Bios checksum error 41

bios checksum error 41

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Bios checksum error 41
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BIOS Power-On Self-Test (POST) Codes

The system BIOS provides a basic power-on self-test (POST), during which the BIOS checks the basic devices required for the server to operate. The progress of the self-test is indicated by a series of POST codes. This chapter explains the BIOS POST testing, provides an alternate method for viewing the codes, describes how to change POST options, and lists the POST codes.

This chapter contains the following sections:

About POST

The POST is a systematic check of basic system devices. As the testing progresses, the BIOS displays codes that you can use to interpret the status of your server. The codes appear at the bottom right corner of the system’s VGA screen, after the self-test has progressed far enough to initialize the video monitor. Because the codes might scroll off of the screen too quickly to be read, an alternate method of displaying POST codes is bios checksum error 41 redirect the output of the console to a serial port (see Redirecting Console Output).

You can also see some of the post codes on LEDs inside the front panel of your server node (see POST Code LEDs).

How BIOS POST Memory Testing Works

The BIOS POST memory testing is performed as follows:

1. The first megabyte of DRAM bios checksum error 41 tested by the BIOS before the BIOS code is shadowed (that is, copied from ROM to DRAM).

2, bios checksum error 41. Once executing out of DRAM, the BIOS performs a simple memory test (a write/read of every location with the pattern ).



Note - This memory test is performed only if Quick Boot is not enabled from the Boot Settings Configuration screen, bios checksum error 41. Enabling Quick Boot causes the BIOS to skip the memory test. See Changing POST Options for more information.


3. The BIOS polls the memory controllers for both correctable and non-correctable memory errors and logs those errors into the SP.

4, bios checksum error 41. The message appears at the end of POST.

Redirecting Console Output

You can access BIOS POST codes remotely using the web interface or the CLI.


procedure icon  To Access BIOS POST Codes Using the Web Interface

1. Open a browser and use the SP’s IP address as the URL. bios checksum error 41 to the Sun Integrated Cmos features error Out Manager 2.0 User’s Guide (820-1188) for information on how to obtain the IP address of the SP.

2. Type a user name and password as follows: bios checksum error 41 name: Password:

3. The ILOM SP web interface screen appears.

4. Click the Remote Control tab.

5. Click the Redirection tab.

6. Click the Start Redirection button.

The javaRConsole window appears and prompts you for your user name and password again, then the current POST screen appears.


procedure icon  To Access BIOS POST Codes Using the CLI

1. Log in to the SP cli with the command SP IP address and use the command to start the serial console.

Changing POST Options

These instructions are optional, but you can use them to change the operations that the server performs during POST testing, bios checksum error 41.


procedure icon  To Change the POST Options

1. Initialize the BIOS Setup Utility by pressing the F2 key while the system is performing the power-on self-test (POST).

The BIOS Main Menu screen appears.

2. Select the Boot menu.

The Boot Settings screen appears.

3. Select Boot Settings Configuration.

The Boot Settings Configuration screen appears.

4. On the Boot Settings Configuration screen, there are several options that you can enable or disable:

  • Retry Boot List: Automatically retries the boot list when all devices have failed. This option is enabled by default.
  • Quick Boot: This option is enabled by default. The BIOS skips certain tests while booting, such as the extensive memory test. This decreases the time it takes for the system to boot.
  • Quiet Boot: This option is disabled by default. If you enable this option, bios checksum error 41, the Sun Microsystems logo appears instead of POST codes.
  • Wait for F1 if Error: This option is enabled by default. The system pauses if an error is found during POST and only resumes when you press the F1 key.
  • On-board IB gPXE Boot First: Sets the on-board infiniband gPXE to always boot first. This option is disabled by default. pixma mp140 error 5 Codes

    TABLE 8-1 contains descriptions of each of the POST codes, listed in the same order in which they are generated. These POST codes appear at the bottom right of the BIOS screen as a four-digit string that is a combination of two-digit output from primary I/O port 80 and two-digit output from secondary I/O port 81, bios checksum error 41. In the POST codes listed in TABLE 8-1, the first two digits are from port 81 and the last two digits are from port 80.

    You can see some of the POST codes from primary I/O port 80 on LEDs inside the front panel of your server node (see POST Code LEDs).

    The Response column describes the action taken by the system on encountering the corresponding error, bios checksum error 41. The actions are:

    • Warning or Not an Error - The message appears on the screen. An error record is logged to the system event log (SEL). The system continues booting with a degraded state. The user might want to replace the unit.
    • Pause - The message appears on the screen, bios checksum error 41, an error is logged to the SEL, and user input is required to continue. The user can take immediate corrective action or choose to continue booting.
    • Halt - The message appears on the screen, an error is logged to the SEL, and the system cannot boot unless the error is resolved. The user needs to replace the faulty part and restart the system.

    • Error Bios checksum error 41

      Error Message

      Response

      0000

      Timer Error

      Pause

      0003

      CMOS Battery Low

      Pause

      0004

      CMOS Settings Wrong

      Pause

      0005

      CMOS Checksum Bios checksum error 41

      Pause

      000B

      CMOS Memory Size Wrong

      Pause

      000C

      RAM R/W Test Failed

      Pause

      000E

      A: Drive Error

      Pause

      000F

      B: Drive Error

      Pause

      0012

      CMOS Date/Time Not Set

      Pause

      0040

      Refresh Timer Test Failed

      Halt

      0041

      Display Memory Test Failed

      Pause

      0042

      CMOS Bios checksum error 41 Type Wrong chainloader bootmgr error 15 windows 7

      Pause

      0043

      ~<INS> Pressed

      Pause

      0044

      DMA Controller Error

      Halt

      0045

      DMA-1 Error

      Halt terror mixen 2007 rowspan="1" colspan="1">

      0046

      DMA-2 Error

      Halt

      0047

      Unknown BIOS error, bios checksum error 41. Error code = 0047

      Halt

      0048

      Password Check Failed

      Halt

      0049

      Unknown BIOS error. Error code = 0049

      Halt

      004A

      Unknown BIOS error. Error code = 004A

      Pause

      004B

      Unknown BIOS error. Error code = 004B

      Pause

      004C

      Keyboard/Interface Error

       

      005D bios checksum error 41 rowspan="1" colspan="1">

      S.M.A.R.T. Command Failed

       

      bios checksum error 41

      Password Check Failed

      Pause

      0101

      Warning! This system board does not support the power requirements of the installed processor. The processor will be run at a reduced frequency, which will impact system performance.

