Cancel error resume next vba

cancel error resume next vba

You also can turn off the On Error Resume Next statement by applying the On Error GoTo -1 statement. www.anysitesolutions.com › Articles. In a macro I use the statement "on error resume next". It works fine, but then I want to turn error handling back on (i.e. cancel the above statement).

Cancel error resume next vba - really. agree

On Error GoTo ... Resume Statement

Enables an error-handling routine after an error occurs, or resumes program execution.

Syntax:

On Error Statement diagram

Parameters:

GoTo Labelname: If an error occurs, enables the error-handling routine that starts at the line "Labelname".

Resume Next: If an error occurs, program execution continues with the statement that follows the statement in which the error occurred.

GoTo 0: Disables the error handler in the current procedure.

Local: "On error" is global in scope, and remains active until canceled by another "On error" statement. "On Local error" is local to the routine which invokes it. Local error handling overrides any previous global setting. When the invoking routine exits, the local error handling is canceled automatically, and any previous global setting is restored.

The On Error GoTo statement is used to react to errors that occur in a macro.

Example:

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Error Handling in VBA

error handling in vba

If VBA can’t execute a statement (command) then a run-time error occurs. By default Excel deals with these, so when a run-time error occurs, you'll see a default error message like this:

vba runtime error

But you can change this and instruct Excel to allow your code to deal with run-time errors.

NOTE : I’m going to use the terms sub, function and procedure interchangeably. For the purposes of this article they all mean the same thing – a chunk of code written to do a particular thing.

The On Error Statement

To instruct Excel what to do when an error occurs, you use the On Error statement. You can use On Error in four ways:

On Error GoTo 0 On Error Resume Next On Error GoTo [label] On Error GoTo -1

On Error GoTo 0

This is the default mode and is already turned on when you start writing your code. You don’t need to use an On Error GoTo 0 statement at the start of your VBA.

In this mode VBA displays the standard style error message box, and gives you the choice to Debug the code (enter VBA editor and use debugging tools) or End code execution.

You would use On Error GoTo 0 to turn default error handling back on if you have previously told VBA to deal with errors in some other way e.g. by using On Error Resume Next.

On Error Resume Next

On Error Resume Next tells VBA to continue executing statements immediately after the statement that generated the error.

On Error Resume Next allows your code to continue running even if an error occurs. Resume Next does not fix an error, it just ignores it. This can be good and bad.

The Good?

If you know that your code could generate an error, then using Resume Next can prevent an interruption in code execution.

For example, we want to create a file, but I want to make sure a file with the same name doesn’t already exist. To do this, I will attempt to delete the file, and of course if it doesn’t already exist, an error will occur.

I don’t care if an error occurs. If it does, the file doesn’t exist and that’s fine for what I want to do. So before I attempt to delete the file, I instruct VBA to ignore the error.

Sub DeleteFile() Dim FilePath As String FilePath = "d:\temp\somefile.csv" On Error Resume Next 'Delete the file Kill FilePath 'If the file doesn't exist the Kill statement 'generates an error. 'But I have assumed that is ok as it indicates that 'I am ok to create a new file with the same filename 'This is a bad assumption - see the next sub 'UnhandledError() End Sub

The Bad

But hang on. What if the file I am trying to delete is read only? If it is I will get an error when I try to delete it. I’ve assumed that I will only get an error if the file isn’t there. So an error caused by trying to delete a read only file will get missed.

And If I then try to create a new file with the same name, or open it for writing data to it, I will generate more errors and they will be missed too.

Sub UnhandledError() Dim FilePath As String FilePath = "d:\temp\somefile.csv" On Error Resume Next 'Delete the file Kill FilePath 'But if the file is read-only I can't delete it 'and the Kill statement generates an error 'I can't now create a new file with the same name 'Trying to Open the file for writing data to it will 'also generate an error but it will be missed as 'we've told VBA to continue executing code if an 'error occurs Open FilePath For Output As #1 Write #1, "Some data" Close #1 End Sub

If you do use On Error Resume Next you should immediately turn default error handling back on (or turn on your custom error handler – see below)

Be careful when using On Error Resume Next. You are better off seeing if an error occurred by checking the Err object (see below). Doing this can tell you the error number and help you figure out exactly what happened.

On Error GoTo [LABEL]

If an error occurs, this transfers code execution to the line following the label. This is typically used to specify your own error handling code.

None of the code between the line generating the error and the label is executed.

Error Handlers

So you write your own error handling code and use On Error GoTo [LABEL] to instruct VBA to use your code to deal with errors.

You can place your error-handling code anywhere in a procedure, but typically it is placed at the end.

Your error handler should either fix the error and resume code execution, or terminate the routine gracefully.

Sub ErrorHandler() Dim num As Integer On Error GoTo ErrHandler num = 1 / 0 MsgBox "This line is not executed" Exit sub ErrHandler: MsgBox "Oops, an error has occured." & vbCrLf & vbCrLf & "Error Code : " & Err.Number & " , " & Err.Description End Sub

As VBA will execute each line of code in turn going from top to bottom, if no error is generated then it will execute your error handling code when it gets to that point in your sub.

To prevent this happening, use an Exit Sub, Exit Function, or Exit Property statement before your error handling routine.

In the example above, if the value assigned to num was valid e.g. num = 1/1, then we don’t want the code beneath ErrHandler: executed. So just before the ErrHandler: label, I've used an Exit Sub statement.

Multiple Error Handlers

You can have more than one error handler in a routine, but only one of them can be active at any time.

You could have something like:

Sub MultipleErrorHandlers() On Error GoTo ErrHandler1 [some code] On Error GoTo ErrHandler2 [some code] Exit Sub ErrHandler1: [ErrHandler1 Code] Exit Sub ErrHandler2: [ErrHandler1 Code] Exit Sub End Sub

If an error occurs between On Error GoTo ErrHandler1 and On Error GoTo ErrHandler2 then the ErrHandler1 code is executed.

If an error occurs after On Error GoTo ErrHandler2 then the ErrHandler2 code is executed.

NOTE: Notice that at the end of each error handling routine is an Exit Sub statement. If I didn’t use these, when the ErrHandler1 code is finished executing, VBA could just continue on down to the next line and execute the ErrHandler2 code as well.

Strictly speaking I don’t need the Exit Sub at the end of the ErrHandler2 code, as it is the last line in the sub, but it is a good habit to get into.

