Barracuda es drive error recovery control

barracuda es drive error recovery control

NAS-optimised hard drive for the best-possible user experience optimised that maximises responsiveness and uptime with NAS-aware Error Recovery Control. Buy Seagate Barracuda ES.2 Hard Disk Drive (1TB) featuring 3.5" SATA II Error recovery control - quick error resolution to prevent system timeouts. Buy Seagate Barracuda ES.2 SATA 3.0-Gb/s 1-TB Hard Drive at low price in Pakistan, Error recovery control – quick error resolution to prevent system.

Barracuda es drive error recovery control - afraid

Seagate Barracuda ES.2 ST3500320NS 500GB 7200RPM SATA Hard Drive.
[ST3500320NS]

Barracuda ES.2 SATA 3.0-Gb/s 500-GB Hard Drive

ST3500320NS

The Barracuda� ES2 drive is perfect for high-capacity, 7200-RPM nearline storage where dollars/GB and watts/GB are primary metrics. It offers energy-saving PowerTrim� features, internal data integrity protection, superior rotational vibration tolerance and a SATA 3.0-Gb/s interface.

Key Features and Benefits

  • Perpendicular recording technology for maximum capacity
  • 24x7 operation and 1.2 M hrs. MTBF
  • Dynamic power saving using Seagate PowerTrim� technology
  • Broad spectrum rotational vibration tolerance at 12.5 rads/s2
  • Error recovery control - quick error resolution to prevent system timeouts
  • Workload management to ensure operational reliability
  • Quick and robust download with firmware security checks
  • Write Same command for efficient RAID initialization
  • Idle Read After Write data integrity checking
  • 32-MB cache</>
  • Low total cost of ownership

The Barracuda ES.2 drive is the perfect solution for high-capacity enterprise storage applications such as the migration of mission-critical transactional data, from tier 1 to tier 2 (nearline) storage, where dollars/GB and GB/watt are a primary concern. With energy-saving PowerTrimâ„¢ features, superior rotational vibration tolerance and a choice of SATA or SAS interfaces, the Barracuda ES.2 drive provides world-leading technology and value.

Key Features and Benefits

  • Perpendicular recording technology for maximum capacity
  • 24×7 operation and 1.2 M hrs. MTBF
  • Dynamic power saving using Seagate PowerTrimâ„¢ technology
  • Broad spectrum rotational vibration tolerance at 12.5 rads/s2
  • Error recovery control – quick error resolution to prevent system timeouts
  • Workload management to ensure operational reliability
  • Quick and robust download with firmware security checks
  • Write Same command for efficient RAID initialization
  • Idle Read After Write data integrity checking
  • 16-MB cache
  • Low total cost of ownership
  • 3-year limited warranty

Specifications

Technical

  • Model Number: ST31000340NS
  • Interface: SATA 3Gb/s
  • Cache: 32MB
  • Capacity: 1TB
  • Guaranteed Sectors: 1,953,525,168

Physical

  • Height: 26.1mm (1.028 in)
  • Width: 101.6mm (4.010 in)
  • Length: 146.99mm (5.787 in)
  • Weight (typical): 677g (1.493 lb)

Performance

  • Spin Speed: 7,200 RPM
  • Average latency: 4.16ms
  • Random read seek time: 8.5ms
  • Random write seek time: 9.5ms

Reliability

  • Annual Failure Rate: 0.73%

Power

  • Maximum start current, DC: 3.0

Warranty

Out of stock

Manufacturer: SeagateSKU: ST31000340NSCategory: Internal HDD for Desktop

Turn Off Error Recovery in RAID Drives: TLER, ERC, and CCTL

Hard disk drives encounter errors from time to time, so it’s a good thing that most have the ability to recover data anyway. But RAID systems usually have their own error recovery capabilities and can be thrown off when a hard disk pauses I/O. So it’s a good idea to use hard disk drives that allow you to disable or limit error recovery in RAID systems.

Error Recovery Basics

Hard disk drives have more points of failure than most other modern computer components: They are physical devices that rely on magnetism and mechanical precision, not just solid state electronics. And ever-increasing drive density magnifies the challenge of always returning valid data. In fact, magnetic disk media is surprisingly unreliable, with hard drives often relying on error recovery technologies to cover for read and write errors.

The most basic form of error recovery on hard disk drives is CRC32C, a simple error-detecting code that reliably uncovers read and write errors. In most cases, disk drives can re-try a read, adjusting the heads slightly to detect the correct value. Once an error is detected and the correct data is uncovered, the disk drive will either re-write the data in place or mark that spot as bad and re-map it to another physical location.

All this should happen very quickly, but the application must wait for it to complete. Under light load, this process is barely noticeable. But systems with heavy I/O can escalate this wait time to unacceptable levels. In busy systems, an error recovery can take many seconds or even minutes to complete.

RAID and Error Recovery

Multi-drive systems, including RAID and similar solutions, can’t tolerate long waits for error recovery. Most RAID controllers assume that a drive that hasn’t completed an I/O request within a few seconds has failed. The controller will then mark the entire disk drive as “offline” and attempt to rebuild using an available spare disk or simply take the entire RAID set offline to avoid data loss. This can prove problematic, since a RAID rebuild can take hour or days to complete!

It’s not the fault of the RAID system, either. There has to be some threshold where a disk is declared to have failed. It wouldn’t be practical (or even desirable) to escalate the I/O wait “up the stack” and pause all operations until a disk recovers (if ever). So most RAID solutions or controllers set a threshold of a few seconds.

The rule of thumb for RAID controllers is 8 seconds, though this can vary. Some controllers wait for 10, 20, or 30 seconds, for example, and this can be configured on many. ZFS will generally wait as long as needed for error recovery, and this can dramatically impact performance.

Time-Limited Error Recovery

Disk drives intended for RAID use typically implement some form of time limiting for error recovery. Western Digital calls this Time Limited Error Recovery (TLER), while Seagate calls it Error Recovery Control (ERC) and Samsung and Hitachi call it Command Completion Time Limit (CCTL).

Regardless of what it’s called, the drive will limit the wait time on any error recovery command to a settable value, typically 7 seconds by default. The drive will usually report a failed I/O up the stack and attempt to re-try the error recovery at a later time. Meanwhile, the RAID controller will likely recover the data from parity or erasure code and continue operation.

ZFS, and other software RAID systems, will typically “react” the same way when TLER is enabled, recovering data and remapping that block.

Note that most desktop hard disk drives to not have this capability. Error recovery is always turned on and recovery will take as long as necessary. This is one reason that conventional desktop disk drives are not appropriate for use in RAID solutions.

Checking and Setting TLER

If a hard drive is to be used in a RAID or similar setup, it is desirable to have TLER or ERC enabled and set to a value under 8 seconds.

Most UNIX-like systems have the “smartmon” tools package, including the command, smartctl. This can be used to query TLER and similar settings. For example, here is the result of that command in FreeNAS (FreeBSD) for a Western Digital Red NAS drive:

# smartctl -l scterc /dev/da2 smartctl 6.5 2016-05-07 r4318 [FreeBSD 11.0-STABLE amd64] (local build) Copyright (C) 2002-16, Bruce Allen, Christian Franke, www.smartmontools.org SCT Error Recovery Control: Read: 70 (7.0 seconds) Write: 70 (7.0 seconds)

This tool can also set TLER on a drive as follows:

smartctl -l scterc,80,80 /dev/da2

Western Digital provides a DOS utility, WDTLER.EXE, with similar functionality.