      Pause

      0102

      Error! The CPU Core to Bus ratio or VID configuration has failed! Please enter BIOS Setup and re-config it.

      Pause

      0103

      ERROR! CPU MTRRs configuration failed!

      Uncacheable memory hole or PCI space too complicated.

       

      0120

      Thermal Trip Failure

      Pause

      0121

      Thermal Trip Failure

      Pause

      0122

      Thermal Trip Failure

      Pause

      0123

      Thermal Trip Failure

      Pause

      0124

      Thermal Trip Failure

      Pause

      0125

      Thermal Trip Failure

      Pause

      0126

      Thermal Trip Failure

      Pause

      0127

      Thermal Trip Failure

      Pause

      0128

      Thermal Trip Failure

       

      0129

      Thermal Trip Failure

       

      012A

      Thermal Trip Failure

       

      012B

      Thermal Trip Failure

       

      012C

      Thermal Trip Failure

       

      debian skype error

      Thermal Trip Failure

       

      012E

      Thermal Trip Failure

      error code 1054 mysql

      012F

      Thermal Trip Failure

       

      0150

      miles error mss dll Failed BIST

      Pause

      0151

      Processor Failed BIST

      Pause

      0152

      Processor Failed BIST

      Pause

      0153

      Processor Failed BIST

      Pause

      bios checksum error 41 colspan="1">

      0154

      Processor Failed BIST

      Pause

      0155

      Processor Failed BIST

      Pause

      0156

      Processor Failed BIST

      Pause

      0157

      Processor Failed BIST

      Pause

      0158

      Processor Failed BIST

       

      0159

      Processor Failed BIST

       

      015A

      Processor Failed BIST bios checksum error 41 rowspan="1" colspan="1">

       

      015B

      Processor Failed BIST

       

      015C

      Processor Failed BIST

       

      015D

      Processor Failed BIST

       

      015E

      Processor Failed BIST

       

      015F

      Processor Failed BIST

       

      0160

      Processor missing microcode

      Pause

      0161

      Processor missing microcode

      Pause

      0162

      Processor missing microcode

      Pause

      0163

      Processor missing microcode

      Pause

      0164

      Processor missing microcode

      Pause

      0165

      Processor missing microcode

      Pause

      0166

      Processor missing microcode

      Pause

      0167

      Processor missing microcode

      Pause

      0168

      Processor missing microcode

      opera error 1316 colspan="1">

       

      0169

      Processor missing microcode

       

      016A

      Processor missing microcode

       

      016B

      Processor missing microcode

       

      016C

      Processor missing microcode

       

      016D

      Processor missing microcode

       

      016E

      Processor bios checksum error 41 microcode

       

      016F

      Processor missing microcode

       

      0180

      BIOS does not support current stepping

      Pause

      0181

      BIOS does not support current stepping

      Pause

      0182

      BIOS does not support current stepping

      Pause

      0183

      BIOS does not support current stepping

      Pause

      0184

      BIOS does not support current stepping

      Pause

      0185

      BIOS does not support current stepping

      Pause

      0186

      BIOS does not support current stepping

      Pause

      0187

      BIOS does not support current stepping

      Pause

      0188

      BIOS does not support current stepping

       

      0189

      BIOS does not support current stepping

       

      018A

      BIOS does not support current stepping

       

      018B

      BIOS does not support current stepping

       

      018C

      BIOS does not support current stepping

       

      018D

      BIOS does update-ux error 1 bundles cannot be installed support current stepping

       

      error 017 undefined symbol strings colspan="1">

      018E

      BIOS does not support current stepping

       

      018F

      BIOS does not support current stepping

       

      0192

      L2 cache size mismatch.

       

      0193

      CPUID, Processor stepping are different.

       

      0194

      CPUID, Processor family are different.

      Pause

      0195

      Front side bus mismatch. System halted.

       

      0196

      CPUID, Processor Model are different, bios checksum error 41.

      Pause

      0197

      Processor speeds mismatched.

      Pause

      5120

      CMOS cleared by jumper, bios checksum error 41.

      Pause

      5121

      Password cleared by jumper.

      Pause

      5125

      Not enough conventional memory to copy PCI Option ROM.

       

      5180

      Unsupported Memory Vendor : DIMM_A0

      Warning

      5181

      Unsupported Memory Vendor : DIMM_A1

      Warning

      5182

      Unsupported Memory Vendor : DIMM_A2

      Warning

      5183

      Unsupported Memory Vendor : DIMM_A3

      Warning

      5184

      Unsupported Memory Vendor : DIMM_A4

       