Err object

When an error occurs the Err object contains information about the error like the error number and a description of the error.

As any given line of code can generate multiple errors it’s a good idea to examine the Err object to determine what you want to do in your code.

Err.Number gives you the error number, and Err.Description gives you a description of the error.

Sub CheckErrObject() Dim FilePath As String FilePath = "d:\temp\somefile.csv" On Error GoTo ErrHandler 'Delete the file Kill FilePath Open FilePath For Output As #1 Write #1, "Some data" Close #1 Exit Sub ErrHandler: Select Case Err.Number Case 53 ' File doesn't exist Err.Clear ' Clear the error Case 75 ' File is Read Only MsgBox "Error Number : " & Err.Number & vbCrLf & vbCrLf & Err.Description Exit Sub Case Else ' Code to handle other errors End Select Resume Next ' Continue executing code after line that generated error End Sub

Resume

The Resume statement tells VBA to resume executing code at a specified point. Resume can only be used in an error handling routine, any other use will generate an error.

Resume takes three forms:

Resume Resume Next Resume [label]

Using just Resume causes execution to resume at the same line of code that caused the error. If you haven’t fixed the error, your code will begin an infinite loop as it switches between the line of code generating the error and the error handling routine.

If you look at the example sub Resume_Next() which is below, num = 1 / 0 causes a Divide by 0 error. I’ve instructed VBA to use my error handler, called ErrHandler.

In ErrHandler I’ve attempted to fix the error by assigning num the value 1. If I then used only Resume, all that would happen is that VBA would go back to num = 1 / 0 and another Divide by 0 error would be generated.

Instead, I use Resume Next to carry on executing code at the line after the one causing the error.

In doing so I have handled the error by assigning the value 1 to num, and execution will continue without another error at the line result = num / 1

Sub Resume_Next() Dim num As Integer Dim result As Integer On Error GoTo ErrHandler num = 1 / 0 result = num / 1 Exit Sub ErrHandler: num = 1 Resume Next End Sub

Resume [label] passes code execution to the line with that label.

Sub Resume_Next() Dim num As Integer Dim result As Integer On Error GoTo ErrHandler num = 1 / 0 result = num / 1 MyLabel: ‘Code execution starts again from here result = num * 1 Exit Sub ErrHandler: num = 1 Resume MyLabel End Sub

Whenever you use Resume it clears the Err object.

Error Handling With Multiple Procedures

Every sub/function doesn’t have to have an error handler. If an error occurs, VBA will use the last On Error statement to determine what happens.

If an On Error statement has been used in a procedure and an error occurs in that procedure, then that error is handled as I've just described.

But if an error occurs in a sub that hasn’t used an On Error statement, VBA goes back through procedure calls until it finds an On Error directive.

Let’s look at an example with three subs.

SubOne() calls SubTwo(). SubTwo calls SubThree(), and has some code of its own to execute. SubThree() carries out a calculation.

Sub SubOne() On Error GoTo ErrHandler SubTwo Exit Sub ErrHandler: MsgBox "Error caught in SubOne" End Sub Sub SubTwo() SubThree MsgBox "No errors here" End Sub Sub SubThree() Dim num As Integer num = 1 / 0 End Sub

SubOne() has an error handler routine, ErrHandler, and has instructed VBA to use it.

SubTwo() will display a message on screen after it’s call to SubThree() has finished.

However SubThree() generates a Divide by 0 error.

SubThree() hasn’t used an On Error statement to tell VBA what to do if an error occurs, so VBA goes back to SubTwo(). That also doesn’t have an On Error statement so VBA goes back to SubOne().

Here we have our error handler and the code in it is executed.

Note that the message "No errors here" in SubTwo() is not displayed because that line of code is not executed.

When SubThree() generated an error, code execution went back to the error handler in SubOne() and any code in SubTwo() after the call to SubThree() is missed out.

On Error GoTo -1

This resets the current error. It’s the equivalent of using Err.Clear.

You can see that in this sub, after the Divide By 0 error is generated, after On Error GoTo -1 is used, Err.Number is 0 (no error) and Err.Description is empty.

Sub GoToMinus1() Dim num As Integer On Error Resume Next num = 1 / 0 'If error is Divide by Zero If Err.Number = 11 Then MsgBox "Error Code : " & Err.Number & " , " & Err.Description On Error GoTo -1 MsgBox "Error Code : " & Err.Number & " , " & Err.Description End If End Sub

Sample Code

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Syntax

.Clear

Use: Required

Data Type: Error object

An instance of the Err object.

Description

Explicitly resets all the properties of the Err object after an error has been handled.

Rules at a Glance

You need only to Clear the Err object if you need to reference its properties for another error within the same subroutine or before another statement within the same subroutine.

Example

On Error Resume Next i = oObjectOne.MyFunction(iVar) If Err.Number <> 0 Then MsgBox "The Error : " & Err.Description & vbCrLf _ & " was generated in " & Err.Source Err.Clear End If j = oObjectTwo.YourFunction(iVar) If Err.Number <> 0 Then MsgBox "The Error : " & Err.Description & vbCrLf _ & " was generated in " & Err.Source Err.Clear End If

Programming Tips and Gotchas

  • Resetting the Err object explicitly using the Clear method is necessary when you use and test the value of repeatedly. Unless you reset the Err object, you run the very real risk of catching the previously handled error, the details of which are still lurking in the Err object's properties.

  • The Err object is automatically reset when either a , , , , or statement is executed.

  • You can achieve the same results by setting the property to 0; however your code will be more self-documenting if you use the Clear method.

  • When testing the value of , don't forget that OLE servers often return "negative" ...

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On Error Statement (Visual Basic)

  • Article
  • 7 minutes to read

Enables an error-handling routine and specifies the location of the routine within a procedure; can also be used to disable an error-handling routine. The statement is used in unstructured error handling and can be used instead of structured exception handling. Structured exception handling is built into .NET, is generally more efficient, and so is recommended when handling runtime errors in your application.

Without error handling or exception handling, any run-time error that occurs is fatal: an error message is displayed, and execution stops.

Note

The keyword is also used in the Error Statement, which is supported for backward compatibility.

