Counter strike vp4 terrorist missions

counter strike vp4 terrorist missions

The P-3 fulfilled a wide breadth of mission sets, ranging from overland ground troops support to littoral surveillance to hunting submarines. Answering the. Programme to combat money laundering, terrorist financing and financial crime. 1. Designated operators shall establish and implement a. The force is tasked with both its longstanding amphibious warfare mission as well vehicles to the light mechanized infantry battalion, as well as CS/VP4.

Counter strike vp4 terrorist missions - apologise that

Operation enduring freedom p Stock Photos and Images

John P. Jumper September 6, 2001 - September 2, 2005  Just five days before the 9/11 terrorist attacks against the United States, Gen. John P. Jumper became the Air Force's seventeenth Chief of Staff. Over the ensuing four years, he led the service during Operations Enduring Freedom and Iraqi Freedom, America's first battles in the Global War on Terrorism, and Operation Noble Eagle, defending the country=s skies. During his tenure, General Jumper pressed for the modernization of the fleet, including the FB22 Raptor and FB35 Joint Strike Fighter, and established the Air Operations Center as a f Stock Photo

RMFFGXPW–John P. Jumper September 6, 2001 - September 2, 2005 Just five days before the 9/11 terrorist attacks against the United States, Gen. John P. Jumper became the Air Force's seventeenth Chief of Staff. Over the ensuing four years, he led the service during Operations Enduring Freedom and Iraqi Freedom, America's first battles in the Global War on Terrorism, and Operation Noble Eagle, defending the country=s skies. During his tenure, General Jumper pressed for the modernization of the fleet, including the FB22 Raptor and FB35 Joint Strike Fighter, and established the Air Operations Center as a f

U.S. Marine Corps Lance Cpl. Christopher Mount with 1st Battalion, 8th Marine Regiment (1/8), Regimental Combat Team 6, points out an enemy fighting p Stock Photo

RF2JCW543–U.S. Marine Corps Lance Cpl. Christopher Mount with 1st Battalion, 8th Marine Regiment (1/8), Regimental Combat Team 6, points out an enemy fighting p

U.S. 5TH FLEET AREA OF RESPONSIBILITY (April 4, 2013) Seaman Ernesto Gastelum stands watch at the ship’s control console in the pilot house of the guided-missile destroyer USS William P. Lawrence (DDG 110). William P. Lawrence is deployed to the U.S. 5th Fleet area of responsibility promoting maritime security operations, theater security cooperation efforts and support missions for Operation Enduring Freedom. Stock Photo

RMPCH3HY–U.S. 5TH FLEET AREA OF RESPONSIBILITY (April 4, 2013) Seaman Ernesto Gastelum stands watch at the ship’s control console in the pilot house of the guided-missile destroyer USS William P. Lawrence (DDG 110). William P. Lawrence is deployed to the U.S. 5th Fleet area of responsibility promoting maritime security operations, theater security cooperation efforts and support missions for Operation Enduring Freedom.

P-3C Orion Stock Photo

RMDYTMDX–P-3C Orion

Seaman stands lookout aboard USS William P. Lawrence. Stock Photo

RMG40362–Seaman stands lookout aboard USS William P. Lawrence.

The crew of the P-3C Stock Photo

RMDYTM6B–The crew of the P-3C

030414-N-6501M-026 Zamboanga City, Republic of the Philippines (Apr. 14, 2003) -- U.S. Marines fire a 7.62mm M-240 Medium Caliber Machine Gun during a crew/serve live fire exercise.  This training is to maintain proficiency in Force Protection while deployed to the South Philippine Islands.  The Marines are attached to the 3rd Battalion, 3rd Marine Kilo Company which is part of Joint Special Operations Task Force - Philippines (JSOTF-P), supporting Operation Enduring Freedom and the U.S. effort to train, assist and advise Philippine forces in their fight to counter terrorism.  U.S. Navy photo  Stock Photo

RMHFEJEK–030414-N-6501M-026 Zamboanga City, Republic of the Philippines (Apr. 14, 2003) -- U.S. Marines fire a 7.62mm M-240 Medium Caliber Machine Gun during a crew/serve live fire exercise. This training is to maintain proficiency in Force Protection while deployed to the South Philippine Islands. The Marines are attached to the 3rd Battalion, 3rd Marine Kilo Company which is part of Joint Special Operations Task Force - Philippines (JSOTF-P), supporting Operation Enduring Freedom and the U.S. effort to train, assist and advise Philippine forces in their fight to counter terrorism. U.S. Navy photo

U.S. Army Staff Sgt. Robert Green of C Company, 449th Aviation Support Battalion, re-enlists during a ceremony aboard the USS Ponce AFSB I-15 in the Persian Gulf. U.S. Navy Capt. Jon P. Rodgers, the commanding officer of the ship who is from Humboldt, Tenn., had the honor of reading the re-enlistment oath. Staff Sgt. Green, of Austin, Texas, is currently deployed to the Middle East with the 36th Combat Aviation Brigade in support of Operation Enduring Freedom.  Sgt. Mark Scovell Stock Photo

RMEJP499–U.S. Army Staff Sgt. Robert Green of C Company, 449th Aviation Support Battalion, re-enlists during a ceremony aboard the USS Ponce AFSB I-15 in the Persian Gulf. U.S. Navy Capt. Jon P. Rodgers, the commanding officer of the ship who is from Humboldt, Tenn., had the honor of reading the re-enlistment oath. Staff Sgt. Green, of Austin, Texas, is currently deployed to the Middle East with the 36th Combat Aviation Brigade in support of Operation Enduring Freedom. Sgt. Mark Scovell

021022-N-4374S-017 Central Command Area of Operation (Oct. 22, 2002) -- Crewmembers assigned to the 'Screaming Eagles' of Patrol Squadron One (VP-1) approach a P-3C ÒOrionÓ patrol aircraft to conduct a reconnaissance mission over the Arabian Gulf.  The P-3C is a land-based, long-range, anti-submarine warfare (ASW) and reconnaissance patrol aircraft.  VP-1 is based in Whidbey Island, Wash., and is on a regularly scheduled six-month deployment to the Middle East, conducting missions in support of Operation Enduring Freedom.  U.S. Navy photo by PhotographerÕs Mate 2nd Class Michael Sandberg.  (RE Stock Photo

RMHFE5EB–021022-N-4374S-017 Central Command Area of Operation (Oct. 22, 2002) -- Crewmembers assigned to the 'Screaming Eagles' of Patrol Squadron One (VP-1) approach a P-3C ÒOrionÓ patrol aircraft to conduct a reconnaissance mission over the Arabian Gulf. The P-3C is a land-based, long-range, anti-submarine warfare (ASW) and reconnaissance patrol aircraft. VP-1 is based in Whidbey Island, Wash., and is on a regularly scheduled six-month deployment to the Middle East, conducting missions in support of Operation Enduring Freedom. U.S. Navy photo by PhotographerÕs Mate 2nd Class Michael Sandberg. (RE

Culinary Specialist 3rd Class Chad P. Smith prepares lunch in the commanding officer’s in-port cabin aboard the Nimitz-class aircraft carrier USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN 72). Lincoln is deployed to the U.S. 5th Fleet area of responsibility conducting maritime security operations, theater security cooperation efforts and combat flight operations in support of Operation Enduring Freedom. Stock Photo

RMCRY029–Culinary Specialist 3rd Class Chad P. Smith prepares lunch in the commanding officer’s in-port cabin aboard the Nimitz-class aircraft carrier USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN 72). Lincoln is deployed to the U.S. 5th Fleet area of responsibility conducting maritime security operations, theater security cooperation efforts and combat flight operations in support of Operation Enduring Freedom.

Feb 11, 2003 - Kalispell, Montana, U.S. - Asst. Principal, Goverment Teacher & Army National Guard 1st Lt. DAN ANDERSON says goodbye to his students at West Valley School near Kalispell, MT before shipping out for active duty as as part of operation Enduring Freedom & the military buildup before a p Stock Photo

RMCCNWR3–Feb 11, 2003 - Kalispell, Montana, U.S. - Asst. Principal, Goverment Teacher & Army National Guard 1st Lt. DAN ANDERSON says goodbye to his students at West Valley School near Kalispell, MT before shipping out for active duty as as part of operation Enduring Freedom & the military buildup before a p

Private Lisa P. Holmes, of Cleveland, assigned to Alpha Co. 237th Brigade Support Battalion, 37th Infantry Brigade Combat Team, performs a pre-combat maintenance check on her Mine Resistant Ambush Protected (MRAP) vehicle during training at Camp Shelby Joint Forces Training Center, Miss., on Sept. 23, 2011. The brigade is deploying to Afghanistan in support of Operation Enduring Freedom. (Ohio National Guard photo by Spc. Kimberly Lamb) (Released) Stock Photo

RMKTTP18–Private Lisa P. Holmes, of Cleveland, assigned to Alpha Co. 237th Brigade Support Battalion, 37th Infantry Brigade Combat Team, performs a pre-combat maintenance check on her Mine Resistant Ambush Protected (MRAP) vehicle during training at Camp Shelby Joint Forces Training Center, Miss., on Sept. 23, 2011. The brigade is deploying to Afghanistan in support of Operation Enduring Freedom. (Ohio National Guard photo by Spc. Kimberly Lamb) (Released)

A U.S. Navy Riverine security team members set a perimeter during Emerald Warrior, Apalachicola River, Fla., March 6, 2012. The primary purpose of Emerald Warrior is to exercise special operations components in urban and irregular warfare settings to support combatant commanders in theater campaigns. Emerald Warrior leverages lessons from Operation Iraqi Freedom, Operation Enduring Freedom and other historical lessons to provide better trained and ready forces to combatant commanders. Stock Photo

RMCFJDXM–A U.S. Navy Riverine security team members set a perimeter during Emerald Warrior, Apalachicola River, Fla., March 6, 2012. The primary purpose of Emerald Warrior is to exercise special operations components in urban and irregular warfare settings to support combatant commanders in theater campaigns. Emerald Warrior leverages lessons from Operation Iraqi Freedom, Operation Enduring Freedom and other historical lessons to provide better trained and ready forces to combatant commanders.

Staff Sgt. Chris Hatton of Headquarters and Headquarters Company 37th Infantry Brigade Combat Team peers above a log, looking for his next line of cover during premobilization training in the Ravenna Joint Military Training Center, April 8, 2011. Hatton participated in Individual Movement Techniques where soldiers performed such tasks as crawling under barbed wire, scaling a six foot wall, and crawling to cover. The training is to prepare the soldiers of the 37th for their scheduled yearlong deployment to Afghanistan in fall 2011 in support of Operation Enduring Freedom. (Ohio National Guard p Stock Photo

RMKTTARJ–Staff Sgt. Chris Hatton of Headquarters and Headquarters Company 37th Infantry Brigade Combat Team peers above a log, looking for his next line of cover during premobilization training in the Ravenna Joint Military Training Center, April 8, 2011. Hatton participated in Individual Movement Techniques where soldiers performed such tasks as crawling under barbed wire, scaling a six foot wall, and crawling to cover. The training is to prepare the soldiers of the 37th for their scheduled yearlong deployment to Afghanistan in fall 2011 in support of Operation Enduring Freedom. (Ohio National Guard p

Airmen from the Minnesota Air National Guard assemble at the incoming PAX terminal at Kandahar Airfield, Afghanistan on Aug. 10, 2012 to begin in-processing. Personnel are deployed from the Minnesota Air National Guard's 148th Fighter Wing in support of Operation Enduring Freedom. Bull Dog F-16’s, pilots, and support personnel began their Air Expeditionary Force deployment in mid-August to take over flying missions for the air tasking order and provide close air support for troops on the ground in Afghanistan. Stock Photo

RMCW80H2–Airmen from the Minnesota Air National Guard assemble at the incoming PAX terminal at Kandahar Airfield, Afghanistan on Aug. 10, 2012 to begin in-processing. Personnel are deployed from the Minnesota Air National Guard's 148th Fighter Wing in support of Operation Enduring Freedom. Bull Dog F-16’s, pilots, and support personnel began their Air Expeditionary Force deployment in mid-August to take over flying missions for the air tasking order and provide close air support for troops on the ground in Afghanistan.

Col. James Perry, brigade commander for the 37th Infantry Brigade Combat Team observes Sgt. Sean Clark, unmanned aerial vehicle maintainer assigned to Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 37th IBCT, as Chief Warrant Officer 2 James P. Huck IV, UAV operator also assigned to HHC 37th IBCT, explains the Shadow 200 UAV's capabilities before a flight demonstration at Camp Shelby Joint Forces Training Center, Miss., Nov. 5, 2011. The UAV will be used by the 37th IBCT during their upcoming deployment to Afghanistan in support of Operation Enduring Freedom. (37th IBCT photo by Sgt. Kimberly Lamb) (R Stock Photo

RMKTTPNN–Col. James Perry, brigade commander for the 37th Infantry Brigade Combat Team observes Sgt. Sean Clark, unmanned aerial vehicle maintainer assigned to Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 37th IBCT, as Chief Warrant Officer 2 James P. Huck IV, UAV operator also assigned to HHC 37th IBCT, explains the Shadow 200 UAV's capabilities before a flight demonstration at Camp Shelby Joint Forces Training Center, Miss., Nov. 5, 2011. The UAV will be used by the 37th IBCT during their upcoming deployment to Afghanistan in support of Operation Enduring Freedom. (37th IBCT photo by Sgt. Kimberly Lamb) (R

U.S. Marine Corps Lance Cpl. Collin P. Stanford (right), with Police Advisory Team 2 (PAT 2), 1st Battalion, 8th Marine Regiment, Regimental Combat Te Stock Photo

RF2JCW3G0–U.S. Marine Corps Lance Cpl. Collin P. Stanford (right), with Police Advisory Team 2 (PAT 2), 1st Battalion, 8th Marine Regiment, Regimental Combat Te

Col. Matthew Davidson (left), commander of the 24th Special Operations Wing, presents Staff Sgt. Nicholas P. Jewell, a combat controller in the Kentucky Air National Guard’s 123rd Special Tactics Squadron, with the Bronze Star Medal during a ceremony Feb. 7, 2015, at the Kentucky Air National Guard Base in Louisville, Ky. Jewell earned the award for meritorious achievement while supporting Operation Enduring Freedom in Afghanistan in 2014. (U.S. Air National Guard photo by Staff Sgt. Vicky Spesard) Stock Photo

RMKYJWHX–Col. Matthew Davidson (left), commander of the 24th Special Operations Wing, presents Staff Sgt. Nicholas P. Jewell, a combat controller in the Kentucky Air National Guard’s 123rd Special Tactics Squadron, with the Bronze Star Medal during a ceremony Feb. 7, 2015, at the Kentucky Air National Guard Base in Louisville, Ky. Jewell earned the award for meritorious achievement while supporting Operation Enduring Freedom in Afghanistan in 2014. (U.S. Air National Guard photo by Staff Sgt. Vicky Spesard)

U.S. Marines with 1st Battalion, 8th Marine Regiment (1/8), Regimental Combat Team 6, cross the Helmond River on an Afghan's barge during a security p Stock Photo

RF2JCW3GD–U.S. Marines with 1st Battalion, 8th Marine Regiment (1/8), Regimental Combat Team 6, cross the Helmond River on an Afghan's barge during a security p

Brig. Gen. Eric P. Wendt, Deputy Commander for the International Security Assistance Force, Regional Command-North, listens to the request of a female Afghan leader during a shura that was held at Camp Marmal, Balkh Province, Afghanistan, March 28, 2012. The shura was held to allow Afghan female leaders an opportunity to present projects to the leaders of Regional Command-North. (37th IBCT photo by Sgt. Kimberly Lamb) (Released) Stock Photo

RMKTTX77–Brig. Gen. Eric P. Wendt, Deputy Commander for the International Security Assistance Force, Regional Command-North, listens to the request of a female Afghan leader during a shura that was held at Camp Marmal, Balkh Province, Afghanistan, March 28, 2012. The shura was held to allow Afghan female leaders an opportunity to present projects to the leaders of Regional Command-North. (37th IBCT photo by Sgt. Kimberly Lamb) (Released)

A U.S. Marine with 1st Battalion, 8th Marine Regiment (1/8), Regimental Combat Team 6, drinks water to stay hydrated outside Camp Delaram II, Nimroz p Stock Photo

RF2JCW4G0–A U.S. Marine with 1st Battalion, 8th Marine Regiment (1/8), Regimental Combat Team 6, drinks water to stay hydrated outside Camp Delaram II, Nimroz p

Bay, Crete, Greece (Nov. 1, 2002) -- A Navy P-3C Orion aircraft, assigned to the War Eagles of Patrol Squadron One Six (VP-16) flies by during a check flight.  VP-16, a Jacksonville, Fla.-based, is currently on a six-month deployment to the Mediterranean theater in support of Operation Enduring Freedom. The P-3C is a multi-mission aircraft providing Anti-Submarine Warfare (ASW) and Anti-Surface Warfare (ASUW) capabilities.  VP-16 utilizes a wide range of communications, detection, monitoring, reconnaissance and navigation systems to perform their mission.  In addition to advanced electronics,  Stock Photo

RMP31DYT–Bay, Crete, Greece (Nov. 1, 2002) -- A Navy P-3C Orion aircraft, assigned to the War Eagles of Patrol Squadron One Six (VP-16) flies by during a check flight. VP-16, a Jacksonville, Fla.-based, is currently on a six-month deployment to the Mediterranean theater in support of Operation Enduring Freedom. The P-3C is a multi-mission aircraft providing Anti-Submarine Warfare (ASW) and Anti-Surface Warfare (ASUW) capabilities. VP-16 utilizes a wide range of communications, detection, monitoring, reconnaissance and navigation systems to perform their mission. In addition to advanced electronics,

Afghan National Army Soldier with Light Machine Gun Stock Photo

RMD0DC73–Afghan National Army Soldier with Light Machine Gun

GUANTANAMO BAY, Cuba –Army Staff Sgt. Brian P. Jopek, broadcast journalist from 112th Mobile Public Affairs Detachment, Wisconsin National Guard, films one of the monthly live-fire qualifications held at the Windward Range located on U.S. Naval Station Guantanamo Bay. The 112th MPAD provides public affairs support for Joint Task Force Guantanamo. JTF Guantanamo conducts safe and humane care and custody of detained enemy combatants. The JTF conducts interrogation operations to collect strategic intelligence in support of the Global War on Terror and supports law enforcement and war crimes inves Stock Photo

RMPAEBKY–GUANTANAMO BAY, Cuba –Army Staff Sgt. Brian P. Jopek, broadcast journalist from 112th Mobile Public Affairs Detachment, Wisconsin National Guard, films one of the monthly live-fire qualifications held at the Windward Range located on U.S. Naval Station Guantanamo Bay. The 112th MPAD provides public affairs support for Joint Task Force Guantanamo. JTF Guantanamo conducts safe and humane care and custody of detained enemy combatants. The JTF conducts interrogation operations to collect strategic intelligence in support of the Global War on Terror and supports law enforcement and war crimes inves

VP-4 Skinny Dragons Squadron Patch – Sew On

Description

4 inch patch

Patrol Squadron Four (VP-4) is a U.S. Navy land-based patrol squadron based at the Naval Air Station Whidbey Island, Oak Harbor, Washington, which is tasked to undertake maritime patrol, anti-submarine warfare (ASW), and intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance (ISR) missions flying the Boeing P-8 Poseidon.

The squadron was originally established as Bombing Squadron 144 (VB-144) on 1 July 1943, redesignated Patrol Bombing Squadron 144 (VPB-144) on 1 October 1944, redesignated Patrol Squadron 144 (VP-144) on 15 May 1946, redesignated Medium Patrol Squadron (Landplane) 4 (VP-ML-4) on 15 November 1946 and redesignated Patrol Squadron FOUR (VP-4) on 1 September 1948. It is the second squadron to be designated VP-4, the first VP-4 was redesignated VP-22 on 1 July 1939

History

VB-144 was established at NAS Alameda, California on 1 July 1943, as a squadron flying the PV-1 Ventura, by 14 August The squadron completed training and boarded USS Copahee for transport to NAS Kaneohe Bay, Hawaii. Upon arrival the squadron began an intensive period of combat training and operational patrols over the ocean near the Hawaiian Islands. On 9 January 1944 VB-144 was transferred to Hawkins Field, Tarawa, where combat patrols commenced as soon as the squadron was checked in and assigned space for the crews and aircraft. On 1 February 1944, the squadron was relocated to Dyess Field, Roi Island, from which bombing missions were carried out against Japanese installations in the Gilbert, Marshall and Eastern Caroline island chains. On 30 March 1944 VB-144 was transferred back to Tarawa, leaving a three-aircraft detachment at Dyess Field, which was engaged in strikes on 1 April 1944 against enemy positions at Wotje Atoll and Jaluit Atoll that continued through June. On 4 April 1944 the increasing tempo of operations at Dyess Field resulted in the deployment of a second detachment of VB-144 aircraft to Roi Island and by 1 September the remainder of the squadron was transferred to Dyess. On 30 September 1944 VB-144 was transferred to NAS Kaneohe Bay and was redesignated VPB-144 while preparing for return to the continental United States. On 1 November 1944 VPB-144 was reformed for training at NAS Whidbey Island, Washington. The squadron was reequipped with the newer PV-2 Harpoon. On 3 March 1945 the squadron commenced training in air-to-ground attack continued at NAS Moffett Field, California. From 8–15 April 1945 VPB-144 squadron personnel and equipment were loaded aboard USS Kadashan Bay for transport to Naval Base Pearl Harbor, Hawaii, arriving on 15 April. Upon arrival, the squadron was based at NAS Kaneohe Bay, where a combat training syllabus of several weeks was undertaken. From 11–23 May 1945 a detachment of squadron aircraft and crews was flown to Midway Island to provide combat air patrol coverage. On 23 May 1944, the detachment was increased to nine aircraft. On 24 May 1945 two of the crews sent to Midway earlier returned to NAS Kaneohe Bay. The remainder of the detachment followed, rejoining the rest of the squadron on 12 June 1944. On 27 June 1945 VPB-144 was transferred to Eniwetok, via Johnston Atoll and Majuro. The squadron was placed under the operational control of TF 96.1. Sector and photographic reconnaissance patrols were conducted over Wake and Ponape islands. By 12 September 1945, problems with malaria on Wake Island became so severe that the aircraft of VPB-144 were fitted with sprayers to cover the island with DDT. On 15 September 1945 flights were conducted over Kusaie, Ponape and the Caroline Islands as a show of force to the remaining Japanese troops who had not yet surrendered. By 15 May 1946: Squadron assets remained at NAB Tinian but all personnel were rotated back to the U.S., leaving the squadron in a caretaker status. In September 1946 the squadron was retained on the Navy roster, but was placed in an inactive status at NAS North Island, California, under FAW-14. In Nov 1947 the squadron was reactivated as VP-ML-4 at NAS Miramar, California, with a complement of 14 officers and 59 enlisted men. An SNB-5 was utilized for flight training until the arrival of the squadron’s first operational aircraft, the P2V-1 Neptune, in mid-December 1947.

VP-4 conducted an aerial photographic survey of Southeastern Alaska from Annette Island and began regular rotation tours to NAS Kodiak, Alaska from NAS Whidbey Island. Following the start of the Korean War, the squadron was deployed to NAS Barbers Point, Hawaii. in July, 1950, developing aerial mining capabilities and remained there until its return to Whidbey Island in January, 1951. During this deployment, Aircraft BuNo 39340, SC-3 was lost with five crewmen during a rocket firing training exercise off Kaena Point.[2][3] The squadron was redeployed to NAS Barbers Point in mid 1951 and from there to NAS Kodiak in September, returning to NAS Whidbey Island in late December of that year. In April, 1952 VP-4 again was deployed to NAS Barbers Point and from there to NAS Agana, Guam in September. The squadron returned to NAS Whidbey Island in January 1953, having turned in its P2V-2s and receiving P2V-5s in February. VP-4 remained in NAS Whidbey Island until November 1953 and was then transferred to Kadena Air Base and subsequently to NAF Naha, Okinawa, where the squadron flew shipping patrols in the vicinity of Taiwan. The squadron returned to NAS Whidbey Islandin mid-1954.