      5185

      Unsupported Memory Vendor : DIMM_B0

      Warning

      5186

      Unsupported Memory Vendor : DIMM_B1

      Warning

      5187

      Unsupported Memory Vendor : DIMM_B2

      Warning

      5188

      Unsupported Memory Vendor : DIMM_B3

      Warning

      5189

      Unsupported Memory Vendor : DIMM_B4

      Warning

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      518A

      Unsupported Memory Vendor : DIMM_B5

      Warning

      518B

      Unsupported Memory Vendor : DIMM_C0

      Warning

      518C

      Unsupported Memory Vendor : DIMM_C1

      Warning

      518D

      Unsupported Memory Vendor : DIMM_C2

      Warning

      518F

      Unsupported Memory Vendor : DIMM_C3

      Warning

      5190

      Unsupported Memory Vendor : DIMM_C4

      Warning

      5191

      Unsupported Memory Vendor : DIMM_C5

      Warning

      5192

      Unsupported Memory Vendor : DIMM_D0

      Warning

      5193

      Unsupported Memory Vendor : DIMM_D1

      Warning

      5194

      Unsupported Memory Vendor : DIMM_D2

      Warning

      5195

      Unsupported Memory Vendor : DIMM_D3

      Warning

      5196

      Unsupported Memory Vendor : DIMM_D4

      Warning

      5197

      Unsupported Memory Vendor : DIMM_D5

      Warning

      51A0

      Unsupported AMB Vendor : DIMM_A0

      Warning

      51A1

      Unsupported AMB Vendor : DIMM_A1

      Warning

      51A2

      Unsupported AMB Vendor : DIMM_A2

      Warning

      51A3

      Unsupported AMB Vendor : DIMM_A3

      Warning

      51A4

      Unsupported AMB Vendor : DIMM_A4

      Warning

      51A5

      Unsupported AMB Vendor : DIMM_A5

      Warning

      51A6

      Unsupported AMB Vendor : DIMM_B0

      Warning

      51A7

      Unsupported AMB Vendor : DIMM_B1

      Warning

      51A8

      Unsupported AMB Vendor : DIMM_B2

      Pause

      51A9

      Unsupported AMB Vendor : DIMM_B3

      Warning

      51AA

      Unsupported AMB Vendor : DIMM_B4

      Warning

      51AB

      Unsupported AMB Vendor : DIMM_B5

      Warning

      51AC

      Unsupported AMB Vendor unix disk errors DIMM_C0

      Warning

      51AD

      Unsupported AMB Vendor : DIMM_C1

      Pause

      51AE

      Unsupported AMB Vendor : DIMM_C2

      Warning

      51AF

      Unsupported AMB Vendor : DIMM_C3

      Pause

      51B0

      Unsupported AMB Vendor : DIMM_C4

      Pause

      51B1

      Unsupported AMB Vendor : DIMM_C5

      Pause

      51B2

      Unsupported AMB Vendor : DIMM_D0

       

      51B3

      Unsupported AMB Vendor : DIMM_D1

       

      51B4

      Unsupported AMB Vendor : DIMM_D2

       

      51B5

      Unsupported AMB Vendor : DIMM_D3

       

      51B6

      Unsupported AMB Vendor : DIMM_D4

       

      51B7

      Unsupported AMB Vendor : DIMM_D5

       

      51C0

      Memory Configuration Error, bios checksum error 41.

       

      8101

      Warning! USB Host Controller not found at the specified address!!!

       

      8102

      Error! USB device failed to initialize!!!

       

      8104

      Warning! Port 60h/64h emulation is not supported by this USB Host Controller!!!

       

      8105

      Warning! EHCI controller disabled. It requires 64bit data support in the BIOS.

       

      8301

      Not enough space in runtime area. SMBIOS data will not be available.

       

      8302

      Not enough space in runtime area. SMBIOS data will not be available.

       

      8601

      Error: BMC Not Responding

       

      8701

      Insufficient Runtime space for MPS data.!.

      System may operate in PIC or Non-MPS mode.

       


    POST Code LEDs

    Two LEDs inside the front w200 erom error of your server node display the same two-digit POST code output from primary I/O port 80 that is shown on the BIOS screen (the right-most two digits on the lower right of the BIOS screen are the POST code from primary I/O port 80).

    In general, the POST codes change so rapidly that you cannot distinguish individual digits. Some POST tests take enough time (or pause or stop), however, so that they might be readable if you look at the LEDs through the front panel, bios checksum error 41. Such codes are listed in TABLE 8-2.

     


    Code

    Meaning

    4F

    Initializing IPMI BT interface.

    D4

    Testing base memory; system might hang if test fails.

    D5

    Copying Boot Block to RAM and transferring control to RAM.

    38

    Initializing different devices through DIM (Device Initialization Manager). For example, USB controllers are initialized at this point.

    75

    Initializing Int-13 and preparing for IPL detection.

    78

    Initializing IPL devices controlled by BIOS and option ROMs.

    85

    Displaying errors to the user and getting the user response for error.

    87

    Executing BIOS setup if needed / requested. Checking boot password if installed, bios checksum error 41.

    00

    Passing control to OS Loader (typically INT19h).

    FF

    The flash has been updated successfully, bios checksum error 41. Making flash write disabled. Disabling ATAPI hardware. Restoring CPUID value back into register. Giving control to F000 ROM at F000:FFF0h.




    Note - For each cold boot (such as when a blade is re-seated into the chassis), POST testing begins to run and detects system resources for a short while. After just a few POST codes, the node is turned off or restarted depending on the selected state in the BIOS for AC Power Loss (Always On, Always Off, or Last State), bios checksum error 41.


    Copyright © 2009 Sun Microsystems, Inc, bios checksum error 41. All rights reserved.

CMOS Checksum Bad Error

Computer users frequently encounter CMOS Checksum Bad Error for many reasons. This error may be frustrating, but the good part bios checksum error 41 that it can be solved easily. There are very few reasons for the CMOS Checksum Bad Error, hence they can be handled effectively.

The Error Explained

A checksum is computed as an error detecting code to guard the BIOS settings stored in the CMOS bios checksum error 41. The CMOS Checksum Bad Error is an error that occurs when the CMOS tc65 sjra error turn out to be incorrect. The CMOS memory stores a specific value normally to guard the BIOS software. Each time the computer is booted, this value, which is a number is checked against the stored value in the CMOS memory. If these two values are different, it causes a CMOS Checksum error message. If these values are the same, the computer boots normally.

Each computer usually deals with the CMOS Checksum Bad Error differently. Some computers warn the user and continue to boot up using settings in the CMOS, while other computers might warn the user and use the default settings in the BIOS as the correct settings and carry on with a normal boot or reboot. Usually, the strategy the computer employs is stated in the error message.

Causes of CMOS Checksum Bad Error

There are usually three main reasons that a CMOS Checksum Bad Error occurs. They include:

  • CMOS Battery may not be functioning properly. The battery life may have expired.
  • The user or a virus may have updated the BIOS.
  • The computer may not have been shut down bios checksum error 41 e.g. shutting off the computer’s main power without first shutting down the computer (MS Windows requires the computer to be shut down before the power is shut off).

Solutions to CMOS Checksum Bad Error

The CMOS Checksum Bad Error can be fixed easily by following the listed steps carefully.

CMOS Battery May Not be Functioning Properly

If the user suspects that the CMOS battery is not functioning properly, he/she can easily change it, bios checksum error 41. Before changing the battery, reboot the computer to make sure that the error still exists, bios checksum error 41. If it does, go into the CMOS and write down all of the settings. If all the settings are lost, they can usually be retrieved from the computer manufacturer. Now locate the battery and remove it. Consult the computer manual or technical support to remove your battery (the battery is flat, shiny silver colored, and coin-shaped) if needed. Take down the CMOS battery’s information such as volt, size, etc. Replace the old battery with a new one and reenter the CMOS bios checksum error 41. If the battery caused the CMOS Checksum Bad Error, the problem should be solved.

The BIOS May Have Been Updated

If the BIOS was recently updated, the CMOS settings may have reset. Make sure that the values entered in the BIOS are correct or simply reset them to the default settings. If a virus has updated the BIOS settings, run a virus scan and make sure that the BIOS settings are back to the default.

