12V on mainboard are incorrect

    • Have you been trying to overclock or bee changing settings in the BIOS?

      Have you considered the CPU or Motherboard may be the issue if you have not? What happened before you started to look at this to cause it to hang, any power failures, storms, shorts?

    • Any time when PC hang, the mainboard(Coloful Igame Z270) alway so E1 error code.

      There are too many factors can cause this.

      The PSU still running, the LED still light

    • In my experience, bad voltage on a PSU would not cause a machine to just hang. It would cause it to shutdown instantly or to reboot... in either case, there would be a message in the eventlog saying previous shutdown was caused by a power event...

    • This could be the slate issue itself.
      Try the same psu with some other pc to verify voltage.

    • jamerencher wrote:

      Any time when PC hang, the mainboard(Coloful Igame Z270) alway so E1 error code.

      There are too many factors can cause this.

      Like what factors?

      The web is a wonderful place to find answers, but that motherboard, I can't even find a manual, let alone what E1 means.

      Are you able to test your CPU on another MB?

      I would guess either something is wrong with the board or something needs connecting that has been missed, for example the 4 PIN CPU specific connection.

    • Just my 2 cents....any firmware updates for mobo and/or mobo software ? 

      Then rather then using 3rd party software, do you have readings from the manufacturer software or monitoring tool ?

    • If the board is any good there will be points near the power plug to read the actual voltages with a multi-meter. 

      Before going off on weird tangents over whats written on a PC app. I would be checking the event logs and testing hard drive memory and CPU for stability. Then going to firmware updates and drivers.

    • The board he has seems to be this one:

      https://en.colorful.cn/contents/352/692.html

      Someone over on Toms Hardware pointed to the voltages

      https://forums.tomshardware.com/threads/pc-keep-hang-3-time-per-day.3517674/

      I'd be more inclined to ask if you have any other computers to test, it's been a while since I've looked but the RAM/CPU voltages can differ wildly from the set 3/5/12 when reported through software as you don't know what is being reported.

      A quick look around for an i5 CPU stock voltage turns up

      https://forums.tomshardware.com/threads/core-i5-750-stock-vcore-voltage.332278/

      https://www.masterslair.com/vcore-vtt-dram-pll-pch-voltages-explained-core-i7-i5-i3

      If I download the tool you are using and run it it tells me all my voltages are 0 or 0.9 which sounds daft, so I wouldn't worry too much and concentrate of the other areas, temperature/air flow, do a chkdsk, remove random junk running in the background, check the event log and update drivers/AV software.

    • Snap! Azure outage, malware in JWST images, floppy disks, Voyager 1, & more

      Snap! Azure outage, malware in JWST images, floppy disks, Voyager 1, & more

      Spiceworks Originals

      Your daily dose of tech news, in brief. While the month may be ending, we're halfway through the week. Let's jump into today's Snap! and see some of the things going on in the world. You need to hear this. Microsoft Azure outage knocks Ubuntu...

    • Monitor our Weblogs

      Monitor our Weblogs

      Security

      Hi,I would like to ask for your recommendations on how I can capture the websites our end users access during office hours.our current firewall doesnt support it as it only logs HTTP connections and we all know that almost all of the websites now are usin...

    • How to keep a record on my phone: of my own calls I will fix or need to fix

      How to keep a record on my phone: of my own calls I will fix or need to fix

      IT & Tech Careers

      I am the sole I.T. guy for a company.That has Servers/ NAS, I manage the PIX firewall. take full responsibility of all data including accounting Backups on NAS, Servers, Camera ( recordings).Do Cabling/Crimping as needed ,Set up VPN for remote folks,  Pur...

    • Spark! Pro series - 31st August 2022 - The Bacon Day Edition

      Spark! Pro series - 31st August 2022 - The Bacon Day Edition

      Spiceworks Originals

      Today in History: 1142 Possible date for establishment of the Iroquois (Haudenosaunee) LeagueCenturies before the creation of the United States and its Constitution, democracy had already taken root in North America—among a handful of Indigenous nations. ...

    • Showing End Users How The Sausage Is Made

      Showing End Users How The Sausage Is Made

      Best Practices & General IT

      Basic scenario is this1 - End user submits issue via email2 - IT investigates and proves issue is with external vendor3 - IT emails vendor4 - Vendor emails back5 - repeat 3+4 until issue is fixed6 - IT emails end user to say it's fixed, or details how to ...

    Troubleshooting and Solutions for Processor High Temperature and System Blue Screen in i-Café

    This is a general troubleshooting guide for processor high temperature and blue screen issues especially in i-cafe (Internet café) environment. 


