Apache start service error 1069

apache start service error 1069

Steps to solve · Check that the account running the TomCat service has permissions for the AX files and folders. This can be done by adding the. The NiceLabelAutomationProxyService service was unable to log on as DOMAIN\user with the currently configured password due to the following error: Logon failure. provide the correct password for your service application;. apache start service error 1069

Apache start service error 1069 - perhaps

To solve this problem, type the correct password in the Microsoft SQL Server service account on the SQL Server host computer.

To correct the password follow these steps:

 

1. Click Start, point to Settings, and then click Control Panel.

 

2. Double-click System and Security. 

  • This step does not apply for Microsoft Windows 2000 Server and Microsoft Windows XP 

 

3. Double-click Administrative Tools, and then double-click Services.

4. Use one of the following steps based on your instance type: 

  • For a default instance of SQL Server, double-click MSSQLServer, and then click the Log On tab.

  • For a named instance of SQL Server, double-click MSSQL$YourInstanceName, and then click the Log On tab. Replace YourInstanceName with the actual name of the SQL Server instance.

  • For a default instance of SQL Server Agent, double-click SQLAgent, and then click the Log On tab.

  • For a named instance of SQL Server Agent, double-click SQLAgent$YourInstanceName, and then click the Log On tab. Replace YourInstanceName with the actual name of the SQL Server instance.


5. Type the correct password in the Password and Confirm password textbox, and then click OK.

6.  Start up the SQL Server Service

7.  Startup the SQL Server Agent

 

Error 1069: The service did not start due to a logon failure

Error Message

When starting the ArcIMS Application Server, the following error occurs:

"Error 1069: The service did not start due to a logon failure"

Cause

The error message can display for a number of reasons; most often it occurs when the account password under which ArcIMS is running has been changed.

Note: ArcIMS Application Server is a retired product that has been superseded by ArcGIS Online and Portal for ArcGIS. This error can still occur in later iterations of ArcGIS Enterprise. Please see Knowledge Base article 000023322.

Solution or Workaround

Try each procedure as outlined, in the order given below. If none of the procedures provide an answer, proceed to Step 4, Contact ESRI Technical Support, and supply the Support Analyst with the answers to the questions described within that step.

  1. Update the Logon Information for the ArcIMS Services
    1. In Windows, navigate to Control Panel > Administrative Tools > Services.
    2. Right-click on the ArcIMS Application Server service; select Properties.
    3. Switch to the Log On tab.
    4. Enter the password for the listed account in both the Password and Confirm password boxes. It may be necessary to check if the password was recently changed. Click OK.
    5. Start the Service. If it starts, repeat the above steps for the ArcIMS Monitor and the ArcIMS Tasker services.
  2. Log out and log in
    Log out and log back in with the username and password used in step D above. If the username and password do not work for logging into Windows, contact your network system administrator. The system administrator will need to investigate why this account can not log into this Windows machine.
  3. Verify permissions
    If the user and password can be used to log into the machine but can not be used to start ArcIMS, the account may not have the necessary permissions to logon as a Windows service. In this case, run the ArcIMS post-installation. It asks for the account and password and resets the 'log on as a service' permission.
  4. Contact ESRI Technical Support
    If none of the above procedures gave satisfactory results, contact ESRI Technical Support. You will be asked to provide the following information:
  • Question 1: What were your results when you followed the procedures in this article? Please include this article number, 000007436, in your request for support.
  • Question 2: Is this a new installation of ArcIMS, an upgrade of ArcIMS, or an existing ArcIMS installation?
  • Question 3: Is the Windows account used for ArcIMS a local account or a domain account? If you are unsure, please tell the support analyst.
  • Question 4: Is there anything unusual with the account being used for ArcIMS?
  • Question 5: Were any errors encountered when running the post-installation in Step 2?

Related Information

Last Published: 6/8/2020

Article ID: 000007436

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SQL error 1069: The service did not start due to a logon failure – Rapid ways to fix the error

An error message such as SQL error 1069: a service that did not start due to a logon failureis a common error that occurs when fail to start the service while restarting Microsoft SQL Server or SQL Server Agent.

Here at Bobcares, we have seen several such SQL related issues as part of our Server Management Services for web hosts and online service providers.

Today we’ll take a look at the cause for this error and see how to fix it.

Reasons to occur SQL error 1069

Often, Windows customers report that they are experiencing an SQL error while restarting Microsoft SQL Server or SQL Server Agent?

The error looks like,

Error 1069: The service did not start due to a logon failure.