Syntax

Parts

TermDefinition
lineEnables the error-handling routine that starts at the line specified in the required line argument. The line argument is any line label or line number. If a run-time error occurs, control branches to the specified line, making the error handler active. The specified line must be in the same procedure as the statement or a compile-time error will occur.
Disables enabled error handler in the current procedure and resets it to .
Disables enabled exception in the current procedure and resets it to .
Specifies that when a run-time error occurs, control goes to the statement immediately following the statement where the error occurred, and execution continues from that point. Use this form rather than when accessing objects.

Note

We recommend that you use structured exception handling in your code whenever possible, rather than using unstructured exception handling and the statement. For more information, see Try...Catch...Finally Statement.

An "enabled" error handler is one that is turned on by an statement. An "active" error handler is an enabled handler that is in the process of handling an error.

If an error occurs while an error handler is active (between the occurrence of the error and a , , , or statement), the current procedure's error handler cannot handle the error. Control returns to the calling procedure.

If the calling procedure has an enabled error handler, it is activated to handle the error. If the calling procedure's error handler is also active, control passes back through previous calling procedures until an enabled, but inactive, error handler is found. If no such error handler is found, the error is fatal at the point at which it actually occurred.

Each time the error handler passes control back to a calling procedure, that procedure becomes the current procedure. Once an error is handled by an error handler in any procedure, execution resumes in the current procedure at the point designated by the statement.

Note

An error-handling routine is not a procedure or a procedure. It is a section of code marked by a line label or a line number.

Number Property

Error-handling routines rely on the value in the property of the object to determine the cause of the error. The routine should test or save relevant property values in the object before any other error can occur or before a procedure that might cause an error is called. The property values in the object reflect only the most recent error. The error message associated with is contained in .

Throw Statement

An error that is raised with the method sets the property to a newly created instance of the Exception class. In order to support the raising of exceptions of derived exception types, a statement is supported in the language. This takes a single parameter that is the exception instance to be thrown. The following example shows how these features can be used with the existing exception handling support:

Notice that the statement traps all errors, regardless of the exception class.

On Error Resume Next

causes execution to continue with the statement immediately following the statement that caused the run-time error, or with the statement immediately following the most recent call out of the procedure containing the statement. This statement allows execution to continue despite a run-time error. You can place the error-handling routine where the error would occur rather than transferring control to another location within the procedure. An statement becomes inactive when another procedure is called, so you should execute an statement in each called routine if you want inline error handling within that routine.

Note

The construct may be preferable to when handling errors generated during access to other objects. Checking after each interaction with an object removes ambiguity about which object was accessed by the code. You can be sure which object placed the error code in , as well as which object originally generated the error (the object specified in ).

On Error GoTo 0

disables error handling in the current procedure. It doesn't specify line 0 as the start of the error-handling code, even if the procedure contains a line numbered 0. Without an statement, an error handler is automatically disabled when a procedure is exited.

On Error GoTo -1

disables the exception in the current procedure. It does not specify line -1 as the start of the error-handling code, even if the procedure contains a line numbered -1. Without an statement, an exception is automatically disabled when a procedure is exited.

To prevent error-handling code from running when no error has occurred, place an , , or statement immediately before the error-handling routine, as in the following fragment:

Here, the error-handling code follows the statement and precedes the statement to separate it from the procedure flow. You can place error-handling code anywhere in a procedure.

Untrapped Errors

Untrapped errors in objects are returned to the controlling application when the object is running as an executable file. Within the development environment, untrapped errors are returned to the controlling application only if the proper options are set. See your host application's documentation for a description of which options should be set during debugging, how to set them, and whether the host can create classes.

If you create an object that accesses other objects, you should try to handle any unhandled errors they pass back. If you cannot, map the error codes in to one of your own errors and then pass them back to the caller of your object. You should specify your error by adding your error code to the constant. For example, if your error code is 1052, assign it as follows:

Caution

System errors during calls to Windows dynamic-link libraries (DLLs) do not raise exceptions and cannot be trapped with Visual Basic error trapping. When calling DLL functions, you should check each return value for success or failure (according to the API specifications), and in the event of a failure, check the value in the object's property.

Example

This example first uses the statement to specify the location of an error-handling routine within a procedure. In the example, an attempt to divide by zero generates error number 6. The error is handled in the error-handling routine, and control is then returned to the statement that caused the error. The statement turns off error trapping. Then the statement is used to defer error trapping so that the context for the error generated by the next statement can be known for certain. Note that is used to clear the object's properties after the error is handled.

Requirements

Namespace:Microsoft.VisualBasic

Assembly: Visual Basic Runtime Library (in Microsoft.VisualBasic.dll)

See also

One of the most important jobs in Microsoft Excel VBA is error handling. If you’re a programmer, you’re well aware of the necessity of error handling in creating a flawless application. Any error in a statement can wreak havoc on your VBA code in a variety of ways. As a result, you must exercise caution when handling errors in the VBA code. Today, In this tutorial, we will learn very quickly and the most time-saving way how to VBA On Error Resume Next turn off in Excel with appropriate illustrations.


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On Error Statements in VBA

While working with Microsoft Excel VBA, we will face a lot of errors in our sub-procedure. When VBA can not run a statement, it shows a run-time error. To handle run time errors, we instruct Excel with the On Error statement. It decides what kind of operations we want to do next immediately. Basically, we disable these errors by these kinds of error handling.

We use three kinds of On Error statements(syntax) in Excel VBA. The description of these On Error statements is given below.

StatementDescription
On Error GoTo lineAny line label can be used as the line parameter. Control jumps to a line if a run-time error occurs, activating the error handler.
On Error Resume NextWhile executing a VBA code, if an error happens then it stops executing. When a run-time error occurs, the command is passed to the statement immediately after the one that caused the error, and execution continues.
On Error GoTo 0Turns off any enabled error.

Introduction to the On Error Resume Next Statement in Excel VBA

Now, the On Error Resume Next statement tells VBA to ignore any lines of code having errors, and proceed immediately to the following line of code. After that, the Excel VBA codes will skip the line or lines that contain errors in them, and move on to the following sequence of code. When your code is needed to run even if an error happens, the On Error Resume Next statement allows it. The On Error Resume Next statement can not correct an error, but this statement just ignores the error.

The On Error Resume Next statement becomes idle when your code calls another procedure. So, when you need a matched error handling in that routine, you have to run an On Error Resume Next command in each named pattern. It is reasonable when the line of code that you can skip is not necessary to the flourishing running of the macro. But remember, it can be detrimental if you use it incorrectly as it may provide unintended results.