In 1956, VP-4 was relocated to NAF Naha, from this base, the squadron flew reconnaissance and Anti-submarine warfare (ASW) missions to counter the Communist Chinese threat to the islands of Matsu and Quemoy. In 1964, the squadron marked its fourth year of operational excellence with three Commander, Naval Air Forces Pacific (COMNAVAIRPAC) Navy Battle “E” Awards, three Chief of Naval Operations (CNO) Safety Awards, and four Arnold J. Isbell ASW Awards. In April 1964, VP-4 returned to NAS Barbers Point, from there, the squadron made numerous deployments to Southeast Asia in support of the Vietnam War. It was on one of these deployments in 1965 when the squadron logo was changed from the Okinawa-era “Neptune” design to a Hawaiian-inspired “Black Griffin.” The logo caused some confusion on the part of waitresses in the local Officer’s Club, who remarked that it more closely resembled a “Skinny Dragon” and the new nickname was quickly adopted.

In 1966, the VP-4 began transitioning from the SP-2H Neptune to the P-3A Orion. Following completion of the transition, VP-4 became the first Hawaii-based squadron to deploy P-3As to NAS Adak, Alaska in 1969. In 1972, VP-4 was awarded the Navy Meritorious Unit Commendation for its efforts during Operations Market Time and Yankee Team. During the 1975 deployment to NAS Cubi Point, Philippines VP-4 participated in the Operation Frequent Wind, the evacuation of South Vietnam and the Mayaguez recovery operation, and in 1976 saw detachment operations to NAS Agana, Guam during which the squadron participated in Australia’s Kangaroo II fleet exercise.

In July 1978, VP-4 assumed the Guam Detachment and simultaneously conducted operations that stretched around the world including locations as distant as: NAS Cubi Point; NAS Barbers Point; NAS Moffett Field, California; NAS Brunswick, Maine and NAS Sigonella, Italy. VP-4 finished transitioning to the P-3B (MOD), or “SUPER BEE” in May 1979. The squadron then started a work up period for its next NAS Cubi Point deployment, which began in November 1979. While assigned to COMNAVAIRPAC, VP-4 was awarded the Navy Battle “E” Award for operational excellence for the cycle from 1 January 1979 to 30 June 1980. During the height of the Cold War, VP-4 fought on the front lines. Making numerous deployments to NAS Cubi Point; Diego Garcia; Kadena Air Base and Misawa Air Base, Japan; NAS Adak, Alaska and numerous other remote detachment sites, the squadron located, tracked and collected vital intelligence on Soviet ballistic missile and attack submarines. This era in VP-4’s history is marked by a number of “firsts” including becoming the first squadron at NAS Barbers Point to transition to the P-3C, the first NAS Barbers Point squadron to deploy to Diego Garcia (May 1980), and the first Hawaii squadron to deploy with P-3Cs to NAS Adak. VP-4’s operational excellence and contributions to the Cold War were recognized in 1987 in once again earning the Navy Battle “E” Award. Additionally, during this time, the squadron’s concern for the safety and welfare of its Sailors was marked by surpassing 100,000 hours of mishap free flying and earning back-to-back Golden Anchor Retention Excellence awards in 1987 and 1988.

In 1988 VP-4 returned to Hawaii where they participated in numerous exercises, including Exercise RIMPAC. In 1989 VP-4 completed a highly deployment to NAS Adak, conducting numerous ASW operations and participating in PACIFIC EXERCISE-89, the largest Naval exercise since World War II. Deploying to Diego Garcia in November 1990, VP-4 quickly established a detachment at RAFO Masirah, Oman to enforce the United Nations Embargo against Iraq during Operation Desert Shield. By early January 1991, 179 missions had challenged 3,669 merchant vessels. The embargo gave way to Battle Force Protection as war was declared on 17 January 1991. Flying 279 combat missions and 2,779 flight hours in the Persian Gulf in support of Operations Desert Shield and Desert Storm, VP-4 provided detection and targeting, resulting in the total destruction of the Iraqi Navy.

Upon returning home to Hawaii, VP-4 learned that it had again received the Chief of Naval Operations Golden Anchor and the Commander, Patrol Wings Pacific (COMPATWINGSPAC) Golden Orion for retention excellence. In November 1993, VP-4 deployed to Misawa AB, Japan, and established a permanent detachment at Kadena AB, Okinawa. While on deployment, VP-4 received the 1993 Chief of Naval Operations Aviation Safety Award for a Pacific Fleet Maritime Patrol Squadron, the Commander, US 7th Fleet Award and the Captain Arnold Jay Isbell Trophy, both for Anti-Submarine Warfare (ASW) excellence.

After completing a home training cycle, VP-4 conducted a split-site deployment to Misawa AB and Kadena AB in 1995. During this deployment the squadron flew around the clock for seventeen straight days during the Third Taiwan Strait Crisis, providing intelligence support and protection against anti-surface and subsurface threats to both the USS Nimitz and USS Independence carrier battle groups. In early 1997, VP-4 completed a quad-site deployment to Diego Garcia; Masirah, Oman; Manama, Bahrain, and Kadena AB, Japan. While on deployment, VP-4 aircrew and maintenance personnel conducted the first permanent detachment in the Persian Gulf. In addition, VP-4 acted as the armed patrol aircraft detachment from Doha, Qatar, flying 21 straight days with weapons and exercised the first 24-hour armed ready alert Maritime Patrol Aviation (MPA) posture in the Persian Gulf. VP-4 acted as the fleet’s “eyes in the sky” in support of Maritime Interdiction Operations (MIO), enforcing United Nations Security Council Resolutions (UNSCRs) and the Iraqi Oil for Food program. In 1998, pursuant to the BRAC decision to close NAS Barbers Point, VP-4 relocated to NAS Kaneohe Bay, now known as Marine Corps Base Hawaii. In December 1998, VP-4 again deployed to six sites around the Middle East, during their deployment, the squadron participated in three combat operations: Operation Desert Fox, where they were awarded the Navy Unit Commendation; Operation Southern Watch, where VP-4 triggered the initial strike and delivered pre and post-strike imagery; and Operations Allied Force/Noble Anvil in Kosovo, which resulted in VP-4’s Combat Air Crew 10 being awarded eleven (11) Air Medals. In home waters that same year, VP-4 also hosted 35 countries during RIMPAC 98.

VP-4 was the first VP squadron to introduce the P-3C Anti-Surface Warfare Improvement Program (P-3C AIP) aircraft to the Fleet. VP-4 proved AIP’s power during deployment by supporting three aircraft carrier battle groups in the Persian Gulf and becoming the first squadron to achieve reliable AIP imagery transfer. VP-4 was also the first squadron in the US 7th Fleet to fire the AGM-65 Maverick air-to-surface missile from a P-3C AIP aircraft. In November 1999, VP-4 flew to NAS North Island, California to participate in Joint Fleet Exercise (JTFEX/FLEETEX). While at JTFEX/FLEETEX, the squadron participated in 23 events, including AIP and AGM-84 Standoff Land Attack Missile (SLAM) demo flights.

In June 2000, VP-4 conducted a WESTPAC deployment with detachments in 13 countries and participating in 27 multi-national exercises. The squadron also saved 22 lives in various Search and Rescue (SAR) operations within the Seventh Fleet’s Area of Responsibility (AOR). The squadron was again honored with the Navy Battle “E” Award in 2000, the third such award in five years. Following the September 11 attacks, VP-4 deployed to the US Central Command (USCENTCOM) AOR under Commander, Task Force 57 (CTF 57), a subordinate element of US Naval Forces Central Command (USNAVCENT)/US 5th Fleet. VP-4 conducted overland operations above Afghanistan flying armed reconnaissance missions and over the waters of the Middle East conducting Leadership Interdiction Operations in the first days of Operation Enduring Freedom. Over Afghanistan, VP-4 aircraft provided commanders a bird’s eye view of the terrain where US special operations forces (SOF) were operating to dislodge Taliban and Al-Qaeda fighters from their mountainous hideouts. VP-4 also played a pivotal role in Operation Anaconda, the largest land battle in Afghanistan to that date. Over water, aircrews were instrumental in operations to intercept and cut-off fleeing Taliban and Al-Qaeda fighters. For their efforts, VP-4 was once again recognized with the 2002 Commander, Naval Air Force Pacific Battle “E” Award as the top P-3 squadron in the Pacific Fleet.

During their 2003 deployment, VP-4 continued to support Operation Enduring Freedom against terrorist factions in the Philippines, providing critical real time intelligence. These missions highlighted the expanse of Coalition operations against Al-Qaeda and Al-Qaeda backed terrorists. VP-4 also had the opportunity to conduct the P-3C’s primary mission, ASW, against diesel and nuclear powered submarines, completing this deployment by flying over 4,000 mishap-free flight hours and completing over 800 missions. In 2005, VP-4 successfully completed a wartime deployment to the Middle East and Western Pacific, carrying out a wide variety of missions ranging from humanitarian assistance and disaster relief support missions to the Indian Ocean tsunami victims, to direct support of ground combat operations in support of Operation Iraqi Freedom in Iraq and Operation Enduring Freedom in Afghanistan. In December 2006, the squadron deployed to Misawa AB and Kadena AB, and to the Philippines, in support of Operation Enduring Freedom in the Philippines. This was followed by a return to Iraq in support of Operation Iraqi Freedom in November 2008. On this deployment, VP-4 supplied detachments in support of numerous joint and multinational exercises at RAF Lakenheath, United Kingdom; RAF Kinloss, Scotland; and NAS Sigonella, Sicily. This experience proved invaluable during the ensuing interdeployment readiness cycle, when VP-4 successfully planned, hosted, and executed the world’s largest joint, multinational military exercise, RIMPAC 2010. Following completion of a series of detachment operations, VP-4 departed MCB Kaneohe Bay for a split site deployment in November 2010, supporting assets in both the US 5th Fleet and US 7th Fleet AORs. Following the catastrophic 2011 Tōhoku earthquake and tsunami of 11 March 2011, VP-4 forward-deployed to Misawa AB in fewer than 24 hours and re-established CTG 72.4 as an operational entity and the first US aviation unit on station for Operation Tomodachi, with VP-4 subsequently providing 254 flight hours of humanitarian and disaster relief support to the Japanese people.

In November 2012, VP-4 was deployed to the US 6th Fleet in the Mediterranean, operating from NAS Sigonella, NS Rota, Spain and numerous other locations in support of US Naval Forces Europe, US Naval Forces Africa, NATO and Unified Combatant Commanders. As of 2013, the squadron has surpassed over 40 years of mishap-free flying, with over 254,000 flight hours.

Patrol Squadron Four’s most recent deployment in the Fifth and Sixth fleet was from June 2014 to February 2015 and was regarded by the Navy as a resounding success. The Skinny Dragons began deployment with an operational detachment to Keflavik, Iceland, in support of emergent Theater ASW tasking. Additionally, VP-4 provided support to the Organization for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons, enabling the safe destruction of chemical weapons in the international waters of the Mediterranean Sea. Patron Four was recognized for their monumental operational achievements and Theater ASW prowess while simultaneously taking part in 5 exercises located in Bulgaria, Finland, Spain and Turkey. The Skinny Dragons safely returned home in February 2015 after another successful deployment. After a brief period to relax, VP-4 immediately began a grueling home cycle to prepare for what would be their final P-3C Orion deployment.

In March 2016, the Skinny Dragons departed Oahu for the last time as a Hawaii squadron. Their ‘Aloha Deployment’ was a busy one that saw personnel spread across three continents and twelve different countries. The Skinny Dragons executed their mission flawlessly throughout the entire deployment, and everyone from the maintenance professionals, to aircrew and support personnel was instrumental in ensuring their last P-3C Orion deployment was a resounding success. While on deployment, VP-4 executed a Permanent Duty Station Change (PDSC) to Naval Air Station Whidbey Island. Returning home in September, the Skinny Dragons currently await the start of the transition to the P-8A Poseidon, slated to begin at the end of October. VP-4 proudly looks forward to many more years as the leader in US Navy Maritime Patrol Aviation, emboldened by their motto: Family, Leadership, Integrity.[4] [4]

Operations
Vietnam War
Starting 26 March 1965, the squadron began a split-site deployment to MCAS Iwakuni, Japan, with detachments at various dates located at Naval Air Facility Tan Son Nhut Air Base, South Vietnam; Naval Station Sangley Point and NAS Cubi Point, Philippines.

31 Jan 1967: The squadron again deployed to WestPac at Iwakuni, Japan, and provided support to Task Force 72 during Operation Market Time (coastal patrols off the coasts of South Vietnam). Detachments were maintained at NS Sangley Point and NAF Naha, Okinawa. Upon completion of deployment, Commander Patrol Forces, Seventh Fleet presented the squadron a letter of commendation for its support of operations and assistance in the destruction of an enemy trawler carrying arms destined for the Viet Cong.

17 Apr 1967: A VP-4 P-3A Orion flying patrol off the coast of Korea was fired upon by an infiltrating North Korean speedboat. The damaged aircraft landed safely after reporting the vessel’s location. South Korean forces sank the intruder shortly thereafter. Lieutenant Commander C. W. Larzelere III, the PPC, received a Navy Commendation Medal for his handling of the emergency while under fire.

28 Apr 1967: A VP-4 P-3A Orion (BuNo. 151365) flown by Lieutenant C. D. Burton was lost at sea with all hands off the coast of Tsushima Island, Japan.[6]

1 Aug 1968: VP-4 was deployed to WestPac under FAW-6 at Iwakuni, Japan. Patrols were conducted in the South China Sea, Sea of Japan, Korea, the Philippine Islands and Guam. Detachments were sent to Cam Ranh Bay, in support of Yankee Team and Market Time operations. Yankee Team was a joint U.S. Air Force and U.S. Navy operation begun in 1963 that provided low-level aerial reconnaissance of suspected Communist infiltration routes in eastern and southern Laos.

Desert Shield/Desert Storm
On 10 November 1990, as a normal rotation, NAS Barbers Point based VP-4 (with P-3C Update I’s) relieved VP-1 at Diego Garcia and RAFO Al Masirah. VP-4 C.O. Commander Bob Cunningham, took over CTG 72.8 and his X.O. Commander Carlos Badger, assumed the detachment(det). at RAFO Al Masirah.

During one 34-hour period, P-3s provided the detection and target locating information that resulted in a substantial reduction in the Iraqi Navy’s offense of capability. A group of 15 Iraqi vessels heading for Maridim Island, an outpost in Kuwaiti hands was detected by VP-4s Crew Five, who vectored strike aircraft against the force, resulting in five ships sunk and seven more damaged. This effort ended what would be Iraqis last seaborne assault.

Hours later, VP-4s Crew 2 detected a group of Iraqi vessels attempting a rapid transit from Iraqi ports around Bubiyan Island, apparently trying to reach the safety of Iranian territorial waters. P-3s from VPs 4, 19, and 45 provided the target locations for the strike aircraft which destroyed 11 Iraqi vessels in what has been named the Battle of Bubiyan.

Between 25–27 March 2006, a series of anti-submarine warfare exercises were held in Hawaiian waters that included Carrier Strike Group Nine, the nuclear-powered attack submarines USS Seawolf, USS Cheyenne, USS Greeneville, USS Tucson, and USS Pasadena, as well as land-based P-3 Orions from patrol squadrons VP-9, and VP-47, and VP-4.

Aircraft assignments

A VP-4 P-8A in May 2017.
The squadron was assigned the following aircraft, effective on the dates shown:

PV-1 – July 1943
PV-2 – July 1945
P2V-1 – September 1947
P2V-2 – January 1948
P2V-5 – March 1953
P2V-5F – March 1956
P2V-7/SP-2H – September 1962
P-3A – October 1965
P-3B-MOD (Super Bee) – February 1979
P-3C – March 1984
P-3C UI – November 1989
P-3C UIIIR – 1992
P-8A – October 2016
Home port assignments
The squadron was assigned to these home ports, effective on the dates shown

NAS Alameda, California – 1 July 1943
Naval Air Station Whidbey Island, Washington – 1 November 1944
NAB Eniwetok – 27 June 1945
NAB Tinian – 1946
NAS North Island, California – September 1946
NAS Miramar, California – November 1947
Naval Air Station Whidbey Island – January 1948
NAF Naha, Okinawa – 13 August 1956
NAS Barbers Point, Hawaii – November 1963
Marine Corps Base Hawaii – 1998
Naval Air Station Whidbey Island – September 2016

Patrol Squadron 4 (United States Navy)

Military unit

Patrol Squadron Four (VP-4) is a U.S. Navy land-based patrol squadron based at the Naval Air Station Whidbey Island, Oak Harbor, Washington, which is tasked to undertake maritime patrol, anti-submarine warfare (ASW), and intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance (ISR) missions flying the Boeing P-8 Poseidon.

The squadron was originally established as Bombing Squadron 144 (VB-144) on 1 July 1943, redesignated Patrol Bombing Squadron 144 (VPB-144) on 1 October 1944, redesignated Patrol Squadron 144 (VP-144) on 15 May 1946, redesignated Medium Patrol Squadron (Landplane) 4 (VP-ML-4) on 15 November 1946 and redesignated Patrol Squadron FOUR (VP-4) on 1 September 1948. It is the second squadron to be designated VP-4, the first VP-4 was redesignated VP-22 on 1 July 1939.[1]

History[edit]

VP-4 P2V-2sover Alaska in 1948

VB-144 was established at NAS Alameda, California on 1 July 1943, as a squadron flying the PV-1 Ventura, by 14 August The squadron completed training and boarded USS Copahee for transport to NAS Kaneohe Bay, Hawaii. Upon arrival the squadron began an intensive period of combat training and operational patrols over the ocean near the Hawaiian Islands. On 9 January 1944 VB-144 was transferred to Hawkins Field, Tarawa, where combat patrols commenced as soon as the squadron was checked in and assigned space for the crews and aircraft. On 1 February 1944, the squadron was relocated to Dyess Field, Roi Island, from which bombing missions were carried out against Japanese installations in the Gilbert, Marshall and Eastern Caroline island chains. On 30 March 1944 VB-144 was transferred back to Tarawa, leaving a three-aircraft detachment at Dyess Field, which was engaged in strikes on 1 April 1944 against enemy positions at Wotje Atoll and Jaluit Atoll that continued through June. On 4 April 1944, the increasing tempo of operations at Dyess Field resulted in the deployment of a second detachment of VB-144 aircraft to Roi Island and by 1 September the remainder of the squadron was transferred to Dyess. On 30 September 1944 VB-144 was transferred to NAS Kaneohe Bay and was redesignated VPB-144 while preparing for return to the continental United States. On 1 November 1944 VPB-144 was reformed for training at NAS Whidbey Island, Washington. The squadron was reequipped with the newer PV-2 Harpoon. On 3 March 1945, the squadron commenced training in air-to-ground attack continued at NAS Moffett Field, California. From 8–15 April 1945 VPB-144 squadron personnel and equipment were loaded aboard USS Kadashan Bay for transport to Naval Base Pearl Harbor, Hawaii, arriving on 15 April. Upon arrival, the squadron was based at NAS Kaneohe Bay, where a combat training syllabus of several weeks was undertaken. From 11–23 May 1945 a detachment of squadron aircraft and crews was flown to Midway Island to provide combat air patrol coverage. On 23 May 1944, the detachment was increased to nine aircraft. On 24 May 1945 two of the crews sent to Midway earlier returned to NAS Kaneohe Bay. The remainder of the detachment followed, rejoining the rest of the squadron on 12 June 1944. On 27 June 1945 VPB-144 was transferred to Eniwetok, via Johnston Atoll and Majuro. The squadron was placed under the operational control of TF 96.1. Sector and photographic reconnaissance patrols were conducted over Wake and Ponape islands. By 12 September 1945, problems with malaria on Wake Island became so severe that the aircraft of VPB-144 were fitted with sprayers to cover the island with DDT. On 15 September 1945 flights were conducted over Kusaie, Ponape and the Caroline Islands as a show of force to the remaining Japanese troops who had not yet surrendered. By 15 May 1946: Squadron assets remained at NAB Tinian but all personnel were rotated back to the U.S., leaving the squadron in a caretaker status. In September 1946 the squadron was retained on the Navy roster, but was placed in an inactive status at NAS North Island, California, under FAW-14. In Nov 1947 the squadron was reactivated as VP-ML-4 at NAS Miramar, California, with a complement of 14 officers and 59 enlisted men. An SNB-5 was utilized for flight training until the arrival of the squadron's first operational aircraft, the P2V-1 Neptune, in mid-December 1947.[1]

VP-4 conducted an aerial photographic survey of Southeastern Alaska from Annette Island and began regular rotation tours to NAS Kodiak, Alaska from NAS Whidbey Island. Following the start of the Korean War, the squadron was deployed to NAS Barbers Point, Hawaii. in July, 1950, developing aerial mining capabilities and remained there until its return to Whidbey Island in January, 1951. During this deployment, Aircraft BuNo 39340, SC-3 was lost with five crewmen during a rocket firing training exercise off Kaena Point.[2][3] The squadron was redeployed to NAS Barbers Point in mid 1951 and from there to NAS Kodiak in September, returning to NAS Whidbey Island in late December of that year. In April 1952, VP-4 again was deployed to NAS Barbers Point and from there to NAS Agana, Guam in September. The squadron returned to NAS Whidbey Island in January 1953, having turned in its P2V-2s and receiving P2V-5s in February. VP-4 remained in NAS Whidbey Island until November 1953 and was then transferred to Kadena Air Base and subsequently to NAF Naha, Okinawa, where the squadron flew shipping patrols in the vicinity of Taiwan. The squadron returned to NAS Whidbey Islandin mid-1954.