The Computer May Not Have Been Shut Bios checksum error 41 Properly

Sometimes when running MS Windows, if stepashka planet terror computer is shut down without first properly shutting down the operating brutus proxy pre-authentification error, the Canon bjc 2100 service error 5c00 settings will get corrupted, causing the CMOS Checksum Bad Error. Easily avoid this error by making sure that the computer is shut down properly before turning off the main power. This usually entails going into the Start Menu and clicking Turn Off Computer/ Shut Down. If improper shutdown caused the error,  the issue may have been solved.

well i recently put together a comp for my girlfriend and it worked fine on first boot and has been under heavy load without having any problems, but now when ever its been off long enough for it to cool down, it takes 3-5 tries to get it to post, and when it does it gives me an error saying "cmos checksum error, reverted to default settings" and the bios is reset. i've read that this is a common error and ways to fix it are to increase the rams voltage/speed/linking, also to upgrade the bios itself, bios checksum error 41. however i also read this board is super picky about which bios version it uses for specific hardware, i'm looking on the asus site right now and have no clue which bios to use. any ideas based on my specs listed below, and/or what voltage/speed/linking i should set the ram to?

ASUS P5N32-E SLI Plus LGA 775 NVIDIA nForce 650i SLI ATX Intel Motherboard
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16813131153
G.SKILL 2GB error cannot retrieve repository metadata repomd.xml x 1GB) 240-Pin DDR2 SDRAM DDR2 800 (PC2 6400)
http://www.newegg.com/product/product.asp?item=N82E16820231065
Intel Core 2 Duo E6600 Conroe 2.4GHz 4M shared L2 Cache LGA 775 Processor
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16819115003
EVGA GeForce 8800 GTX / 768MB GDDR3 / SLI Ready / PCI Express / Dual DVI / HDTV / Video Card
http://www.tigerdirect.com/applications/SearchTools/item-details.asp?EdpNo=2597917&Sku=E145-8000
SeaSonic S12 Energy Plus SS-650HT ATX12V / EPS12V 650W Power Supply 100 - 240 V UL, CE, CB, TUV, FCC
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16817151028

 

I desoldered the DIN keyboard connector, cleaned it, checked the tracks and surrounding elements - no effect.

I have read this topic

Socket 5 - Dallas RTC replacement gone bad

Here is the quote I followed:

The two failing devices (Keyboard, RTC) are connected on the "X-Bus". That's an 8-bit data bus interconnected to the ISA bus via a sync error java.lang.nullpointerexception chip, usually a 74F245, as this is the chip type recommended by Intel. An interesting test might be booting with an ISA graphics card to check whether the ISA bus already behaves strangely (garbled screen or beeps), or the problem seems limited to the X-Bus.

As I suppose you only soldered near the RTC, bios checksum error 41, it's unlikely that you damaged the KBCS# trace thats selecting the keyboard controller, but some signal that connects to both the KBC and the RTC, and this is the 8 data lines, bios checksum error 41. So, the first thing I would check if KBC and RTC start failing at the same time is accidental shorts between the data pins D0-D7 on the X-Bus. There is a catch with the theory that shorted data lines on the X-Bus are causing the problem: The BIOS chip usually is also connected to the X-Bus data lines, but the BIOS chip obviously works fine. The board layout makes it unlikely that data lines at the KBC are working, but are non-functional at the BIOS chip.

I noticed that I have vertical stripes on the screen. They appear on both the ISA and PCI buses, but are denser for PCI. I tried on three different graphics cards. I located a similar 74F244 chip close to the CPU and replaced error 10256 qt - no improvement.

The cause of the problems with the start were the shortened and broken paths that suffered during desoldering of the Dallas chip. I soldered the socket, repaired all paths. On the old Dallas chip, motherboard returned to its original state displaying various error messages, problems with KB/Inteface error, FDC problem, cache damaged, cmos checksum.

After inserting the second, new (hopefully) Dallas chip, all the errors disappeared except for one:

IMG-20220525-201221.jpg

I tried to leave the motherboard on for a while to let it recharge a little, but the error persists.

Here's a comparison of the two chips - looks original, has a slightly different font. The one above is old

IMG-20220525-202236.jpg

Assuming it's brand new, is this behavior typical? Does it mean that I have to turn on the clock, which is turned off by default ? If so, bios checksum error 41, how can I do this?

Motherboard keeps giving checksum error after installing new battery

I am repairing a computer with an ASUS M2NBP-VM CSM ACPI motherboard (I am not sure this is the correct description of the motherboard but, at least, this is what gets printed to the screen during boot).

During boot, I get the following error message:

Indeed, bios checksum error 41, the time, date, and boot device priority are reset and the values I had set up before switching the computer off are gone.

My first explanation was that the CMOS battery must be empty so I bought and installed a new one. But the behaviour has not changed: after switching off and disconnecting the power ts socket error, the next time I switch on, the CMOS settings are lost and the error message is printed again.

Any suggestions as to what I should check next?

EDIT

Following the suggestions contained in the answers and comments, I performed a few further tests using another computer that I know is working properly, i.e. it does not lose BIOS settings between reboots.

  1. Unplugged ms access on error goto 0 with its own battery on, waited a minute or two, plugged again, booted: settings are there.
  2. Unplugged again, removed battery, put new battery (the one I had used to test the bad computer as described above) in, plugged in, booted, set up time and date, shut down, unplugged, waited for a few minutes, plugged, booted: settings are there. So: the new battery is good.
  3. Unplugged again, removed new battery, put old battery from bad computer in, plugged, set up time and date, shut down, unplugged, waited for a few minutes, plugged, booted: settings are NOT THERE. So: the old battery is bad.

So, I have ruled out the case that the new battery is bad. I have performed another test on another computer I am trying to repair. Same model as the bad one above. Removed battery and put the new battery in: it does not retain the settings. The reset jumper is also in the proper position (no reset).

So the problem must be in the main boards. Since I would find it unlikely that they have both broken in the same way, I guess the only test left is to flash the firmware on the main board. Only, I do not understand why this bios checksum error 41 work: the old firmware has worked before, why should the old firmware have stopped working at some point?