Stephen’s Stance

One reason to use enterprise or NAS hard disk drives is the capability to limit error recovery for smoother performance. I strongly recommend only using such drives with RAID systems, especially ZFS (as in FreeNAS)!

You might also want to read these other posts...

Filed Under: Enterprise storage, Terabyte homeTagged With: CCTL, CRC, CRC32C, enterprise disk, ERC, FreeNAS, hard disk, hard disk drive, NAS, NAS disk, RAID, SMART, TLER, ZFS

The Barracuda ES.2 drive is the perfect solution for high-capacity enterprise storage applications such as the migration of mission-critical transactional data, from tier 1 to tier 2 (nearline) storage, where dollars/GB and GB/watt are a primary concern. With energy-saving PowerTrimâ„¢ features, superior rotational vibration tolerance and a choice of SATA or SAS interfaces, the Barracuda ES.2 drive provides world-leading technology and value.

Key Features and Benefits

  • Perpendicular recording technology for maximum capacity
  • 24×7 operation and 1.2 M hrs. MTBF
  • Dynamic power saving using Seagate PowerTrimâ„¢ technology
  • Broad spectrum rotational vibration tolerance at 12.5 rads/s2
  • Error recovery control – quick error resolution to prevent system timeouts
  • Workload management to ensure operational reliability
  • Quick and robust download with firmware security checks
  • Write Same command for efficient RAID initialization
  • Idle Read After Write data integrity checking
  • 16-MB cache
  • Low total cost of ownership
  • 3-year limited warranty

Specifications

Technical

  • Model Number: ST3750330NS
  • Interface: SATA 3Gb/s
  • Cache: 32MB
  • Capacity: 750GB
  • Guaranteed Sectors: 1,465,149,168

Physical

  • Height: 26.1mm (1.028 in)
  • Width: 101.6mm (4.010 in)
  • Length: 146.99mm (5.787 in)
  • Weight (typical): 633g (1.396 lb)

Performance

  • Spin Speed: 7,200 RPM
  • Average latency: 4.16ms
  • Random read seek time: 8.5ms
  • Random write seek time: 9.5ms

Reliability

  • Annual Failure Rate: 0.73%

Power

  • Maximum start current, DC: 3.0

Warranty

Out of stock

SKU: ST3750330NSCategory: Internal HDD for Desktop

How to Fix External Hard Disk I/O Device Errors? [2022 Update]

An I/O device error on the computer happens when a drive is inaccessible. So when you try to open a drive, you would see the error message – the request could not be performed. I/O errors cause a panic because sometimes, your files may get deleted. And often, there is no feasible way to recover them. But our article will help you ease that panic. We’ll show you ways to fix I/O device errors on external hard disks and on internal drives.

Table of Content

Overview – Our blog takes you through multiple I/O device error scenarios. We’ll show you how to fix Device I/O errors on external hard disks.

Here is a link to Stellar’s window data recovery software. You can download it in case of unexpected data loss from damaged hard disks to recover data.

Usually, Input/output (I/O) errors are very generic and create different types of hard drive error messages in different platforms such as Windows, Mac, and Linux, etc. The most common I/O device error messages are:

  • “The request could not be performed because of an I/O device error.”

I/O Device Error

  • “Only part of a readprocessmemory or writeprocessmemory request was completed.”

I/O Device Error

Primary reasons that cause Hard Disk I/O Device Error

  • Outdated drivers
  • The hard drive is incompatible with the OS platform
  • Faulty CD/DVD writer and USB port
  • Loose USB or e SATA cord
  • Physically damaged hard drive
  • Drive letter conflict during initializing the device
  • Broken connection port

इस पोस्ट को हिंदी में पढ़ने के लिए यहां क्लिक करें।

Fixing I/O device errors on external hard disks isn’t hard. Most times, it’s a matter of checking for loose connections. But sometimes, fixing an I/O device error takes a bit more work. There are a couple of methods you can use to correct the errors. Read to learn about them.

  1. Restart your computer/Laptop.
  2. Try to reaccess the drive/device.
  3. If the problem remains the same, then try to access the device/drive data on another Computer/Laptop to confirm that the drive or device is not damaged.
  4. The device input/output error is fixed and you no longer get the error message, you are finished. If the problem remains, then continue with the following solutions.

The Easiest Solutions to Fix Hard Disk I/O Device Error

Solution 1: Check all cables connections

The easiest fix to your problems is to check the cords. Most of the I/O device errors occur due to cords. The cables tend to get loose and the cords may weaken. First, check to see if all the cords are connected properly at the hub and computer ports. Check if there’s an issue with your computer’s port by connecting the drive to another computer. If this solution fixes the problems, then you are done. If this did not resolve the issue, try the next solution.

Solution 2: Update or Re-Install the Drivers

At times, an outdated driver may also cause an I/O device error. This error can be fixed by updating or re-installing a new driver. You need to check whether the drivers are updated and compatible with the disk transfer.

Solution 3: Check all the Cords

The next easiest way to resolveI/O errors on an external drive is cord crosstalk. The electricity in one set of wires tends to leak into another set of cables. This might interfere with the connection when you perform input-output operations. To fix this problem disconnect all the additional devices except your external hard drive on your computer and the necessary accessories connected. You can avoid this issue permanently by replacing the current wires with better cables. You can also join your external drive to another system to check whether the cord is faulty or if there is a problem with your external drive.

Solution 4: Change the drive transfer mode in IDE Channel Properties

OS cannot transfer data from drive to computer if the transfer mode is incorrect, you can change transfer mode by following steps.

  1. Press (Windows + X) both Keys together and select device manager from the menu list
  2. Expand IDE ATA/ATAPI controllers. A subset will open, that lists the different IDE ATA/ATAPI channels.
  3. Right-click on the channel where the appropriate drive is connected, and then click properties. Typically, this channel is the Secondary IDE channel.
  4. Go to the advanced settings tab and select PIO Only in the transfer mode box for the device that represents the appropriate drive. Typically, this is device 0. Then, click ok and exit all windows.
  5. Test the drive and check if the error message has been removed.

Warning: Do not change the Primary IDE Channel, Device 0. Changing this transfer mode setting may cause the computer to operate incorrectly or not at all.

Solution 5: Check and Repair Device in Command Prompt

  1. Press (Windows + X) both Keys together and select Command Prompt (Admin) from the menu list
  2. Click Yes to allow OS to launch the Command Prompt as Administrator.
  3. In Command Prompt window, type chkdsk G: /f /r /x. Here G is the drive letter; you can replace it with your drive letter.

This option will check and repair disk errors on the external & internal hard drive/USB drive/SD card to fix I/O device errors. And then you will no longer see the “The request could not be performed because of an I/O device error” message.

Solution 6: Try Clean Booting your Computer

When you’re trying this method, make sure you don’t disable advanced booting options. Here’s how to fix I/O device errors on an external hard disk by Clean Booting.

  1. Type “MSConfig” in the search bar and press enter. This will open the System Configuration App.
  2. On the next window, navigate to the “Administrations” tab, then click the option “Hide all Microsoft administrations”. Then select “Disable all”.
  3. Next, in the Startup tab, open the Task Manager.
  4. Pick all the startup items, then click “Disable”. Close the Task Manager.
  5. Finally, return to the System Configuration window. Click “Startup”, then select “Ok’ and reboot your PC.

Solution 7: Change the drive letter

If your system reads or detects the wrong letter for the drive, it could result in an I/O error. To fix this I/O device error on an external hard disk, you can just change the drive letter. Here’s how to change your drive letter.

1. Right-click the start button and click Disk Management. This will open Disk Management with administrator permissions.