In 1956, VP-4 was relocated to NAF Naha, from this base, the squadron flew reconnaissance and Anti-submarine warfare (ASW) missions to counter the Communist Chinese threat to the islands of Matsu and Quemoy. In 1964, the squadron marked its fourth year of operational excellence with three Commander, Naval Air Forces Pacific (COMNAVAIRPAC) Navy Battle "E" Awards, three Chief of Naval Operations (CNO) Safety Awards, and four Arnold J. Isbell ASW Awards. In April 1964, VP-4 returned to NAS Barbers Point, from there, the squadron made numerous deployments to Southeast Asia in support of the Vietnam War. It was on one of these deployments in 1965 when the squadron logo was changed from the Okinawa-era "Neptune" design to a Hawaiian-inspired "Black Griffin." The logo caused some confusion on the part of waitresses in the local Officer's Club, who remarked that it more closely resembled a "Skinny Dragon" and the new nickname was quickly adopted.[4]

In 1966, the VP-4 began transitioning from the SP-2H Neptune to the P-3A Orion. Following completion of the transition, VP-4 became the first Hawaii-based squadron to deploy P-3As to NAS Adak, Alaska in 1969. In 1972, VP-4 was awarded the Navy Meritorious Unit Commendation for its efforts during Operations Market Time and Yankee Team. During the 1975 deployment to NAS Cubi Point, Philippines VP-4 participated in the Operation Frequent Wind, the evacuation of South Vietnam and the Mayaguez recovery operation, and in 1976 saw detachment operations to NAS Agana, Guam during which the squadron participated in Australia's Kangaroo II fleet exercise.[4]

In July 1978, VP-4 assumed the Guam Detachment and simultaneously conducted operations that stretched around the world including locations as distant as: NAS Cubi Point; NAS Barbers Point; NAS Moffett Field, California; NAS Brunswick, Maine and NAS Sigonella, Italy. VP-4 finished transitioning to the P-3B (MOD), or "SUPER BEE" in May 1979. The squadron then started a work up period for its next NAS Cubi Point deployment, which began in November 1979. While assigned to COMNAVAIRPAC, VP-4 was awarded the Navy Battle "E" Award for operational excellence for the cycle from 1 January 1979 to 30 June 1980. During the height of the Cold War, VP-4 fought on the front lines. Making numerous deployments to NAS Cubi Point; Diego Garcia; Kadena Air Base and Misawa Air Base, Japan; NAS Adak, Alaska and numerous other remote detachment sites, the squadron located, tracked and collected vital intelligence on Soviet ballistic missile and attack submarines. This era in VP-4's history is marked by a number of "firsts" including becoming the first squadron at NAS Barbers Point to transition to the P-3C, the first NAS Barbers Point squadron to deploy to Diego Garcia (May 1980), and the first Hawaii squadron to deploy with P-3Cs to NAS Adak. VP-4's operational excellence and contributions to the Cold War were recognized in 1987 in once again earning the Navy Battle "E" Award. Additionally, during this time, the squadron's concern for the safety and welfare of its Sailors was marked by surpassing 100,000 hours of mishap-free flying and earning back-to-back Golden Anchor Retention Excellence awards in 1987 and 1988.[4]

In 1988 VP-4 returned to Hawaii where they participated in numerous exercises, including Exercise RIMPAC. In 1989 VP-4 completed a highly deployment to NAS Adak, conducting numerous ASW operations and participating in PACIFIC EXERCISE-89, the largest Naval exercise since World War II. Deploying to Diego Garcia in November 1990, VP-4 quickly established a detachment at RAFO Masirah, Oman to enforce the United Nations Embargo against Iraq during Operation Desert Shield. By early January 1991, 179 missions had challenged 3,669 merchant vessels. The embargo gave way to Battle Force Protection as war was declared on 17 January 1991. Flying 279 combat missions and 2,779 flight hours in the Persian Gulf in support of Operations Desert Shield and Desert Storm, VP-4 provided detection and targeting, resulting in the total destruction of the Iraqi Navy.[4]

Upon returning home to Hawaii, VP-4 learned that it had again received the Chief of Naval Operations Golden Anchor and the Commander, Patrol Wings Pacific (COMPATWINGSPAC) Golden Orion for retention excellence. In November 1993, VP-4 deployed to Misawa AB, Japan, and established a permanent detachment at Kadena AB, Okinawa. While on deployment, VP-4 received the 1993 Chief of Naval Operations Aviation Safety Award for a Pacific Fleet Maritime Patrol Squadron, the Commander, US 7th Fleet Award and the Captain Arnold Jay Isbell Trophy, both for Anti-Submarine Warfare (ASW) excellence.[4]

After completing a home training cycle, VP-4 conducted a split-site deployment to Misawa AB and Kadena AB in 1995. During this deployment the squadron flew around the clock for seventeen straight days during the Third Taiwan Strait Crisis, providing intelligence support and protection against anti-surface and subsurface threats to both the USS Nimitz and USS Independence carrier battle groups. In early 1997, VP-4 completed a quad-site deployment to Diego Garcia; Masirah, Oman; Manama, Bahrain, and Kadena AB, Japan. While on deployment, VP-4 aircrew and maintenance personnel conducted the first permanent detachment in the Persian Gulf. In addition, VP-4 acted as the armed patrol aircraft detachment from Doha, Qatar, flying 21 straight days with weapons and exercised the first 24-hour armed ready alert Maritime Patrol Aviation (MPA) posture in the Persian Gulf. VP-4 acted as the fleet's "eyes in the sky" in support of Maritime Interdiction Operations (MIO), enforcing United Nations Security Council Resolutions (UNSCRs) and the Iraqi Oil for Food program. In 1998, pursuant to the BRAC decision to close NAS Barbers Point, VP-4 relocated to NAS Kaneohe Bay, now known as Marine Corps Base Hawaii. In December 1998, VP-4 again deployed to six sites around the Middle East, during their deployment, the squadron participated in three combat operations: Operation Desert Fox, where they were awarded the Navy Unit Commendation; Operation Southern Watch, where VP-4 triggered the initial strike and delivered pre and post-strike imagery; and Operations Allied Force/Noble Anvil in Kosovo, which resulted in VP-4's Combat Air Crew 10 being awarded eleven (11) Air Medals. In home waters that same year, VP-4 also hosted 35 countries during RIMPAC 98.[4]

VP-4 was the first VP squadron to introduce the P-3C Anti-Surface Warfare Improvement Program (P-3C AIP) aircraft to the Fleet. VP-4 proved AIP's power during deployment by supporting three aircraft carrier battle groups in the Persian Gulf and becoming the first squadron to achieve reliable AIP imagery transfer. VP-4 was also the first squadron in the US 7th Fleet to fire the AGM-65 Maverick air-to-surface missile from a P-3C AIP aircraft. In November 1999, VP-4 flew to NAS North Island, California to participate in Joint Fleet Exercise (JTFEX/FLEETEX). While at JTFEX/FLEETEX, the squadron participated in 23 events, including AIP and AGM-84 Standoff Land Attack Missile (SLAM) demo flights.[4]

In June 2000, VP-4 conducted a WESTPAC deployment with detachments in 13 countries and participating in 27 multi-national exercises. The squadron also saved 22 lives in various Search and Rescue (SAR) operations within the Seventh Fleet’s Area of Responsibility (AOR). The squadron was again honored with the Navy Battle "E" Award in 2000, the third such award in five years. Following the September 11 attacks, VP-4 deployed to the US Central Command (USCENTCOM) AOR under Commander, Task Force 57 (CTF 57), a subordinate element of US Naval Forces Central Command (USNAVCENT)/US 5th Fleet. VP-4 conducted overland operations above Afghanistan flying armed reconnaissance missions and over the waters of the Middle East conducting Leadership Interdiction Operations in the first days of Operation Enduring Freedom. Over Afghanistan, VP-4 aircraft provided commanders a bird's eye view of the terrain where US special operations forces (SOF) were operating to dislodge Taliban and Al-Qaeda fighters from their mountainous hideouts. VP-4 also played a pivotal role in Operation Anaconda, the largest land battle in Afghanistan to that date. Over water, aircrews were instrumental in operations to intercept and cut-off fleeing Taliban and Al-Qaeda fighters. For their efforts, VP-4 was once again recognized with the 2002 Commander, Naval Air Force Pacific Battle "E" Award as the top P-3 squadron in the Pacific Fleet.[4]

During their 2003 deployment, VP-4 continued to support Operation Enduring Freedom against terrorist factions in the Philippines, providing critical real-time intelligence. These missions highlighted the expanse of Coalition operations against Al-Qaeda and Al-Qaeda backed terrorists. VP-4 also had the opportunity to conduct the P-3C's primary mission, ASW, against diesel and nuclear powered submarines, completing this deployment by flying over 4,000 mishap-free flight hours and completing over 800 missions. In 2005, VP-4 successfully completed a wartime deployment to the Middle East and Western Pacific, carrying out a wide variety of missions ranging from humanitarian assistance and disaster relief support missions to the Indian Ocean tsunami victims, to direct support of ground combat operations in support of Operation Iraqi Freedom in Iraq and Operation Enduring Freedom in Afghanistan. In December 2006, the squadron deployed to Misawa AB and Kadena AB, and to the Philippines, in support of Operation Enduring Freedom in the Philippines. This was followed by a return to Iraq in support of Operation Iraqi Freedom in November 2008. On this deployment, VP-4 supplied detachments in support of numerous joint and multinational exercises at RAF Lakenheath, United Kingdom; RAF Kinloss, Scotland; and NAS Sigonella, Sicily. This experience proved invaluable during the ensuing interdeployment readiness cycle, when VP-4 successfully planned, hosted, and executed the world's largest joint, multinational military exercise, RIMPAC 2010. Following completion of a series of detachment operations, VP-4 departed MCB Kaneohe Bay for a split site deployment in November 2010, supporting assets in both the US 5th Fleet and US 7th Fleet AORs. Following the catastrophic 2011 Tōhoku earthquake and tsunami of 11 March 2011, VP-4 forward-deployed to Misawa AB in fewer than 24 hours and re-established CTG 72.4 as an operational entity and the first US aviation unit on station for Operation Tomodachi, with VP-4 subsequently providing 254 flight hours of humanitarian and disaster relief support to the Japanese people.[4]

In November 2012, VP-4 was deployed to the US 6th Fleet in the Mediterranean, operating from NAS Sigonella, NS Rota, Spain and numerous other locations in support of US Naval Forces Europe, US Naval Forces Africa, NATO and Unified Combatant Commanders. As of 2013, the squadron has surpassed over 40 years of mishap-free flying, with over 254,000 flight hours.

VP-4 deployed in the Fifth and Sixth fleet from June 2014 to February 2015. The squadron began deployment with an operational detachment to Keflavik, Iceland, in support of emergent Theater ASW tasking. Additionally, VP-4 provided support to the Organization for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons, enabling the safe destruction of chemical weapons in the international waters of the Mediterranean Sea. VP-4 simultaneously took part in 5 exercises located in Bulgaria, Finland, Spain and Turkey. VP-4 returned home in February 2015 to prepare for what would be their final P-3C Orion deployment.

In March 2016, VP-4 departed Oahu for the last time as a Hawaii squadron. Their 'Aloha Deployment' was a busy one that saw personnel spread across three continents and twelve different countries. While on deployment, VP-4 executed a Permanent Duty Station Change (PDSC) to Naval Air Station Whidbey Island, returning home in September. VP-4 become the first squadron at NAS Whidbey Island to covert to the P-8 Poseidon in October 2016.[5] On April 2, 2018 the squadron departed for Kadena Air Base, Okinawa, Japan for its inaugural deployment.[5]

Operations[edit]

Vietnam War[edit]

Starting 26 March 1965, the squadron began a split-site deployment to MCAS Iwakuni, Japan, with detachments at various dates located at Naval Air Facility Tan Son Nhut Air Base, South Vietnam; Naval Station Sangley Point and NAS Cubi Point, Philippines.

31 January 1967: The squadron again deployed to WestPac at Iwakuni, Japan, and provided support to Task Force 72 during Operation Market Time (coastal patrols off the coasts of South Vietnam). Detachments were maintained at NS Sangley Point and NAF Naha, Okinawa. Upon completion of deployment, Commander Patrol Forces, Seventh Fleet presented the squadron a letter of commendation for its support of operations and assistance in the destruction of an enemy trawler carrying arms destined for the Viet Cong.[6]

17 April 1967: A VP-4 P-3A Orion flying patrol off the coast of Korea was fired upon by an infiltrating North Korean speedboat. The damaged aircraft landed safely after reporting the vessel's location. South Korean forces sank the intruder shortly thereafter. Lieutenant Commander C. W. Larzelere III, the PPC, received a Navy Commendation Medal for his handling of the emergency while under fire.[6]

28 April 1967: A VP-4 P-3A Orion (BuNo. 151365) flown by Lieutenant C. D. Burton was lost at sea with all hands off the coast of Tsushima Island, Japan.[7]

1 August 1968: VP-4 was deployed to WestPac under FAW-6 at Iwakuni, Japan. Patrols were conducted in the South China Sea, Sea of Japan, Korea, the Philippine Islands and Guam. Detachments were sent to Cam Ranh Bay, in support of Yankee Team and Market Time operations. Yankee Team was a joint U.S. Air Force and U.S. Navy operation begun in 1963 that provided low-level aerial reconnaissance of suspected Communist infiltration routes in eastern and southern Laos.[6]

Desert Shield/Desert Storm[edit]

On 10 November 1990, as a normal rotation, NAS Barbers Point based VP-4 (with P-3C Update I's) relieved VP-1 at Diego Garcia and RAFO Al Masirah. VP-4 C.O. Commander Bob Cunningham, took over CTG 72.8 and his X.O. Commander Carlos Badger, assumed the detachment(det). at RAFO Al Masirah.

During one 34-hour period, P-3s provided the detection and target locating information that resulted in a substantial reduction in the Iraqi Navy's offense of capability. A group of 15 Iraqi vessels heading for Maridim Island, an outpost in Kuwaiti hands was detected by VP-4s Crew Five, who vectored strike aircraft against the force, resulting in five ships sunk and seven more damaged. This effort ended what would be Iraqis last seaborne assault.

Hours later, VP-4s Crew 2 detected a group of Iraqi vessels attempting a rapid transit from Iraqi ports around Bubiyan Island, apparently trying to reach the safety of Iranian territorial waters. P-3s from VPs 4, 19, and 46 provided the target locations for the strike aircraft which destroyed 11 Iraqi vessels in what has been named the Battle of Bubiyan.[8]

Between 25–27 March 2006, a series of anti-submarine warfare exercises were held in Hawaiian waters that included Carrier Strike Group Nine, the nuclear-powered attack submarines USS Seawolf, USS Cheyenne, USS Greeneville, USS Tucson, and USS Pasadena, as well as land-based P-3 Orions from patrol squadrons VP-9, and VP-47, and VP-4.[9][10]

Aircraft assignments[edit]

The squadron was assigned the following aircraft, effective on the dates shown:[1]

  • PV-1 – July 1943
  • PV-2 – July 1945
  • P2V-1 – September 1947
  • P2V-2 – January 1948
  • P2V-5 – March 1953
  • P2V-5F – March 1956
  • P2V-7/SP-2H – September 1962
  • P-3A – October 1966
  • P-3B-MOD (Super Bee) – February 1979
  • P-3C – March 1984
  • P-3C UI – November 1989
  • P-3C UIIIR – 1992
  • P-8A – October 2016

Home port assignments[edit]

The squadron was assigned to these home ports, effective on the dates shown:[1]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

This article incorporates text from the public domainDictionary of American Naval Aviation Squadrons.

External links[edit]

Patrol Squadron Four (VP-4) is a U.S. Navy land-based patrol squadron based at the Marine Corps Base Hawaii, Oahu, Hawaii, which is tasked to undertake maritime patrol, anti-submarine warfare (ASW), and intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance (ISR) missions flying the Lockheed P-3 Orion.

History

Patrol Squadron FOUR has a long and distinguished history dating back to before World War II. The first squadron designated Patrol Squadron FOUR (VP-4) was established in 1928 and was based in Pearl Harbor, Hawaii. Re-designated Patrol Squadron TWENTY-TWO (VP-22) in 1938, the squadron was nearly destroyed during the Japanese attack on 7 December 1941. Following the attack, the squadron was reformed, refitted, and called to duty in World War II. While in the defense of the Philippines the squadron lost all but one aircraft leading to the disestablishment of the squadron. This paved the way for the second Patrol Squadron FOUR to be formed.[1]

In July 1943, a new bombing squadron, Bombing Squadron ONE HUNDRED FORTY FOUR (VB-144) was established at NAS Alameda, California with the PV-1 Ventura and continued to conduct combat and reconnaissance operations throughout the Pacific Theater. VB-144 was redesignated Patrol Bombing Squadron 144 (VPB-144) in October 1944. Following the war, VPB-144 was placed in an inactive status and existed only administratively at NAS North Island, California. On 15 May 1946 VPB-144 was redesignated Patrol Squadron (VP-144). Shortly thereafter, on 15 November 1946, VP-144 was redesignated Medium Patrol Squadron (Landplane) FOUR (VP-ML-4). In 1947, VP-ML-4 was reactivated at NAS Miramar, California. After taking receipt of the United States Navy’s newest patrol and reconnaissance aircraft, the P2V Neptune, VP-ML-4 moved to NAS Whidbey Island, Washington in January 1948. In September 1948, the squadron was redesignated Patrol Squadron FOUR (VP-4). These events mark the birth of the squadron as we know it today.[1]

In 1956, VP-4 was relocated to Naha Air Base, Okinawa, Japan. From this base, the squadron flew reconnaissance and Anti-Submarine Warfare (ASW) missions to counter the Communist Chinese threat to the islands of Matsu and Quemoy. Starting a long-standing tradition of excellence, in 1964, the squadron marked its fourth year of unequaled operational excellence with three Commander, Naval Air Forces Pacific (COMNAVAIRPAC) Navy Battle “E” Awards, three Chief of Naval Operations (CNO) Safety Awards, and four Arnold J. Isbell ASW Awards. In April 1964, VP-4 returned to their original home of NAS Barbers Point, Hawaii. From there, the squadron made numerous deployments to Southeast Asia in support of military action in Vietnam. It was on one of these deployments in 1965 when the squadron logo was changed from the Okinawa-era "Neptune" design to a Hawaiian-inspired "Black Griffin." The logo caused some confusion on the part of waitresses in the local Officer's Club, who remarked that it more closely resembled a "Skinny Dragon" and the new nickname was quickly adopted.[1]

In 1966, the Skinny Dragons began transitioning from the SP-2H Neptune to the P-3A Orion. Following completion of the transition, PATRON FOUR again made history by becoming the first Hawaii-based squadron to deploy P-3As to NAS Adak, Alaska in 1969. In 1972, VP-4 was awarded the Navy Meritorious Unit Commendation for its efforts during Operations MARKET TIME and YANKEE STATION. During the 1975 deployment to NAS Cubi Point, VP-4 participated in the evacuation of South Vietnam and the "Mayaguez" recovery operations, and in 1976 saw detachment operations to Naval Air Station Agana, Guam during which the squadron participated in Australia’s Kangaroo II fleet exercise.[1]

In July 1978, the "Skinny Dragons" assumed the Guam Detachment and simultaneously conducted operations that stretched around the world including locations as distant as: NAS Cubi Point, Republic of the Philippines; NAS Barbers Point, Hawaii; NAS Moffett Field, California; NAS Brunswick, Maine and NAS Sigonella, Italy. Patrol Squadron FOUR finished transitioning to the P-3B (MOD), or "SUPER BEE" in May 1979. The squadron then started a work up period for its next NAS Cubi Point deployment, which began in November 1979. While assigned to COMNAVAIRPAC, VP-4 was awarded the Navy Battle “E” Award for operational excellence for the cycle from 1 January 1979 to 30 June 1980. During the height of the Cold War, VP-4 fought on the front lines. Making numerous deployments to NAS Cubi Point, Philippines; Diego Garcia, British Indian Ocean Territory; Kadena Air Base and Misawa Air Base, Japan; NAS Adak, Alaska and countless other remote detachment sites, the squadron located, tracked and collected vital intelligence on Soviet ballistic missile and attack submarines. This era in VP-4’s history is marked by a number of “firsts” including becoming the first squadron at NAS Barbers Point, Hawaii to transition to the P-3C, the first NAS Barbers Point squadron to deploy to Diego Garcia (May 1980), and the first Hawaii squadron to deploy with P-3Cs to NAS Adak, Alaska (1981). VP-4’s operational excellence and contributions to the Cold War were recognized in 1987 in once again earning the Navy Battle “E” Award. Additionally, during this time, the squadron’s concern for the safety and welfare of its Sailors was marked by surpassing 100,000 hours of mishap free flying and earning back-to-back Golden Anchor Retention Excellence awards in 1987 and 1988.[1]

In 1988 VP-4 returned to Hawaii where they participated in numerous exercises, including RIM OF THE PACIFIC (RIMPAC) Exercise. In 1989 the "Skinny Dragons" completed a highly successful deployment to NAS Adak, conducting numerous Anti-Submarine Warfare (ASW) operations and participating in PACIFIC EXERCISE-89, the largest Naval exercise since World War II. Deploying to Diego Garcia in November 1990, the "Skinny Dragons" quickly established a detachment in Masirah, Oman to enforce the United Nations Embargo against Iraq during Operation DESERT SHIELD. By early January 1991, 179 missions had challenged 3,669 merchant vessels. The embargo gave way to Battle Force Protection as war was declared on 17 January 1991. Flying 279 combat missions and 2,779 flight hours in the Persian Gulf in support of Operations DESERT SHIELD and DESERT STORM, VP-4 provided detection and targeting, resulting in the total destruction of the Iraqi Navy.[1] Upon returning home to Hawaii, VP-4 learned that it had again received the Chief of Naval Operations Golden Anchor and the Commander, Patrol Wings Pacific (COMPATWINGSPAC) Golden Orion for retention excellence. In November 1993, VP-4 deployed to Misawa AB, Japan, and established a permanent detachment at Kadena AB, Okinawa. While on deployment, VP-4 received the 1993 Chief of Naval Operations Aviation Safety Award for a Pacific Fleet Maritime Patrol Squadron, the Commander, US 7th Fleet Award and the Captain Arnold Jay Isbell Trophy, both for Anti-Submarine Warfare (ASW) excellence.[1]

After completing a challenging at home training cycle, VP-4 conducted a split-site deployment to Misawa AB and Kadena AB in 1995. During this deployment the squadron flew around the clock for seventeen straight days during the People’s Republic of China-Taiwan Crisis, providing intelligence support and protection against anti-surface and subsurface threats to both the NIMITZ and INDEPENDENCE carrier battle groups. In early 1997, VP-4 completed a quad-site deployment to Diego Garcia; Masirah, Oman; Manama, Bahrain, and Kadena AB, Japan. While on deployment, Skinny Dragon aircrew and maintenance personnel conducted the first permanent detachment in the Persian Gulf. In addition, VP-4 acted as the armed patrol aircraft detachment from Doha, Qatar, flying 21 straight days with weapons and exercised the first 24-hour armed ready alert Maritime Patrol Aviation (MPA) posture in the Persian Gulf. In addition, VP-4 acted as the fleet's “eyes in the sky” in support of Maritime Interdiction Operations (MIO), enforcing United Nations Security Council Resolutions (UNSCRs) and the Iraqi Oil for Food program. In 1998, pursuant to the BRAC decision to close NAS Barbers Point, Hawaii, VP-4 executed a homeport change to the other side of Oahu, relocating to MCAS Kaneohe Bay, now known as Marine Corps Base Hawaii. In December 1998, VP-4 again deployed to six sites around the Middle East. During their deployment, the "Skinny Dragons" participated in three combat operations: Operation Desert Fox, where they were awarded the Navy Unit Commendation; Operation Southern Watch, where VP-4 triggered the initial strike and delivered pre and post-strike imagery; and Operations Allied Force/Noble Anvil in Kosovo, which resulted in VP-4's Combat Air Crew 10 being awarded eleven (11) Air Medals. In home waters that same year, VP-4 also hosted 35 countries during RIMPAC 98.[1]

Patrol Squadron FOUR was the first VP squadron to introduce the P-3C Anti-Surface Warfare Improvement Program (P-3C AIP) aircraft to the Fleet. VP-4 proved AIP’s power during deployment by supporting three aircraft carrier battle groups in the Persian Gulf and becoming the first squadron to achieve reliable AIP imagery transfer. VP-4 was also the first squadron in the US 7th Fleet to fire the AGM-65 Maverick air-to-surface missile from a P-3C AIP aircraft. In November 1999, VP-4 flew to NAS North Island, California to participate in Joint Fleet Exercise (JTFEX/FLEETEX). While at JTFEX/FLEETEX, the Skinny Dragons participated in 23 events, including AIP and AGM-84 Standoff Land Attack Missile (SLAM) demo flights.[1] In June 2000, VP-4 conducted a WESTPAC deployment with detachments in 13 countries and participating in 27 multi-national exercises. The squadron also saved 22 lives in various Search and Rescue (SAR) operations within US 7th Fleet’s Area of Responsibility (AOR). The squadron was again honored with the Navy Battle “E” Award in 2000, the third such award in five years. Following the attacks of 11 September 2001, VP-4 deployed to the US Central Command (USCENTCOM) AOR under Commander, Task Force 57 (CTF 57), a subordinate element of US Naval Forces Central Command (USNAVCENT)/US 5th Fleet. VP-4 conducted overland operations above Afghanistan flying armed reconnaissance missions and over the waters of the Middle East conducting Leadership Interdiction Operations in the first days of Operation Enduring Freedom. Over Afghanistan, VP-4 aircraft provided commanders a bird's eye view of the terrain where US special operations forces (SOF) were operating to dislodge Taliban and Al-Qaeda fighters from their mountainous hideouts. VP-4 also played a pivotal role in Operation ANACONDA, the largest land battle in Afghanistan to that date. Over water, aircrews were instrumental in operations to intercept and cut-off fleeing Taliban and Al-Qaeda fighters. For their efforts, VP-4 was once again recognized with the 2002 Commander, Naval Air Force Pacific Battle “E” Award as the top P-3 squadron in the Pacific Fleet.[1]

During their 2003 deployment, VP-4 continued to support Operation Enduring Freedom against terrorist factions in the Philippines, providing critical real time intelligence. These missions highlighted the expanse of Coalition operations against Al-Qaeda and Al-Qaeda backed terrorists. VP-4 also had the opportunity to conduct the P-3C’s primary mission, Antisubmarine Warfare, against diesel and nuclear powered submarines, completing this deployment by flying over 4,000 mishap-free flight hours and completing over 800 missions. In 2005, VP-4 successfully completed a wartime deployment to the Middle East and Western Pacific, carrying out a wide variety of missions ranging from humanitarian assistance and disaster relief support missions to the Indian Ocean tsunami victims, to direct support of ground combat operations in support of Operation Iraqi Freedom in Iraq and Operation Enduring Freedom in Afghanistan. In December 2006, the squadron deployed to Misawa AB and Kadena AB, and to the Philippines, in support of Operation Enduring Freedom in the Philippines. This was followed by a return to Iraq in support of Operation Iraqi Freedom in November 2008. On this deployment, VP-4 supplied detachments in support of numerous joint and multinational exercises at RAF Lakenheath, United Kingdom; RAF Kinloss, Scotland; and NAS Sigonella, Sicily. This experience proved invaluable during the ensuing interdeployment readiness cycle, when the "Skinny Dragons" successfully planned, hosted, and executed the world's largest joint, multinational military exercise, RIMPAC 2010. Following completion of a series of detachment operations, VP-4 departed MCB Kaneohe Bay for a split site deployment in November 2010, supporting assets in both the US 5th Fleet and US 7th Fleet AORs. Following the catastrophic earthquake and tsunami of 11 March 2011, VP-4 forward-deployed to Misawa AB in fewer than 24 hours and re-established CTG 72.4 as an operational entity and the first US aviation unit on station for Operation Tomodachi, with VP-4 subsequently providing 254 flight hours of humanitarian and disaster relief support to the Japanese people.[1]

In November 2012, VP-4 was deployed to the US 6th Fleet in the Mediterranean, operating from NAS Sigonella, Italy; NS Rota, Spain and numerous other locations in support of US Naval Forces Europe, US Naval Forces Africa, NATO and Unified Combatant Commanders. As of 2013, the squadron has surpassed over 40 years of mishap-free flying, with over 254,000 flight hours.[1]

Operations

Between 25–27 March 2006, a series of anti-submarine warfare exercises were held in Hawaiian waters that included Carrier Strike Group Nine, the nuclear-powered attack submarines Seawolf, Cheyenne, Greeneville, Tucson, and Pasadena, as well as land-based P-3 Orion aircraft from patrol squadrons VP-9, and VP-47, and VP-4.[2][3]

See also

References

External links

VP-4 History

HISTORY OF THE SKINNY DRAGONS

Notes on Earlier Squadrons

Over the years cruise books and squadron histories have mentioned earlier squadrons dating back to 1928. The first squadron bearing the designation VP-4 was formed up about 1928 and operated out of Pearl Harbor. In 1939 the first US Navy patrol wings were formed and all patrol squadrons at Pearl Harbor were organized under the command of Patrol Wing Two. A new squadron numbering system was also instituted at that time, where the first number designated the patrol wing and the second number designated the squadron within the wing. All of the 21 U.S. Navy patrol squadrons were renumbered under this new system. VP-4 thus became VP-22, Number two squadron under Patrol Wing Two.