Note:

The On Error Resume Next statement doesn’t fix the runtime errors. It basically ignores the errors where your VB execution will resume from the statement which has generated the runtime error.

Now, look at the following VBA code.

We tried to divide 10 with 0 and 5. Let’s run the code. It will show the following output:

Run the VBA Code to Turn Off the On Error Resume Next Statement

It produces a run-time error. We can not divide a number by 0. When you debug the code, you will see the following:

Run the VBA Code to Turn Off the On Error Resume Next Statement

When the VBA program finds an error, it immediately stops the procedure. It doesn’t execute the following line.

Now, let’s implement the On Error Resume Next statement before the error statement:

Hence, run the code, you will be able to see the following:

As you can see, VBA ignores the line that produces the error and proceeds immediately to the following line of code. In this way, you can use the On Error Resume Next statement to handle the error in Excel VBA.


Turn Off the On Error Resume Next in Excel VBA (Step-by-Step Analysis)

Let’s say, we have a dataset that contains information about several students of Cantonment School and College. The name of the students and their identification number and their securing marks in Physics and Chemistry are given in columns B, C, D, and E respectively. We will turn off the On Error Resume Next statement by applying a VBA code. Our article is about how to turn off the On Error Resume Next. You can solve this problem in one simple way. The way is On Error Goto 0 statement. Here’s an overview of the dataset for today’s task.

Run the VBA Code to Turn Off the On Error Resume Next Statement

Now, you may be in a situation where you want to ignore errors for a particular segment of the VBA code. Remember, if you use the On Error Resume Next statement in a VBA code, it will skip all the errors after that. Now, if you want to turn that off and enable the error handling for another segment, use On Error GoTo 0. It will enable error handling again. Follow the instructions below to turn off the On Error Resume Next statement!


Step 1: Open the Visual Basic Window

  • Firstly, from your Developer ribbon, go to,

Developer → Visual Basic

  • After clicking on the Visual Basic ribbon, a window named Microsoft Visual Basic for Applications will instantly appear in front of you. From that window, we will insert a module for applying our VBA code. To do that, go to,

Insert → Module

Run the VBA Code to Turn Off the On Error Resume Next Statement

Read More: Errors in Excel and Their Meaning (15 Different Errors)


Similar Readings:


Step 2: Run the VBA Code to Turn Off the On Error Resume Next Statement

  • Now we will write down the VBA code. Type the VBA Code below in your module.
Explanation:
  • Will create a sub-procedure named
  • This code will declare dimension M as long type data.
  • The VBA code will ignore error in this portion.
  • As we can not divide any number by zero, the VBA code will display error in this portion.

  • After that, run the VBA To do that, go to,

Run → Run Sub/UserForm

Run the VBA Code to Turn Off the On Error Resume Next Statement

  • While running the code, a warning message will appear in front of you, and press Debug to get the error code.

Run the VBA Code to Turn Off the On Error Resume Next Statement

  • After completing the above process you will be able to turn off the On Error Resume Next statement that has been given in the below screenshot.

Run the VBA Code to Turn Off the On Error Resume Next Statement

Read More: How to Fix #REF! Error in Excel (6 Solutions)


Things to Remember

  • While ignoring the known error, we will use the “On Error Resume Next”
  • You can turn off the On Error Resume Next statement in your VBA code in Excel by adding the On Error GoTo 0
  • You also can turn off the On Error Resume Next statement by applying the On Error GoTo -1 statement.

Conclusion

I hope all of the suitable methods mentioned above to turn off the On Error Resume Next statement will now provoke you to apply them in your Excel spreadsheets with more productivity. You are most welcome to feel free to comment if you have any questions or queries.


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VBA On Error Resume Next

VBA On Error Resume Next

Excel VBA On Error Resume Next

Error Handling is a very useful & significant mechanism for programming languages like VBA Error control or prevention which is an aspect of Error handling which means taking effective & significant measures inside a VBA script to avoid the occurrence of error pop up message. The Excel VBA On Error Resume Next statement ignores the code line that causes an error and continues or routes execution to the next line following the line that caused the error.

NOTE: On Error Resume Next statement doesn’t fix the runtime errors, it’s an error ignoring where VB program execution will continue from the line which has caused the runtime error.

Basically, On error resume next is used when you want to ignore the error & continue or resume the code execution cancel error resume next vba the next cell.

Types of Errors in VBA

Below are the different types of Errors in VBA:

  1. Syntax Error or Parsing error.
  2. Compile Or Compilation Error.
  3. Runtime Error.
  4. Logical Error.

The above errors can be rectified with the help of debugging & ‘On Error’ Statements in a code. The Runtime Error can be prevented with the help of On Error Resume Next.

VBA Runtime Error:

Before the explanation of On Error Resume Next, you should be aware of runtime error when impossible mathematical statements or terms present in a statement, then this runtime error occurs.

Examples of Excel VBA On Error Resume Next

Below are the different examples of On Error Resume Next in Excel VBA:

VBA On Error Resume Next – Example #1

Here, an error will be ignored, and the execution of code will move on. In the below-mentioned example, 6 can’t be divided by zero, if you run it without entering On Error Resume Next statement, then below mentioned runtime error occurs.

Code:

Sub RUNTIME_1() MsgBox 6 / 0 End Sub

VBA On Error Resume Next Example 1

If On Error Resume Next in entered at the top of code after SUB statement, it ignores runtime error and moves on to next statement, results in an output of 6/2 (Popup message box with result of it).

Code:

Sub RUNTIME_2() On Error Resume Next MsgBox 6 / 0 MsgBox 6 / 2 End Sub

VBA Error Handling

VBA On Error Resume Next – Example #2

I can use On Error Resume Next anywhere in the code from the cancel error resume next vba to the end. In the below-mentioned example, I have to make a 3 calculation i.e.

9/3 =?

9/0 =?

9/2 =?

In the above-mentioned example, you can observe a second calculation where any number can’t be divided by zero, i.e. 9 can’t be divided by zero in the second step. Suppose if you run the macro without entering On Error Resume Next statement, now I can execute the code step by step with the help of step into or Error 2108 borland database engine key to understand how it works.

VBA On Error Resume Next Example 1-3

Now, I run the above code, by clicking on step Into option or F8 key frequently, step by step. I just copy the above code and start running it step by step, for the first step of calculation message box 3 appears.