Appendix B - System Error Message

When the BIOS encounters an error that requires the user to

correct something, either a beep code will sound or a message will

be displayed in a box in the middle of the screen and the message,

PRESS F1 TO CONTINUE, CTRL-ALT-ESC or DEL TO ENTER

SETUP, will be shown in the information box at the bottom. Enter

Setup to correct the error.

POST Beep

There are showmessage error delphi kinds of beep codes in the BIOS. One code indicates

that a video error has occured and the BIOS cannot initialize the

video screen to display any additional information. This beep code

consists of a single long beep followed by three short beeps. The

other code indicates that a DRAM error has occured. This beep

code consists of a single long beep.

Error Messages

One or more of the following messages may be displayed if the

BIOS detects an error during the POST. This list indicates the error

messages for all Awards BIOSes:

CMOS BATTERY HAS Bios checksum error 41 CMOS battery is no longer functional, bios checksum error 41. It should be replaced.

Caution:

Danger of explosion if battery incorrectly replaced. Replace only

with the same or equivalent type recommended by the

manufacturer. Dispose of used batteries according to the

battery manufacturer's instructions.

CMOS CHECKSUM ERROR

Checksum of CMOS is incorrect. This can indicate that CMOS has

become corrupt. This error may have been caused by a weak

battery. Check the battery and replace if necessary.

DISPLAY SWITCH IS Com port writefile error 87 INCORRECTLY

The display switch on the motherboard can be set to either

monochrome or color. This indicates the switch is set to a different

System Error Message

B

139

Bios checksum error 41 - yet

I desoldered the DIN keyboard connector, cleaned it, checked the tracks and surrounding elements - no effect.

I have read this topic

Socket 5 - Dallas RTC replacement gone bad

Here is the quote I followed:

The two failing devices (Keyboard, RTC) are connected on the "X-Bus". That's an 8-bit data bus interconnected to the ISA bus via a buffer chip, usually a 74F245, as this is the chip type recommended by Intel. An interesting test might be booting with an ISA graphics card to check whether the ISA bus already behaves strangely (garbled screen or beeps), or the problem seems limited to the X-Bus.

As I suppose you only soldered near the RTC, it's unlikely that you damaged the KBCS# trace thats selecting the keyboard controller, but some signal that connects to both the KBC and the RTC, and this is the 8 data lines. So, the first thing I would check if KBC and RTC start failing at the same time is accidental shorts between the data pins D0-D7 on the X-Bus. There is a catch with the theory that shorted data lines on the X-Bus are causing the problem: The BIOS chip usually is also connected to the X-Bus data lines, but the BIOS chip obviously works fine. The board layout makes it unlikely that data lines at the KBC are working, but are non-functional at the BIOS chip.

I noticed that I have vertical stripes on the screen. They appear on both the ISA and PCI buses, but are denser for PCI. I tried on three different graphics cards. I located a similar 74F244 chip close to the CPU and replaced it - no improvement.

The cause of the problems with the start were the shortened and broken paths that suffered during desoldering of the Dallas chip. I soldered the socket, repaired all paths. On the old Dallas chip, motherboard returned to its original state displaying various error messages, problems with KB/Inteface error, FDC problem, cache damaged, cmos checksum..

After inserting the second, new (hopefully) Dallas chip, all the errors disappeared except for one:

IMG-20220525-201221.jpg

I tried to leave the motherboard on for a while to let it recharge a little, but the error persists.

Here's a comparison of the two chips - looks original, has a slightly different font. The one above is old

IMG-20220525-202236.jpg

Assuming it's brand new, is this behavior typical? Does it mean that I have to turn on the clock, which is turned off by default ? If so, how can I do this?

PC seems strange CMOS checksum error?

The monitor likely has a short, which drew to much power from the onboard video which is what caused the damage. As far as the HD audio, your video card comes with an onboard high defintion sound card, to allow you to stream both video signal and sound throught the HDMI port. Virtually all modern video cards have this feature.

For your checksum error, Try going into your BIOS (usually the f12 or del key on startup) choose load fail safe defaults, then exit and save changes. If that doesnt fix the problem, go ahead and change out your CMOS battery, their fairly easy to replace, just remove the old one and either write down the part number or bring it to your local computer shop/watch shop/wal-mart and find a matching one.

As for the administrator account, there is still one though it may be hidden. You can access it (assumimg its not password protected or you have the password) by pressing f8 on startup, and going into safe mode, on the login screen for safe mode, administrator should appear. Go into administrator and follow these steps:

•Right-click on My Computer

•Click on Manage

•Expand Local Users and Groups

•Click on Groups

•Double click on Administrators

•Click on Add

•Enter the account name on this machine that you want to assign administrative privileges to.

•OK your way back out.

Then reboot your machine normally, and see if that fixes the problem.

Edited by the_patriot11, 02 January 2012 - 10:07 PM.

picard5.jpg

 

 

"Silence in the face of Evil is itself evil: God will not hold us guiltless. Not to speak is to speak. Not to act is to act." ~Dietrich Bonhoeffer

If I don't reply within 24 hours of your reply, feel free to send me a pm.

How to Fix a CMOS Checksum Error

A CMOS Checksum error is a conflict between the CMOS (Complementary Metal Oxide Semiconductor) and BIOS (Basic Input Output System) that happens when you boot up a computer. It occurs when the computer isn't able to read startup information or the data does not match up.

In this guide, we explain what causes a CMOS Checksum error and offer instructions for troubleshooting and fixing the problem.

Causes of CMOS Checksum Errors

There are several potential reasons for a CMOS checksum error, but almost all come back to the information on the CMOS being corrupt for one reason or another.

Before an operating system boots, the computer's motherboard handles many lower-level tasks, preparing the system components to run and eventually handing those tasks off to the operating system. The software on the motherboard is called the BIOS. In addition to booting up a computer, the BIOS contains several settings for its hardware, like speeds, voltages, system time, and boot priorities. The BIOS settings aren't saved on the hard drive. They're on a chip called the CMOS.

Whenever you make changes to the BIOS settings, start your computer up, or shut it down, those events are written to the CMOS. It keeps track of the data to make sure that things run normally the next time you start the computer. The CMOS stays on while the rest of the computer is off because it's powered independently by a watch battery. When the computer starts, it reads the state it was last in from the CMOS. Usually, it can read the information and restore itself without an issue. A CMOS Checksum error occurs when the computer isn't able to read that information.

One of the more common causes of a checksum error is also the simplest to solve. The battery that powers the CMOS is a watch battery, and it can run out of power. When the battery is dead, the CMOS can't store information anymore.