VP-4 was flying all PBY-3’s in 1939 when its designation changed to VP-22. Based on Ford Island, Pearl Harbor in December 1941. During the Japanese surprise attack on December 7th, seven of these aircraft were destroyed and others damaged. In January 1942 VP-22 was sent to the Philippines to aid Patrol Wing Ten. Heavy losses throughout Patwing 10 resulted in the decommissioning of three of the four patrol squadrons attached to the wing, including VP-22, in April 1942, and all remaining assets and personnel were absorbed into VP-101.

VB-144 was a brand new squadron commissioned at NAS Alameda on July 1, 1943, with no connection to the above-mentioned VP-4/22. Its designation was changed to VPB-144 in October 1944. In late 1946 the squadron was demobilized, its assets dispersed, and all personnel sent home to the US for reassignment or discharge.

Some confusion exists about the connection of this squadron to the current VP-4. This is because while VPB-144 no longer actually existed as an operational unit, it was kept on the Navy’s books, a squadron on paper. On May 15, 1946, the designations of all VPB squadrons, whether actually existing or only on the books, were changed to VP squadrons. The ink had hardly dried on this change when in November 1946 patrol squadron designations were again changed. The new designations reflected the type of patrol squadron, and VP-144 became VPML-4. This stood for heavier-than-air, medium (twin engine), land-based patrol squadron. All still just on paper with no actual squadron existing, but this was about to change. In June 1947 new P2V-2s began coming off the Lockheed assembly line at Burbank, California, and new squadrons were needed to operate them. Thus the stage was set for the formation of the VP-4 that we know today.

VPML/VP-4 History

Patrol Squadron VPML-4 was formed up at the Naval Auxiliary Air Station Miramar, California on November 1, 1947. On that November 1st, the squadron consisted of 59 enlisted men, 14 officers, and no aircraft. On November 25th CDR Thomas F. Pollock arrived on board and assumed command as the first permanently assigned Commanding Officer. Three P2V-1s arrived in early December, on loan from VPML-1, also based at Miramar. On the day before Christmas 1947, three new P2V-2s were flown in from Burbank, the first aircraft received by the squadron for permanent custody. On April 10, 1948, the squadron’s administration was moved to Whidbey Island, Washington, the squadron’s new homeport, under the command of Fleet Air Wing Four. About September 1, 1948, the patrol squadron designation system in effect since November 1946 was dropped and all patrol squadrons were again simply VP squadrons. And so VPML-4 became VP-4, the name it carries to this day.

VP-4 conducted an aerial photographic survey of Southeastern Alaska from Annette Island and began regular rotation tours to Kodiak, AK from NAS Whidbey Island, WA. Following the onset of the Korean War, the squadron was deployed to Barbers Point, HI. in July 1950, developing aerial mining capabilities and remained there until its return to Whidbey Island, in January 1951. During this deployment, Aircraft BuNo 39340, SC-3 was lost with five crewmen during a rocket firing training exercise off Kaena Point. The squadron was redeployed to Barbers Point, HI in mid-1951, and from there to Kodiak, AK in September, returning to Whidbey in late December of that year. In April 1952 VP-4 again was deployed to Barbers Point and from there to NAS Agana, Guam in September. The squadron returned to Whidbey in January 1953, having turned in its P2V-2s and receiving P2V-5s in February. VP-4 remained in Whidbey until November of 1953 and was then transferred to Kadena AFB and subsequently to Naha NAS, Okinawa, where the squadron flew shipping patrols in the vicinity of Taiwan. The squadron returned to Whidbey in mid-1954.

Naha, Okinawa became the new homeport of VP-4 in 1956. From this base, the squadron flew reconnaissance and ASW coverage to counter the Communist Chinese threat to the islands of Matsu and Quemoy. In 1964 the squadron completed four years of unequaled operational excellence that resulted in three COMNAVAIRPACBattle Efficiency “E” Awards, three CNO Safety Awards, and four Arnold J. Isbell ASW Awards. Having returned to their original home of Hawaii, VP-4 began transitioning from the P-2V Neptune to the P-3A Orion in 1966. The “Skinny Dragons” went on to participate in the 1968 RIMPAC Exercise with representative squadrons from Australia, New Zealand, and Japan.

In August 1968, VP-4 continued its’ long history of quality service by deploying to MCAS Iwakuni, Japan with its’ newly acquired P3 Orion Aircraft. VP-4 not only carried on its’ regular missions in Japan but also provided support for operations in Viet Nam by maintaining short-term detachments to NAF Cam Ranh Bay. Returning to NAS Barber’s Point in February 1969, VP-4 continued to stress the need for preparation and training of all flight crews and ground personnel on the P3 aircraft. In November 1969, the squadron deployed to NS Adak, Alaska, maintained a small detachment in Viet Nam and also maintained a three crew detachment to NS Agana, Guam from March 1970 until the end of the deployment in May. While in Adak, VP-4 was advised that it had won the competition for the Arnold J. Isbell Trophy as well as the CNO Maintenance award for Pacific-based Patrol Squadrons.

VP-4 deployed to MCAS Iwakuni once again in February 1971. While the conflict in Viet Nam was winding down, VP-4 continued to send flight crews and ground support personnel to NAF Cam Ranh Bay until ending its’ deployment on July 31, 1971, and returning to NAS Barber’s Point.

During a subsequent deployment in 1972 to Cubi Point, Republic of the Philippines, VP-4 was awarded the Meritorious Unit Commendation for its effort during operations “Market Time” and “Yankee Station“.

During the 1975 deployment to Cubi Point, VP-4 participated in the evacuation of South Vietnam and the “Mayaguez” recovery operations. 1976 saw detachment operations to NAS Agana, Guam during which the squadron participated in Australia’s Kangaroo II fleet exercise.

Following Guam detachment operations, the squadron relocated to Midway Island to take part in multi-service RECON operations of Russian long-range missile shots. In April 1976 the squadron found itself back in Cubi Point where it operated throughout the Western Pacific, South China Sea, and the Indian Ocean. A highlight of the South China Sea operations was the sighting by a VP-4 crew and eventual rescue of a small boat with thirty Vietnamese refugees fleeing South Vietnam following its fall to North Vietnam. All thirty of the refugees eventually immigrated to the United States, and have successfully established themselves and their families within both the Vietnamese and American communities.

In July 1978, the “Skinny Dragons” assumed the Guam Detachment and simultaneously conducted operations that stretched around the world from Cubi Point to Barbers Point, Moffett Field, Brunswick, and Sigonella. Patrol Squadron FOUR finished transitioning to the P-3B (MOD), or “SUPER BEE” in May 1979. The squadron then started a work up period for its next Cubi Point deployment, which began in November 1979.

In May 1980, VP-4 returned from a very productive six-month Cubi Point deployment with a detachment in Diego Garcia, British Indian Ocean Territory. In February 1984, Patrol Squadron FOUR commenced transitioning to P-3C aircraft and had the honor of becoming the first P-3C squadron at NAS Barbers Point, Hawaii.

VP-4 became the first Barbers Point squadron to deploy to Diego Garcia in January 1985. The squadron concluded this remarkable deployment by surpassing over 100,000 hours of mishap free flying.

In June 1986, the “Skinny Dragons” deployed to remote Adak, Alaska; the first Barbers Point squadron to do so. In November 1987, the “Skinny Dragons” again deployed to Cubi Point. During 1987 VP-4 earned the Golden Anchor Award and the Battle “E” Award.

1988 saw the “Skinny Dragons” return to Hawaiian waters, where they participated in numerous exercises, including RIMPAC and READIEX. The highlight of the year was receiving their second consecutive Golden Orion and Golden Anchor Awards for retention, an unprecedented accomplishment for a deployable pacific squadron.

1989 saw the “Skinny Dragons” complete a highly successful deployment to Adak, Alaska. While in Adak, VP-4 conducted numerous ASW operations and participated in PACEX-89, the largest Naval exercise since World War II.

Deploying to Diego Garcia in November 1990, the “Skinny Dragons” quickly established a detachment in Masirah, Oman to enforce the UN embargo against Iraq during Operation DESERT SHIELD. By early January 1991, 179 missions had challenged 3,669 merchant vessels. The embargo gave way to Battle Force Protection as the war was declared on 17 January 1991.

Flying 279 combat missions and 2,779 flight hours in the Arabian Gulf in support of Operations DESERT SHIELD and DESERT STORM, the “Skinny Dragons” provided detection and targeting, resulting in the total destruction of the Iraqi Navy. In the fall of 1991 Patrol Squadron FOUR transitioned to the newest P-3C model, the Update III. In 1992, VP-4 once again deployed to Diego Garcia, B.I.O.T. with permanent detachments in Masirah, Oman and Kadena AB, Okinawa. Deployed from May-November 1992, VP-4 resumed missions in support of Operation DESERT STORM and successfully conducted numerous multinational exercises and independent operations.

Upon returning home to Hawaii, Patrol Squadron FOUR learned that it had again received the Golden Anchor and the COMPATWINGSPAC Golden Orion for retention excellence.

In November 1993, VP-4 deployed to Misawa AB, Japan, and established a permanent detachment in Kadena, Okinawa. While on deployment, Patrol Squadron FOUR received the 1993 Chief of Naval Operations Aviation Safety Award for a Pacific Fleet Maritime Patrol Squadron, the Commander Seventh Fleet Award and the Captain Arnold Jay Isbell Trophy, both for Anti-Submarine Warfare (ASW) excellence.

After completing a challenging at home training cycle, Patrol Squadron FOUR again received the 1994 Chief of Naval Operations Aviation Safety Award. In November 1995, VP-4 conducted a split-site deployment to Misawa AB, Japan, and Kadena, Okinawa, fully integrating into COMSEVENTHFLT operations. During this deployment, the squadron flew around the clock for seventeen straight days during the PRC-Taiwan Crisis in support of both the Nimitz and Independence Battlegroups.

After a highly successful deployment, the “Skinny Dragons” continued down the path of excellence, immediately jumping into RIMPAC ’96 and conducting a flawless Harpoon shot.

In early 1997, VP-4 again set the West Coast standard with outstanding results on the Mining Readiness Certification Inspection, the Aviation Maintenance Evaluation (AME), the Conventional Weapons Technical Proficiency Inspection (CWTPI) and the Operational Readiness Evaluation (ORE). In addition, the squadron performed superbly during the first ever detachment operations from Point Mugu, CA while supporting the Constellation Battlegroup and Boxer ARG in JTFEX 97-1. In recognition of their superb performance, the Skinny Dragons were awarded the CNO Safety Award and the Battle Efficiency “E” award in March 1997.

From May to December 1997, VP-4 completed a quad-site deployment to Diego Garcia, Masirah, Bahrain, and Kadena. While on deployment the Skinny Dragons flew over 5,600 mishap-free flight hours in support of 5 Carrier Battlegroups and 2 Amphibious Ready Groups. VP-4 set new standards of mission excellence, flying over 100 armed sorties while carrying over 200,000 pounds of ordnance. Skinny Dragon aircrew and maintenance personnel conducted the first armed detachment from Doha, Qatar, flying 21 straight days with weapons and exercised the first 24-hour armed ready alert MPA posture in the Arabian Gulf. In addition, VP-4 participated in numerous bilateral ASW exercises, SAR and Med. Evac missions and Maritime Interdiction Operations, and was present during increased tensions with Iraq.

During RIMPAC ’98, VP-4 flawlessly hosted three countries in support of 35 events. In December 1998, Patrol Squadron FOUR deployed to six sites around the Middle East, covering three Fleet Areas of Responsibility.

During their December-June 1999 deployment, the Skinny Dragons participated in three combat operations. Operation Desert Fox, where they were awarded the Navy Unit Commendation; Operation Southern Watch, where VP-4 triggered the initial strike and delivered pre- and post-strike imagery; and the Operation Allied Force/Noble Anvil, which resulted in the Skinny Dragon Crew 10 being awarded 11 Air Medals.

Again dictating Navy standards, Patrol Squadron FOUR was the first VP squadron to introduce the Avionics Improvement Package (AIP) to the Fleet. The Skinny Dragons proved AIP’s power during deployment by supporting three Battlegroups in the Arabian Gulf, and by becoming the first squadron to achieve reliable AIP imagery transfer. VP-4 was also the first squadron in the Seventh Fleet to fire the Maverick Missile from an AIP aircraft.

In November 1999, Patrol Squadron FOUR flew to North Island, California to participate in Joint Fleet Exercise. While at JTFEX/FLEETEX, the Skinny Dragons participated in 23 events including C3F AIP and Standoff Land Attack Missile (SLAM) demo flights.

In June 2000, the Skinny Dragons kicked off the new millennium with an outstanding WESTPAC deployment, compiling the highest mission capable aircraft rate of any recent patrol squadron deployed to Misawa, Japan. VP-4 was detached to 13 Pacific Rim countries and participated in 27 multi-national exercises. The multi-mission P-3 was also used to save twenty-two lives in various SAR operations within Seventh Fleet’s area of responsibility. Continuing their high standards of excellence, the squadron was once again honored with the Battle “E” Award in 2000, making it their third award in five years.

Thus far in the 2001 inter-deployment cycle, the Skinny Dragons have continued on their quest towards distinction with a successful Maverick missile launch and participation in an internationally recognized search and rescue effort. Now in their twenty-ninth year of mishap-free flying, the Skinny Dragons of Patrol Squadron Four proudly look forward to many more years as the leader in U.S. Navy Maritime Patrol Aviation, emboldened by their motto, “Pride and Excellence.”

After the tragedy of 11 September 2001, the “Skinny Dragons” were once again called to the defense of America. The “Skinny Dragons” found themselves in the skies above Afghanistan flying armed reconnaissance missions and over the waters of the Middle East conducting Leadership Interdiction Operations in the first days of what has now become the Global War on Terrorism. Over Afghanistan, VP-4 aircraft provided commanders a bird’s eye view of the terrain where special operations forces were operating to dislodge Taliban and Al-Qaeda fighters from their mountainous hideouts. The “Skinny Dragons” played a pivotal role in Operation ANACONDA, the largest land battle in Afghanistan to that date. Overwater, aircrews were instrumental in operations to intercept and cut-off fleeing Taliban and Al-Qaeda fighters. For their efforts, the “Skinny Dragons” were once again recognized with the 2002 Navy “E” Ribbon Award.

During the 2003 deployment, Patrol Squadron FOUR continued their contributions to the Global War on Terrorism by flying daily missions in support of Operation ENDURING FREEDOM-Philippines providing critical real-time intelligence. These missions highlighted the expanse of Coalition operations against Al-Qaeda and Al-Qaeda backed terrorists. Patrol Squadron FOUR also had the opportunity to conduct the P-3C’s primary mission, Antisubmarine Warfare or ASW, against diesel and nuclear-powered submarines. All told, the “Skinny Dragons” successfully completed this deployment by flying over 4,000 mishap-free flight hours and completing over 800 missions.

In 2005, VP-4 successfully completed a wartime deployment to the Middle East and Western Pacific. Patrol Squadron FOUR carried out a wide variety of missions ranging from humanitarian assistance and disaster relief support missions to the Indian Ocean tsunami victims, to direct support of ground combat operations in support of Operations IRAQI FREEDOM and ENDURING FREEDOM-AFGHANISTAN.

In December 2006, VP-4 deployed to Misawa and Kadena, Japan, and to the Philippines in support of Operation ENDURING FREEDOM.

This was followed by a return to Iraq in support of Operation IRAQI FREEDOM, in November 2008. Also on this deployment, VP-4 supplied detachments in support of numerous joint, multinational exercises, in Lakenheath, Scotland, and Sigonella, Sicily. This experience proved invaluable during the ensuing inter-deployment readiness cycle, when the “Skinny Dragons” successfully planned, hosted, and executed the world’s largest joint, multinational military exercise, RIMPAC 2010.

Following the completion of a series of detachment operations providing exemplary fleet anti-submarine warfare support PATRON FOUR departed Kaneohe Bay for a split site deployment in November 2010, supporting assets in both 5th and 7th Fleet areas of responsibility. Following the catastrophic earthquake and tsunami on March 11th, 2011, VP-4 forward-deployed to Misawa AB, Japan, in fewer than 24 hours and re-established CTG 72.4 as an operational entity and the first US aviation unit on-station for Operation TOMODACHI. The Skinny Dragons provided 254 hours of critical humanitarian and disaster relief support to the Japanese people.

In November 2012, Patrol Squadron Four was deployed to the U.S. Sixth Fleet to aid Task Force 67 (CTF-67) to provide professional and relevant support to Naval Forces Europe, Naval Forces Africa, NATO, and Unified Commanders. They are a valuable asset in support of airborne Anti-Submarine Warfare, Intelligence Surveillance and Reconnaissance, and Theater Security Cooperation in the European and African theaters. Now marking their 40th year of mishap-free flying, with over 254,000 flight hours.

Patrol Squadron Four’s most recent deployment in the Fifth and Sixth fleet was from June 2014 to February 2015 and was regarded by the Navy as a resounding success. The Skinny Dragons began deployment with an operational detachment to Keflavik, Iceland, in support of emergent Theater ASW tasking. Additionally, VP-4 provided support to the Organization for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons, enabling the safe destruction of chemical weapons in the international waters of the Mediterranean Sea. Patron Four was recognized for their monumental operational achievements and Theater ASW prowess while simultaneously taking part in 5 exercises located in Bulgaria, Finland, Spain, and Turkey.

The Skinny Dragons safely returned home to the beautiful island of Oahu in February 2015 after another successful deployment.

In March 2016, Patrol Squadron Four’s P-3C aircraft departed Kaneohe Bay for the last time as the Skinny Dragons began a challenging tri-site deployment in Sigonella, El Salvador, and Djibouti. Upon returning from deployment in September 2016, VP-4 executed a permanent duty station change to NAS Whidbey Island and transition to the Boeing P-8A Poseidon aircraft.

In April 2018, VP-4 deployed to Kadena, Japan, and the squadron’s 12 combat aircrews logged 3,575 mishap-free flight hours and sustained a 100 percent sortie completion rate across numerous detachment sites to nine countries. The Skinny Dragons, along with regional allied nations flew numerous missions monitoring UNSC Resolution 2397 prohibiting illegal ship-to-ship transfers.

The Skinny Dragons of Patrol Squadron FOUR proudly look forward to many more years as the leader in US Navy Maritime Patrol Aviation, emboldened by their motto, “Pride and Excellence.”

Special Thanks go out to Richard M. Douglass for his research and his book, “A Brief History of Patrol Squadron Four, The Neptune Years 1947 – 1966”

Last updated 25 Jun 2018

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VP-4 Skinny Dragons Squadron Patch – Sew On

Description

4 inch patch

Patrol Squadron Four (VP-4) is a U.S. Navy land-based patrol squadron based at the Naval Air Station Whidbey Island, Oak Harbor, Washington, which is tasked to undertake maritime patrol, anti-submarine warfare (ASW), and intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance (ISR) missions flying the Boeing P-8 Poseidon.