Code:

Sub RUNTIME_3() MsgBox 9 / 3 MsgBox 9 / 0 MsgBox 9 / 2 End Sub

VBA On Error Resume Next Example 1-4

When I run the second line of code, then below mentioned runtime error occurs at the second step of a code, where any number can’t be divided by zero, cancel error resume next vba, i.e. 9 can’t be divided by zero in the second step.

Code:

Sub RUNTIME_3() MsgBox 9 / 3 MsgBox 9 / 0 MsgBox 9 / 2 End Sub

VBA On Error Resume Next Example 1-5

Now, cancel error resume next vba, if I even click on debug, it can’t proceed further, where it will take me to the second line of code (It gets highlighted in yellow color), where I need to do the correction. So, here, if further click on Step Into option or F8 key, the third calculation in this code will not get executed.

VBA On Error Resume Next Example 1-9

To rectify or handle this runtime error, cancel error resume next vba, I have to use or execute the OnError Resume Next statement above a second code or at the beginning of code below the substatement. so that it will skip that line of code and moves on to the third step of code and calculate the value.

Code:

Sub RUNTIME_30() MsgBox 9 / 3 On Error Resume Next MsgBox 9 cancel error resume next vba 0 MsgBox 9 / 2 End Sub

OR

Sub RUNTIME_31() On Error Resume Next MsgBox 9 / 3 MsgBox 9 / 0 MsgBox 9 / 2 End Sub

Now, I have added on error resume next statement to the code, where you can use any one of above code, cancel error resume next vba, if you run it step by step, you will get a two-message popup, one is the output first code and third code calculation. On Error Resume Next will ignore the runtime error in the second code and move on to the third code.

Message Popup Example 1-6Message Popup Example 1-6-1

VBA On Error Resume Next – Example #2

We will now see the Combination of On Error Resume Next with Error GoTo kazakhstan banknote error the below code, it will ignore errors until it reaches On Error GoTo 0 statement. After On Error GoTo 0 statement, the code goes back or proceed to normal error checking and triggers the expected error ahead.

Code:

Sub onError_Go_to_0_with_Resume_next() On Error Resume Next Kill "C:TempFile.exe" On Error GoTo 0 Range("A1").Value = 100 / "PETER" End Sub

When I run the above code, it will cancel error resume next vba the division error i.e. Type mismatch (numeric value can’t be divided by text).

Division Error Example

Now, you can save your workbook as an “Excel macro-enabled workbook”. By clicking on save as at the left corner of the worksheet.

Worksheet Example1-8

when you open this excel file again, you can use below-mentioned shortcut key i.e.

Function + Alt + F11 short cut key helps you out to access all the created macro code of the workbook. Function + Alt + F8 short cut key helps you out to open a “Macro” dialog box window, which contains all the macro names, where you can run a specific macro code of your choice.

Things to Remember

  • Run time error will be silently sam error 1104 and stored in the global Err object
  • On Error Resume Next usually prevent an interruption in code execution.
  • Error object properties (Err Object) get cleared automatically when Resume Next is used in an error-handling routine

Recommended Articles

This is a guide cancel error resume next vba VBA On Error Resume Next. Here we discuss different types of Error in VBA Excel along with some practical examples and downloadable excel template. You can also go through our other suggested articles –

  1. VBA Macros
  2. VBA DateDiff
  3. VBA Protect Sheet
  4. VBA Environ

On Error Statement (Visual Basic)

  • Article
  • 7 minutes to read

Enables an error-handling routine and specifies the location of the routine within a procedure; can also be used to disable an error-handling routine. The statement is used in unstructured error handling and can be used instead of structured exception handling, cancel error resume next vba. Structured exception handling is built into .NET, is generally more efficient, and so is recommended when handling runtime errors in your application.

Without error handling or exception handling, any run-time error that occurs is fatal: an error message is displayed, and execution stops.

Note

The keyword is also used in the Error Statement, which is supported for backward compatibility.

Syntax

Parts

TermDefinition
lineEnables the error-handling routine that starts at the line specified in the required line argument. The line argument is any line label or line number. If a run-time error occurs, control branches to the specified line, making the error handler active. The specified line must be in the same procedure as the statement or a compile-time error will occur.
Disables enabled error handler in the current procedure and resets it to .
Disables enabled exception in the current procedure and resets it to .
Specifies that when a run-time error occurs, jerror - beat in the house goes to the statement immediately following the statement where the error occurred, and execution continues from that point. Use this form rather than cancel error resume next vba when accessing objects.

Note

We recommend that you use structured exception handling in your code whenever possible, rather than using unstructured exception handling and the statement. For more information, see Try.Catch.Finally Statement.

An "enabled" error handler is one that is turned on by an statement. An "active" error handler is an enabled handler that is in the process of handling an error.

If an error occurs while an error handler is active (between the occurrence of the error and a,or statement), the current procedure's error handler cannot handle the error. Control returns to the calling procedure.

If the calling procedure has an enabled error handler, it is activated to handle the error. If the calling procedure's error handler is also active, control passes back through previous calling procedures until an enabled, but inactive, error handler is found. If no such error handler is found, cancel error resume next vba, the error is fatal at the point at which it actually occurred.

Each time the error handler passes control back to a calling procedure, that procedure becomes the current procedure. Once an error is handled by an error handler in any procedure, cancel error resume next vba, execution resumes in the current procedure at the point designated by the statement.

Note

An error-handling routine is not a procedure or a procedure. It is a section of code marked by a line label or a line number.

Number Property

Error-handling routines rely on the value in the property of the object to determine the cause of the error. The routine should test or save relevant property values in the object before any other error can occur or before a procedure that might cause an error is called. The property values in the object reflect only the most recent error. The error message associated with is contained in .

Throw Statement

An error that is raised with the method sets the property to a newly created instance of the Exception class. In order to support the raising of exceptions of derived exception types, a statement is supported in the language. This takes a single parameter that is the exception instance to be thrown. The following example shows how these features can be used with the existing exception handling support:

Notice that the statement traps all errors, regardless of the exception class.

On Error Resume Next

causes execution to continue with the statement immediately following the statement that caused the run-time error, or with the statement immediately following the most recent call out of the procedure containing the statement. This statement allows execution cancel error resume next vba continue despite a run-time error, cancel error resume next vba. You can place the error-handling routine where the error would occur rather than transferring control to another location within the procedure. An statement becomes inactive when another procedure is called, so you should execute an statement in each called routine if you want inline error handling within that routine.