2. On this window, right-click on the volume you want to change the drive letter for. On the menu that will appear, click “Change Drive Letter and Paths”.

Sometimes, the option to Change Drive Letter and Path will be greyed out. If this is the case, your drive is probably unallocated and needs to be initialized. It could also be because you don’t have permission to access the drive letter.

3. To change the letter, click “Change”. Then select the drive letter you want from the list.

You would be prompted about how programs that rely on drive letters may not run correctly. Click “Yes” when you see this dialogue box.

What if the DIY approach does not work for resolving I/O Device Error?

If you have essential data on your external & internal hard drive, USB flash drive, pen drive, Memory Cards, CD Discs, etc., and the above solutions failed to resolve the issue. It means your hard drive is suffering from hardware issues and not detected by your system then there is no point to waste your time by applying simple recovery tricks. It is better to go to a trusted data recovery service provider to get back your data from the affected drive.

Before contacting any data recovery company, you will try to find the answer to two questions.

  1. How much does hard drive data recovery cost?
  2. Why trust Stellar Data Recovery?

When it comes to data recovery, Stellar is the expert. It has expert technicians and efficient technologies that will save you from a disaster situation. And that’s how Stellar Data Recovery has built trust by providing reliable service for more than 24 years.

FAQs

1.What is the meaning of I/O error?

This stands for Input/Output error. When you have an I/O error, Windows will be unable to read the content on the disk. This can result in data loss and disk damage.

2.How can I improve my I/O performance?

If your system is I/O intensive, you can raise the I/O Page Lock Limit. This will increase the effective rate at which the OS reads or writes data.

3. How can I avoid I/O device errors on external hard disks?

Malware infections are one cause of I/O device errors. You can avoid I/O errors by keeping away from suspicious websites and installing good anti-virus software.

4.How do I troubleshoot disk IO Windows?

The best way to monitor the performance of drives is by using a tool like PerfMon. This can help you to catch errors before they occur, which will then prevent bottlenecks.

5.How do I fix a corrupted hard drive?

There are several methods by which you can fix a corrupted hard drive. The simplest is by unplugging and replugging the external drive. You can also uninstall and reinstall the disk drive.

Checking for TLER, ERC, etc. support on a drive

One of the problems with consumer-grade hard drives is that most of them will hang in the event that they run into an error, and will internally retry the operation, possibly for a minute or more. For a desktop PC, where redundancy does not exist, this is the correct course of action, because failure of a sector means loss of the data.

Enterprise class drives typically support the ability to limit the amount of time a drive wastes trying to recover data. Most of these drives are used in RAID arrays, and so in the event of a failure, the data can be recovered from parity. A drive encountering read errors cannot be allowed to hang for large amounts of time, because this stalls whatever the server is trying to do. So manufacturers include features to control the retries of failures.

For Western Digital, this is called TLER - Time-Limited Error Recovery. Great PDF.

For Seagate, it is called ERC - Error Recovery Control.

Samsung and Hitachi call it CCTL.

Some people are confused and think that these features are only necessary for hardware RAID, or aren't useful for software RAID. It is absolutely true that this is a very important feature for hardware RAID, because a hardware RAID controller is probably configured to deem a "hung" hard drive as failed and to place it in an offline or recovery status, which has many negatives associated with it. So you absolutely do want TLER/ERC/etc for a hardware RAID setup.

But what about ZFS?

If you've got a ZFS pool, and your underlying disk device appears to hang for a minute, you probably stop serving up data. This is likely to be bad behaviour for a filer. Unlike a hardware RAID controller, ZFS will typically wait for the command to complete, and if it is trying to read many sectors, this could take a very long time. So TLER/ERC/etc are also desirable properties for a ZFS system.

We've been thrilled in recent years to see the addition of "NAS" class hard drives, which are essentially conventional consumer-grade hard drives that have firmware that defaults to supporting TLER/ERC.

You can verify that a drive has TLER/ERC turned on by probing it with smartctl.

Code:

# smartctl -l scterc /dev/ada0 smartctl 6.3 2014-07-26 r3976 [FreeBSD 9.3-RELEASE-p8 amd64] (local build) Copyright (C) 2002-14, Bruce Allen, Christian Franke, www.smartmontools.org SCT Error Recovery Control: Read: Disabled Write: Disabled


That doesn't have it.

Code:

# smartctl -l scterc /dev/ada4 smartctl 6.3 2014-07-26 r3976 [FreeBSD 9.3-RELEASE-p8 amd64] (local build) Copyright (C) 2002-14, Bruce Allen, Christian Franke, www.smartmontools.org SCT Error Recovery Control: Read: 70 (7.0 seconds) Write: 70 (7.0 seconds)


That does, and it's set to a typical 7 seconds. Further, the same command can be used to try to set ERC.

Code:

# smartctl -l scterc,80,80 /dev/ada4 smartctl 6.3 2014-07-26 r3976 [FreeBSD 9.3-RELEASE-p8 amd64] (local build) Copyright (C) 2002-14, Bruce Allen, Christian Franke, www.smartmontools.org SCT Error Recovery Control set to: Read: 80 (8.0 seconds) Write: 80 (8.0 seconds)


Some hard drives may not come with TLER/ERC enabled by default but can have it turned on regardless. If you try this, make sure to power cycle the drive to make sure the setting sticks around. It's hard to test for TLER/ERC working correctly without actually encountering a bad drive, however.

[2015-02-10] : I note that we just picked up some Samsung ST2000LM003 2.5" 2TB drives which appear to allow TLER to be set, but the setting appears to do nothing and isn't persistent. I happened to luck out in that a drive failed SMART testing with a bad sector and was therefore easily tested.

I'll be pruning responses to this thread, but if you have useful information to share, I may update this post and credit you.

 

How to Fix External Hard Disk I/O Device Errors? [2022 Update]

An I/O device error on the computer happens when a drive is inaccessible. So when you try to open a drive, you would see the error message – the request could not be performed. I/O errors cause a panic because sometimes, your files may get deleted. And often, there is no feasible way to recover them. But our article will help you ease that panic. We’ll show you ways to fix I/O device errors on external hard disks and on internal drives.

Table of Content

Overview – Our blog takes you through multiple I/O device error scenarios. We’ll show you how to fix Device Barracuda es drive error recovery control errors on external hard disks.

Here is a link to Stellar’s window data recovery software. You can download it in case of unexpected data loss from damaged hard disks to recover data.

Usually, Input/output (I/O) errors are very generic and create different types of hard drive error messages in different platforms such as Windows, Mac, and Linux, etc. The most common I/O device error messages are:

  • “The barracuda es drive error recovery control could not be performed because of an I/O device error.”

I/O Device Error

  • “Only part of a readprocessmemory or writeprocessmemory request was completed.”

I/O Device Error

Primary reasons that cause Hard Disk I/O Device Error

  • Outdated drivers
  • The barracuda es drive error recovery control drive is incompatible with the OS platform
  • Faulty CD/DVD writer and USB port
  • Loose USB or e SATA cord
  • Physically damaged hard drive
  • Drive letter conflict during initializing the device
  • Broken connection port

इस पोस्ट को हिंदी में पढ़ने के लिए यहां क्लिक करें।

Fixing I/O device errors on external hard disks isn’t hard. Most times, barracuda es drive error recovery control, it’s a matter of checking for loose connections. But sometimes, fixing an I/O device error takes a bit more work. There are a couple of methods you can use to correct the errors. Read to learn about them.