The squadron was originally established as Bombing Squadron 144 (VB-144) on 1 July 1943, redesignated Patrol Bombing Squadron 144 (VPB-144) on 1 October 1944, redesignated Patrol Squadron 144 (VP-144) on 15 May 1946, redesignated Medium Patrol Squadron (Landplane) 4 (VP-ML-4) on 15 November 1946 and redesignated Patrol Squadron FOUR (VP-4) on 1 September 1948. It is the second squadron to be designated VP-4, the first VP-4 was redesignated VP-22 on 1 July 1939

History

VB-144 was established at NAS Alameda, California on 1 July 1943, as a squadron flying the PV-1 Ventura, by 14 August The squadron completed training and boarded USS Copahee for transport to NAS Kaneohe Bay, Hawaii. Upon arrival the squadron began an intensive period of combat training and operational patrols over the ocean near the Hawaiian Islands. On 9 Counter strike vp4 terrorist missions 1944 VB-144 was transferred to Hawkins Field, Tarawa, where combat patrols commenced as soon as the squadron was checked in and assigned space for counter strike vp4 terrorist missions crews and aircraft. On 1 February 1944, the squadron was relocated to Dyess Field, Roi Island, from which bombing missions were carried out against Japanese installations in the Gilbert, Marshall and Eastern Caroline island chains. On 30 March 1944 VB-144 was transferred back to Tarawa, leaving a three-aircraft detachment at Dyess Field, which was engaged in strikes on 1 April 1944 against enemy positions at Wotje Atoll and Jaluit Atoll that continued through June. On 4 April c error e2277 the increasing tempo of operations at Dyess Field resulted in the deployment of a second detachment of VB-144 aircraft to Roi Island and by 1 September the remainder of the squadron was transferred to Dyess. On 30 September 1944 VB-144 was transferred to NAS Kaneohe Bay and was redesignated VPB-144 while preparing for return to the continental United States. On 1 November 1944 VPB-144 was reformed for training at NAS Whidbey Island, Washington. The squadron was reequipped with the newer PV-2 Harpoon. On 3 March 1945 the squadron commenced training in air-to-ground attack continued at NAS Moffett Field, California. From 8–15 April 1945 VPB-144 squadron personnel and equipment were loaded aboard USS Kadashan Bay for transport to Naval Base Pearl Harbor, Hawaii, arriving on 15 April. Upon arrival, the squadron was based at NAS Kaneohe Bay, where a combat training syllabus of several weeks was undertaken. From 11–23 May 1945 a detachment of squadron aircraft and crews was flown to Midway Island to provide combat air patrol coverage. On 23 May 1944, the detachment was increased to nine aircraft. On 24 May 1945 two of the crews sent to Midway earlier returned to NAS Kaneohe Bay. The remainder of the detachment followed, rejoining the rest of the squadron on 12 June 1944. On 27 June 1945 VPB-144 was transferred to Eniwetok, via Johnston Atoll and Majuro. The squadron was placed under the operational control of TF 96.1. Sector and photographic reconnaissance patrols were conducted over Wake and Ponape islands. By 12 September 1945, problems with malaria on Wake Island became so severe that the aircraft of VPB-144 were fitted with sprayers to cover the island with DDT. On 15 September 1945 flights were conducted over Kusaie, Ponape and the Caroline Islands as a show of force to the remaining Japanese troops who had not yet surrendered. By 15 May 1946: Squadron assets remained at NAB Tinian but all personnel were rotated back to the U.S., leaving the squadron in a caretaker status. In September 1946 the squadron was retained on the Navy roster, but was placed in an inactive status at NAS North Island, California, under FAW-14. In Nov 1947 the squadron was reactivated as VP-ML-4 at NAS Miramar, California, with a complement of 14 officers and 59 enlisted men, counter strike vp4 terrorist missions. An SNB-5 was utilized for flight training until the arrival of the squadron’s first operational aircraft, the P2V-1 Neptune, in mid-December 1947.

VP-4 conducted an aerial photographic survey of Southeastern Alaska from Annette Island and began regular rotation tours to NAS Kodiak, Alaska from NAS Whidbey Island, counter strike vp4 terrorist missions. Following the start of the Korean War, the squadron was deployed to NAS Barbers Point, Hawaii. in July, 1950, developing aerial mining capabilities and remained there until its return to Whidbey Island in January, 1951. During this deployment, Aircraft BuNo 39340, counter strike vp4 terrorist missions, SC-3 was lost with five crewmen during a rocket firing training exercise off Kaena Point.[2][3] The squadron was redeployed to NAS Barbers Point in mid 1951 and from there to NAS Kodiak in September, returning to NAS Whidbey Island in late December of that year. In April, 1952 VP-4 again was deployed to NAS Barbers Point and from there to NAS Agana, Guam in September. The squadron returned to NAS Whidbey Island in January 1953, counter strike vp4 terrorist missions, having turned in its P2V-2s and receiving P2V-5s in February. VP-4 remained in NAS Whidbey Island until November 1953 and was then transferred to Kadena Air Base and subsequently to NAF Naha, Okinawa, where the squadron flew shipping patrols in the counter strike vp4 terrorist missions of Taiwan. The squadron returned to NAS Whidbey Islandin mid-1954.

In 1956, VP-4 was relocated to NAF Naha, from this base, the squadron flew reconnaissance and Anti-submarine warfare (ASW) missions to counter the Communist Chinese threat to the islands of Matsu and Quemoy. In 1964, the squadron marked its fourth year of operational excellence with three Commander, Naval Air Forces Pacific (COMNAVAIRPAC) Navy Battle “E” Awards, three Chief of Naval Operations (CNO) Safety Awards, and four Arnold Use of register assumed to error. Isbell ASW Awards. In April 1964, VP-4 returned to NAS Barbers Point, from there, the squadron made numerous deployments to Southeast Asia in support of counter strike vp4 terrorist missions Vietnam War. It was on one of these deployments in 1965 when the squadron logo was changed from the Okinawa-era “Neptune” design to a Hawaiian-inspired “Black Griffin.” The logo caused some confusion on the part of waitresses in the local Officer’s Club, who remarked that it more closely resembled a “Skinny Dragon” and the new nickname was quickly adopted.

In 1966, the VP-4 began transitioning from the SP-2H Neptune to the P-3A Orion. Following completion of the transition, VP-4 became the first Hawaii-based squadron to deploy P-3As to NAS Adak, Alaska in 1969. In 1972, VP-4 was awarded the Navy Meritorious Unit Commendation for its efforts during Operations Market Time and Yankee Team. During the 1975 deployment to NAS Cubi Point, Philippines VP-4 participated in the Operation Frequent Wind, the evacuation of South Vietnam and the Mayaguez recovery operation, and in 1976 saw detachment operations to NAS Agana, Guam during which the squadron participated in Australia’s Kangaroo II fleet exercise.

In July 1978, VP-4 assumed the Guam Detachment and simultaneously conducted operations that stretched around the world including locations as distant as: NAS Cubi Point; NAS Barbers Point; NAS Moffett Field, California; NAS Brunswick, Maine and NAS Sigonella, Italy. VP-4 finished transitioning to the P-3B (MOD), or “SUPER BEE” in May 1979. The squadron then started a work up period for its next NAS Cubi Point deployment, which began in November 1979. While assigned to COMNAVAIRPAC, VP-4 was awarded the Navy Battle “E” Award for operational excellence for the cycle from 1 January 1979 to 30 June 1980. During the height of the Cold War, VP-4 fought on the front lines. Making numerous deployments to NAS Cubi Point; Diego Garcia; Kadena Air Base and Misawa Air Base, Japan; NAS Adak, Alaska and numerous other remote detachment sites, the squadron located, tracked and collected vital intelligence on Soviet ballistic missile and attack submarines. This era in VP-4’s history is marked by a number of “firsts” including becoming the first squadron at NAS Barbers Point to transition to the P-3C, the first NAS Barbers Point squadron to deploy to Diego Garcia (May 1980), and the first Hawaii squadron to deploy with P-3Cs to NAS Adak. VP-4’s operational excellence and contributions to the Cold War were recognized in 1987 in once again earning the Navy Battle “E” Award. Additionally, during this time, the squadron’s concern for the safety and welfare of its Sailors was marked by surpassing 100,000 hours of mishap free flying and earning back-to-back Golden Counter strike vp4 terrorist missions Retention Excellence awards in 1987 and 1988.

In 1988 VP-4 returned to Hawaii where they participated in numerous exercises, including Exercise RIMPAC. In 1989 VP-4 completed a highly deployment to NAS Adak, conducting numerous ASW operations and participating in PACIFIC EXERCISE-89, the largest Naval exercise since World War II. Deploying to Diego Garcia in November 1990, VP-4 quickly established a detachment at RAFO Masirah, Oman to java.lang.error failed to load ./config the United Nations Embargo against Iraq during Operation Desert Shield. By early January 1991, 179 missions had challenged 3,669 merchant vessels. The embargo gave way to Battle Force Protection as war was declared on 17 January 1991. Flying 279 combat missions and 2,779 flight hours in the Persian Gulf in support of Operations Desert Shield and Desert Storm, VP-4 provided detection and targeting, resulting in the total destruction of the Iraqi Navy.

Upon returning home to Hawaii, VP-4 learned that it had again received the Chief of Naval Operations Golden Anchor and the Commander, Patrol Wings Pacific (COMPATWINGSPAC) Golden Orion for retention excellence. In November 1993, VP-4 deployed to Misawa AB, Japan, and established a permanent detachment at Kadena AB, Okinawa. While on deployment, VP-4 received the 1993 Chief of Naval Operations Aviation Safety Award for a Pacific Fleet Maritime Patrol Squadron, counter strike vp4 terrorist missions, the Commander, US 7th Fleet Award and the Captain Arnold Jay Isbell Trophy, both for Anti-Submarine Warfare (ASW) excellence.

After completing a home training cycle, VP-4 conducted a split-site deployment to Misawa AB and Kadena AB in 1995, counter strike vp4 terrorist missions. During this deployment the squadron flew around the clock for seventeen counter strike vp4 terrorist missions days during the Third Taiwan Strait Crisis, providing intelligence support and protection against anti-surface and subsurface threats to both the USS Nimitz and USS Independence carrier battle groups. In early 1997, VP-4 completed a quad-site deployment to Diego Garcia; Masirah, Oman; Manama, Bahrain, and Kadena AB, Japan. While on deployment, VP-4 aircrew and maintenance personnel conducted the first permanent detachment in the Persian Gulf. In addition, VP-4 acted as the armed patrol aircraft detachment from Doha, counter strike vp4 terrorist missions, Qatar, flying 21 straight days with weapons and exercised the first 24-hour armed ready alert Maritime Patrol Aviation (MPA) posture in the Persian Gulf. VP-4 acted as the fleet’s “eyes in the sky” in support of Maritime Interdiction Operations (MIO), enforcing United Nations Security Council Resolutions (UNSCRs) and the Iraqi Oil for Food program. In 1998, pursuant to the BRAC decision to close NAS Barbers Point, VP-4 relocated to NAS Kaneohe Bay, now known as Marine Corps Base Hawaii. In December 1998, VP-4 again deployed to six sites around the Middle East, during their deployment, the squadron participated in three combat operations: Operation Desert Fox, where they were awarded the Navy Unit Commendation; Operation Southern Watch, where VP-4 triggered the initial strike and delivered pre and post-strike imagery; and Operations Allied Force/Noble Anvil in Kosovo, which resulted in VP-4’s Combat Air Crew 10 being awarded eleven (11) Air Medals. In home waters that same year, VP-4 also hosted 35 countries during RIMPAC 98.

VP-4 was the first VP squadron to introduce the P-3C Anti-Surface Warfare Improvement Program (P-3C AIP) aircraft to the Fleet. VP-4 proved AIP’s power during deployment by supporting three aircraft carrier battle groups in the Persian Gulf and grub error no such device the first squadron to achieve reliable AIP imagery transfer. VP-4 was also the first squadron in the US 7th Fleet to fire the AGM-65 Maverick air-to-surface missile from a P-3C AIP aircraft. In November 1999, VP-4 flew to NAS North Island, California to participate in Joint Fleet Exercise (JTFEX/FLEETEX). While at JTFEX/FLEETEX, the squadron participated in 23 events, including AIP and AGM-84 Standoff Land Attack Missile (SLAM) demo flights.

In June 2000, VP-4 conducted a WESTPAC deployment with detachments in 13 countries and participating in 27 multi-national exercises. The squadron also saved 22 lives counter strike vp4 terrorist missions various Search and Rescue (SAR) operations within the Seventh Fleet’s Area of Responsibility (AOR). The squadron was again honored with the Navy Battle “E” Award in 2000, the third such award in five years. Following the September 11 attacks, VP-4 deployed to the US Central Command (USCENTCOM) AOR under Commander, Task Force 57 (CTF 57), a subordinate element of US Naval Forces Central Command (USNAVCENT)/US 5th Fleet. VP-4 conducted overland operations above Afghanistan flying armed reconnaissance missions and over the counter strike vp4 terrorist missions of the Middle East conducting Leadership Interdiction Operations in the first days of Operation Enduring Freedom. Over Afghanistan, VP-4 aircraft provided commanders a bird’s eye view of the terrain where US special operations forces (SOF) were operating to dislodge Taliban and Al-Qaeda fighters from their mountainous hideouts. VP-4 also played a pivotal role in Operation Anaconda, the largest land battle in Afghanistan to that date. Over water, aircrews were instrumental in operations to intercept and cut-off fleeing Taliban and Al-Qaeda fighters. For their efforts, VP-4 was once again recognized with the 2002 Commander, Naval Air Force Pacific Battle “E” Award counter strike vp4 terrorist missions the top P-3 squadron in the Pacific Fleet.

During their 2003 deployment, VP-4 continued to support Operation Enduring Freedom against terrorist factions in the Philippines, providing critical real time intelligence. These missions highlighted the expanse of Coalition operations against Al-Qaeda and Al-Qaeda backed terrorists. VP-4 also had the opportunity to conduct the P-3C’s primary mission, ASW, against diesel and nuclear powered submarines, completing this deployment by flying over 4,000 mishap-free flight hours and completing over 800 missions. In 2005, VP-4 successfully completed a wartime deployment to counter strike vp4 terrorist missions Middle East and Western Pacific, carrying out a wide variety of missions ranging from humanitarian assistance and disaster relief support missions to the Indian Ocean tsunami victims, to direct support of ground combat operations in support of Operation Iraqi Freedom in Iraq and Operation Enduring Freedom in Afghanistan. In December 2006, the squadron deployed to Misawa AB and Kadena AB, and to the Philippines, in support of Operation Enduring Freedom in the Philippines. This was followed by a return to Iraq in support of Operation Iraqi Freedom in November 2008. On this deployment, VP-4 supplied detachments in support of numerous joint and multinational exercises at RAF Lakenheath, United Kingdom; RAF Kinloss, Scotland; error 84 l7 NAS Sigonella, Sicily. This experience proved invaluable during the ensuing interdeployment readiness cycle, when VP-4 successfully planned, counter strike vp4 terrorist missions, hosted, and executed the world’s largest joint, counter strike vp4 terrorist missions, multinational military exercise, RIMPAC 2010. Following completion of a series of detachment operations, VP-4 departed MCB Kaneohe Bay for a split terror ist ein gespenst deployment in November 2010, supporting assets in both counter strike vp4 terrorist missions US 5th Fleet and US 7th Fleet AORs. Following the catastrophic 2011 Tōhoku earthquake and tsunami of 11 March 2011, VP-4 forward-deployed to Misawa AB in fewer than 24 hours and re-established CTG 72.4 as an operational entity and the first US aviation unit on station for Operation Tomodachi, with VP-4 subsequently providing 254 flight hours of humanitarian and disaster relief support to the Japanese people.

In November 2012, VP-4 was deployed to didk error ocured US 6th Fleet in the Mediterranean, operating from NAS Sigonella, NS Rota, Spain and numerous other locations in support of US Naval Forces Europe, US Naval Forces Africa, NATO and Unified Combatant Commanders. As of 2013, the squadron has surpassed over 40 years of mishap-free flying, with over 254,000 flight hours.

Patrol Squadron Four’s most recent deployment in the Fifth and Sixth fleet was from June 2014 to February 2015 and was regarded by the Navy as a resounding success. The Runtime error at 90 165 Dragons began deployment with an operational detachment to Keflavik, Iceland, in support of emergent Theater ASW tasking. Additionally, VP-4 provided support to the Organization for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons, enabling the safe destruction of chemical weapons in the international waters of the Mediterranean Sea. Patron Four was recognized for their monumental operational achievements and Theater ASW prowess while simultaneously taking part in 5 exercises located in Bulgaria, Finland, Spain and Turkey. The Skinny Dragons safely returned home in February 2015 after another successful deployment. After a brief period to relax, VP-4 immediately began a grueling home cycle to prepare for what would be their final P-3C Orion deployment.

In March 2016, the Skinny Dragons departed Oahu for the last time as a Hawaii squadron. Their ‘Aloha Deployment’ was a busy one that saw personnel spread across three continents and twelve different countries. The Skinny Dragons executed their mission flawlessly throughout the entire deployment, and everyone from the maintenance professionals, to aircrew and support personnel was instrumental in ensuring their last P-3C Orion deployment was a resounding success. While on deployment, VP-4 executed a Permanent Duty Station Change (PDSC) to Naval Air Station Whidbey Island. Returning home in September, the Skinny Dragons currently await the start of the transition to the P-8A Poseidon, slated to begin at the end of October. VP-4 proudly looks forward to many more years as the leader in US Navy Maritime Patrol Aviation, emboldened by their motto: Family, Leadership, Integrity.[4] [4]

Operations
Vietnam War
Starting 26 March 1965, the squadron began a split-site deployment to MCAS Iwakuni, Japan, with detachments at various dates located at Naval Air Facility Tan Son Nhut Air Base, South Vietnam; Naval Station Sangley Point and NAS Cubi Point, Philippines.

31 Jan 1967: The squadron again deployed to WestPac at Iwakuni, Japan, and provided support to Task Force 72 during Operation Market Time (coastal patrols off the coasts of South Vietnam). Detachments were maintained at NS Sangley Point and NAF Naha, Okinawa. Upon completion of deployment, Commander Patrol Forces, Seventh Fleet presented the squadron a letter of commendation for its support of operations and assistance in the destruction of an enemy trawler carrying arms destined for the Viet Cong.

17 Apr 1967: A VP-4 P-3A Orion flying patrol off the coast of Korea was fired upon by an infiltrating North Korean speedboat. The damaged aircraft landed safely after reporting the vessel’s location. South Korean forces sank the intruder shortly thereafter. Lieutenant Commander C. W. Larzelere III, the PPC, received a Navy Commendation Medal for his handling of the emergency while under fire.

28 Apr 1967: A VP-4 P-3A Orion (BuNo. 151365) flown by Lieutenant C. D. Burton was lost at sea with all hands off the coast of Tsushima Island, Japan.[6]

1 Aug 1968: VP-4 was deployed to WestPac under FAW-6 at Iwakuni, Japan. Patrols were conducted in the South China Sea, Sea of Japan, Korea, the Philippine Islands and Guam. Detachments were sent to Cam Ranh Bay, in support of Yankee Team and Market Time operations. Yankee Resident evil 5 pixel shader error was a joint U.S. Air Force and U.S. Navy operation begun in 1963 that provided low-level aerial reconnaissance of suspected Communist infiltration routes in eastern and southern Laos.

Desert Shield/Desert Storm
On 10 November 1990, as a normal rotation, NAS Barbers Point based VP-4 (with P-3C Update I’s) relieved VP-1 at Diego Garcia and RAFO Al Masirah. VP-4 C.O. Commander Bob Cunningham, took over CTG 72.8 and his X.O. Commander Carlos Badger, assumed the detachment(det). at RAFO Al Masirah.

During one 34-hour period, P-3s provided the detection and target locating information that resulted in a substantial reduction in the Iraqi Navy’s offense of capability. A group of 15 Iraqi vessels heading for Maridim Island, an outpost in Kuwaiti hands was detected by VP-4s Crew Five, who vectored strike aircraft against the force, counter strike vp4 terrorist missions, resulting in five ships sunk and seven more damaged. This effort ended what would be Iraqis last seaborne assault.

Hours later, VP-4s Crew 2 detected a group of Iraqi vessels attempting a rapid transit from Iraqi ports around Bubiyan Island, apparently trying to reach the safety of Iranian territorial waters. P-3s from VPs 4, 19, and 45 provided the target locations for the strike aircraft which destroyed 11 Iraqi vessels in what has been named the Battle of Bubiyan.

Between 25–27 March 2006, a series of anti-submarine warfare exercises were held in Hawaiian waters that included Carrier Strike Group Nine, the nuclear-powered attack submarines USS Seawolf, USS Cheyenne, USS Greeneville, USS Tucson, and USS Pasadena, as well as land-based P-3 Orions from patrol squadrons VP-9, and VP-47, and VP-4.

Aircraft assignments

A VP-4 P-8A in May 2017.
The squadron was assigned the following aircraft, effective on the dates shown:

PV-1 – July 1943
PV-2 – July 1945
P2V-1 – September 1947
P2V-2 – January 1948
P2V-5 – March 1953
P2V-5F – March 1956
P2V-7/SP-2H – September 1962
P-3A – October 1965
P-3B-MOD (Super Bee) – February 1979
P-3C – March 1984
P-3C UI – November 1989
P-3C UIIIR – 1992
P-8A – October 2016
Home port assignments
The squadron was assigned to these home ports, effective on the dates shown

NAS Alameda, California – 1 July 1943
Naval Air Station Whidbey Island, Washington – 1 November 1944
NAB Eniwetok – 27 June 1945
NAB Tinian – 1946
NAS North Island, California – September 1946
NAS Miramar, counter strike vp4 terrorist missions, California – November 1947
Naval Air Station Whidbey Island – January 1948
NAF Naha, Okinawa – 13 August 1956
NAS Barbers Point, Hawaii – November 1963
Marine Corps Base Hawaii – 1998
Naval Air Station Whidbey Island – September 2016

VP-4 History

HISTORY OF THE SKINNY DRAGONS

Notes on Earlier Squadrons

Over the years cruise books and squadron histories have mentioned earlier squadrons dating back to 1928. The first squadron bearing the designation VP-4 was formed counter strike vp4 terrorist missions about 1928 and operated out of Pearl Harbor. In 1939 the first US Navy patrol wings were formed and all patrol squadrons at Pearl Harbor were organized under the command of Patrol Wing Two. A new squadron numbering system was also instituted at that time, where the first number designated the patrol wing and the second number designated the squadron within the wing. All of the 21 U.S. Navy patrol squadrons were renumbered under this new system. VP-4 thus became VP-22, Number two squadron under Patrol Wing Two.

VP-4 was flying all PBY-3’s in 1939 when its designation changed to VP-22. Based on Ford Island, Pearl Harbor in December 1941. During the Japanese surprise attack on December 7th, seven of these aircraft were destroyed and others damaged. In January 1942 VP-22 was sent to the Philippines to aid Patrol Wing Ten. Heavy losses throughout Patwing counter strike vp4 terrorist missions resulted in the decommissioning of three of the four patrol squadrons attached to the wing, including VP-22, in April 1942, and all remaining assets and personnel were absorbed into VP-101.

VB-144 was a brand new squadron commissioned at NAS Alameda on July 1, 1943, counter strike vp4 terrorist missions, with no connection to the above-mentioned VP-4/22. Its designation was changed to VPB-144 in October 1944, counter strike vp4 terrorist missions. In late 1946 the squadron was demobilized, its assets dispersed, and all personnel sent home to the US for reassignment or discharge.

Some confusion exists about the connection of this squadron to the current VP-4. This is because while VPB-144 no longer actually existed as an operational unit, it was kept on the Navy’s books, a squadron on paper. On May 15, 1946, the designations of all VPB squadrons, whether actually existing or only on the books, were changed to VP squadrons. The ink had hardly dried on this change when in November 1946 patrol squadron designations were again changed. The new designations reflected the type of patrol squadron, and VP-144 became VPML-4. This stood for heavier-than-air, medium (twin engine), counter strike vp4 terrorist missions, land-based patrol squadron. All still just on paper with no actual squadron existing, but this was about to change. In June 1947 new P2V-2s began coming off the Lockheed assembly line at Burbank, California, and new squadrons were needed to operate them. Thus the stage was set for the formation of the VP-4 that we know today.

VPML/VP-4 History

Patrol Squadron VPML-4 was formed up at the Naval Auxiliary Air Station Miramar, California on November 1, 1947. On that November 1st, the squadron consisted of 59 enlisted men, 14 officers, and no aircraft. On November 25th CDR Thomas F. Pollock arrived on board and assumed command as the first permanently assigned Commanding Officer. Three P2V-1s arrived in early December, on loan from VPML-1, counter strike vp4 terrorist missions, also based at Miramar. On the day before Christmas 1947, three new P2V-2s were flown in from Burbank, the first aircraft received by the squadron for counter strike vp4 terrorist missions custody. On April 10, 1948, the squadron’s administration was moved to Whidbey Island, Washington, the squadron’s new homeport, under the command of Fleet Air Wing Four. About September 1, 1948, the patrol squadron designation system in effect since November counter strike vp4 terrorist missions was dropped and all patrol squadrons were again simply VP squadrons. And so VPML-4 became VP-4, the name it carries to this day.