    Computer overheating, processor high temperature, or frequent blue screen errors are common problems that many players and Internet cafe owners are encountering. In particular, performance-seeking players and high-end Internet cafes pay special attention to the emergence of such issues. This article provides an analysis.

    • Common causes of the blue screen of death and overheating of the processor or system.
    • How to perform troubleshooting and the corresponding solutions!

    The following factors contribute to the high temperature of the processor and the blue screen errors:

    • Wrong choice of the the thermal solutions.
    • Improper BIOS setting of the motherboard.
    • Some low-cost power supplies cause weak power supply of the motherboard.
    • Abnormal heat dissipation of the computer case.
    • CPU overclocking.
    • Too high ambient temperature.

    Most processor and system overheating and the related blue screen problem can be resolved, and everyone's computers can maintain stable operation using the troubleshooting tips listed below.

    Types of thermal solutions

    Regardless of the type of thermal solutions used, the thermal design power (TDP) wattage marked with the heat dissipation specifications must first be checked to ensure that the specifications are higher than or equal to the TDP wattage of the CPU used.

    Air cooling - tower type (single tower, double tower), and lower pressure type

    Air cooling

    Advantages:

    • It can optimize heat dissipation by sufficiently utilizing the air duct of the case, and at the same time strengthening the air duct of the whole case and promoting the expulsion of hot air.
    • The lower pressure type can simultaneously take into account the heat dissipation of the motherboard components.
    • Long service life.

    Disadvantages:

    • The higher the specifications, the more space will be taken up.
    • Due to the common ATX case, the CPU is located directly above the graphics card, so it is easily affected by the graphics card temperature.
    • The temperature control is not as cold as water. It quickly reaches the highest temperature

    Tips for installing air cooling thermal solution  

    • Do not screw the fastener too tight or too loose. This is to prevent damage to the hardware or insufficient pressure on the contact surface.
    • Tighten the screw of the fastener to just a moderate tightness. Do not exert excessive force or just casually tighten.
    • Gently press the radiator after installation to check whether it is installed well.
    • The radiator base needs to be installed horizontally so that the thermal paste can spread evenly. Separately tighten the screws from the opposite corners halfway and then tighten them completely.

      Radiator base

     

    Water cooling thermal solution

    Water cooling thermal solution 1Water cooling thermal solution 2

    Types of cold exhaust specifications: 120mm, 240mm, 280mm, 360mm, 480mm.

    Advantages:

    • Water has a higher specific heat capacity and can absorb more heat, making it difficult to reach the highest temperature.
    • Except for the cold exhaust, not much of the space in the case will be occupied.
    • It is less affected by the air duct of the case and graphics card temperature than by air cooling.

    Disadvantages:

    • Risk of liquid leakage.
    • Its service life is not as cold as air cooling.

    Tips for water cooling thermal solution

    • Due to manufacturing limitations, the integrated water cooling currently in the market will contain 10%~20% air. Based on the principles of physics, the water level in the same container will always be the same height and the bubbles will always move toward the highest point. Therefore, if the cold head is higher than the position of the cold exhaust, the bubble will rise to the highest point so in the cold head, the heat of the cold head cannot be completely transferred to the water, leading to a temperature rise, and long-term operations may even cause the cold head to be damaged.
    • When installing integrated water cooling, the best way is to install the cold exhaust at the top, filling the cold head with liquid, thus achieving the best cooling effect.
    • If the cold exhaust is installed on the side, it should be noted that the connection between the cold exhaust and the water pipe should be placed at a low place. If placed at a high place, the air in the waterway will be in this position, which will produce bubble noise. This method also allows users to separate the integrated water cooling.

      Installed integrated water cooling

    Tips for thermal paste coating (thermal interface material)

    • Thermal paste  (also known as thermal interface material (TIM) is used to fill the gaps between the planes of different materials so that heat can be transferred better. The thermal efficiency of thermal paste depends on its thermal conductivity and the application method.
    • Avoid applying too much or too little, re-using the thermal paste, and avoid presence of foreign substances, which can lead to lower thermal conductivity and incomplete filling of contact surface.
    • A common simple application method can be smearing in the middle of the CPU the amount of a green bean size, either a long strip or an X shape, and then apply by the radiator down pressure to make it spread evenly. (Adjust the specific amount according to CPU surface area.)

    BIOS setting of motherboards

    Most modern BIOS major manufacturers, especially for some high-end models, will unlock the power consumption limit of the processor (PL1 and PL2) by default and set higher voltages to fully release its performance.

    Here is an example of two BIOS settings that can be different between motherboards.