  1. Restart your computer/Laptop.
  2. Try to reaccess the drive/device.
  3. If the problem remains the same, then try to access the device/drive data on another Computer/Laptop to confirm that the drive or device is not damaged.
  4. The device input/output error is fixed and you no longer get the error message, you are finished. If the problem remains, then continue with the following solutions.

The Easiest Solutions to Fix Hard Disk I/O Device Error

Solution 1: Check all cables connections

The easiest fix to your problems is to check the cords. Most of the I/O device errors occur due to cords. The cables tend to get loose and the cords may weaken. First, check to see if all the cords are connected properly at the hub and computer ports. Check if there’s an issue with your computer’s port by connecting the drive to another computer. If this solution fixes the problems, then you are done. If this did not resolve the issue, try the next solution.

Solution 2: Update or Re-Install the Drivers

At times, an outdated driver may also cause an I/O device error. This error can be fixed by updating or re-installing a new driver. You need to check whether the drivers are updated and compatible with the disk transfer.

Solution 3: Check all the Cords

The next easiest way to resolveI/O errors on an external drive is cord crosstalk. The electricity in one set of wires tends to leak into another set of cables. This might interfere with the connection when you perform input-output operations. To fix this problem disconnect all the additional devices except your external hard drive on your computer and the necessary accessories connected. You can avoid this issue permanently by replacing the current wires with better cables, barracuda es drive error recovery control. You can also join your external drive to another system to check whether the cord is faulty or if there is a problem with your external drive.

Solution 4: Change the drive transfer mode in IDE Channel Properties

OS cannot transfer data from drive to computer if the transfer mode is incorrect, you can change transfer mode by following steps.

  1. Press (Windows + X) both Keys together and select device manager from the menu list
  2. Expand IDE ATA/ATAPI controllers. A subset will open, that lists the different IDE ATA/ATAPI channels.
  3. Right-click on the channel where the appropriate drive is connected, and then click properties. Typically, this channel is the Secondary IDE channel.
  4. Go to the advanced settings tab and select PIO Only in the transfer mode box for the device that represents the appropriate drive. Typically, this is device 0. Then, click ok and exit all windows.
  5. Test the barracuda es drive error recovery control and check if the error message barracuda es drive error recovery control been removed.

Warning: Do not change the Primary IDE Channel, Device 0. Changing this transfer mode setting may cause the computer to operate incorrectly or not at all.

Solution 5: Check and Repair Device in Command Prompt

  1. Press (Windows + X) both Keys together and select Command Prompt (Admin) from the menu list
  2. Click Yes to allow OS to launch the Command Prompt as Administrator.
  3. In Command Prompt window, type chkdsk G: /f /r /x, barracuda es drive error recovery control. Here G is the drive letter; you can replace it with your drive letter.

This option will check and repair disk errors on the external & internal hard drive/USB drive/SD card to fix I/O device errors. And then you will no longer see the “The request could not be performed because of an I/O device error” message.

Solution 6: Try Clean Booting your Computer

When you’re trying this method, make sure you don’t disable advanced booting options, barracuda es drive error recovery control. Here’s how to fix I/O device errors on an external hard disk by Clean Booting.

  1. Type “MSConfig” in the search bar and press enter. This will open the System Configuration App.
  2. On the next window, navigate to the “Administrations” tab, then click the option “Hide all Microsoft administrations”. Then select “Disable all”.
  3. Next, in the Startup tab, barracuda es drive error recovery control the Task Manager.
  4. Pick all the startup items, then click “Disable”. Close the Task Manager.
  5. Finally, return to the System Configuration window. Click “Startup”, then select “Ok’ and reboot your PC.

Solution 7: Change the drive letter

If your system reads or detects the wrong letter for the drive, it could result in an I/O error. To fix this I/O device error on an external hard disk, you can just change the drive letter. Here’s how to change your drive letter.

1. Right-click the start button and click Disk Management. This will open Disk Management with administrator permissions.

2. On this window, right-click on the volume you want to change the drive letter for. On the menu that will appear, click “Change Drive Letter and Paths”.

Sometimes, the option to Change Drive Letter and Path will be greyed out. If this is the case, your drive is probably unallocated and needs to be initialized, barracuda es drive error recovery control. It could also be because you don’t have permission to access the drive letter.

3, barracuda es drive error recovery control. To change the letter, click “Change”, barracuda es drive error recovery control. Then select the drive letter you want from the list.

You would be prompted about how programs that rely on drive letters may not run correctly. Click “Yes” when you see this dialogue box.

What if the DIY approach does not work for resolving I/O Device Error?

If you have essential data on your external & internal hard drive, USB flash drive, pen drive, Memory Cards, CD Discs, etc., and the above solutions failed to resolve the issue. It means your hard drive is suffering from hardware issues and not detected by your system then there is no point to waste your time by applying simple recovery tricks. It is better to go to a trusted data recovery service provider to get back your data from the affected drive.

Before contacting any data recovery company, you will try to find the answer to two questions.

  1. How much does hard drive data recovery cost?
  2. Why trust Stellar Data Recovery?

When it comes to data recovery, Stellar is the expert. It has expert technicians and efficient technologies that will save you from a disaster situation. And that’s how Stellar Data Recovery has built trust by providing reliable service for more than 24 years.

FAQs

1.What is the meaning of I/O error?

This stands for Input/Output error. When you have an I/O error, Windows will be unable to read the content on the disk. This can result in data loss and disk damage.

2.How can I improve my I/O performance?

If your system is I/O intensive, you can raise the I/O Page Lock Limit. This will increase the effective rate at which the OS reads or writes data.

3. How can I avoid I/O device errors on external hard disks?

Malware infections are one cause of Barracuda es drive error recovery control device errors. You can avoid I/O errors by keeping away from suspicious websites and canon mp495 error code e04 good anti-virus software.

4.How do I troubleshoot disk IO Windows?

The best way to monitor the performance of drives is by using a tool like PerfMon. This can help you to catch errors before they occur, which will then prevent bottlenecks.

5.How do I fix a corrupted hard drive?

There are several methods by which you can fix a corrupted hard drive. The simplest is by unplugging and replugging the external drive. You can also uninstall and reinstall the disk drive.

Turn Off Error Recovery in RAID Drives: TLER, ERC, and CCTL

Hard disk drives encounter errors from time to time, so it’s a good thing that most have the ability to recover data anyway. But RAID systems usually have their own error recovery capabilities and can be thrown off when a hard disk pauses I/O. So it’s a good idea to use hard disk drives that allow you to disable or limit error recovery in RAID systems.

Error Recovery Basics

Hard disk drives have more points of failure than most other modern computer components: They are physical devices that rely on magnetism and mechanical precision, not just solid state electronics. And ever-increasing drive density magnifies the challenge of always returning valid data. In fact, magnetic disk media is surprisingly unreliable, with hard drives often relying on error recovery technologies to cover for read and write errors.

The most basic form of error recovery on hard disk drives is CRC32C, a simple error-detecting code that reliably uncovers read and write errors. In most cases, disk drives can re-try a read, adjusting the heads barracuda es drive error recovery control to detect the correct value. Once an error is detected and the correct data is uncovered, the disk drive will either re-write the data in place or mark that spot as bad and re-map it to another physical location.

All this should happen very quickly, but the application must wait for it to complete. Under light load, this process is barely noticeable, barracuda es drive error recovery control. But systems with heavy I/O can escalate this wait time to unacceptable levels. In busy systems, an error recovery can take many seconds or even minutes to complete.