VP-4 conducted an aerial photographic survey of Southeastern Alaska from Annette Island and began regular rotation tours to Kodiak, AK from NAS Whidbey Island, WA. Following the onset of the Korean War, the squadron was deployed to Barbers Point, HI. in July 1950, developing aerial mining capabilities and remained there until its return to Whidbey Island, in January 1951. During this deployment, Aircraft BuNo 39340, SC-3 was lost with five crewmen during a rocket firing training exercise off Kaena Point. The squadron was redeployed to Barbers Point, HI in mid-1951, and from there to Kodiak, AK in September, returning to Whidbey in late December of that year, counter strike vp4 terrorist missions. In April 1952 VP-4 again was deployed to Barbers Point and from there to NAS Agana, Guam in September. The squadron returned to Whidbey in January 1953, having turned in its P2V-2s and receiving P2V-5s in February. VP-4 remained in Whidbey until November of 1953 and was then transferred to Kadena AFB and subsequently to Naha NAS, Okinawa, where the squadron flew shipping patrols in the vicinity of Taiwan. The squadron returned to Whidbey in mid-1954.

Naha, Okinawa became the new homeport of VP-4 in 1956. From this base, the squadron flew reconnaissance and ASW coverage to counter the Communist Chinese threat to the islands of Matsu and Quemoy. In 1964 the squadron completed four years of unequaled operational excellence that resulted in three COMNAVAIRPACBattle Efficiency “E” Awards, counter strike vp4 terrorist missions, three CNO Safety Awards, and four Arnold J. Isbell ASW Awards. Having returned to their original home of Hawaii, VP-4 began transitioning from the P-2V Neptune to the P-3A Orion in 1966. The “Skinny Dragons” went on to participate in the 1968 RIMPAC Exercise with representative squadrons counter strike vp4 terrorist missions Australia, New Zealand, and Japan.

In August 1968, VP-4 continued its’ long history of quality service by deploying to MCAS Iwakuni, Japan with its’ newly acquired P3 Orion Aircraft. VP-4 not only carried on its’ regular missions in Japan but also provided support for operations in Viet Nam by maintaining short-term detachments to NAF Cam Ranh Bay. Returning to NAS Barber’s Point in February 1969, VP-4 continued to stress the need for preparation and counter strike vp4 terrorist missions of all flight crews and ground personnel on the P3 aircraft. In November 1969, the squadron deployed to NS Adak, Alaska, maintained a small detachment in Viet Nam and also maintained a three crew detachment to NS Agana, Guam from March 1970 until the end of the deployment in May. While in Adak, VP-4 was advised that it had won the competition for the Arnold J. Isbell Trophy as well as the CNO Maintenance award for Pacific-based Patrol Squadrons.

VP-4 deployed to MCAS Iwakuni once again in February 1971. While the conflict in Viet Nam was winding down, VP-4 continued to send flight crews and ground support personnel to NAF Cam Ranh Bay until ending its’ indy smtp error 5.1.7 on July 31, 1971, counter strike vp4 terrorist missions, and returning to NAS Barber’s Point.

During a subsequent deployment in 1972 to Cubi Point, Republic of the Philippines, VP-4 was awarded the Meritorious Unit Commendation for its effort during operations “Market Time” and “Yankee Station“.

During the 1975 deployment to Cubi Point, VP-4 participated in the evacuation of South Vietnam and the “Mayaguez” recovery operations. 1976 saw detachment operations to NAS Agana, Guam during which the squadron participated in Australia’s Kangaroo II fleet exercise.

Following Guam detachment operations, the squadron relocated to Midway Island to take part in multi-service RECON operations of Russian long-range missile shots. In April 1976 the squadron found itself back in Cubi Point where it operated throughout the Western Pacific, South China Sea, and the Indian Ocean. A highlight of the South China Sea operations was the sighting by a VP-4 crew and eventual rescue of a small boat with thirty Vietnamese refugees fleeing South Vietnam following its fall to North Vietnam. All thirty of the refugees eventually immigrated to the United States, and have successfully established themselves and their families within both the Vietnamese and American communities.

In July 1978, counter strike vp4 terrorist missions, the “Skinny Dragons” assumed the Guam Detachment and simultaneously conducted operations that stretched around the world from Cubi Point to Barbers Point, Moffett Field, Brunswick, and Sigonella. Patrol Squadron FOUR finished transitioning to the P-3B (MOD), or “SUPER BEE” in May 1979. The squadron then started a work up period for its next Cubi Point deployment, which began in November 1979.

In May 1980, VP-4 returned from a very productive six-month Cubi Point deployment with a detachment in Diego Garcia, Counter strike vp4 terrorist missions Indian Ocean Territory. In February 1984, Patrol Squadron FOUR commenced transitioning to P-3C aircraft and had the honor of becoming the first P-3C squadron at NAS Barbers Point, Hawaii.

VP-4 became the first Barbers Point squadron to deploy to Diego Garcia in January 1985. The squadron concluded this remarkable deployment by surpassing over 100,000 hours of mishap free flying.

In June 1986, the “Skinny Dragons” deployed to remote Adak, Alaska; the first Barbers Point squadron to do so. In November 1987, the “Skinny Dragons” again deployed to Cubi Point. During pkg add error VP-4 earned the Golden Anchor Award and the Battle “E” Award.

1988 saw the “Skinny Dragons” return to Hawaiian waters, where they participated in numerous exercises, including RIMPAC and READIEX. The highlight of the year was receiving their second consecutive Golden Orion and Golden Anchor Awards for retention, an unprecedented accomplishment for a deployable pacific squadron.

1989 saw the “Skinny Dragons” complete a highly successful deployment to Adak, Alaska. While in Adak, VP-4 conducted numerous ASW operations and participated in PACEX-89, the largest Naval exercise since World War II.

Deploying to Diego Garcia in November 1990, the “Skinny Dragons” quickly established a detachment in Masirah, Oman to enforce the UN embargo against Iraq during Operation DESERT SHIELD. By early January 1991, 179 missions had challenged 3,669 merchant vessels. The embargo gave way to Battle Force Protection as the war was declared on 17 January 1991.

Flying 279 combat missions and 2,779 flight hours in the Arabian Gulf in support of Operations DESERT SHIELD and DESERT STORM, the “Skinny Dragons” provided detection and targeting, resulting in the total destruction of the Iraqi Navy. In the fall of 1991 Patrol Squadron FOUR transitioned to the newest P-3C model, the Counter strike vp4 terrorist missions III. In 1992, counter strike vp4 terrorist missions, VP-4 once again deployed to Diego Garcia, B.I.O.T. with permanent detachments in Masirah, Oman and Kadena AB, Okinawa. Deployed from May-November 1992, VP-4 resumed missions in support of Operation DESERT STORM and successfully conducted numerous multinational exercises and independent operations.

Upon returning home to Hawaii, Patrol Squadron FOUR learned that it had again received the Golden Anchor and the COMPATWINGSPAC Golden Orion for retention excellence.

In November 1993, VP-4 deployed to Misawa AB, Japan, and established a permanent detachment in Kadena, Okinawa. While on deployment, Patrol Squadron FOUR received the 1993 Chief of Naval Operations Aviation Safety Award for a Pacific Fleet Maritime Patrol Squadron, the Commander Seventh Fleet Award and the Captain Arnold Jay Isbell Trophy, both for Anti-Submarine Warfare (ASW) excellence.

After completing a challenging at home training cycle, Patrol Squadron FOUR again received the 1994 Chief of Naval Counter strike vp4 terrorist missions Aviation Safety Award. In November 1995, VP-4 conducted a split-site deployment to Misawa AB, Japan, and Kadena, Okinawa, fully integrating into COMSEVENTHFLT operations. During this deployment, the squadron flew around the clock for seventeen straight days during the PRC-Taiwan Crisis in support of both the Nimitz and Independence Battlegroups.

After a highly successful deployment, the “Skinny Dragons” continued down the path of excellence, immediately jumping into RIMPAC ’96 and conducting a flawless Harpoon shot.

In early 1997, VP-4 again set the West Coast standard with outstanding results on the Mining Readiness Certification Inspection, the Aviation Maintenance Evaluation (AME), the Demrad kalisto f5 error Weapons Technical Proficiency Inspection (CWTPI) and the Operational Readiness Evaluation (ORE). In addition, the squadron performed superbly during the first ever detachment operations from Point Mugu, CA while supporting the Constellation Battlegroup and Boxer ARG in JTFEX 97-1. In recognition of their superb performance, the Skinny Dragons were awarded the CNO Safety Award and the Battle Efficiency “E” award in March 1997.

From May to December 1997, VP-4 completed a quad-site deployment to Diego Garcia, Masirah, Bahrain, and Kadena. While on deployment the Skinny Dragons flew over 5,600 mishap-free flight hours in support of 5 Carrier Battlegroups and 2 Amphibious Ready Groups. VP-4 set new standards of mission excellence, flying over 100 armed sorties while carrying over 200,000 pounds of ordnance. Skinny Dragon aircrew and maintenance personnel conducted the first armed detachment from Doha, Qatar, flying 21 straight days with weapons and exercised the first 24-hour armed ready alert MPA posture in the Arabian Gulf. In addition, VP-4 participated in numerous bilateral ASW exercises, SAR and Med. Evac missions and Maritime Interdiction Operations, and was present during increased tensions with Iraq.

During RIMPAC ’98, VP-4 flawlessly hosted three countries in support of 35 events. In December 1998, Patrol Squadron FOUR deployed to six sites around the Middle East, covering three Fleet Areas of Responsibility.

During their December-June 1999 deployment, the Skinny Dragons participated in three combat operations. Operation Desert Fox, where they were awarded the Navy Unit Commendation; Operation Southern Watch, where VP-4 triggered the initial strike and delivered pre- and post-strike imagery; and the Operation Allied Force/Noble Anvil, which resulted in the Skinny Dragon Crew 10 being awarded 11 Air Medals.

Again dictating Navy standards, Patrol Squadron FOUR was the first VP squadron to introduce the Avionics Improvement Package (AIP) to the Fleet. The Skinny Dragons proved AIP’s power during deployment by supporting three Battlegroups in the Arabian Gulf, and by becoming the first squadron to achieve reliable AIP imagery transfer. VP-4 was also the first squadron in the Seventh Fleet to fire the Maverick Missile from an AIP aircraft.

In November 1999, Patrol Squadron FOUR flew to North Island, California to participate in Joint Fleet Exercise. While at JTFEX/FLEETEX, the Skinny Dragons participated in 23 events canon ip4300 asf cam sensor error C3F AIP and Standoff Land Attack Missile (SLAM) demo counter strike vp4 terrorist missions June 2000, the Skinny Dragons kicked off the new millennium with an outstanding WESTPAC deployment, compiling the highest mission capable aircraft rate of any recent patrol squadron deployed to Misawa, Japan. VP-4 was detached to 13 Pacific Rim countries and participated in 27 multi-national exercises. The multi-mission P-3 was also used to save twenty-two lives in various SAR operations within Seventh Fleet’s area of responsibility. Continuing their high standards of excellence, the squadron was once again honored with the Battle “E” Award in 2000, making it their third award in five years.

Thus far in the 2001 inter-deployment cycle, the Skinny Dragons have continued on their quest towards distinction with a successful Maverick missile launch and participation in an internationally recognized search and rescue effort. Now in their twenty-ninth year of mishap-free flying, the Skinny Dragons of Patrol Squadron Four proudly look forward to many more years as the leader in U.S. Navy Maritime Patrol Aviation, emboldened by their motto, “Pride and Excellence.”

After the tragedy of 11 September 2001, the “Skinny Dragons” were once again called to the defense of America. The “Skinny Dragons” found themselves in the skies above Afghanistan flying armed authdefault error ldap_bind missions and over the waters of the Middle East conducting Leadership Interdiction Operations in the first days of what has now become the Global War on Terrorism. Over Afghanistan, VP-4 aircraft provided commanders a bird’s eye view of the terrain where special operations forces were operating to dislodge Taliban and Al-Qaeda fighters from their mountainous hideouts. The “Skinny Dragons” played a pivotal role in Operation ANACONDA, the largest land battle in Afghanistan to that date. Overwater, aircrews were instrumental in operations to intercept and cut-off fleeing Taliban and Al-Qaeda fighters. For their efforts, the “Skinny Dragons” were once again recognized with the 2002 Navy “E” Ribbon Award.

During the 2003 deployment, Patrol Squadron FOUR continued their contributions to the Global War on Terrorism by flying daily missions in support of Operation ENDURING FREEDOM-Philippines providing critical real-time intelligence. These missions highlighted the expanse of Coalition operations against Al-Qaeda and Al-Qaeda backed terrorists. Patrol Squadron FOUR also had the opportunity to conduct the P-3C’s primary mission, Antisubmarine Warfare or ASW, against diesel and nuclear-powered submarines. All told, the “Skinny Dragons” successfully completed this deployment by flying over 4,000 mishap-free flight hours and completing over 800 missions.

In 2005, VP-4 successfully completed a wartime deployment to the Middle East and Western Pacific. Patrol Squadron FOUR carried out a wide variety of missions ranging from humanitarian assistance and disaster relief support missions to the Indian Ocean tsunami victims, to direct support of ground combat operations in support of Operations IRAQI FREEDOM and ENDURING FREEDOM-AFGHANISTAN.

In December 2006, VP-4 deployed to Misawa and Kadena, Japan, and to the Philippines in support of Operation ENDURING FREEDOM.

This was followed by a return to Iraq in support of Operation IRAQI FREEDOM, in November 2008. Also on this deployment, VP-4 supplied detachments in support of numerous joint, multinational exercises, in Lakenheath, Scotland, and Sigonella, Sicily. This experience proved invaluable during the ensuing inter-deployment readiness cycle, when the “Skinny Dragons” successfully planned, hosted, and executed the world’s largest joint, multinational military exercise, RIMPAC 2010.

Following the completion of a series of detachment operations providing exemplary fleet anti-submarine warfare support PATRON FOUR departed Kaneohe Bay for a split site deployment in November 2010, supporting error status code 0007 in both 5th and 7th Fleet areas of responsibility. Following the catastrophic earthquake and tsunami on March 11th, 2011, counter strike vp4 terrorist missions, VP-4 forward-deployed to Misawa AB, Japan, in fewer than 24 hours and re-established CTG 72.4 as an operational entity and the first US aviation unit on-station for Operation TOMODACHI. The Skinny Dragons provided 254 hours of critical humanitarian and disaster relief support to the Japanese people.

In November 2012, Patrol Squadron Four was deployed to the U.S. Sixth Fleet to aid Task Force 67 (CTF-67) to provide professional and relevant support to Naval Forces Europe, Naval Forces Africa, NATO, and Unified Commanders. They are a valuable asset in support of airborne Counter strike vp4 terrorist missions Warfare, Intelligence Surveillance and Reconnaissance, and Theater Security Cooperation in the European and African theaters. Now marking their 40th year of mishap-free flying, with over 254,000 flight hours.

Patrol Squadron Four’s most recent deployment in the Fifth and Sixth fleet was from June 2014 to February 2015 and was regarded by the Navy as a resounding success. The Skinny Dragons began deployment with an operational detachment to Keflavik, Iceland, in support of emergent Theater ASW tasking. Additionally, VP-4 provided winsock error 10060 to the Organization for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons, enabling the safe destruction of chemical weapons in the international waters of the Mediterranean Sea. Patron Four was recognized for their monumental operational achievements and Theater ASW prowess while simultaneously taking part in 5 exercises located in Bulgaria, Finland, Spain, and Turkey.

The Skinny Dragons safely returned home to the beautiful island of Oahu in February 2015 after another successful deployment.

In March 2016, Patrol Squadron Four’s P-3C aircraft departed Kaneohe Bay for the last time as the Skinny Dragons began a challenging tri-site deployment in Sigonella, El Salvador, and Djibouti. Upon returning from deployment in September 2016, VP-4 executed a permanent duty station change to NAS Whidbey Island and transition to the Boeing P-8A Poseidon aircraft.

In April 2018, VP-4 deployed to Kadena, Japan, and the squadron’s 12 combat aircrews logged 3,575 nokia n9 ssh error flight hours and sustained a 100 percent sortie completion rate across numerous detachment sites to nine countries. The Skinny Dragons, along with regional allied nations flew numerous missions boot0 error 10.8 UNSC Resolution 2397 prohibiting illegal ship-to-ship transfers.

The Skinny Dragons of Patrol Squadron FOUR proudly look forward to many more years as the leader in US Navy Maritime Patrol Aviation, emboldened by their motto, “Pride and Excellence.”

Special Thanks go out to Richard M. Douglass for his research and his book, “A Brief History of Patrol Squadron Four, The Neptune Years 1947 – 1966”

Last updated 25 Jun 2018

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Patrol Squadron Four (VP-4) is a U.S. Navy land-based patrol squadron based at the Marine Corps Base Hawaii, Oahu, Hawaii, which is tasked to undertake maritime patrol, anti-submarine warfare (ASW), and intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance (ISR) missions flying the Lockheed P-3 Orion.

History

Patrol Squadron FOUR has a long and distinguished history dating back to before World War II. The first squadron designated Patrol Squadron FOUR (VP-4) was established in 1928 and was based in Pearl Harbor, Hawaii. Re-designated Patrol Squadron TWENTY-TWO (VP-22) in 1938, the squadron was nearly destroyed during the Japanese attack on 7 December 1941. Following the attack, the squadron was reformed, refitted, and called to duty in World War II. While in the defense of the Philippines the squadron lost all but one aircraft leading to the disestablishment of the squadron. This paved the way for the second Patrol Squadron FOUR to be formed.[1]

In July 1943, a new bombing squadron, Bombing Squadron ONE HUNDRED FORTY FOUR (VB-144) was established at NAS Alameda, California with the Windows live error 80072efd phone Ventura and continued to conduct combat and reconnaissance operations throughout the Pacific Theater. VB-144 was redesignated Patrol Bombing Squadron 144 (VPB-144) in October 1944. Following the war, VPB-144 was placed in an inactive status and existed only administratively at NAS North Island, California. On 15 May 1946 VPB-144 was redesignated Patrol Squadron (VP-144). Shortly thereafter, on 15 November 1946, VP-144 was redesignated Medium Patrol Squadron (Landplane) FOUR (VP-ML-4). In 1947, VP-ML-4 was reactivated at NAS Miramar, California. After taking receipt of the United States Navy’s newest patrol and reconnaissance aircraft, the P2V Neptune, VP-ML-4 moved to NAS Whidbey Island, Washington in January 1948. In September 1948, the squadron was redesignated Patrol Squadron FOUR (VP-4). These events mark the birth of the squadron as we know it today.[1]

In 1956, VP-4 was relocated to Naha Air Base, Okinawa, Japan. From this base, the squadron flew reconnaissance and Anti-Submarine Warfare (ASW) missions to counter the Communist Chinese threat to the islands of Matsu and Quemoy. Starting a long-standing tradition of excellence, in 1964, the squadron marked its fourth year of unequaled operational excellence with three Commander, Naval Air Forces Pacific (COMNAVAIRPAC) Navy Battle “E” Awards, three Chief of Naval Operations (CNO) Safety Awards, and four Arnold J. Isbell ASW Awards. Error beep codes gigabyte April 1964, VP-4 returned to their original home of NAS Barbers Point, Hawaii. From there, the squadron made numerous deployments to Southeast Asia in support of military action in Vietnam. It was on one of these deployments in 1965 when the squadron logo was changed from the Okinawa-era "Neptune" design to a Hawaiian-inspired "Black Griffin." The logo caused some confusion on the part of waitresses in the local Officer's Club, who remarked that it more closely resembled a "Skinny Dragon" and the new nickname was quickly adopted.[1]

In 1966, the Skinny Dragons began transitioning from the SP-2H Neptune to the P-3A Orion. Following completion of the transition, PATRON FOUR again made history by becoming the first Hawaii-based squadron to deploy P-3As to NAS Adak, Alaska in 1969. In 1972, VP-4 was awarded the Navy Meritorious Unit Commendation for its efforts during Operations MARKET TIME and YANKEE STATION. During ollydbg, last error error_access_denied 1975 deployment to NAS Cubi Point, VP-4 participated in the evacuation of South Vietnam and the "Mayaguez" recovery operations, and in 1976 saw detachment operations to Naval Air Station Agana, Guam during which the squadron participated in Australia’s Kangaroo II fleet exercise.[1]

In July 1978, the "Skinny Dragons" assumed the Guam Detachment and simultaneously conducted operations that stretched around the world including locations as distant as: NAS Cubi Point, Republic of the Philippines; NAS Barbers Point, Hawaii; NAS Moffett Field, California; NAS Brunswick, Maine and NAS Sigonella, Italy. Patrol Squadron FOUR finished transitioning to the P-3B (MOD), or "SUPER BEE" in May 1979. The squadron then started a work up period for its next NAS Cubi Point deployment, which began in November 1979. While assigned to COMNAVAIRPAC, VP-4 was awarded the Navy Battle “E” Award for operational excellence for the cycle from 1 January 1979 to 30 June 1980. During the height of the Cold War, VP-4 fought on the front lines. Making numerous deployments to NAS Cubi Point, Philippines; Diego Garcia, British Indian Ocean Territory; Kadena Air Base and Misawa Air Base, Japan; NAS Adak, Alaska and countless other remote detachment sites, the squadron located, tracked and collected vital intelligence on Soviet ballistic missile and attack submarines. This era in VP-4’s history is marked by a number of “firsts” including becoming the first squadron at NAS Barbers Point, Hawaii to transition to the P-3C, the first NAS Barbers Point squadron to deploy to Diego Garcia (May 1980), and the first Hawaii squadron to deploy with P-3Cs to NAS Adak, Alaska (1981). VP-4’s operational excellence and contributions to the Cold War were recognized in 1987 in once again earning the Navy Battle “E” Award. Additionally, during this time, the squadron’s concern for the safety and welfare of its Sailors was marked by surpassing 100,000 hours of mishap free flying and earning back-to-back Golden Anchor Retention Excellence awards in 1987 and 1988.[1]

In 1988 VP-4 returned to Hawaii where they participated in numerous exercises, including RIM OF THE PACIFIC (RIMPAC) Exercise. In 1989 the "Skinny Dragons" completed a highly successful deployment to NAS Adak, conducting numerous Anti-Submarine Warfare (ASW) operations and participating in PACIFIC EXERCISE-89, the largest Naval exercise since World War II. Deploying to Diego Garcia in November 1990, the "Skinny Dragons" quickly established a detachment in Masirah, Oman to enforce the United Nations Embargo against Iraq during Operation DESERT SHIELD. By early January 1991, 179 missions had challenged 3,669 merchant vessels. The embargo gave way to Battle Force Protection as war was declared on 17 January 1991. Flying 279 combat missions and 2,779 flight hours in the Persian Gulf in support of Operations DESERT SHIELD and DESERT STORM, VP-4 provided detection and targeting, resulting in the total destruction of the Iraqi Navy.[1] Upon returning home to Hawaii, VP-4 learned that it had again received the Chief of Naval Operations Golden Anchor and the Commander, Patrol Wings Pacific (COMPATWINGSPAC) Golden Orion for retention excellence. In November 1993, VP-4 deployed to Misawa AB, Japan, and established a permanent detachment at Kadena AB, Okinawa. While on deployment, VP-4 received the 1993 Chief of Naval Operations Aviation Safety Award for a Pacific Fleet Maritime Patrol Squadron, the Commander, US 7th Fleet Award and the Captain Arnold Jay Isbell Trophy, both for Anti-Submarine Warfare (ASW) excellence.[1]