This error happens when the service fails to start with the following error message:

Do you ever think why the SQL server service doesn’t start?

Here s the reasons,

  1. This error arises due to the incorrect password of the SQL Server startup service account or the SQL Server Agent startup service account. Whenever change the password for the account, it is necessary to update for the SQL Server service or the SQL Server Agent service.
  2. whenever the SQL Server is set to an account type other than the Local System account.

So, let’s see how our Support Engineers fix this error.

 

Remedies for SQL error 1069

Now, we can see how to fix this error.

In order to fix the error, our Support Engineers set up the Microsoft SQL Server service account with the right password on the SQL Server host computer.

For example, let’s see how to correct the password in Microsoft Windows 2000 Server and Microsoft Windows XP:

1. Initially, we click Start > Settings > click Control Panel> double-click Administrative Tools > double-click Services.

2. Then, for a default instance of SQL Server, we double-click MSSQLServer > go to Log On tab.
tab.
3. Next, we double-click SQLAgent, and then click the Log On tab.

4. Finally, we enter the correct password in the Password and Confirm password textbox, and then click OK.

At last, we start the SQL Server Service and the SQL Server Agent.

 

[Need any further assistance in fixing SQL errors? – We’re available 24*7]

 

Conclusion

In short, this SQL error 1069 arises when SQL Server service fails to start while restarting Microsoft SQL Server or SQL Server Agent. Today, we saw the reasons and how our Support Engineers fix this error.

Error 1069 occurs when you start SQL Server service

  • Article
  • 7 minutes to read

You receive error 1069 when starting the SQL Server service, which results in a logon failure. This article provides resolutions for error 1069 related events.

Original product version:   SQL Server
Original KB number:   282254

Symptoms

When you try to restart Microsoft SQL Server or the SQL Server Agent, the service doesn't start, and you receive the following error message, depending on how you try to start the service:

  • By using the Services applet:

    Windows could not start the SQL Server service on Local Computer.
    Error 1069: The service did not start due to a logon failure.

  • By using a command prompt:

    System error 1069 has occurred.
    The service did not start due to a logon failure.

Cause

This problem occurs because there is an issue either with the service account itself or the information that is currently saved for the service account.

Resolution

The resolutions for event ID 7041 and event ID 7038 are different. Note the event ID and description of the event that's associated with the failure in the system event log. Then, use the corresponding information to fix the issue.

Event ID: 7041

In the log entry that is event ID 7041 related, you may find the following error message:

Logon failure: the user has not been granted the requested logon type at this computer.

The complete message entry in event log should resemble the following:

To fix this issue, check which permissions are assigned to the <Account Name> service account using Local Security Settings (Secpol.msc).

  1. Verify these rights per the Server permissions. For more information, see Windows Privileges and Rights. Manually assign any missing permissions.

  2. Review the service account to learn whether it was assigned any Deny* permissions. Remove any Deny* permissions from the SQL Service service account and then retest. For example, if the service account was assigned Deny Service Logon along with , revoke the right for the logon and restart SQL Server.

Event ID: 7038

In the log entries that are event ID 7038 related, you may find the following error message:

This user can't sign in because this account is currently disabled

The complete message entry in event log should resemble the following:

To fix this issue, follow these steps:

  1. If SQL Server Startup account is a Local User Account on the computer, open Computer Management (compmgmt.msc) and verify that the service account is disabled in Local Users & Groups. If it is disabled, enable the account and restart the SQL Server service.

  2. If SQL Server Startup account is a Windows Domain Account, check whether the account is disabled in Active Directory Users and Computers. If it is disabled, enable the account, and restart the SQL Server service.

The user's password must be changed before signing in

The complete message entry in event log should resemble the following:

To fix this issue, follow these steps:

  1. If the SQL Server Startup account is a Local User Account on the computer, open Computer Management (compmgmt.msc) and clear the User Must change the password at next logon property for SQL Server Startup Account under Local Users & Groups. Then, select OK, and restart the SQL Server service.

  2. If the SQL Server Startup account is a Windows Domain Account, open Active Directory Users and Computers, and then verify that the SQL Server Startup Account has the User Must change the password at next logon property enabled.

  3. If the property in step 2 is enabled, you must either clear this option or log in interactively to a Windows client, and then set a new password, then, update the new password for the SQL Server Service by using the SQL Server Configuration Manager tool.