RAID and Error Recovery

Multi-drive systems, including RAID and similar solutions, barracuda es drive error recovery control, can’t tolerate long waits for error recovery. Most RAID controllers assume that a drive that hasn’t completed an I/O request within a few seconds has failed. The controller will then mark the entire disk drive as “offline” and attempt to rebuild using an available spare disk or simply take the entire RAID set offline to avoid data loss. This can prove problematic, since a RAID rebuild can take hour or days to complete!

It’s not the fault of the RAID system, either. There has to be some threshold where a disk is declared to have failed. It wouldn’t be practical (or even desirable) to escalate the I/O wait “up the stack” and pause all operations until a disk recovers (if ever). So most RAID solutions or controllers set a threshold of a few seconds.

The rule of thumb for RAID controllers is 8 seconds, though this can vary. Some controllers wait for 10, 20, or 30 seconds, for example, and this can be configured on many. ZFS will generally wait as long as needed for error recovery, and this can dramatically impact performance.

Time-Limited Error Recovery

Disk drives intended for RAID use typically implement some form of time limiting for error recovery, barracuda es drive error recovery control. Western Digital calls this Time Limited Error Recovery (TLER), while Seagate calls it Error Recovery Control (ERC) and Samsung and Hitachi call it Command Completion Time Limit (CCTL).

Regardless of what it’s called, the drive will limit the wait time on any error recovery command to a settable value, typically 7 seconds by default. The drive will usually report a failed I/O up the stack and attempt to re-try the error recovery at a later time. Meanwhile, the RAID controller will likely recover the data from parity or erasure code and continue operation.

ZFS, and other software RAID systems, barracuda es drive error recovery control, will typically “react” the same way when TLER is enabled, recovering data and remapping that block.

Note that most desktop hard disk drives to not have this capability. Error recovery is always turned on and recovery will take as long as necessary. This is one reason that conventional desktop disk drives are not appropriate for use in RAID solutions.

Checking and Setting TLER

If a hard drive is to be used in a RAID or similar setup, it is desirable to have TLER or ERC enabled and set to a value under 8 seconds.

Most UNIX-like systems have the “smartmon” tools package, including the command, smartctl. This can be used to query TLER and similar settings. For example, here is the result of that command in FreeNAS (FreeBSD) for a Western Digital Red NAS drive:

# smartctl -l scterc /dev/da2 smartctl 6.5 2016-05-07 r4318 [FreeBSD 11.0-STABLE amd64] (local build) Copyright (C) 2002-16, Bruce Allen, barracuda es drive error recovery control, Christian Franke, www.smartmontools.org SCT Error Recovery Control: Read: 70 (7.0 seconds) Write: 70 (7.0 seconds)

This tool can also set TLER on a drive as follows:

smartctl -l scterc,80,80 /dev/da2

Western Digital provides a DOS utility, WDTLER.EXE, with similar functionality.

Stephen’s Stance

One reason to use enterprise or NAS hard disk drives is the capability to limit error recovery for smoother performance. I strongly recommend only using such drives with RAID systems, especially ZFS (as in FreeNAS)!

You might also want to read these other posts.

Filed Under: Enterprise storage, Terabyte homeTagged With: CCTL, CRC, CRC32C, enterprise disk, ERC, FreeNAS, hard disk, hard disk drive, NAS, NAS disk, RAID, SMART, TLER, ZFS

Checking for TLER, ERC, etc. support on a drive

One of the problems with consumer-grade hard drives is that most of them will hang in the event that they run into an error, and will internally retry the operation, possibly for a minute or more. For a desktop PC, where redundancy does not exist, this is the correct course of action, because failure of a sector means loss of the data.

Enterprise class drives typically support the ability to limit the amount of time a barracuda es drive error recovery control wastes trying to recover data. Most of these drives are used in RAID arrays, and so in the event of a failure, the data can be recovered from parity. A drive encountering read errors cannot be allowed to hang for large amounts of time, because this stalls whatever the server is trying to do. So manufacturers include features to control the retries of failures.

For Western Digital, this is called TLER - Time-Limited Error Recovery. Great PDF.

For Seagate, it is called ERC - Error Recovery Control.

Samsung and Hitachi call it CCTL.

Some people are confused and think that these features are only necessary for hardware RAID, or aren't useful for software RAID. It is absolutely true that this is a very important feature for hardware RAID, because a hardware RAID controller is probably configured to deem a "hung" hard drive as failed and to place it in an offline or recovery status, which has many negatives associated with it. So you absolutely do want TLER/ERC/etc for a hardware RAID setup.

But what about ZFS?

If you've got a ZFS pool, and your underlying disk device appears to hang for a minute, you probably stop serving up data. This is likely to be bad behaviour for a filer. Unlike a hardware RAID controller, ZFS will typically wait for the command to complete, and if it is trying to read many sectors, this could take a very long time. So TLER/ERC/etc are also desirable properties for a ZFS system.

We've been thrilled in recent years to see the addition of "NAS" class hard drives, which are essentially conventional consumer-grade hard drives that have firmware that defaults to supporting TLER/ERC.

You can verify that a drive has TLER/ERC turned on by probing it with smartctl.

Code:

# smartctl -l scterc /dev/ada0 smartctl 6.3 2014-07-26 r3976 [FreeBSD 9.3-RELEASE-p8 amd64] (local build) Copyright (C) 2002-14, Bruce Allen, Christian Franke, barracuda es drive error recovery control, www.smartmontools.org SCT Error Recovery Control: Read: Disabled Write: Disabled


That doesn't have it.

Code:

# smartctl -l scterc /dev/ada4 smartctl 6.3 2014-07-26 r3976 [FreeBSD 9.3-RELEASE-p8 amd64] (local build) Copyright (C) 2002-14, Bruce Allen, Christian Franke, www.smartmontools.org SCT Error Recovery Control: Read: 70 (7.0 seconds) Write: barracuda es drive error recovery control (7.0 seconds)


That does, and it's set to a typical 7 seconds. Further, the same command can be used to try to set ERC.

Code:

# smartctl -l scterc,80,80 /dev/ada4 smartctl 6.3 2014-07-26 r3976 [FreeBSD 9.3-RELEASE-p8 amd64] (local build) Copyright (C) 2002-14, Bruce Allen, Christian Franke, www.smartmontools.org SCT Error Recovery Control set to: Read: 80 (8.0 seconds) Write: 80 (8.0 seconds)


Some hard drives may not come with TLER/ERC enabled by default but can have it turned on regardless. If you try this, make sure to power cycle the drive to make sure the setting sticks around. It's hard to test for TLER/ERC working correctly without actually encountering a bad drive, however.

[2015-02-10] : I note that we just picked up some Samsung ST2000LM003 2.5" 2TB drives which appear to allow TLER to be set, but the setting appears to do nothing and isn't persistent. I happened to luck out in that a drive failed SMART testing with a bad sector and was therefore easily tested.

I'll be pruning responses to this thread, but if you have useful information to share, I may update this post and credit you.

 

ManufacturerSeagate
ModelBarracuda ES
Price (street)
AvailabilityNow

SCSI HAS LONG RULED the enterprise world, but Serial ATA is slowly creeping into corporate server rooms. Serial ATA simply can’t be beaten when it comes to storage density, and when you’re paying for not only the drives, but also the rack they sit in, barracuda es drive error recovery control, density can be an even more important metric than performance.

Today, the highest capacity SCSI drives top out at 300GB—just 60% of the capacity of today’s enterprise-class Serial ATA drives, which are available up to 500GB. Seagate has just raised the bar even higher, introducing a new Barracuda ES hard drive with a whopping 750GB of storage. To put that into perspective, consider the storage capacity of a four-drive 1U rack server running RAID 5. With 300GB SCSI drives, you won’t even break one terabyte. 500GB Serial ATA drives could give you 1.5TB of redundant capacity, while an array of 750GB Barracuda ES drives would offer a cool 2.25TB, all in the same physical space.