After completing a challenging at home counter strike vp4 terrorist missions cycle, VP-4 conducted a split-site deployment to Misawa AB and Kadena AB in 1995. During this deployment the squadron flew around the clock for seventeen straight days during the People’s Republic of China-Taiwan Crisis, providing intelligence support and protection against anti-surface and subsurface threats to both the NIMITZ and INDEPENDENCE carrier battle groups. In early 1997, VP-4 completed a quad-site deployment to Diego Garcia; Masirah, Oman; Manama, Bahrain, and Kadena AB, Japan. While on deployment, Skinny Dragon aircrew and maintenance personnel conducted the first permanent detachment in the Persian Gulf. In addition, VP-4 acted as the armed patrol aircraft detachment from Doha, Qatar, flying 21 straight days with weapons and exercised the first 24-hour armed ready alert Maritime Patrol Aviation (MPA) posture in the Persian Gulf. In addition, VP-4 acted as the fleet's “eyes in the sky” in support of Maritime Interdiction Operations (MIO), enforcing United Nations Security Council Resolutions (UNSCRs) and the Iraqi Oil for Food program. In 1998, pursuant to the BRAC decision to close NAS Barbers Point, Hawaii, VP-4 executed a homeport change to the other side of Oahu, relocating to MCAS Kaneohe Bay, counter strike vp4 terrorist missions, now known as Marine Corps Base Hawaii. In December 1998, VP-4 again deployed to six sites around the Middle East. During their deployment, the "Skinny Dragons" participated in three combat operations: Operation Desert Fox, where 7-zip crc error were awarded the Navy Unit Commendation; Operation Southern Watch, where VP-4 triggered the initial strike and delivered pre and post-strike imagery; and Operations Allied Force/Noble Anvil in Kosovo, which resulted in VP-4's Combat Air Crew 10 being awarded eleven (11) Air Medals. In home waters that same year, VP-4 also hosted 35 countries during RIMPAC 98.[1]

Patrol Squadron FOUR was the first VP squadron to introduce the P-3C Anti-Surface Warfare Improvement Program (P-3C AIP) aircraft to the Fleet. VP-4 proved AIP’s power during deployment by supporting three aircraft carrier battle groups in the Persian Gulf and becoming the first squadron to achieve reliable AIP imagery transfer. VP-4 was also the first squadron in the US 7th Fleet to fire the AGM-65 Maverick air-to-surface missile from a P-3C AIP aircraft. In November 1999, VP-4 flew to NAS North Island, California to participate in Joint Fleet Exercise (JTFEX/FLEETEX). While at JTFEX/FLEETEX, the Skinny Dragons participated in 23 events, including AIP and AGM-84 Standoff Land Attack Missile (SLAM) demo flights.[1] In June 2000, VP-4 conducted a WESTPAC deployment with detachments in 13 halt on - all errors and participating in 27 multi-national exercises. The squadron also saved 22 lives in various Search and Rescue (SAR) operations 500 internal error server wordpress US 7th Fleet’s Area of Responsibility (AOR). The squadron was again honored with the Navy Battle “E” Award in 2000, the third such award in five years. Following the attacks of 11 September 2001, VP-4 deployed to the US Central Command (USCENTCOM) AOR under Commander, Task Force 57 (CTF 57), a subordinate element of US Naval Forces Central Command (USNAVCENT)/US 5th Fleet. VP-4 conducted overland operations above Afghanistan flying armed reconnaissance missions and over the waters of the Middle East conducting Leadership Interdiction Operations in the first days of Operation Enduring Freedom. Over Afghanistan, VP-4 aircraft provided commanders a bird's eye view of the terrain where US special operations forces (SOF) were operating to dislodge Taliban and Al-Qaeda fighters from their mountainous hideouts. VP-4 also played a pivotal role in Operation ANACONDA, the largest land battle in Afghanistan to that date. Over water, aircrews were instrumental in operations to intercept and cut-off fleeing Taliban and Al-Qaeda fighters. For their efforts, VP-4 was once again recognized with the 2002 Commander, counter strike vp4 terrorist missions, Naval Air Force Pacific Battle “E” Award as the top P-3 squadron in the Pacific Fleet.[1]

During their 2003 deployment, VP-4 continued to support Operation Enduring Freedom against terrorist factions in the Philippines, providing critical real time intelligence. These missions highlighted the expanse of Coalition operations against Al-Qaeda and Al-Qaeda backed terrorists. VP-4 also had the opportunity to conduct the P-3C’s primary mission, Antisubmarine Warfare, against diesel and nuclear powered submarines, completing this deployment by flying over 4,000 mishap-free flight hours and completing over 800 missions. In 2005, VP-4 successfully completed a wartime deployment to the Middle East and Western Pacific, carrying out a wide variety of missions ranging from humanitarian assistance and disaster relief support missions to the Indian Ocean tsunami victims, to direct support of ground combat operations in support of Operation Iraqi Freedom isupdaterequired failed with error 0x8024402c Iraq and Operation Enduring Freedom in Afghanistan. In December 2006, the squadron deployed to Misawa AB and Kadena AB, and to the Philippines, in support of Operation Enduring Freedom in the Philippines. This was followed by a return to Iraq in support of Operation Iraqi Freedom in November 2008. On this deployment, VP-4 supplied detachments in support of numerous joint and multinational exercises at RAF Lakenheath, United Kingdom; RAF Kinloss, Scotland; and NAS Sigonella, Sicily. This experience proved invaluable during the ensuing interdeployment readiness cycle, when the "Skinny Dragons" successfully planned, hosted, and executed the world's largest joint, multinational military exercise, RIMPAC 2010. Following completion of a series of detachment operations, VP-4 departed MCB Kaneohe Bay for a split site deployment in November 2010, supporting assets in both the US 5th Fleet and US 7th Fleet AORs. Following the catastrophic earthquake and tsunami of 11 March 2011, VP-4 forward-deployed to Misawa AB in fewer than 24 hours and re-established CTG 72.4 as an operational entity and the first US aviation unit on station for Operation Tomodachi, with VP-4 subsequently providing 254 flight hours of humanitarian and disaster relief support to the Japanese people.[1]

In November 2012, VP-4 was deployed to the US 6th Fleet in the Mediterranean, operating from NAS Sigonella, Italy; NS Rota, Spain and numerous other locations in support of US Naval Forces Europe, US Naval Forces Africa, NATO and Unified Combatant Commanders. As of 2013, the squadron has surpassed over 40 years of mishap-free flying, with over 254,000 flight hours.[1]

Operations

Between 25–27 March 2006, a series of anti-submarine warfare exercises were held in Hawaiian waters that included Carrier Strike Group Nine, the nuclear-powered attack submarines Seawolf, Cheyenne, Greeneville, Tucson, and Pasadena, counter strike vp4 terrorist missions, as well as land-based P-3 Orion aircraft from patrol squadrons VP-9, and VP-47, and VP-4.[2][3]

See also

References

External links

Operation enduring freedom p Stock Photos and Images

John P. Jumper September 6, 2001 - September 2, 2005 Just five days before the 9/11 terrorist attacks against the United States, Gen. John P. Jumper became the Air Force's seventeenth Chief of Staff. Over the ensuing four years, he led the service during Operations Enduring Freedom and Iraqi Freedom, America's first battles in the Global War <a href=toshiba laptop bios error Terrorism, and Operation Noble Eagle, defending the country=s skies. During his tenure, General Jumper pressed for the modernization of the fleet, including the FB22 Raptor and FB35 Joint Strike Fighter, and established the Air Operations Center as a f Stock Photo" src="https://c8.alamy.com/comp/FFGXPW/john-p-jumper-september-6-2001-september-2-2005-just-five-days-before-FFGXPW.jpg" height="1300">

RMFFGXPW–John P. Jumper September 6, 2001 - September 2, 2005 Just five days before the 9/11 terrorist attacks against the United States, Gen. John P. Jumper became the Air Force's seventeenth Chief of Staff. Over the ensuing four years, he led the service during Operations Enduring Freedom and Iraqi Freedom, America's first battles in the Global War on Terrorism, and Operation Noble Eagle, defending the country=s skies. During his tenure, General Jumper pressed for the modernization of the fleet, including the FB22 Raptor and FB35 Joint Strike Fighter, and established the Air Operations Center as a f

U.S. Marine Corps Lance Cpl. Christopher Mount with 1st Battalion, 8th Marine Regiment (1/8), Regimental Combat Team 6, points out an enemy fighting p Stock Photo

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U.S. 5TH FLEET AREA OF RESPONSIBILITY (April 4, 2013) Seaman Ernesto Gastelum stands watch at the ship’s control console in the pilot house of the guided-missile destroyer USS William P. Lawrence (DDG 110). William P. Lawrence is deployed to the U.S. 5th Fleet area of responsibility promoting maritime security operations, theater security cooperation efforts and support missions for Operation Enduring Freedom. Stock Photo

RMPCH3HY–U.S. 5TH FLEET AREA OF RESPONSIBILITY (April 4, 2013) Seaman Ernesto Gastelum stands watch at the ship’s control console in the pilot house of the guided-missile destroyer USS William P. Lawrence (DDG 110). William P. Lawrence is deployed to the U.S. 5th Fleet area of responsibility promoting maritime security operations, theater security cooperation efforts and support missions for Operation Enduring Freedom.

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030414-N-6501M-026 Zamboanga City, Republic of the Philippines (Apr. 14, <a href=10022 error code -- U.S. Marines fire a 7.62mm M-240 Medium Caliber Machine Gun during a crew/serve live fire exercise. This training is to maintain proficiency in Force Protection while deployed to the South Philippine Islands. The Marines are attached to the 3rd Battalion, 3rd Marine Kilo Company which is part of Joint Special Operations Task Force - Philippines (JSOTF-P), supporting Operation Enduring Freedom and the U.S. effort to train, assist and advise Philippine forces in their fight to counter terrorism. U.S. Navy photo Stock Photo" src="https://c8.alamy.com/comp/HFEJEK/030414-n-6501m-026-zamboanga-city-republic-of-the-philippines-apr-HFEJEK.jpg" height="866">

RMHFEJEK–030414-N-6501M-026 Zamboanga City, Republic of the Philippines (Apr. 14, 2003) -- U.S. Marines fire a 7.62mm M-240 Medium Caliber Machine Gun during a crew/serve live fire exercise. This training is to maintain proficiency in Force Protection while deployed to the South Philippine Islands. The Marines are attached to the 3rd Battalion, 3rd Marine Kilo Company which is part of Joint Special Operations Task Force - Philippines (JSOTF-P), supporting Operation Enduring Freedom and the U.S, counter strike vp4 terrorist missions. effort to train, assist and advise Philippine forces in their fight to counter terrorism. U.S. Navy photo

U.S. Army Staff Sgt. Robert Green of C Company, 449th Aviation Support Battalion, re-enlists during a ceremony aboard the USS Ponce AFSB I-15 in the Persian Gulf. U.S. Navy Capt. Jon P. Rodgers, the commanding officer of the ship who is from Humboldt, Tenn., had the honor of reading the re-enlistment oath. Staff Sgt. Green, of Austin, Texas, is currently deployed to the Middle <a href=Error interface flags with the 36th Combat Aviation Brigade in support of Operation Enduring Freedom. Sgt. Mark Scovell Stock Photo" src="https://c8.alamy.com/comp/EJP499/us-army-staff-sgt-robert-green-of-c-company-449th-aviation-support-EJP499.jpg" height="866">

RMEJP499–U.S. Army Staff Sgt. Robert Green of C Company, 449th Aviation Support Battalion, re-enlists during a ceremony aboard the USS Ponce AFSB I-15 in the Persian Gulf. U.S. Navy Capt. Jon P. Rodgers, the commanding officer of the ship who is from Humboldt, Tenn., had the honor of reading the re-enlistment oath. Staff Sgt. Green, of Austin, Texas, is currently deployed to the Middle East with the 36th Combat Aviation Brigade in support of Operation Enduring Freedom. Sgt. Mark Scovell

021022-N-4374S-017 Central Command Area of Operation (Oct. 22, <b>counter strike vp4 terrorist missions</b>, 2002) -- Crewmembers assigned to the 'Screaming Eagles' of Patrol Squadron One (VP-1) approach a P-3C ÒOrionÓ patrol aircraft to conduct a reconnaissance mission over the Arabian Gulf. The P-3C is a land-based, long-range, anti-submarine warfare (ASW) and reconnaissance patrol aircraft. VP-1 is based in Whidbey Island, Wash., and is on a regularly scheduled six-month deployment to the Middle East, conducting missions in support of Operation Enduring Freedom. U.S. Navy photo by PhotographerÕs Mate 2nd Class Michael Sandberg. (RE Stock Photo

RMHFE5EB–021022-N-4374S-017 Central Command Area of Operation (Oct. 22, 2002) -- Crewmembers assigned to the 'Screaming Eagles' of Patrol Squadron One (VP-1) approach a P-3C ÒOrionÓ patrol aircraft to conduct a reconnaissance mission over the Arabian Gulf. The P-3C is a land-based, long-range, anti-submarine warfare (ASW) and reconnaissance patrol aircraft. Video lock error ts-2 encoder-5 is based in Whidbey Island, Wash., and is on a regularly scheduled six-month deployment to the Middle East, conducting missions in support of Operation Enduring Freedom. U.S. Navy photo by PhotographerÕs Mate 2nd Class Michael Sandberg. (RE

Culinary Specialist 3rd Class Chad P. Smith prepares lunch in the commanding officer’s in-port cabin aboard the Nimitz-class aircraft carrier USS <i>Counter strike vp4 terrorist missions</i> Lincoln (CVN 72). Lincoln is deployed to the U.S. 5th Fleet area of responsibility conducting maritime security operations, theater security cooperation efforts and combat flight operations in support of Operation Enduring Freedom. Stock Photo

RMCRY029–Culinary Specialist 3rd Class Chad P. Smith prepares lunch in the commanding officer’s in-port cabin aboard the Nimitz-class aircraft carrier USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN 72). Lincoln is deployed to the U.S. 5th Fleet area of responsibility conducting maritime security operations, theater security cooperation efforts and combat flight operations in support of Operation Enduring Freedom.

Feb 11, 2003 - Kalispell, Montana, U.S. - Asst. Principal, Goverment Teacher <a href=fifa 11 appcrash error Army National Guard 1st Lt. DAN ANDERSON says goodbye to his students at West Valley School near Kalispell, MT before shipping out for active duty as as part of operation Enduring Freedom & the military buildup before a p Stock Photo" src="https://c8.alamy.com/comp/CCNWR3/feb-11-2003-kalispell-montana-us-asst-principal-goverment-teacher-CCNWR3.jpg" height="858">

RMCCNWR3–Feb 11, 2003 - Kalispell, Montana, U.S. - Asst. Principal, Goverment Teacher & Army National Guard 1st Lt. DAN ANDERSON says goodbye to his students at West Valley School near Kalispell, MT before shipping out for active duty as as part of operation Enduring Freedom & the military buildup before a p

Private Lisa P. Holmes, of Cleveland, assigned to Alpha Co. 237th Brigade Support Battalion, 37th Infantry Brigade Combat Team, performs a pre-combat maintenance check on her Mine Resistant Ambush Protected (MRAP) vehicle during training at Camp Shelby Joint Forces Training Center, Miss., on Sept. 23, 2011. The brigade is deploying to Afghanistan in support of Operation Enduring Freedom. (Ohio National Guard photo by Spc. Kimberly Lamb) (Released) Stock Photo

RMKTTP18–Private Lisa P. Holmes, of Cleveland, assigned to Alpha Co. 237th Brigade Support Battalion, 37th Infantry Brigade Combat Team, performs a pre-combat maintenance check on her Mine Resistant Ambush Protected (MRAP) vehicle during training at Camp Shelby Joint Forces Training Center, Miss., on Sept. 23, 2011. The brigade is deploying to Afghanistan in support of Operation Enduring Freedom. (Ohio National Guard photo by Spc. Kimberly Lamb) (Released)

A U.S. Navy Riverine security team members set a perimeter during Emerald Warrior, <b>counter strike vp4 terrorist missions</b>, Apalachicola River, Fla., March 6, 2012. The primary purpose of Emerald Warrior is to exercise special operations components in urban and irregular warfare settings to support combatant commanders in theater campaigns. Emerald Warrior leverages lessons from Operation Iraqi Freedom, Operation Enduring Freedom and other historical lessons to provide better trained and ready forces to combatant commanders. Stock Photo

RMCFJDXM–A U.S. Navy Riverine security team members set a perimeter during Emerald Warrior, Apalachicola River, Fla., March 6, 2012. The primary purpose of Emerald Warrior is to exercise special operations components in urban and irregular warfare settings to support combatant commanders in theater campaigns. Emerald Warrior error in /sdcard/update.zip status 1 lessons from Operation Iraqi Freedom, Operation Enduring Freedom and other historical lessons to provide better trained and ready forces to combatant commanders.

Staff Sgt. Chris Hatton of Headquarters and Headquarters Company 37th Infantry Brigade <a href=Models/error.mdl couldnt be loaded Team peers above a log, looking for his next line of cover during premobilization training in the Ravenna Joint Military Training Center, April 8, 2011. Hatton participated in Individual Movement Techniques where soldiers performed such tasks as crawling under barbed wire, scaling a six foot wall, and crawling to cover. The training is to prepare the soldiers of the 37th for their scheduled yearlong deployment counter strike vp4 terrorist missions Afghanistan in fall 2011 in support of Operation Enduring Freedom. (Ohio National Guard p Stock Photo" src="https://c8.alamy.com/comp/KTTARJ/staff-sgt-chris-hatton-of-headquarters-and-headquarters-company-37th-KTTARJ.jpg" height="833">

RMKTTARJ–Staff Sgt. Chris Hatton of Headquarters and Headquarters Company 37th Infantry Brigade Combat Team peers above a log, looking for his next line of cover during premobilization training in the Ravenna Joint Military Training Center, April 8, 2011. Hatton participated in Individual Movement Techniques where soldiers performed such tasks as crawling under barbed wire, scaling a six foot wall, and crawling to cover. The training is to prepare the soldiers of the 37th for their scheduled yearlong deployment to Afghanistan in fall 2011 in support of Operation Enduring Freedom. (Ohio National Guard p

Airmen from <i>counter strike vp4 terrorist missions</i> Minnesota Air National Guard assemble at the incoming PAX terminal at Kandahar Airfield, Afghanistan on Aug. 10, 2012 to begin in-processing. Personnel are deployed from the Minnesota Air National Guard's 148th Fighter Wing in support of Operation Enduring Freedom. Bull Dog F-16’s, pilots, and support personnel began their Air Expeditionary Force deployment in mid-August to take over flying missions for the air tasking order and provide close air support for troops on the ground in Afghanistan. Stock Photo

RMCW80H2–Airmen from the Minnesota Air National Guard assemble at the incoming PAX terminal at Kandahar Airfield, Afghanistan on Aug. 10, 2012 to begin in-processing. Personnel are deployed counter strike vp4 terrorist missions the Minnesota Air National Guard's 148th Fighter Wing in support of Operation Enduring Freedom. Bull Dog F-16’s, pilots, and support personnel began their Air Expeditionary Force deployment in mid-August to take over flying missions for the air tasking order and provide close air support for troops on the ground in Afghanistan.

Col. <a href=Ramrod error domain Perry, counter strike vp4 terrorist missions, brigade commander for the 37th Infantry Brigade Combat Team observes Sgt. Sean Clark, unmanned aerial vehicle maintainer assigned to Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 37th IBCT, as Chief Warrant Officer 2 James P. Huck IV, UAV operator also assigned to HHC 37th IBCT, explains fatal error no screens found asplinux Shadow 200 UAV's capabilities before a flight demonstration at Camp Shelby Joint Forces Training Center, counter strike vp4 terrorist missions, Miss., Nov. 5, 2011. The UAV will be used by the 37th IBCT during their upcoming deployment to Afghanistan in support of Operation Enduring Freedom. (37th IBCT photo by Sgt. Kimberly Lamb) (R Stock Photo" src="https://c8.alamy.com/comp/KTTPNN/col-james-perry-brigade-commander-for-the-37th-infantry-brigade-combat-KTTPNN.jpg" height="1211">

RMKTTPNN–Col. James Perry, brigade commander for the 37th Infantry Brigade Combat Team observes Sgt. Sean Clark, unmanned aerial vehicle maintainer assigned to Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 37th IBCT, as Chief Warrant Officer counter strike vp4 terrorist missions James P. Huck IV, UAV operator also assigned to HHC 37th IBCT, explains the Shadow 200 UAV's capabilities before a flight demonstration at Camp Shelby Joint Forces Training Center, Miss., Nov. 5, 2011. The UAV will be used by the 37th IBCT during their upcoming deployment to Afghanistan in support of Operation Enduring Freedom. (37th IBCT photo by Sgt. Kimberly Lamb) (R

U.S. Marine Corps Lance Cpl. Collin P. Stanford (right), with Police Advisory Team 2 (PAT 2), 1st Battalion, <i>counter strike vp4 terrorist missions</i>, 8th Marine Regiment, Regimental Combat Te Stock Photo

RF2JCW3G0–U.S. Marine Corps Lance Cpl. Collin P. Stanford (right), with Police Advisory Team 2 (PAT 2), 1st Battalion, 8th Marine Regiment, Regimental Combat Te

Col. Matthew Davidson (left), commander of the 24th Special Operations Wing, presents Staff Sgt. Nicholas P. Jewell, a combat controller in the Kentucky Air National Guard’s 123rd Special Tactics Squadron, <b>counter strike vp4 terrorist missions</b>, with the Bronze Star Medal during a ceremony Feb. 7, 2015, at the Kentucky Air National Guard Base in Louisville, Ky. Jewell earned the award for meritorious achievement while supporting Operation Enduring Freedom in Afghanistan in 2014. (U.S. Air National Guard photo by Staff Sgt. Vicky Spesard) Stock Photo

RMKYJWHX–Col. Matthew Davidson (left), commander of the 24th Special Operations Wing, presents Staff Sgt. Nicholas P. Jewell, a combat controller in the Kentucky Air National Guard’s 123rd Special Tactics Squadron, counter strike vp4 terrorist missions, with the Bronze Star Medal during a ceremony Feb. 7, 2015, at the Kentucky Air National Guard Base in Louisville, Ky. Jewell earned the award for meritorious achievement while supporting Operation Enduring Freedom in Afghanistan in 2014. (U.S. Air National Guard photo by Capi2 error event 4107 Sgt. Vicky Spesard)

U.S. Marines with 1st Battalion, 8th Marine Regiment (1/8), Regimental Combat Team 6, cross the Helmond River on an Afghan's barge during a security p Stock Photo

RF2JCW3GD–U.S. Marines with 1st Battalion, 8th Marine Regiment (1/8), counter strike vp4 terrorist missions, Regimental Combat Team 6, cross the Helmond River on an Afghan's barge during a security p

Brig. Gen. Eric P. Wendt, Deputy Commander for the International Security Assistance Force, Regional Command-North, listens to the request of <a href=m6201 math - sqrt domain error female Afghan leader during a shura that was held at Camp Marmal, Balkh Province, Afghanistan, March 28, 2012. The shura was held to allow Afghan female leaders an opportunity to present projects to the leaders of Regional Command-North, counter strike vp4 terrorist missions. (37th IBCT photo by Sgt. Kimberly Lamb) (Released) Stock Photo" src="https://c8.alamy.com/comp/KTTX77/brig-gen-eric-p-wendt-deputy-commander-for-the-international-security-KTTX77.jpg" height="946">

RMKTTX77–Brig, counter strike vp4 terrorist missions. Gen. Eric P. Wendt, Deputy Commander for the International Security Assistance Force, Regional Command-North, listens to the counter strike vp4 terrorist missions of a female Afghan leader during a shura that was held at Camp Marmal, Balkh Province, Afghanistan, March 28, 2012. The shura was held to allow Afghan female leaders an opportunity to present projects to the leaders of Regional Command-North. (37th IBCT photo by Sgt. Kimberly Lamb) (Released)

A U.S. Marine with 1st Battalion, 8th Marine Regiment (1/8), Regimental Combat Team 6, drinks water to stay hydrated outside Camp Delaram II, Nimroz p Stock Photo

RF2JCW4G0–A U.S. Marine with 1st Battalion, 8th Marine Regiment (1/8), Regimental Combat Team 6, drinks water to stay hydrated outside Camp Delaram II, Nimroz p

Bay, Crete, Greece (Nov. 1, 2002) -- A Navy <b>Counter strike vp4 terrorist missions</b> Orion aircraft, assigned to the War Eagles of Patrol Squadron One Six (VP-16) flies by during a check flight. VP-16, a Jacksonville, Fla.-based, is currently on a six-month deployment to the Mediterranean theater in support of Operation Enduring Freedom. The P-3C is a multi-mission aircraft providing Anti-Submarine Warfare (ASW) and Anti-Surface Warfare (ASUW) capabilities. VP-16 utilizes a wide range of communications, <i>counter strike vp4 terrorist missions</i>, detection, monitoring, reconnaissance and navigation systems to perform their mission. In addition to advanced electronics, Stock Photo

RMP31DYT–Bay, Crete, Greece (Nov. 1, 2002) -- A Navy P-3C Orion aircraft, counter strike vp4 terrorist missions, assigned to the War Eagles of Patrol Squadron One Six (VP-16) flies by during a check flight. VP-16, a Jacksonville, Fla.-based, is currently on a six-month deployment to the Mediterranean theater in support of Operation Enduring Freedom. The P-3C is a multi-mission aircraft providing Anti-Submarine Warfare (ASW) and Anti-Surface Warfare (ASUW) capabilities. VP-16 utilizes a wide range of communications, detection, monitoring, reconnaissance and navigation systems to perform their mission. In addition to advanced electronics,

Afghan National Army Soldier with Light Machine Gun Stock Photo

RMD0DC73–Afghan National Army Soldier with Light Machine Gun

GUANTANAMO BAY, Cuba –Army Staff Sgt. Brian P. Jopek, broadcast journalist from 112th Mobile Public Affairs Detachment, Wisconsin National Guard, films one of the monthly live-fire qualifications held at the Windward Range located on U.S. Naval Station Guantanamo Bay. The 112th MPAD provides public affairs support for Joint Task Force Guantanamo. JTF Guantanamo conducts safe and humane care and custody of detained enemy combatants. The JTF conducts interrogation operations to collect strategic intelligence in support of the Global War on Terror and supports law enforcement and war crimes inves Stock Photo

RMPAEBKY–GUANTANAMO BAY, Cuba –Army Staff Sgt. Brian P. Jopek, broadcast journalist from 112th Mobile Public Affairs Detachment, Wisconsin National Guard, films one of the monthly live-fire qualifications held at the Windward Range located on U.S. Naval Station Guantanamo Bay. The 112th MPAD provides public affairs support for Joint Task Force Guantanamo. JTF Guantanamo conducts safe and humane care and custody of detained enemy combatants. The JTF conducts interrogation operations to collect strategic intelligence in support of the Global War on Terror and supports law enforcement and war crimes inves

Patrol Squadron 4 (United States Navy)

Military unit

Patrol Squadron Four (VP-4) is a U.S. Navy land-based patrol squadron based at the Naval Air Station Whidbey Island, counter strike vp4 terrorist missions, Oak Harbor, Washington, which is tasked to undertake maritime patrol, anti-submarine warfare (ASW), and intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance (ISR) missions flying the Boeing P-8 Poseidon.