The user name or password is incorrect

The complete message entry in event log should resemble the following:

To fix this issue, follow these steps:

  1. The error message entry indicates that the current login name or password set is incorrect. To verify the same, you can use the Run-As Windows option to open a Windows Command Prompt window, and then provide the same credentials. If that works without any issues, carefully type the credentials in SQL Server Configuration Manager.

  2. If step 1 fails and reports the same issue, you must reset the password for the Windows logon. If the SQL Server Startup account is a Local User Account on the computer, open Computer Management (compmgmt.msc), and reset the password of the local user. If the SQL Server Startup account is a Windows Domain Account, open Active Directory Users and Computers, and then change the credentials. After the credentials are updated, return to SQL Server Configuration Manager, enter the same credentials, and then start the service.

Type the correct password in the SQL Server service account on the SQL Server host computer. To do this, follow the procedures from SCM Services - Change the Password of the Accounts Used.

The referenced account is currently locked out and may not be logged on to

The complete message entry in event log should resemble the following:

To fix this issue, follow these steps:

  1. If SQL Server Startup account is a Local User Account on the computer, open Computer Management (compmgmt.msc), and clear the Account is Locked Out checkbox for the SQL Server Startup Account under Local Users & Groups. Then, select OK, and restart the SQL Server service.

  2. If SQL Server Startup account is a Windows Domain Account, open Active Directory Users and Computers, and verify that the SQL Server Startup Account has the Account is Locked Out property enabled.

  3. If the property in step 2 is enabled, you must clear this option, set a strong password, and use the same credentials for the SQL Server Startup Account configuration by using SQL Server Configuration Manager.

How to investigate intermittent Windows Server "logon failure" problems?

I am currently working on a project for which the Apache web server is preferred, but Windows is mandatory. I have not used WAMP for some years, but I believe these days that it works well and is stable. We have four web servers, each in two load-balanced pairs. Apache is being run as a Windows Service.

A colleague has found some information that says it is safer to run Apache under a custom account rather than the "Local System Account". So, a local account has been created on each box and the credentials entered into the "Log On" tab in the Service Properties dialogue box.

From time to time when the Apache configuration changes, I need to restart each service. To do that I select the Apache2.4 entry in the Services window and click on the restart button. However, for all boxes, it is touch-and-go as to whether it will be successful. When it fails, I get a Windows error that says:

Windows could not start the Apache2.4 service on Local Computer.

Error 1069: The service did not start due to a logon failure.

So, I dutifully add the service password in again, whenever this happens, and then it always starts up. One guess I have is that the dialogue is forgetting the password it has been given. It does not ever forget the username.

I have examined the permissions given to this local user in Local Security Policy -> Local Policies -> User Rights Assignment -> Log on as a service Properties, and found that the user is in there normally, but if it becomes missing, then an Apache restart will fail.

When researching this, I found this identical scenario (although the service in that case is PostgreSQL). However, the accepted answer of using the Local System Account is not an answer to the question posed, in my view. The question ought to be: why does the user lose the right to log on as a service?

Windows Services Frequently Asked Questions (FAQ)

Windows Services FAQ

Helpful tips for managing your Microsoft Windows 11/10/8 & Server 2022/2019/2016/2012 Services



  1. Windows Services: Overview

    What is a Windows Service?

    A Windows Service is an advanced component/feature of Microsoft Windows that supports the management of long running, background processes and applications. Unlike regular programs that are started by a user and run only while that user is logged on, a Windows Service application can start before any user logs on and can continue to run even after all users have logged off.

    Windows Services are ideal for software that must started when the PC boots. A Windows Service is conceptually similar to a UNIX daemon.

  2. Windows Services: Overview

    How do I manage a Windows Service?

    Windows Services can be managed using the Windows Services control panel applet. To start the applet, either:

    • Choose Start > Control Panel > Administrative Tools > Services; or
    • Run "services.msc" from Start > Run.

    The applet lists the Windows Services installed on your computer:

    Windows Services Control Panel Applet

    Double-click an entry to reveal its specific properties. Here is the "Schedule" service (which operates the Windows Task Scheduler):

    Task Scheduler Windows Service Properties

    You can start, stop, pause or resume the service as appropriate. You can also modify the settings, such as the startup type (Automatic or Manual) or the log on account (on the Log On tab), etc.

  3. Windows Services: Overview

    Where are Windows Services stored/located?

    Services are stored in the Windows Registry — a hierarchical key-value database that is an integral part of the operating system. You can access the registry using the Registry Editor (started by running the regedit command).

    In apache start service error 1069 Registry Editor, you will find services under this key:

    \HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SYSTEM\CurrentControlSet\Services

    And each service will reside in a sub-key with its name.