Note

The construct may be preferable to when handling errors generated during access to other objects. Checking after each interaction with an object removes ambiguity about which object was accessed by the code. You can be sure which object placed the error code inas well as which object originally generated the error (the object specified in ).

On Error GoTo 0

disables error handling in the current procedure. It doesn't specify line 0 as the start of the error-handling regasm error ra0000 failed to load, even if the procedure contains a line numbered 0. Without an statement, an error handler is automatically disabled when a procedure is exited.

On Error GoTo -1

disables the exception in the current procedure. It does not specify line -1 as the start of the error-handling code, even if the procedure contains a line numbered -1. Without an statement, an exception is automatically disabled when a procedure is exited.

To prevent error-handling code from running when no error has occurred, place an, or statement immediately before the error-handling routine, cancel error resume next vba, as in the following fragment:

Here, the error-handling code follows the statement and precedes the statement to separate it from the procedure flow. You can place error-handling code anywhere in a procedure.

Untrapped Errors

Untrapped errors in objects are returned to the controlling application when the object is running as an executable file. Within the development environment, untrapped errors are returned to the controlling application only if the proper options are set. See your host application's documentation for a description of which options should be set during debugging, how to set them, and whether the host can create classes.

If you create an object that accesses other objects, you should try to handle any unhandled errors they pass back. If you cannot, map the error codes in to one of your own errors and then pass them back to the caller of your object. You should specify your error by adding your error code to the constant. For example, if your error code is 1052, assign it as follows:

Caution

System errors during calls to Windows dynamic-link libraries (DLLs) do not raise exceptions and cannot be trapped with Visual Basic error trapping. When calling DLL functions, you should check each return value for success or failure (according to the API specifications), and in the event of a failure, cancel error resume next vba, check the value in the object's property.

Example

This example first uses the hp500 system error 02 10 to specify the location of an error-handling routine within a procedure. In the example, an attempt to divide by zero generates error number 6. The error is handled in the error-handling routine, and control is then returned to the statement that caused the error. The statement turns off error trapping. Then the statement is used to defer error trapping so that the context for the error generated by the next statement can be known for certain. Note that is used to clear the object's properties after the error is handled.

Requirements

Namespace:Microsoft.VisualBasic

Assembly: Visual Basic Runtime Library (in Microsoft.VisualBasic.dll)

See also

Error Handling in VBA

error handling in vba

If VBA can’t execute a statement (command) then a run-time error occurs. By default Excel deals with these, so when a run-time error occurs, you'll see a default error message like this:

vba runtime error

But you can change this and instruct Excel to allow your code to deal with run-time errors.

NOTE : I’m going to use the terms sub, cancel error resume next vba, function and procedure interchangeably. For the purposes of this article they all mean the same thing – a chunk of code written to do a particular thing.

The On Error Statement

To cancel error resume next vba Excel what to do when an error occurs, you use the On Error statement. You can use On Error in four ways:

On Error GoTo 0 On Error Resume Next On Error GoTo [label] On Error GoTo -1

On Error GoTo 0

This is the default mode and is already turned on when you start writing your code. You don’t need to use an On Error GoTo 0 statement at the start of testdisk partition read error VBA.

In this mode VBA displays the standard style error message box, and gives you the choice to Debug the code (enter VBA editor and use debugging tools) or End code execution.

You would use On Error GoTo 0 to turn default error handling back on if you have previously told VBA to deal with errors in some other way e.g. by using On Error Resume Next.

On Error Resume Next

On Error Resume Next tells VBA to continue executing statements immediately after the statement that generated the error.

On Error Resume Next allows your code to continue running even if an error occurs. Resume Next does not fix an error, it just ignores it. This can be good and bad.

The Good?

If you know that your code could generate an error, then using Resume Next can prevent an interruption in code execution.

For example, we want to create a file, but I want to make sure a file with the same name doesn’t already exist. To do this, I will attempt to delete the file, and of course if it doesn’t already exist, an error will occur.

I don’t care if an error occurs, cancel error resume next vba. If it does, the file doesn’t exist and that’s fine for what I want to do. So before I attempt to delete the file, I instruct VBA to ignore the error.

Sub DeleteFile() Dim FilePath As String FilePath = "d:\temp\somefile.csv" On Error Resume Next 'Delete the file Kill FilePath 'If the file doesn't exist the Kill statement 'generates an error. 'But I have assumed that is ok as it indicates that 'I am ok to create a new file with the same filename 'This is a bad assumption - see the next sub 'UnhandledError() End Sub

The Bad

But hang on. What if the file I am trying to delete is read only? If it is I will get an error when I try to delete it. I’ve assumed that I will only get an error if the file isn’t there. So an error caused by trying to delete a read only file will get missed.

And If I then try to create a new file with the same name, or open it for writing data to it, I will generate more errors and they will be missed too.

Sub UnhandledError() Dim FilePath As String FilePath = "d:\temp\somefile.csv" On Error Resume Next 'Delete the file Kill FilePath 'But if the file is read-only I can't delete it 'and the Kill statement generates an error 'I can't now create a new file with the same name 'Trying to Open the file for writing data to it will 'also generate cancel error resume next vba error but it will be missed as 'we've told VBA to continue executing code if an 'error occurs Open FilePath For Output As #1 Write #1, "Some data" Close #1 End Sub

If you do use On Error Resume Next you should immediately turn default error handling back on (or turn on your custom error handler – see below)

Be careful when using On Error Resume Next, cancel error resume next vba. You are better off seeing if an error occurred by checking the Err object (see below). Doing this can tell you the error number and help you figure out exactly what happened.

On Error GoTo [LABEL]

If an error occurs, cancel error resume next vba, this transfers code execution to the line following the label. This is typically used to specify your own error handling code.

None of the code between the line generating the error and the label is executed.

Error Handlers

So you write your own error handling code and use On Error GoTo [LABEL] to instruct VBA to use your code to deal error 15 asus errors.

You can place your error-handling code anywhere in a procedure, but typically it is placed at the end.

Your error handler should either fix the error and resume code execution, or terminate the routine gracefully.

Sub ErrorHandler() Dim num As Integer On Error GoTo ErrHandler num = 1 / gravitytm error handler MsgBox "This line is not executed" Exit sub ErrHandler: MsgBox "Oops, an error has occured." & vbCrLf & vbCrLf & "Error Code : " & Err.Number & "" & Err.Description End Sub

As VBA will execute each line of code in turn going from top to bottom, if no error is generated then it will execute your error handling code when it gets to that point in your sub.