The Barracuda ES owes its freakish capacity to the perpendicular recording technology it shares with Seagate’s desktop-oriented Barracuda 7200.10. Physically, the drives are nearly identical. However, the Barracuda ES packs firmware optimizations that promise better performance under more demanding loads, an attribute whose appeal extends beyond the enterprise world and into the enthusiast’s realm.

How does the Barracuda ES compare with other enterprise-class Serial ATA hard drives? Is it really any faster than the Barracuda 7200.10? Read on to find out.

What makes an ES?
The Barracuda ES is based on the same drive platters and mechanics as the 7200.10, but it’s built to withstand cramped rackmount enclosures where drives can be packed tighter than steerage class on a budget airline. All hard drives vibrate during normal spinning and seek operations, and those vibrations can disrupt the operation of a drive in close proximity by shaking the drive head off its intended path. The disrupted drive must then wait for its head to move back into position before resuming normal operation, resulting in a performance penalty.

To combat vibration-induced performance degradation, the Barracuda ES is outfitted with sensors that detect rotational vibration and adjust the drive head accordingly. These sensors allow the ES to tolerate a rotational vibration of 12.5 rad/second2 with a rotational profile of 20-800Hz. The Barracuda 7200.10, on the other hand, can only tolerate 5.5 rad/second2 between 10 and 300Hz.

Barracuda 7200.10Barracuda ES
Maximum external transfer rate300MB/s300MB/s
Sustained transfer rateNA78MB/s (750GB)
72MB/s (500, 400, 250GB)
Average read seek timeNA8.5ms
Average write seek timeNA9.5ms
Average rotational latency4.16 ms4.16ms
Spindle speed7,200RPM7,200 RPM
Available capacities200, 250, 300, 320, 400, 500, 750GB250, 400, 500, 750GB
Cache size8MB (200GB)
barracuda es drive error recovery control (250GB)
16MB (320-750GB)
8/16 MB fatal error lnk1120 masm 16MB (400-750GB)
Platter size188 GB (750GB)188 GB (750GB)
Rotational vibration5.5 rad/sec212.5 rad/sec2
Rotational vibration profile10-300Hz20-800Hz
Idle acoustics2.7 bels2.7 bels
Seek acoustics3.0 bels3.0 bels
Idle power consumption9.3W9.3W
Read/write power consumption12.6W13.0W
Native Command QueuingYesYes
Warranty lengthFive yearsFive years

Apart from the ES’s rotational vibration sensors, the drive is physically identical to the Barracuda 7200.10. It uses the same 188GB platters with perpendicular recording and is available with up to 16MB of cache. That cache is programmed a little differently on the ES, of course, but it’s the same chip.

In addition to different cache segmentation, the ES’s firmware offers a handful of RAID-specific features that you won’t find in the Barracuda 7200.10. Among them is Error Recovery Control, which limits the drive’s error recovery time to 12 seconds. This prevents prolonged error recovery attempts from causing drives to be prematurely dropped from RAID arrays. Similar functionality is available on Western Digital’s enterprise-class Serial ATA drives, although WD recommends disabling the feature for single-drive operation. Error Recovery Control apparently doesn’t hinder the Barracuda ES in single-drive systems.

Error recovery is nice, but avoiding errors is even better. To help reduce the number of errors the ES encounters in thermally challenging enterprise environments, the Barracuda ES monitors temperatures and shuffles I/O requests in a manner that allows the drive to cool if it gets too hot. The ES also includes features to simplify multi-drive firmware updates and speed RAID initialization.

Although both the Barracuda ES and 7200.10 are available with a 300MB/s Serial ATA interface, the ES also comes in fibre channel flavors. Those flavors are limited to 400 and 500GB capacities with only 8MB of cache, though.

Hard drive manufacturers seem loath to publish performance specifications for their desktop hard drives, barracuda es drive error recovery control, so it’s hard to compare the ES’s seek times and sustained transfer rate specs to those of the 7200.10. We’ll see how real world seek times and transfer rates shake out when we move to our performance benchmarks.

Enterprise-class Serial ATA drives typically offer longer warranties than their desktop counterparts—often five years for enterprise models versus just three years for desktop. Seagate’s barracuda es drive error recovery control little different, though. It offers a five-year warranty for all its internal hard drive products, including desktop and enterprise drives, so the ES doesn’t have an advantage over the 7200.10 in this category. Five-year hard drive warranties are pretty standard in the enterprise world, so Seagate certainly isn’t skimping. The company’s enthusiasm for longer desktop drive warranties has just blunted what could have been another selling point for the ES.

Test notes
We’ll be comparing the performance of the Barracuda ES with that of a slew of competitors, including some of the latest and greatest Serial ATA drives from Hitachi, Maxtor, Seagate, and Western Digital. These drives differ when it comes to external transfer rates, spindle speeds, barracuda es drive error recovery control, cache sizes, platter densities, NCQ support, and capacity, all of which can have an impact on performance. Keep in mind the following differences as we move through our benchmarks:
Max external transfer rateSpindle speedCache sizePlatter sizeCapacityNative Command Queuing?
Barracuda 7200.7 NCQ150MB/s7,200RPM8MB80GB160GBYes
Barracuda 7200.8150MB/s7,200RPM8MB133GB400GBYes
Barracuda 7200.9 (160GB)300MB/s7,200RPM8MB160GB160GBYes
Barracuda 7200.9 (500GB)300MB/s7,200RPM16MB125GB500GBYes
Barracuda 7200.10300MB/s7,200RPM16MB188GB750GBYes
Barracuda ES 300MB/s 7,200RPM 16MB 188GB 750GB Yes
Caviar SE16300MB/s7,200RPM16MB83GB250GBNo
Caviar SE16 (500GB)300MB/s7,200RPM16MB125GB500GBYes
Caviar RE2150MB/s7,200RPM16MB100GB400GBYes
Caviar RE2 (500GB)300MB/s7,200RPM16MB125GB500GBYes
Deskstar 7K500300MB/s7,200RPM16MB100GB500GBYes
DiamondMax 10150MB/s7,200RPM16MB100GB300GBYes
Raptor WD740GD150MB/s10,000RPM8MB37GB74GBNo*
Raptor X150MB/s10,000RPM16MB75GB150GBYes
Raptor WD1500ADFD150MB/s10,000RPM16MB75GB150GBYes

Note that the 250GB Caviar SE16 and the Raptor WD740GD lack support for Native Command Queuing. The WD740GD does support a form of command queuing known as Tagged Command Queuing (TCQ), but host controller and chipset support for TCQ is pretty thin, barracuda es drive error recovery control. Our Intel 955X-based test platform doesn’t support TCQ.

We have test results from older and newer versions of Western Digital’s Caviar SE16 and RE2, barracuda es drive error recovery control. To avoid confusion, we’ll be referring to the newer drives as the Caviar RE2 (500GB) and Caviar SE16 ora-12560 tns protocol adapter error, while the old drives will appear as the Caviar RE2 and Caviar SE16.

Since Seagate makes versions of the 7200.7 both with and without NCQ support, the 7200.7 in our tests appears as the “Barracuda 7200.7 NCQ” to clarify that it’s the NCQ version of the drive. The Barracuda es drive error recovery control RE2, Deskstar T7K250, DiamondMax 10, 7200.8, 7200.9, 7200.10, ES, Raptor X, and Raptor WD1500ADFD aren’t explicitly labeled as NCQ drives because they’re not available without NCQ support.