    For example, here are the settings for the Print Spooler service (which is named "Spooler"):

    Regedit: Spooler Service Key

  4. Windows Services: Overview

    How do I find the name of apache start service error 1069 Windows Service?

    This 50-second video shows how to find the name of a Windows Service:

    You can find the name of your service using the Windows Services control panel applet. To start the applet, either:

    • Choose Start > Control Panel > Administrative Tools > Services; or
    • Run "services.msc" from Start > Run.

    The window that comes up lists all the Windows Services installed on your PC:

    Windows Services Control Panel Applet (Windows Server 2012)

    Find the service you are interested in and double-click on the entry to open its specific properties. The service's name will be shown near the top of the Properties window. Here we can see that the name of the Print Spooler Windows Service is actually "Spooler":

    Windows Services Control Panel Applet Properties (Windows Server 2012)

  5. Windows Services: Overview

    Where can I find the logs for a Windows Service?

    Much like a regular application, a Windows Service can write its logs anywhere. Or it can choose not to write logs at all!

    However, the convention is for services is to report errors, warnings and pertinent information to the Windows Event Logs. Those entries can be inspected using the Windows Event Viewer.

    To find the messages reported scanner error 20 hp 1005 a particular service:

    1. Start the Event Viewer (from the Control Panel, or by running eventvwr.msc)

    2. Navigate to the Windows Logs > Application section (on the left)

    3. In the center panel, look for entries where the Source is the name of your service

    For example, here is a message from the Volume Shadow Copy (VSS) service:

    VSS service log message

  6. Windows Services: Overview

    How do I start/stop a Windows Service from the command line?

    You can use the NET command to start and stop any Windows Service from a DOS prompt.

    To start a service named "MyService", you would execute:

    NET START MyService

    To stop the same service, run:

    NET STOP MyService

    Be sure to enclose the service name in quotes if it contains spaces.

    Note that only users with administrative privileges will be able to run the NET command. Watch out for UAC on Windows 7, Vista and Server 2008!

  7. Windows Services: Overview

    How do I disable a Windows Service from the command line?

    To disable a service, use the SC command, apache start service error 1069.

    Run it like this:

    SC config <Service-Name> start= disabled

    where <Service-Name> is the name of the service. Be sure to enclose the name in quotes if it contains a space!

    For example, to apache start service error 1069 the Bluetooth Support Service (whose name is "bthserv"), run:

    SC config bthserv start= disabled

    Note that space after the "start=" is important. The command will fail if you omit it.

    Also note that disabling ubuntu systemerror installarchives failed service will not stop it. Issue a NET STOP, either before or after disabling, to shut down the service.

    Note: If you are not comfortable working from the command prompt, this short video shows how to disable a Windows Service using the Services GUI application:

  8. Windows Services: Overview

    How do I remove/delete a Windows Service?

    A Service can be deleted using the versatile SC command. Use it like this to remove a service called "MyService":

    SC delete MyService

    Enclose the service name in quotes if it contains spaces, apache start service error 1069.

    Beware: You can do serious damage to your operating system if you delete a critical service. Proceed with caution!

  9. Windows Services: Overview

    How do I prevent a Windows Service from running?

    Most services are set to start automatically when Windows boots. These will show apache start service error 1069 with a Startup type of Automatic (or Automatic (Delayed Start)) in the Services Apache start service error 1069 Panel Applet:

    Windows Services Control Panel: Startup Type

    If starting at boot is not acceptable, you can change the Startup type to one of the following: apache start service error 1069 — The service should only start on demand, when explicitly requested to do so by a user (or by an application). This is the appropriate choice when you want to start and stop the service yourself.

  10. Disabled — The service cannot be started by any user or program. Choose this option to totally disallow the service from running. Be sure not to disable any important Windows Service!
  11. Of course, deleting a service is another way to prevent it from running but that is only recommended if you know what you are doing and can take full responsibility for the consequences!

  • Windows Services: Overview

    How do I start (or stop) my Windows Service at a particular time?

    Use the Windows Task Scheduler to create a scheduled javascript error undefined variable audio running the NET command to start/stop the service at a time of your choosing.

    For example, suppose you have a backup that happens every Saturday from 8-10 PM and you wish to stop your service during that period, apache start service error 1069. You would create two scheduled tasks — one to stop the service at 8 and another to start it at 10.

    The task to stop the service would run this command:

    NET STOP "service-name"

    The task to start it up again would execute:

    NET START "service-name"

    In both cases, "service-name" is the name of your service as shown in the Control Panel Services application.