Power surges and sudden losses of power are other causes. If a computer doesn't have a chance to write information to the CMOS before it's abruptly powered off, it has a hard time picking up where it left off. Power surges can also cause corruption or hardware damage.

The final cause is less common, but it can happen. If the BIOS is damaged or corrupted, it will cause a mismatch between the BIOS and CMOS. It's uncommon but possible for a virus to infect and corrupt the BIOS. Still, it's more common that a BIOS update failed or the operating system updated something which caused it to get out of sync with the BIOS.

How to Fix CMOS Checksum Errors

While it is not always possible to fix a CMOS checksum error, especially in the case of hardware damage, the fix is usually simple. Follow these steps, in order, to resolve the error.

  1. Restart the computer. A normal restart usually creates a new checksum and eliminates the error. An error lingering after a normal restart requires some more work.

  2. Download and flash a BIOS update. Download the update from the motherboard manufacturer's website. Many motherboards can download an update from within the BIOS while they're plugged into your network using an Ethernet cable.

  3. Reset the BIOS. Some motherboards have a switch either on the board or on the back of the computer to reset the BIOS settings. If there isn't a switch like that, remove the CMOS battery from your system for a minute or two. The loss of power causes everything in the CMOS to reset.

  4. Replace the CMOS battery. If the cause is a dead battery, all you need is a new one. The CMOS battery is located on the computer's motherboard. On desktops, it's easy to get to, and it's only held in place with a metal clip. On laptops, you'll need to open the machine up to get to the motherboard, and that might be better left to a professional.

  5. Consult a technician or computer repair expert. If all of the above fail, the problem may be due to hardware damage. Before you buy a new motherboard or recycle the machine, have a professional check it out to be sure.

FAQ

  • A checksum is an algorithm used in many programs to confirm the integrity of a file. This is used frequently in downloaded programs to confirm the file hasn't been tampered with or corrupted.

  • Try using WinZip to repair the file. To do this, right-click on the file and select Extract file. Next, go to Miscellaneous and place a checkmark next to Keep Broken Files then choose an extraction location and select OK.

Thanks for letting us know!

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Appendix B - System Error Message

When the BIOS encounters an error that requires the user to

correct something, either a beep code will sound or a message will

be displayed in a box in the middle of the screen and the message,

PRESS F1 TO CONTINUE, CTRL-ALT-ESC or DEL TO ENTER

SETUP, will be shown in the information box at the bottom. Enter

Setup to correct the error.

POST Beep

There are two kinds of beep codes in the BIOS. One code indicates

that a video error has occured and the BIOS cannot initialize the

video screen to display any additional information. This beep code

consists of a single long beep followed by three short beeps. The

other code indicates that a DRAM error has occured. This beep

code consists of a single long beep.

Error Messages

One or more of the following messages may be displayed if the

BIOS detects an error during the POST. This list indicates the error

messages for all Awards BIOSes:

CMOS BATTERY HAS FAILED

The CMOS battery is no longer functional. It should be replaced.

Caution:

Danger of explosion if battery incorrectly replaced. Replace only

with the same or equivalent type recommended by the

manufacturer. Dispose of used batteries according to the

battery manufacturer's instructions.

CMOS CHECKSUM ERROR

Checksum of CMOS is incorrect. This can indicate that CMOS has

become corrupt. This error may have been caused by a weak

battery. Check the battery and replace if necessary.

DISPLAY SWITCH IS SET INCORRECTLY

The display switch on the motherboard can be set to either

monochrome or color. This indicates the switch is set to a different

System Error Message

B

139


BIOS Power-On Self-Test (POST) Codes

The system BIOS provides a basic power-on self-test (POST), during which the BIOS checks the basic devices required for the server to operate. The progress of the self-test is indicated by a series of POST codes. This chapter explains the BIOS POST testing, provides an alternate method for viewing the codes, describes how to change POST options, and lists the POST codes.

This chapter contains the following sections:

About POST

The POST is a systematic check of basic system devices. As the testing progresses, the BIOS displays codes that you can use to interpret the status of your server. The codes appear at the bottom right corner of the system’s VGA screen, after the self-test has progressed far enough to initialize the video monitor. Because the codes might scroll off of the screen too quickly to be read, an alternate method of displaying POST codes is to redirect the output of the console to a serial port (see Redirecting Console Output).

You can also see some of the post codes on LEDs inside the front panel of your server node (see POST Code LEDs).

How BIOS POST Memory Testing Works

The BIOS POST memory testing is performed as follows:

1. The first megabyte of DRAM is tested by the BIOS before the BIOS code is shadowed (that is, copied from ROM to DRAM).

2. Once executing out of DRAM, the BIOS performs a simple memory test (a write/read of every location with the pattern ).



Note - This memory test is performed only if Quick Boot is not enabled from the Boot Settings Configuration screen. Enabling Quick Boot causes the BIOS to skip the memory test. See Changing POST Options for more information.


3. The BIOS polls the memory controllers for both correctable and non-correctable memory errors and logs those errors into the SP.

4. The message appears at the end of POST.

Redirecting Console Output

You can access BIOS POST codes remotely using the web interface or the CLI.


procedure icon  To Access BIOS POST Codes Using the Web Interface

1. Open a browser and use the SP’s IP address as the URL.

Refer to the Sun Integrated Lights Out Manager 2.0 User’s Guide (820-1188) for information on how to obtain the IP address of the SP.

2. Type a user name and password as follows:

User name: Password:

3. The ILOM SP web interface screen appears.

4. Click the Remote Control tab.

5. Click the Redirection tab.

6. Click the Start Redirection button.

The javaRConsole window appears and prompts you for your user name and password again, then the current POST screen appears.


procedure icon  To Access BIOS POST Codes Using the CLI

1. Log in to the SP cli with the command SP IP address and use the command to start the serial console.

Changing POST Options

These instructions are optional, but you can use them to change the operations that the server performs during POST testing.


procedure icon  To Change the POST Options

1. Initialize the BIOS Setup Utility by pressing the F2 key while the system is performing the power-on self-test (POST).

The BIOS Main Menu screen appears.

2. Select the Boot menu.

The Boot Settings screen appears.

3. Select Boot Settings Configuration.

The Boot Settings Configuration screen appears.