Finally, we should note that our WD1500ADFD has a slightly newer firmware revision than the Raptor X sample we’ve had since February. The drives still share identical internals, but firmware optimizations could give our newer Raptor an edge over the X in some tests.

Our testing methods
All tests were run three times, and their results were averaged, using the following test system, barracuda es drive error recovery control.

Our test system was powered by OCZ PowerStream power supply units. The PowerStream was one of our Editor’s Choice winners in our last PSU round-up.

We used the following versions of our test applications:

The test systems’ Windows desktop was set at 1280×1024 in 32-bit color at an 85Hz screen refresh rate. Vertical refresh sync (vsync) was disabled for all tests.

All the tests and methods we employed are publicly available and reproducible. If you have questions about our methods, hit our forums to talk with us about them.

WorldBench overall performance
WorldBench uses scripting to step through a series of tasks in common Windows applications. It then produces an overall score. WorldBench also spits out individual results for its component application tests, allowing us to compare performance in each. We’ll look at the overall score, atibtmon runtime error then we’ll show individual application results alongside the results from some of our own application tests, barracuda es drive error recovery control.

Seagate’s perpendicular-powered Barracudas are the fastest 7,200-RPM drives in WorldBench, but interestingly, the ES is one step slower than the 7200.10.

Multimedia editing and encoding

MusicMatch Jukebox

Windows Media Encoder

Adobe Premiere

VideoWave Movie Creator

Scores are close through WorldBench’s multimedia editing and encoding tests. The Barracuda 7200.10’s usually a little faster barracuda es drive error recovery control the ES, though.

Image processing

Adobe Photoshop

ACDSee PowerPack

ACDSee separates the drives a little and relegates the ES to the middle of the pack. There, it’s still a few seconds slower than the 7200.10.

Multitasking and office applications

Microsoft Office

Mozilla

Mozilla and Windows Media Encoder

WorldBench’s office and multitasking tests don’t give the drives much room to stretch their legs.

Other applications

Winzip

Nero

WinZip and Nero do, however. The ES is close barracuda es drive error recovery control the front of the pack in both, with only Western Digital’s latest 10K-RPM Raptors and the Barracuda 7200.10 proving faster.

Boot and load times
To test system boot and game level load times, we busted out our trusty stopwatch.

Boot times on the ES are very fast, but the drive’s performance in our level load tests isn’t as impressive.

File Copy Test
File Copy Test is a pseudo-real-world benchmark that times how long it takes to create, read, and copy files in various test patterns. File copying is tested twice: once with the source and target on the same partition, and once with the target on a separate partition. Scores are presented in MB/s.

The Barracuda ES stumbles a little in FC-Test’s file creation tests, losing ground to a couple of Raptors, and more importantly, Western Digital’s latest 7,200-RPM Caviars. Note that the ES lags behind the 7200.10 by a few MB/s with each test pattern.

Seagate bounces back with a stronger showing in FC-Test’s read tests, outrunning the Caviars and even the Raptors in a couple of test patterns. The performance gap between the ES and 7200.10 is much smaller here.

The copy tests’ combination of read and write operations suits the ES well enough to keep it ahead of the competition with most test patterns. However, the Caviars have a slim edge with the Windows and Programs test patterns, which feature a greater number of smaller files. Interestingly, those are the same test patterns where the ES trails the 7200.10 by the greatest margins.

iPEAK multitasking
We’ve developed a series of disk-intensive multitasking tests to highlight the impact of command queuing on hard drive performance. You can get the low-down on these iPEAK-based tests here. The mean service time of each drive is reported in milliseconds, with lower values representing better performance.

The ‘cuda ES starts our iPEAK tests with a win, but soon falls victim to the same Jekyll-and-Hyde performance profile that plagues all of Seagate’s Barracudas in these tests. With multitasking loads that feature a file copy operation as the secondary task, the ES performs very well. However, when that secondary task switches to a VirtualDub import, the ES is ejected rather abruptly to the back of the field with the rest of its Barracuda brethren.

Note that the ES has generally trailed the 7200.10 thus far, but it has a consistent edge in this first round of iPEAK tests.

iPEAK multitasking – con’t

The same patterns persist through our second round of iPEAK tests. The ES does well with one set of secondary loads, but poorly with another. Throughout, however, it maintains a slight edge over the 7200.10.

IOMeter – Transaction rate
IOMeter presents a good test case for command queuing, so the NCQ-less Western Digital Caviar SE16 and Raptor WD740GD should have a slight disadvantage here under higher barracuda es drive error recovery control.

The sheer number of results make these graphs a little hard to read, but I wanted to include them all to illustrate just how many drives perform better than the Barracuda ES in IOMeter. Obviously, the 10K-RPM Raptors are way out ahead, but Western Digital’s enterprise-oriented Caviar RE2s also have a big edge over the ES, especially under increasing loads.

What’s most disappointing, perhaps, is the fact that the Barracuda ES isn’t dramatically faster than the 7200.10, barracuda es drive error recovery control. Here’s how the two compare without all the other drives clouding the picture.

The ES isn’t all that much faster in any test pattern, and doesn’t hit its stride until the number of outstanding I/O requests starts to add up.

IOMeter – Response time

Moving to IOMeter response times, the Barracuda ES again finds itself well behind the Raptors and Western Digital’s latest Caviars. Heck, even the older Barracuda 7200.7 NCQ is quicker than the ES here.

Again, I’ve whipped up a second set of graphs to highlight how the 7200.10’s performance compares with that of the ES.

And again, the enterprise-oriented ES doesn’t offer much of an improvement over its desktop counterpart. Response times are consistently lower, but not by a significant margin.

IOMeter – CPU utilization

To its credit, the Barracuda ES’s CPU utilization is very low in IOMeter. Then again, that’s true for all the drives we tested.

HD Tach
We tested HD Tach with the benchmark’s full variable zone size setting.

The ES can’t quite catch the 7200.10, but its sustained transfer rates easily beat the rest of the 7,200-RPM field. Sustained transfer rates are usually dictated by a combination of spindle speed and platter size, and with higher capacity platters than any other 7,200-RPM drive, it’s easy to see why the ES does so well.

Seagate drives have always fared well in HD Tach’s burst speed test, and the ES is no exception. The drive doesn’t quite max out the interface’s theoretical 300MB/s capacity, but it comes closer than drives from other manufacturers.

Enterprise-class hard drives are usually known for quicker access times, but not the Barracuda ES. In HD Tach, row rejected due to oracle error 1 14.1 millisecond access time is slower than the rest of the field, and a half-millisecond off that of the 7200.10.

CPU utilization scores are well within HD Tach’s +/- 2% margin for error in this test.

Noise levels
Noise levels were measured with an Extech 407727 Digital Sound Level meter 1″ from the side of the drives at idle and under an HD Tach seek load. Drives were run with the PCB facing up.

The Barracuda ES is about as quiet as the 7200.10 at idle, but a decibel louder under a seek load. That makes it one of the loudest drives of the bunch, but noise tends not to be a problem in server rooms already polluted by the constant hum of industrial air conditioning.

Power consumption
For our power consumption tests, we measured the voltage drop across a 0.1-ohm resistor placed in line with the 5V and 12V lines connected to each drive. Through the magic of Ohm’s Law, we were able to calculate the power draw from each voltage rail and add them together for the total power draw of the drive.

Seagate has managed to improve the Barracuda ES’s power consumption over the 7200.10, but there are still a number of drives that consume less juice. If we consider power consumption per gigabyte, however, the Barracuda ES fares better than any other drive.