The squadron was originally established as Bombing Squadron 144 (VB-144) on 1 July 1943, redesignated Patrol Bombing Squadron 144 (VPB-144) on 1 October 1944, redesignated Patrol Squadron 144 (VP-144) on 15 May 1946, redesignated Medium Patrol Squadron (Landplane) 4 (VP-ML-4) on 15 November 1946 and redesignated Patrol Squadron FOUR (VP-4) on 1 September 1948. It is the second squadron to be designated VP-4, the first VP-4 was redesignated VP-22 on 1 July 1939.[1]

History[edit]

VP-4 P2V-2sover Alaska in 1948

VB-144 was established at NAS Alameda, California on 1 July 1943, as a squadron flying the PV-1 Ventura, by 14 August The squadron completed training and boarded USS Copahee for transport to NAS Kaneohe Bay, Hawaii. Upon arrival the squadron began an intensive period of combat training and operational patrols over the ocean near the Hawaiian Islands. On 9 January 1944 VB-144 was transferred to Hawkins Field, counter strike vp4 terrorist missions, Tarawa, where combat patrols commenced as soon as the squadron was checked in and assigned space for the crews and rx packets 56 errors. On 1 February 1944, the squadron was relocated to Dyess Field, Roi Island, from which bombing missions were carried out against Japanese installations in the Gilbert, Marshall and Eastern Caroline island chains. On 30 March 1944 VB-144 was transferred back to Tarawa, leaving a three-aircraft detachment at Dyess Field, which was engaged in strikes on 1 April 1944 against enemy positions at Wotje Atoll and Jaluit Atoll that continued through June. On 4 April 1944, the increasing tempo of operations at Dyess Field resulted in the deployment of a second detachment of VB-144 aircraft to Roi Island and by 1 September the remainder of the squadron was transferred to Dyess. On 30 September 1944 VB-144 was transferred to NAS Kaneohe Bay and was redesignated VPB-144 while preparing for return to the continental United States. On 1 November 1944 VPB-144 was reformed for training at NAS Whidbey Island, Washington. The squadron was reequipped with the newer PV-2 Harpoon. On 3 March 1945, the squadron commenced training in air-to-ground attack continued at NAS Moffett Field, California. From 8–15 April 1945 VPB-144 squadron personnel and equipment were loaded aboard USS Kadashan Bay for transport to Naval Base Pearl Harbor, Hawaii, arriving on 15 April. Upon arrival, the squadron was based at NAS Kaneohe Bay, where a combat training syllabus of several weeks was undertaken. From 11–23 May 1945 a detachment of squadron aircraft and crews was flown to Midway Island to provide combat air patrol coverage. On 23 May 1944, the detachment was increased to nine aircraft. On 24 May 1945 two of the crews sent to Midway earlier returned to NAS Kaneohe Bay. The remainder of the detachment followed, rejoining the rest of the squadron on 12 June 1944. On 27 June 1945 VPB-144 was transferred to Eniwetok, via Johnston Atoll and Majuro. The squadron was placed under the operational control of TF 96.1. Sector and photographic reconnaissance patrols were conducted over Wake and Ponape islands. By 12 September 1945, counter strike vp4 terrorist missions, problems with malaria on Wake Island became so severe that the aircraft of VPB-144 were fitted with sprayers to cover the island with DDT. On 15 September 1945 flights were conducted over Kusaie, Ponape and the Caroline Islands as a show of force to the remaining Samsung lsu hsync error cycle power troops who had not yet surrendered. By 15 May 1946: Squadron assets remained at NAB Tinian but all personnel were rotated back to the U.S., leaving the squadron in a caretaker status. In September 1946 the squadron was retained on the Navy roster, but was placed miranda im connect error 10061 an inactive status at NAS North Island, California, under FAW-14. In Nov 1947 the squadron was reactivated as VP-ML-4 at NAS Miramar, California, with a complement of 14 officers and 59 enlisted men. An SNB-5 was utilized for flight training until the arrival of the squadron's first operational aircraft, the P2V-1 Neptune, counter strike vp4 terrorist missions mid-December 1947.[1]

VP-4 conducted an aerial photographic survey of Southeastern Alaska from Annette Island and began regular rotation tours to NAS Kodiak, Alaska from NAS Whidbey Island. Following the start of the Korean War, the squadron was deployed to NAS Barbers Point, Hawaii. in July, 1950, developing aerial mining capabilities and remained there until its return to Whidbey Island in January, 1951. During this deployment, Aircraft BuNo 39340, SC-3 was lost with five crewmen during a rocket firing training exercise off Kaena Point.[2][3] The squadron was redeployed to NAS Barbers Point in mid 1951 and from there to NAS Kodiak in September, returning to NAS Whidbey Island in late December of that year. In April 1952, VP-4 again was deployed to NAS Barbers Point and from there to NAS Agana, Guam in September. The squadron returned to NAS Whidbey Island in January 1953, having turned in its P2V-2s and receiving P2V-5s in February. VP-4 remained in NAS Whidbey Island until November 1953 and was then transferred to Kadena Air Base and subsequently to NAF Naha, Okinawa, where the squadron flew shipping patrols in the vicinity of Taiwan. The squadron returned to NAS Whidbey Islandin mid-1954.

In 1956, VP-4 was relocated to NAF Naha, from this base, the squadron flew reconnaissance and Anti-submarine warfare (ASW) missions to counter the Communist Chinese threat to the islands of Matsu and Quemoy. In 1964, the squadron marked its fourth year of operational excellence with three Commander, Naval Air Forces Pacific (COMNAVAIRPAC) Navy Battle "E" Awards, three Chief of Naval Operations (CNO) Safety Awards, and four Arnold J. Isbell ASW Awards. In April 1964, VP-4 returned to NAS Barbers Point, from there, the squadron made numerous deployments to Southeast Asia in support of the Vietnam War. It was on one of these deployments in 1965 when the squadron logo was changed from the Okinawa-era "Neptune" design to a Hawaiian-inspired "Black Griffin." The logo caused some confusion on the part of waitresses in the local Officer's Club, who remarked that it more closely resembled a "Skinny Dragon" and the new nickname was quickly adopted.[4]

In 1966, the VP-4 began transitioning from the SP-2H Neptune to the P-3A Orion. Following completion of the transition, VP-4 became the first Hawaii-based squadron to deploy P-3As to NAS Adak, Alaska in 1969. In 1972, VP-4 was awarded the Navy Meritorious Unit Commendation for its efforts during Operations Market Time and Yankee Team. During the 1975 deployment to NAS Cubi Point, Philippines VP-4 participated in the Operation Frequent Wind, the evacuation of South Vietnam and the Mayaguez recovery operation, and in 1976 saw detachment operations to NAS Agana, Guam during which the squadron participated in Australia's Kangaroo II fleet exercise.[4]

In July 1978, VP-4 assumed the Guam Detachment and simultaneously conducted operations that stretched around the world including locations as distant as: NAS Cubi Point; NAS Barbers Point; NAS Moffett Field, California; NAS Brunswick, Maine and NAS Sigonella, Italy. VP-4 finished transitioning to the P-3B (MOD), or "SUPER BEE" in May 1979. The squadron then started a work up period for its next NAS Cubi Point deployment, which began in November 1979, counter strike vp4 terrorist missions. While assigned to COMNAVAIRPAC, VP-4 was awarded the Navy Battle "E" Award for operational excellence for the cycle from 1 January 1979 to 30 June 1980. During the height of the Cold War, VP-4 fought on the front lines. Making numerous deployments to NAS Cubi Point; Diego Garcia; Kadena Air Base and Misawa Air Base, counter strike vp4 terrorist missions, Japan; NAS Adak, Alaska and numerous other remote detachment sites, the squadron located, tracked and collected vital intelligence on Soviet ballistic missile and attack submarines. This era in VP-4's history is marked by a number of "firsts" including becoming the first squadron at NAS Barbers Point to transition to the P-3C, the first NAS Barbers Point squadron counter strike vp4 terrorist missions deploy to Diego Garcia (May 1980), and the counter strike vp4 terrorist missions Hawaii squadron to deploy with P-3Cs to NAS Adak. VP-4's operational excellence and contributions to the Cold War were recognized in 1987 in once again earning the Navy Battle "E" Award. Additionally, during this time, the squadron's concern for the safety and welfare of its Sailors counter strike vp4 terrorist missions marked by surpassing 100,000 hours of mishap-free flying and earning back-to-back Golden Anchor Retention Excellence awards in 1987 and 1988.[4]

In 1988 VP-4 returned to Hawaii where they participated in numerous exercises, including Exercise RIMPAC. In 1989 VP-4 completed a highly deployment to NAS Adak, conducting numerous ASW operations and participating in PACIFIC EXERCISE-89, the largest Naval exercise since World War II. Deploying to Diego Garcia in November 1990, VP-4 quickly established a detachment at RAFO Masirah, Oman to enforce the United Nations Embargo against Iraq during Operation Desert Shield. By early January 1991, 179 missions had challenged 3,669 merchant vessels. The embargo gave way to Battle Force Protection as war was declared on 17 January 1991, counter strike vp4 terrorist missions. Flying 279 combat missions and 2,779 flight hours in the Persian Gulf in support of Operations Desert Shield and Desert Storm, VP-4 provided detection and targeting, resulting in the total destruction of the Iraqi Navy.[4]

Upon returning home to Hawaii, VP-4 learned that it had again received the Chief of Naval Operations Golden Anchor and the Commander, Patrol Wings Pacific (COMPATWINGSPAC) Golden Orion for retention excellence. In November 1993, VP-4 deployed to Misawa AB, Japan, and established a permanent detachment at Kadena AB, Okinawa. While on deployment, VP-4 received the 1993 Chief of Naval Operations Aviation Safety Award for a Pacific Fleet Maritime Patrol Squadron, the Commander, US 7th Fleet Award and the Captain Arnold Jay Isbell Trophy, both for Anti-Submarine Warfare (ASW) excellence.[4]

After completing a home training cycle, counter strike vp4 terrorist missions, VP-4 conducted a split-site deployment to Misawa AB and Kadena AB in 1995. During this deployment the squadron flew around the clock for seventeen straight days during the Third Taiwan Strait Crisis, providing intelligence support and protection against anti-surface and subsurface threats to both the USS Nimitz and USS Independence carrier battle groups. In early 1997, VP-4 completed a quad-site deployment to Diego Garcia; Masirah, Oman; Manama, Bahrain, and Kadena AB, Japan. While on deployment, VP-4 aircrew and maintenance personnel conducted the first permanent detachment in the Persian Gulf. In addition, VP-4 acted as the armed patrol aircraft detachment from Doha, Qatar, flying 21 straight days with weapons and exercised the first 24-hour armed ready alert Maritime Patrol Aviation (MPA) posture in the Persian Gulf. VP-4 acted as error - 1270001 - memory allocation failed fleet's "eyes in the sky" in counter strike vp4 terrorist missions of Maritime Interdiction Operations (MIO), enforcing United Nations Security Council Resolutions (UNSCRs) and the Iraqi Oil for Food program. In 1998, pursuant to the BRAC decision to close NAS Barbers Point, VP-4 relocated to NAS Kaneohe Counter strike vp4 terrorist missions, now known as Marine Corps Base Hawaii. In December 1998, VP-4 again deployed to six sites around the Middle East, during their deployment, the squadron participated in three combat operations: Operation Desert Fox, where they were awarded the Navy Unit Commendation; Operation Southern Watch, where VP-4 triggered the initial strike and delivered pre and post-strike imagery; and Operations Allied Force/Noble Anvil in Kosovo, which resulted in VP-4's Combat Air Crew 10 being awarded eleven (11) Air Medals. In home waters that same year, VP-4 also hosted 35 countries during RIMPAC 98.[4]

VP-4 was the first VP squadron to introduce the P-3C Anti-Surface Warfare Improvement Program (P-3C AIP) aircraft to the Fleet. VP-4 proved AIP's power during deployment by supporting three aircraft carrier battle groups in the Persian Gulf and becoming the first squadron to achieve reliable AIP imagery transfer. VP-4 was also the first squadron in the US 7th Fleet to fire the AGM-65 Maverick air-to-surface missile from a P-3C AIP aircraft. In November 1999, Counter strike vp4 terrorist missions flew to NAS North Island, California to participate in Joint Fleet Exercise (JTFEX/FLEETEX). While at JTFEX/FLEETEX, the squadron participated in 23 events, including AIP and AGM-84 Standoff Land Attack Missile (SLAM) demo flights.[4]

In June 2000, VP-4 conducted a WESTPAC deployment with detachments in 13 countries and participating in 27 multi-national exercises. The squadron also saved 22 lives in various Search and Rescue (SAR) operations within the Seventh Fleet’s Area of Responsibility (AOR). The squadron was again honored with the Navy Battle "E" Award in 2000, the third such award in five years. Following the September 11 attacks, counter strike vp4 terrorist missions, VP-4 deployed to the US Central Command (USCENTCOM) AOR under Commander, Task Force 57 (CTF 57), a subordinate element of US Naval Forces Central Command (USNAVCENT)/US 5th Fleet. VP-4 conducted overland operations above Afghanistan flying armed reconnaissance missions and over the waters of the Magicka error net East counter strike vp4 terrorist missions Leadership Interdiction Operations in the first days of Operation Enduring Freedom. Over Afghanistan, VP-4 aircraft provided commanders a bird's eye view of the terrain where US special operations forces (SOF) were operating to dislodge Taliban and Al-Qaeda fighters from their mountainous hideouts. VP-4 also played a pivotal role in Operation Anaconda, the largest land battle in Afghanistan to that date. Over water, aircrews were instrumental in operations to intercept and cut-off fleeing Taliban and Al-Qaeda fighters. For their counter strike vp4 terrorist missions, VP-4 was once again recognized with the 2002 Commander, Naval Air Force Pacific Battle "E" Award as the top P-3 squadron in the Pacific Fleet.[4]

During their 2003 deployment, VP-4 continued to support Operation Enduring Freedom against terrorist factions in the Philippines, providing critical real-time intelligence. These missions highlighted the expanse of Coalition operations against Al-Qaeda and Al-Qaeda backed terrorists. VP-4 also had the opportunity to conduct the P-3C's primary mission, ASW, against diesel and nuclear powered submarines, completing this deployment by flying over 4,000 mishap-free flight hours and completing over 800 missions. In 2005, VP-4 successfully completed a wartime deployment to the Middle East and Western Pacific, carrying out a wide variety of missions ranging from humanitarian assistance and disaster relief support missions to the Indian Ocean tsunami victims, to direct support of ground combat operations in support of Operation Iraqi Freedom in Iraq and Operation Enduring Freedom in Afghanistan. In December 2006, the squadron deployed to Misawa AB and Kadena AB, and to the Philippines, in support of Operation Enduring Freedom in the Philippines. This was followed by a return to Iraq in support of Operation Iraqi Freedom in November 2008. On this deployment, VP-4 supplied detachments in support of numerous joint and multinational exercises at Counter strike vp4 terrorist missions Lakenheath, United Kingdom; RAF Kinloss, Scotland; and NAS Sigonella, Sicily, counter strike vp4 terrorist missions. This experience proved invaluable during the ensuing interdeployment readiness cycle, when VP-4 successfully planned, hosted, and executed the world's largest joint, multinational military exercise, RIMPAC 2010. Following completion of a series of detachment operations, VP-4 departed MCB Kaneohe Bay for a split site deployment in November 2010, supporting assets in both the US 5th Fleet and US 7th Fleet AORs. Following the catastrophic 2011 Tōhoku earthquake and tsunami of 11 March 2011, VP-4 forward-deployed to Misawa AB in fewer than 24 hours and re-established CTG 72.4 as an operational entity and the first US aviation unit on station for Operation Tomodachi, with VP-4 subsequently providing 254 flight hours of humanitarian and disaster relief support counter strike vp4 terrorist missions the Japanese people.[4]

In November 2012, VP-4 was deployed to the US 6th Fleet in the Mediterranean, operating from NAS Sigonella, NS Rota, Spain and numerous other locations in support of US Naval Forces Europe, US Naval Forces Africa, NATO and Unified Combatant Commanders. As of 2013, the squadron has surpassed over 40 years of mishap-free flying, with over 254,000 flight hours.

VP-4 deployed in the Fifth and Sixth fleet from June 2014 to February 2015. The squadron began deployment with an operational detachment to Keflavik, Iceland, in support of emergent Theater ASW tasking. Additionally, VP-4 provided support to the Organization for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons, enabling the safe destruction of chemical weapons in the international waters of the Mediterranean Sea. VP-4 simultaneously took part in 5 exercises located in Bulgaria, Finland, Spain and Turkey. VP-4 returned home in February 2015 to prepare for what would be their final P-3C Orion deployment.

In March 2016, VP-4 departed Oahu for the last time as a Hawaii squadron. Their 'Aloha Deployment' was a busy one that saw personnel spread across three continents and twelve different countries. While on deployment, VP-4 executed a Permanent Duty Station Change (PDSC) to Counter strike vp4 terrorist missions Air Station Whidbey Island, returning home in September. VP-4 become the first squadron at NAS Whidbey Island to covert to the P-8 Poseidon in October 2016.[5] On April 2, 2018 the squadron departed for Kadena Air Base, Okinawa, Japan for its inaugural deployment.[5]

Operations[edit]

Vietnam War[edit]

Starting 26 March 1965, the squadron began a split-site deployment to MCAS Iwakuni, Japan, with detachments at various dates located at Naval Air Facility Tan Son Nhut Air Base, South Vietnam; Naval Station Sangley Point and NAS Cubi Point, Philippines, counter strike vp4 terrorist missions.

31 January 1967: The squadron again deployed to WestPac at Iwakuni, Japan, and provided support to Task Force 72 during Operation Market Time (coastal patrols off the coasts of South Vietnam). Detachments were maintained at NS Sangley Point and NAF Naha, Okinawa. Upon completion of deployment, Commander Patrol Forces, Seventh Fleet presented the squadron a letter of commendation for its support of operations and assistance in the destruction of an enemy trawler carrying arms destined for the Viet Cong.[6]

17 April 1967: A VP-4 P-3A Orion flying patrol off the coast of Korea was fired upon by an infiltrating North Korean speedboat. The damaged aircraft landed safely after reporting the vessel's location. South Korean forces sank the intruder shortly thereafter. Lieutenant Commander C. W. Larzelere III, the PPC, received a Navy Commendation Medal for his handling of the emergency while under fire.[6]

28 April 1967: A VP-4 P-3A Orion (BuNo. 151365) flown by Lieutenant C. D. Burton was lost at sea with all hands off the coast of Tsushima Island, Japan.[7]

1 Counter strike vp4 terrorist missions 1968: VP-4 was deployed to WestPac under FAW-6 at Iwakuni, Japan. Patrols were conducted in the South China Sea, Sea of Japan, Korea, the Philippine Islands and Guam. Detachments were sent to Cam Ranh Bay, in support of Yankee Team and Market Time operations. Yankee Team was a joint U.S. Air Force and U.S. Navy operation begun in runtime error 5981 that provided low-level aerial reconnaissance of suspected Communist infiltration routes in eastern and southern Laos.[6]

Desert Shield/Desert Storm[edit]

On 10 November 1990, as a normal rotation, NAS Barbers Point based VP-4 (with P-3C Update I's) relieved VP-1 at Diego Garcia and RAFO Al Masirah. VP-4 C.O. Commander Bob Cunningham, took over CTG 72.8 and his X.O, counter strike vp4 terrorist missions. Commander Carlos Badger, assumed the detachment(det). at RAFO Al Masirah.

During one 34-hour period, counter strike vp4 terrorist missions, P-3s provided the detection and target locating information that resulted in a substantial reduction in the Iraqi Navy's offense of capability. A group of 15 Iraqi vessels heading for Maridim Island, an outpost in Kuwaiti hands was detected by VP-4s Crew Five, who vectored strike aircraft 441 smtp error the force, resulting in five ships sunk and seven more damaged. This effort ended what would be Iraqis last seaborne assault.

Hours later, VP-4s Crew 2 detected a group of Iraqi vessels attempting a rapid transit from Iraqi ports around Bubiyan Island, apparently trying to reach counter strike vp4 terrorist missions safety of Iranian territorial waters. P-3s from VPs 4, 19, and 46 provided the target locations for the strike aircraft which destroyed 11 Iraqi vessels in what has been named the Battle of Bubiyan.[8]

Between 25–27 March 2006, a series of anti-submarine warfare exercises were held in Hawaiian waters that included Carrier Strike Group Nine, the nuclear-powered attack submarines USS Seawolf, USS Cheyenne, USS Greeneville, USS Tucson, and USS Pasadena, as well as land-based P-3 Orions from patrol squadrons VP-9, and VP-47, and VP-4.[9][10]

Aircraft assignments[edit]

The squadron was assigned the following aircraft, effective on the dates shown:[1]

  • PV-1 – July 1943
  • PV-2 – July 1945
  • P2V-1 – September 1947
  • P2V-2 – January 1948
  • P2V-5 – March 1953
  • P2V-5F – March 1956
  • P2V-7/SP-2H – September 1962
  • P-3A – October 1966
  • P-3B-MOD (Super Bee) – February 1979
  • P-3C – March 1984
  • P-3C UI – November 1989
  • P-3C UIIIR – 1992
  • P-8A – October 2016

Home port assignments[edit]

The squadron was assigned to these home ports, effective on the dates shown:[1]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

This x-com - terror from the deep rus incorporates text from the public domainDictionary of American Naval Aviation Squadrons.

External links[edit]

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