4. On the Boot Settings Configuration screen, there are several options that you can enable or disable:

  • Retry Boot List: Automatically retries the boot list when all devices have failed. This option is enabled by default.
  • Quick Boot: This option is enabled by default. The BIOS skips certain tests while booting, such as the extensive memory test. This decreases the time it takes for the system to boot.
  • Quiet Boot: This option is disabled by default. If you enable this option, the Sun Microsystems logo appears instead of POST codes.
  • Wait for F1 if Error: This option is enabled by default. The system pauses if an error is found during POST and only resumes when you press the F1 key.
  • On-board IB gPXE Boot First: Sets the on-board infiniband gPXE to always boot first. This option is disabled by default.

POST Codes

TABLE 8-1 contains descriptions of each of the POST codes, listed in the same order in which they are generated. These POST codes appear at the bottom right of the BIOS screen as a four-digit string that is a combination of two-digit output from primary I/O port 80 and two-digit output from secondary I/O port 81. In the POST codes listed in TABLE 8-1, the first two digits are from port 81 and the last two digits are from port 80.

You can see some of the POST codes from primary I/O port 80 on LEDs inside the front panel of your server node (see POST Code LEDs).

The Response column describes the action taken by the system on encountering the corresponding error. The actions are:

  • Warning or Not an Error - The message appears on the screen. An error record is logged to the system event log (SEL). The system continues booting with a degraded state. The user might want to replace the unit.
  • Pause - The message appears on the screen, an error is logged to the SEL, and user input is required to continue. The user can take immediate corrective action or choose to continue booting.
  • Halt - The message appears on the screen, an error is logged to the SEL, and the system cannot boot unless the error is resolved. The user needs to replace the faulty part and restart the system.

  • Error Code

    Error Message

    Response

    0000

    Timer Error

    Pause

    0003

    CMOS Battery Low

    Pause

    0004

    CMOS Settings Wrong

    Pause

    0005

    CMOS Checksum Bad

    Pause

    000B

    CMOS Memory Size Wrong

    Pause

    000C

    RAM R/W Test Failed

    Pause

    000E

    A: Drive Error

    Pause

    000F

    B: Drive Error

    Pause

    0012

    CMOS Date/Time Not Set

    Pause

    0040

    Refresh Timer Test Failed

    Halt

    0041

    Display Memory Test Failed

    Pause

    0042

    CMOS Display Type Wrong

    Pause

    0043

    ~<INS> Pressed

    Pause

    0044

    DMA Controller Error

    Halt

    0045

    DMA-1 Error

    Halt

    0046

    DMA-2 Error

    Halt

    0047

    Unknown BIOS error. Error code = 0047

    Halt

    0048

    Password Check Failed

    Halt

    0049

    Unknown BIOS error. Error code = 0049

    Halt

    004A

    Unknown BIOS error. Error code = 004A

    Pause

    004B

    Unknown BIOS error. Error code = 004B

    Pause

    004C

    Keyboard/Interface Error

     

    005D

    S.M.A.R.T. Command Failed

     

    005E

    Password Check Failed

    Pause

    0101

    Warning! This system board does not support the power requirements of the installed processor. The processor will be run at a reduced frequency, which will impact system performance.

    Pause

    0102

    Error! The CPU Core to Bus ratio or VID configuration has failed! Please enter BIOS Setup and re-config it.

    Pause

    0103

    ERROR! CPU MTRRs configuration failed!

    Uncacheable memory hole or PCI space too complicated.

     

    0120

    Thermal Trip Failure

    Pause

    0121

    Thermal Trip Failure

    Pause

    0122

    Thermal Trip Failure

    Pause

    0123

    Thermal Trip Failure

    Pause

    0124

    Thermal Trip Failure

    Pause

    0125

    Thermal Trip Failure

    Pause

    0126

    Thermal Trip Failure

    Pause

    0127

    Thermal Trip Failure

    Pause

    0128

    Thermal Trip Failure

     

    0129

    Thermal Trip Failure

     

    012A

    Thermal Trip Failure

     

    012B

    Thermal Trip Failure

     

    012C

    Thermal Trip Failure

     

    012D

    Thermal Trip Failure

     

    012E

    Thermal Trip Failure

     

    012F

    Thermal Trip Failure

     

    0150

    Processor Failed BIST

    Pause

    0151

    Processor Failed BIST

    Pause

    0152

    Processor Failed BIST

    Pause

    0153

    Processor Failed BIST

    Pause

    0154

    Processor Failed BIST

    Pause

    0155

    Processor Failed BIST

    Pause

    0156

    Processor Failed BIST

    Pause

    0157

    Processor Failed BIST

    Pause

    0158

    Processor Failed BIST

     

    0159

    Processor Failed BIST

     

    015A

    Processor Failed BIST

     

    015B

    Processor Failed BIST

     

    015C

    Processor Failed BIST

     

    015D

    Processor Failed BIST

     

    015E

    Processor Failed BIST

     

    015F

    Processor Failed BIST

     

    0160

    Processor missing microcode

    Pause

    0161

    Processor missing microcode

    Pause

    0162

    Processor missing microcode

    Pause

    0163

    Processor missing microcode

    Pause

    0164

    Processor missing microcode

    Pause

    0165

    Processor missing microcode

    Pause

    0166

    Processor missing microcode

    Pause

    0167

    Processor missing microcode

    Pause

    0168

    Processor missing microcode

     

    0169

    Processor missing microcode

     

    016A

    Processor missing microcode

     

    016B

    Processor missing microcode

     

    016C

    Processor missing microcode

     

    016D

    Processor missing microcode

     

    016E

    Processor missing microcode

     

    016F

    Processor missing microcode

     

    0180

    BIOS does not support current stepping

    Pause

    0181

    BIOS does not support current stepping

    Pause

    0182

    BIOS does not support current stepping

    Pause

    0183

    BIOS does not support current stepping

    Pause

    0184

    BIOS does not support current stepping

    Pause

    0185

    BIOS does not support current stepping

    Pause

    0186

    BIOS does not support current stepping

    Pause

    0187

    BIOS does not support current stepping

    Pause

    0188

    BIOS does not support current stepping

     

    0189

    BIOS does not support current stepping

     

    018A

    BIOS does not support current stepping

     

    018B

    BIOS does not support current stepping

     

    018C

    BIOS does not support current stepping

     

    018D

    BIOS does not support current stepping

     

    018E

    BIOS does not support current stepping

     

    018F

    BIOS does not support current stepping

     

    0192

    L2 cache size mismatch.