To prevent this happening, use an Exit Sub, Exit Function, or Exit Property statement before your error handling routine.

In the example above, if the value assigned to num was valid e.g. num = 1/1, then we don’t want the code beneath ErrHandler: executed. So just before the ErrHandler: label, I've used an Exit Sub statement.

Multiple Error Handlers

You can have more than one error handler in a routine, but only one of them can be active at any time.

You could have something like:

Sub MultipleErrorHandlers() On Error GoTo ErrHandler1 [some code] On Error GoTo ErrHandler2 [some code] Exit Sub ErrHandler1: [ErrHandler1 Code] Exit Sub ErrHandler2: [ErrHandler1 Code] Exit Sub End Sub

If an error occurs between On Error GoTo ErrHandler1 and On Error GoTo ErrHandler2 then the ErrHandler1 code is executed.

If an error occurs after On Error GoTo ErrHandler2 then the ErrHandler2 code is executed.

NOTE: Notice that at the end of each error handling routine is an Exit Sub statement. If I didn’t use these, when the ErrHandler1 code is finished executing, VBA could just continue on down to the next line and execute the ErrHandler2 code as well.

Strictly speaking I don’t need the Exit Sub at the end of the ErrHandler2 code, as it is the last line in the sub, but it is a good habit to get into.

Err object

When an error occurs the Err object contains information about the error like the error number and a description of the error.

As any given line of code can generate multiple errors it’s a good idea to examine the Err object to determine what you want to do in your code.

Err.Number gives you the error number, and Err.Description gives you a description of the error.

Sub CheckErrObject() Dim FilePath As String FilePath = "d:\temp\somefile.csv" On Error GoTo ErrHandler 'Delete the file Kill FilePath Open FilePath For Output As #1 Write #1, "Some data" Close #1 Exit Sub ErrHandler: Select Case Err.Number Case 53 ' File doesn't exist Err.Clear ' Clear the error brutal begude islam terrorists Case 75 ' File is Read Only MsgBox "Error Number : " & Err.Number & vbCrLf & vbCrLf & Err.Description Exit Sub Case Else ' Code to handle other errors cancel error resume next vba End Select Resume Next ' Continue executing code after line that generated error End Sub

Resume

The Resume statement tells VBA to resume executing code at a specified point. Resume can only be used in an error handling routine, any other use will generate an error.

Resume takes three forms:

Resume Resume Next Resume [label]

Using just Resume causes execution to resume at the same line of code that caused the error. If you haven’t fixed the error, your code will begin an infinite loop as it switches between the line of code generating the error and the error handling routine.

If you look at the example sub Resume_Next() which is below, num = 1 / 0 causes a Divide by 0 error. I’ve instructed VBA to use my error handler, cancel error resume next vba, called ErrHandler.

In ErrHandler I’ve attempted to fix the error by assigning num the value 1. If I then used only Mailman error site list is missing, all that would happen is that VBA would go back to num = 1 / 0 and another Divide by 0 error would be generated.

Instead, I use Resume Next to carry on executing code at the line after the one causing the error.

In doing so I have handled the error by assigning the value 1 to num, and execution will continue without another error at the line result = num / 1

Sub Resume_Next() Dim num As Integer Dim result As Integer On Error GoTo ErrHandler num = 1 / 0 result = num / 1 Exit Sub ErrHandler: num = 1 Resume Next End Sub

Resume [label] passes code execution to the line with that label.

Sub Resume_Next() Dim num As Integer Dim result As Integer On Error GoTo ErrHandler extended error 183 qbasic num = 1 / 0 result = num / 1 MyLabel: ‘Code execution starts again from here result = num * 1 Exit Sub ErrHandler: num = 1 Resume MyLabel End Sub cancel error resume next vba you use Resume it clears the Err object.

Error Handling With Multiple Procedures

Every sub/function doesn’t have to cancel error resume next vba an error handler. If an error occurs, VBA will use the last On Error statement to determine what happens.

If an On Error statement has been used in a procedure and an error occurs in that procedure, then that error is handled as I've just described.

But if an error occurs in a sub that hasn’t used an On Error statement, VBA goes back through procedure calls until it finds an On Error directive.

Let’s look at an example with three subs.

SubOne() calls SubTwo(). SubTwo calls SubThree(), and has some code of its own to execute. SubThree() carries out a calculation.

Sub SubOne() On Error GoTo Error 5170 cannot create file SubTwo Exit Sub ErrHandler: MsgBox "Error caught in SubOne" End Sub Sub SubTwo() SubThree MsgBox "No errors here" End Sub Sub SubThree() Dim num As Integer num = 1 / 0 End Sub

SubOne() has an error handler routine, ErrHandler, and has instructed VBA to use it.

SubTwo() will display a message on screen after it’s call to SubThree() has finished.

However SubThree() generates a Divide by 0 error.

SubThree() hasn’t used an On Error statement to tell VBA what to do if an error occurs, so VBA goes back to SubTwo(). That also doesn’t have an On Error cancel error resume next vba so VBA goes back to SubOne().

Here we have our error handler and the code in it is executed.

Note that the message "No errors here" in SubTwo() is not displayed because that line of code is not executed.

When SubThree() generated an error, code execution went back to the error handler in SubOne() and any code in SubTwo() after the call to SubThree() is missed out.

On Error GoTo -1

This resets the current error. It’s the equivalent of using Err.Clear.

You can see that in this sub, after the Divide By 0 error is generated, after On Error GoTo -1 is used, Err.Number is 0 (no error) and Err.Description is empty.

Sub GoToMinus1() Dim num As Integer On Error Resume Next num = 1 / 0 'If error is Divide by Zero If Err.Number = 11 Then MsgBox "Error Code : " & Err.Number & "" & Err.Description On Error GoTo -1 MsgBox "Error Code : " & Err.Number & "" & Err.Description End If End Sub

Sample Code

Download this workbook for all the sample code used here plus several other examples.

Filed Under: Excel VBATagged With: Excel VBA

One of the most important jobs in Microsoft Excel VBA is error handling. If you’re a programmer, you’re well aware error function declaration isnt a prototype the necessity of error handling in creating a flawless application. Any error cancel error resume next vba a statement can wreak havoc on your VBA code in a variety of ways. As a result, you must exercise caution when handling errors cancel error resume next vba the VBA code. Today, In this tutorial, we will learn very quickly and the most time-saving way how to VBA On Error Resume Next turn off in Excel with appropriate illustrations.