    BIOS settings 1

    BIOS settings 2

    Tips for BIOS settings

    • Most of the BIOS manufactures and vendors, especially the high-end ones, will unlock the power consumption limit of the processor (PL1, PL2) by default and set higher voltages to fully release its performance. This will keep the processor running outside the preset thermal design power (TDP).
    • Better heat dissipation is needed to support this. If ultimate performance is not required and there is no strong heat dissipation, it can be set to the processor's default value.
    • The PL2 of the processor is the short-term maximum power consumption limit. After maintaining operation and achieving the set time (Tau), it will be reduced to the long-term power consumption limit of the PL1 in order to achieve optimum power consumption and performance balance.
    • As the voltage changes, it produces variation. The excess voltage is called "overshoot", which may go beyond the safe voltage range, causing the system to be hot and unstable. To avoid this situation, the load line can be installed, which can appropriately reduce the voltage (Vdroop) at the same time as the load. The purpose is to keep the voltage within a safe range.

    Here is an example on BIOS setting.

    BIOS setting

    For better overclocking, this behavior can be "corrected" in the motherboard (LLC: Load Line Calibration), but it will also bring about a high CPU temperature and even damage.

    Adjusted LLC

    Voltage settings

    Similarly, the CPU temperature will also be affected by the LLC (Load Line Calibration) and SVID Profile (different manufacturers have different names). Turning on the former will result in a higher temperature under CPU loads, while the latter will affect the temperature under all CPU conditions.

    Voltage settings

    Motherboard power supply

    The power supply of the motherboard and the power source will play a decisive role in the overall stability of the computer. This can be seen on some high-end motherboards: for example the power supply part of the CPU will adopt the 8+4 pin or even the 8+8 pin power supply design, aiming at stability under high load operations of the high-end processor.

    Whether a power source is good or bad, it cannot be determined by the nominal wattage only. It also depends on the material of the components, workmanship, and the output stability. If the power source cannot meet the operating conditions, it may cause a blue or black screen, or even a hardware burnout.

    Motherboard power supply

    Tips for power supplies

    Consider the following:

    • Heat dissipation of the CPU power supply part
    • Materials used in the CPU power supply part

    Attention should be paid to the power supply parts: voltage stability, ripple, noise, surge, boot time sequence, power down retention time. Generally choose a good brand when buying power supply and always follow the formula of at least one RMB=one watt.

    Heat dissipation of the case

    When the computer is operating, other hardware such as the CPU, graphics card, and the motherboard power supply, will generate heat. If a fan is not installed in the case, the internal heat cannot escape from the case, resulting in heat accumulation. This will affect the heat dissipation of all hardware, and the temperature will get higher and higher, creating a vicious cycle. Some Internet cafes may put the cases into cabinets for beauty, creating an enclosed space that makes heat dissipation more difficult.

    Heat dissipation of the case

    Tips for heat dissipation of the case

    • Keep the air ducts in the right direction. The common air ducts for ATX cases are: front-in and rear-out, bottom-in and top-out.
    • Place the case in a ventilated environment.
    • Heat dissipation effect cannot be achieved without cold-and-heat exchange, such as all-out or all-in.

    Ambient temperature

    During summer and winter, the temperature of computer hardware can vary by more than ten degrees because of the difference in the room temperature.

    Delta T

    ΔT = T2 - T1

    Ambient temperature

    Tips for maintaining the ambient temperature

    The temperature of the computer is also affected by room temperature. In summer and winter, the temperature of every computer hardware can vary by more than ten degrees because of the difference in the room temperature. To maintain ventilation of the case, it is recommended to use the system it in an air-conditioned room in hot weather.

    Overclocking

    When a system is operating beyond the preset specification, it is called overclocking. If overclocking is required, better hardware is needed to support it such as heat dissipation, motherboard, and power supply.

    Overclocking the CPU

    • By default, Intel® processors can sustain a maximum frequency (PL2) of 28 to 56 seconds(varies according to different processors), and will then fall to a long-term frequency (PL1).
    • Modern BIOS has a CPU multi-core enhancement function (name varies according to different motherboards) that unlocks the limit, maintains the maximum CPU frequency for a long time, and even increases the all-core frequency to the single-core frequency, thus maximizing CPU performance.
    • Overclocking the processor's voltage will reach a higher value and this generates more heat. High temperature is the biggest enemy of electronic components, and will cause blue screens, computer crashes, and even damage.

    Overclocking the memory

    The memory controller is located inside the CPU, and the DDR4 has a default frequency of 2133 MHz/2400MHz/2666 MHz. The exceeded frequency belongs to the overclocking range and is affected by both the CPU and motherboard.

    When purchasing memory DRAM, consider these factors

    • When selecting high-frequency memory, refer to the XMP profile documentation.
    • Check the list of memory compatibility for the purchased motherboard.

      XMP authentication

    cpu over voltage error i3

    0 Comments

    Leave a Comment