     

    0193

    CPUID, Processor stepping are different.

     

    0194

    CPUID, Processor family are different.

    Pause

    0195

    Front side bus mismatch. System halted.

     

    0196

    CPUID, Processor Model are different.

    Pause

    0197

    Processor speeds mismatched.

    Pause

    5120

    CMOS cleared by jumper.

    Pause

    5121

    Password cleared by jumper.

    Pause

    5125

    Not enough conventional memory to copy PCI Option ROM.

     

    5180

    Unsupported Memory Vendor : DIMM_A0

    Warning

    5181

    Unsupported Memory Vendor : DIMM_A1

    Warning

    5182

    Unsupported Memory Vendor : DIMM_A2

    Warning

    5183

    Unsupported Memory Vendor : DIMM_A3

    Warning

    5184

    Unsupported Memory Vendor : DIMM_A4

     

    5185

    Unsupported Memory Vendor : DIMM_B0

    Warning

    5186

    Unsupported Memory Vendor : DIMM_B1

    Warning

    5187

    Unsupported Memory Vendor : DIMM_B2

    Warning

    5188

    Unsupported Memory Vendor : DIMM_B3

    Warning

    5189

    Unsupported Memory Vendor : DIMM_B4

    Warning

    518A

    Unsupported Memory Vendor : DIMM_B5

    Warning

    518B

    Unsupported Memory Vendor : DIMM_C0

    Warning

    518C

    Unsupported Memory Vendor : DIMM_C1

    Warning

    518D

    Unsupported Memory Vendor : DIMM_C2

    Warning

    518F

    Unsupported Memory Vendor : DIMM_C3

    Warning

    5190

    Unsupported Memory Vendor : DIMM_C4

    Warning

    5191

    Unsupported Memory Vendor : DIMM_C5

    Warning

    5192

    Unsupported Memory Vendor : DIMM_D0

    Warning

    5193

    Unsupported Memory Vendor : DIMM_D1

    Warning

    5194

    Unsupported Memory Vendor : DIMM_D2

    Warning

    5195

    Unsupported Memory Vendor : DIMM_D3

    Warning

    5196

    Unsupported Memory Vendor : DIMM_D4

    Warning

    5197

    Unsupported Memory Vendor : DIMM_D5

    Warning

    51A0

    Unsupported AMB Vendor : DIMM_A0

    Warning

    51A1

    Unsupported AMB Vendor : DIMM_A1

    Warning

    51A2

    Unsupported AMB Vendor : DIMM_A2

    Warning

    51A3

    Unsupported AMB Vendor : DIMM_A3

    Warning

    51A4

    Unsupported AMB Vendor : DIMM_A4

    Warning

    51A5

    Unsupported AMB Vendor : DIMM_A5

    Warning

    51A6

    Unsupported AMB Vendor : DIMM_B0

    Warning

    51A7

    Unsupported AMB Vendor : DIMM_B1

    Warning

    51A8

    Unsupported AMB Vendor : DIMM_B2

    Pause

    51A9

    Unsupported AMB Vendor : DIMM_B3

    Warning

    51AA

    Unsupported AMB Vendor : DIMM_B4

    Warning

    51AB

    Unsupported AMB Vendor : DIMM_B5

    Warning

    51AC

    Unsupported AMB Vendor : DIMM_C0

    Warning

    51AD

    Unsupported AMB Vendor : DIMM_C1

    Pause

    51AE

    Unsupported AMB Vendor : DIMM_C2

    Warning

    51AF

    Unsupported AMB Vendor : DIMM_C3

    Pause

    51B0

    Unsupported AMB Vendor : DIMM_C4

    Pause

    51B1

    Unsupported AMB Vendor : DIMM_C5

    Pause

    51B2

    Unsupported AMB Vendor : DIMM_D0

     

    51B3

    Unsupported AMB Vendor : DIMM_D1

     

    51B4

    Unsupported AMB Vendor : DIMM_D2

     

    51B5

    Unsupported AMB Vendor : DIMM_D3

     

    51B6

    Unsupported AMB Vendor : DIMM_D4

     

    51B7

    Unsupported AMB Vendor : DIMM_D5

     

    51C0

    Memory Configuration Error.

     

    8101

    Warning! USB Host Controller not found at the specified address!!!

     

    8102

    Error! USB device failed to initialize!!!

     

    8104

    Warning! Port 60h/64h emulation is not supported by this USB Host Controller!!!

     

    8105

    Warning! EHCI controller disabled. It requires 64bit data support in the BIOS.

     

    8301

    Not enough space in runtime area. SMBIOS data will not be available.

     

    8302

    Not enough space in runtime area. SMBIOS data will not be available.

     

    8601

    Error: BMC Not Responding

     

    8701

    Insufficient Runtime space for MPS data.!.

    System may operate in PIC or Non-MPS mode.

     


POST Code LEDs

Two LEDs inside the front cover of your server node display the same two-digit POST code output from primary I/O port 80 that is shown on the BIOS screen (the right-most two digits on the lower right of the BIOS screen are the POST code from primary I/O port 80).

In general, the POST codes change so rapidly that you cannot distinguish individual digits. Some POST tests take enough time (or pause or stop), however, so that they might be readable if you look at the LEDs through the front panel. Such codes are listed in TABLE 8-2.

 


Code

Meaning

4F

Initializing IPMI BT interface.

D4

Testing base memory; system might hang if test fails.

D5

Copying Boot Block to RAM and transferring control to RAM.

38

Initializing different devices through DIM (Device Initialization Manager). For example, USB controllers are initialized at this point.

75

Initializing Int-13 and preparing for IPL detection.

78

Initializing IPL devices controlled by BIOS and option ROMs.

85

Displaying errors to the user and getting the user response for error.

87

Executing BIOS setup if needed / requested. Checking boot password if installed.

00

Passing control to OS Loader (typically INT19h).

FF

The flash has been updated successfully. Making flash write disabled. Disabling ATAPI hardware. Restoring CPUID value back into register. Giving control to F000 ROM at F000:FFF0h.




Note - For each cold boot (such as when a blade is re-seated into the chassis), POST testing begins to run and detects system resources for a short while. After just a few POST codes, the node is turned off or restarted depending on the selected state in the BIOS for AC Power Loss (Always On, Always Off, or Last State).


Copyright © 2009 Sun Microsystems, Inc. All rights reserved.

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