Conclusions
With online vendors selling the Barracuda ES for around $465, the drive’s price tag certainly lives up to its enterprise aspirations. A Barracuda 7200.10 with the same 750GB capacity can be had for closer to $340, and for most folks—performance-hungry enthusiasts included—that’s the drive to have. For desktop applications, the ES just doesn’t offer enough over the 7200.10 to justify the price premium.

The question, of course, is whether that price premium is justified for the enterprise environments that Seagate is targeting with the drive. From a performance perspective, the answer is no. The Barracuda ES is too slow under multitasking and multi-user loads to compete with Western Digital’s Raptors or even WD’s latest enterprise-oriented Caviar RE2s—drives that feature similar RAID-specific error recovery and vibration compensation capabilities.

Of course, neither the Raptors nor the Caviars are available with 750GB of storage capacity. Freakish capacity is the ‘cuda’s real appeal, especially when you’re trying to squeeze as many gigabytes as possible into limited enclosure or rack space. 500GB is the best the competition can do on that front, and with 50% more capacity in the same perl no child processes error form factor, a 750GB Barracuda ES certainly has some attractiveness. It may not be the fastest drive in its class, but it’s the biggest, and in some enterprise environments that will matter more. 

Error recovery control

In computing, error recovery control (ERC) (Western Digital: time-limited error recovery (TLER), Samsung/Hitachi: command completion time limit (CCTL)) is a feature of hard disks which allow a system administrator to configure the amount of time a drive's netlib_recv failed, error=10058 is allowed to spend recovering from a read or write error. Limiting the recovery time allows for improved error handling in hardware or software RAID environments. In some cases, there is a conflict as to whether error handling should be undertaken by the hard drive or by the RAID implementation, which leads to drives being marked as unusable and significant performance degradation, when this could otherwise have been avoided.

Overview[edit]

Modern hard drives feature an ability to recover from some read/write errors by internally remapping sectors and performing other oracle forms error_level of self-test and recovery. The process for this can sometimes take several seconds or (under heavy usage) minutes, during which time the drive is unresponsive. Hardware RAID controllers and software RAID implementations are designed to recognise a drive which does not respond within a few seconds, and mark it as unreliable, indicating that it should be withdrawn from use and the array rebuilt from parity data. This is a long process, degrades performance, and if more drives fail under error 017 undefined symbol enginecar resulting additional workload, it may be catastrophic.

If the drive itself is inherently reliable but has some bad sectors, then TLER and similar features prevent a disk from being unnecessarily marked as 'failed' by limiting the time spent on correcting detected errors before advising the array controller of a failed operation. The array controller can then handle the data recovery for the limited amount involved, rather than marking the entire drive as faulty.

Desktop computers and TLER[edit]

Effectively, barracuda es drive error recovery control, TLER and similar features limit the performance of on-drive error handling, to allow hardware RAID controllers and software RAID implementations to handle the error if problematic.

Generally, Western Digital enterprise drives such as Raptor, Caviar RE2 and RE2-GP (RAID Edition) come with TLER Read "Enabled" (7 seconds) and TLER Write "Enabled" (7 seconds) while desktop drives such as Caviar SE, SE16, and GP come with TLER Read and Write Disabled (configured as 0 seconds, to disable).

Standalone vs, barracuda es drive error recovery control. RAID considerations[edit]

It is best for TLER to be "enabled" when in a RAID array to prevent the recovery time from a disk read or write error from exceeding the RAID implementation's timeout threshold. If a drive times out, the hard disk will need to be manually re-added to the array, requiring a re-build and re-synchronization of the hard disk. Enabling TLER seeks to prevent this by interrupting error correction before timeout, to report failures only for data segments. The result is increased reliability in a RAID array.

In a stand-alone configuration TLER should be disabled. As the drive is not redundant, reporting segments as failed will only increase manual intervention. Without a hardware RAID controller or a software RAID implementation to drop the disk, normal (no TLER) recovery ability is most stable.

In a software RAID configuration whether or not TLER is helpful is dependent on the operating system. For example, in FreeBSD the ATA/CAM stack controls the timeouts, and is set to progressively increase the timeouts as they occur. Thus, if a desktop disk without TLER starts delaying a response to a sector read, FreeBSD will retry the read with successively longer timeouts to prevent prematurely dropping the disk out of the array.

Model TLER default ( read / write ) Stand-alone recommendation RAID recommendation
Caviar, SE, SE16, GP, RaptorDisabled ( 0s / 0s )DefaultEnabled (if possible)
Caviar RE2, RE2-GP, RedEnabled ( 7s / 7s )Disabled Default

Interaction of TLER with the advanced ZFS filesystem[edit]

The ZFS filesystem was written to immediately write data to a sector that reports as bad or takes an excessively long time to read (such as non-TLER drives); this will usually force an immediate sector remap on a weak sector in most drives.[citation needed]

Western Digital Time Limit Error Recovery utility[edit]

The WDTLER.EXE utility allows for the enabling or disabling of the TLER parameter in the hard disk's firmware settings allowing the user to determine the best setting for his particular usage as either a stand-alone or RAID drive. This utility is written for DOS and you will require a DOS bootable disk with this utility on it to use it.

The utility works on and makes changes to all compatible Western Digital hard disk drives connected to the computer. It is important to remember that any change will affect all the hard drives. If you only wish to change specific hard drives on your computer then you should disconnect the other hard drives before you use this utility, then reconnect them after you are finished.

The utility comes with three batch files, TLERSCAN.BAT to get the current state of the TLER setting on all the hard drives, TLER-ON.BAT to enable TLER, and TLER-OFF.BAT to disable TLER. The included TLER-ON.BAT will set barracuda es drive error recovery control Read & Write TLER time to seven seconds. If you wish to use a custom timeout value, you can use the WDTLER.EXE utility directly with the parameters to specify how many seconds the Time Limit value should be.

Western Digital claims that using the WDTLER.EXE utility on newer drives can damage the firmware and make the disk unusable. The utility is no longer available from Western Digital, and new drives will not be able to have the TLER setting changed. RE disks are only suitable for RAID arrays and Caviar are only suitable for non-RAID use. The utility still[when?] works for older drives.

smartctl utility[edit]

The smartctl utility (part of the smartmontools package) can be used[1] on hard disk drives that fully implement the ATA-8[2] standard to control the TLER behavior by setting the SCT Error Recovery Control (scterc) parameter.

Controlling the TLER behavior through the smartctl utility may not work on all hard disk drives because some manufacturers have changed their desktop drives not to include the support for the ERC parameter,[3][4] purportedly to force sales of their more expensive RAID/enterprise models.[citation oki c830 142 fatal error controllers[edit]

Disconnect timeout values for different usb mouse error can not load program RAID controllers may vary between vendors; thus, TLER should trigger before the controller times out the drive. For example, 3ware 9650SE uses 20 seconds as the timeout,[5] while for the LSI Logic used in IBM x-series it is 10 seconds.[6]

Widely available Intel Matrix RAID / Intel Rapid Storage Technology, embedded in Intel server motherboards and modern desktop motherboards, is a pseudo-hardware controller, not a true hardware RAID controller.

Software RAID[edit]

Linux mdadm simply holds and lets the drive complete its recovery – however, the default command timeout for the SCSI Disk layer (/sys/block/sd?/device/timeout) is 30 seconds,[7] after which it will attempt to reset win7 socket error drive, and if that fails, put the drive offline.[8]

References[edit]

External links[edit]

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Manufacturer: SeagateSKU: ST31000340NSCategory: Internal HDD for Desktop

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