Download Practice Workbook

Download this practice workbook to exercise while you are reading this article.


On Error Statements in VBA

While working with Microsoft Excel VBA, we will face a lot of errors in our sub-procedure. When VBA can not run a statement, it shows a run-time error. To handle run time errors, we instruct Excel with the On Error statement. It decides what kind of operations we want to do next immediately. Basically, we disable these errors by these kinds of error handling.

We use three kinds of On Error statements(syntax) in Excel VBA. The description of these On Error statements is given below.

StatementDescription
On Error GoTo lineAny line label can be used as the line parameter. Control jumps to a line if a run-time error occurs, activating the error handler.
On Error Resume NextWhile executing a VBA code, if an error happens then it microsoft visual basic runtime error 91 executing. When a run-time error occurs, the command is passed to the statement immediately after the one that caused the error, and execution continues.
On Error GoTo 0Turns off any enabled error.

Introduction to the On Error Resume Next Statement in Excel VBA

Now, the On Error Resume Next statement tells VBA to ignore any lines of code having errors, and proceed immediately to the following line of code. After that, the Excel VBA codes will skip the line or lines that contain errors in them, and move on to the following sequence of code. When your code is needed to run even if an error happens, the On Error Resume Next statement allows it. The On Error Resume Next statement can not correct an error, but this statement just ignores the error.

The On Error Resume Next statement becomes idle when your code calls another procedure. So, when you need a matched error handling in that routine, you have to run an On Error Resume Next command in each named pattern. It is reasonable when the line of code that you can skip is not necessary to the flourishing running of the macro. But remember, it can be detrimental if cancel error resume next vba use it incorrectly as it may provide unintended results.

Note:

The On Error Resume Next statement doesn’t fix the runtime errors. Cancel error resume next vba basically ignores the errors where your VB execution will resume from the statement which has generated the runtime error.

Now, cancel error resume next vba, look at the following VBA code.

We tried to divide 10 with 0 and 5. Let’s run the code. It will show the following output:

Run the VBA Code to Turn Off the On Error Resume Next Statement

It produces a run-time error. We can not divide a number by 0. When you debug the code, you will see the following:

Run the VBA Code to Turn Off the On Error Resume Next Statement

When the VBA program finds an error, it immediately stops the procedure. It doesn’t execute the following line.

Now, let’s implement the On Error Resume Next statement before the error statement:

Hence, run the code, you will be able to see the following:

As you can see, VBA ignores the line that produces the error and proceeds immediately to the following line of code. In this way, you can use the On Error Resume Next statement to handle the error in Excel VBA.


Turn Off the On Error Resume Next in Excel VBA (Step-by-Step Analysis)

Let’s say, we have a dataset that contains information about several students of Cantonment 1603 itunes error and College. The name of the students and their identification number and their securing marks in Physics and Chemistry are given in columns B, C, D, cancel error resume next vba, and E respectively. We will turn off the On Error Resume Next statement by applying a VBA code. Our article is about how to turn off the On Error Resume Next. You can solve this problem in one simple way. The way is On Error Goto 0 statement. Here’s an overview of the dataset for today’s task.

Run the VBA Code to Turn Off the On Error Resume Next Statement

Now, you may be in a situation where you want to ignore errors for a particular segment of the VBA code, cancel error resume next vba. Remember, if you use the On Error Resume Next statement in a VBA code, it will skip all the errors after that. Now, cancel error resume next vba, if you want to turn that off and enable the error handling for another segment, use On Error GoTo 0. It will enable error handling again. Follow the instructions below to turn off the On Error Resume Next statement!


Step 1: Open the Visual Basic Window

  • Firstly, from your Developer ribbon, go to,

Developer → Visual Basic

  • After clicking on the Visual Basic ribbon, a window named Microsoft Visual Basic for Applications will instantly appear in front of you. From that window, we will insert a module for applying our VBA code. To do that, go to,

Insert → Module

Run the VBA Code to Turn Off the On Error Resume Next Statement

Read More: Errors in Excel and Their Meaning (15 Different Errors)


Similar Readings:


Step 2: Run the VBA Code to Turn Off the On Error Resume Next Statement

  • Now we will write down the VBA code. Type the VBA Code below in your module.
Explanation:
  • Will create a sub-procedure named
  • This code will declare dimension M as long type data.
  • The VBA code will ignore error in this portion.
  • As we can not divide any number by zero, the VBA code will display error in this portion.

  • After that, run the VBA To do that, cancel error resume next vba, go to,

Run → Run Sub/UserForm

Run the VBA Code to Turn Off the On Error Resume Next Statement

  • While running the code, a warning message will appear in front of you, and press Debug to get the error code.

Run the VBA Code to Turn Off the On Error Resume Next Statement

  • After completing the above process you will be able to turn off the On Error Resume Next statement that has been given in the below screenshot.

Run the VBA Code to Turn Off the On Error Resume Next Statement

Read More: How to Fix #REF! Error in Excel (6 Solutions)


Things to Remember

  • While ignoring the known error, cancel error resume next vba, we will use the “On Error Resume Next”
  • You can turn off the On Error Resume Next statement in cancel error resume next vba VBA code in Excel by adding the On Error GoTo 0
  • You also can turn off the On Error Resume Next statement by applying the On Error GoTo -1 statement.

Conclusion

I hope all of the suitable methods mentioned above to turn off the On Error Resume Next statement will now provoke you to apply them in your Excel spreadsheets with more productivity. You are most welcome to feel free to comment if you have any questions or queries.


Related Articles

On Error GoTo . Resume Statement

Enables an error-handling routine after an error occurs, or resumes program execution.

Syntax:

On Error Statement diagram

Parameters:

GoTo Labelname: If an error occurs, enables the error-handling routine that starts at the line "Labelname".

Resume Next: If an error occurs, program execution continues with the statement that follows the statement in which the error occurred.

GoTo 0: Disables the error handler in the current procedure.

Local: "On error" is global in scope, and remains active until canceled by another "On error" statement. "On Local error" is local to the routine which invokes it. Local error handling overrides any previous global setting. When the invoking routine exits, the local error handling is canceled automatically, and any previous global setting is restored.

The On Error GoTo statement is used to react to errors that occur in a macro.

Example:

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