    Follow this tutorial to create a scheduled task.

  • Windows Services: Overview

    How can I grant a user the right to start/stop/restart a service?

    Every Windows Service has an Access Control List (ACL) recording who is allowed to start, stop or restart it. Here are three ways to manipulate a service's ACL to grant or deny specific rights:

    1. Use Service Security Editor a free point-and-click GUI tool for adjusting any service's rights. Simply select the service, identify the user, and specify the operations that he is allowed to perform.

    2. Use the SC command line tool, as described in this tutorial, apache start service error 1069. However working with SC can be very complicated, involving the composition of lengthy, hand-crafted command lines. It is not recommended for the faint-hearted!

    3. Use the SubInACL command line utility, available for download from Microsoft and documented in Method 3 on this Windows Support page. It is apache start service error 1069 to use than SC but still requires careful attention.

      For example, apache start service error 1069, if you have a user called "MikeJones" in the "SANFRAN" domain that you want to start and stop the "Print Spooler" service, you would run:

      SubInACL.exe /service Spooler /GRANT=SANFRAN\MikeJones=TO
  • Windows Services: Overview

    How do I add a dependency to a service?

    The SC command can be used to set the dependencies on a given service. Use it like this:

    SC CONFIG <service-name> depend= <service-1>[/<service-2>/./<service-N>]

    where <service-name> is the name of the service you wish to change, and <service-1> to <service-N> are the names of the dependent services. Note: The space after "depend=" is required, so don't forget it.

    For example, to add the Windows Firewall as a dependency of the Google Update Service (so that the firewall is always running when updating Google's software), you would:

    1. Open services.msc and find the service name of the Google Update Service. It is "gupdate".

      Google Update Service Properties

    2. Switch to the Dependencies tab and make a note of the services already there. Find their names. There is only one, the Remote Procedure Call service, named "RpcLocator". This is necessary because we don't want to lose the existing dependencies.

      Google Update Service Dependencies

    3. Find the name of the Windows Firewall service. It is "MpsSvc", apache start service error 1069.

      Windows Firewall Service <a href=Oki 5650 980 fatal error Use the SC command to update the dependencies of the Google Update Service to include the Windows Firewall service. The command line is:

      SC CONFIG gupdate depend= RpcLocator/MpsSvc

      Be sure to run it from an elevated command prompt:

      Run SC to Set Dependencies

    4. Open the Google Update Service in services.msc and confirm that the dependencies have been updated:

      Google Update Service Dependencies - Updated

  • Windows Services: Overview

    How do I set the description of a service?

    You can change a service's description using the versatile SC command. Call it like this:

    SC DESCRIPTION [service-name] [new-description]

    For example, to update the description of the Apache windows service (named "Apache2.4"), run:

    SC DESCRIPTION Apache2.4 "An excellent open-source HTTP web server"

    Administrative privileges are required to make this change so be sure to run the command from an elevated prompt.

  • Windows Services: Overview

    How do I set the executable of a service?

    While it may be tempting to fire up regedit.exe and directly modify the registry keys recording the service under HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\System\CurrentControlSet\Services, it is safer to use the versatile SC command to change the executable invoked by the service, apache start service error 1069.

    To set the executable for a service named "MyService", you would run:

    SC CONFIG MyService binPath= "<The full path to your executable>"

    Note that the oddly placed space separating binPath= from the executable's path is actually required. Don't eliminate it!

    And be sure to enclose the path in quotes if it contains a space.

  • Windows Services: Overview

    How do I export a list of the Windows Services installed on my server?

    There are a couple of options for exporting your services:

    Option #1: Export to Text or CSV from the Services application

    1. Start the services application (from the Control Panel or by running "services.msc");

    2. Select Export List from the Action menu;

    3. Specify a file name (and choose Text or CSV format) for the exported services.

    The report will include the following values for each service: Name, Description, Status, Startup Type, Log On As. Here's what a CSV export looks like in Excel:

    Services.msc: CSV export

    Option #2: Export to XML with Windows Service Auditor

    1. Download Windows Service Auditor (it's free);

    2. Start Windows Service Auditor;

    3. Select Export (XML) from the All Services menu;

    4. Specify a file name for the exported services.

    The file will be in XML format, with a detailed record per service (including dependencies, recovery/failure options, triggers and more):

    Windows Service Auditor: Export services to XML
  • Windows Services: Overview

    Can a Windows Service access a mapped drive?

    Yes, but not without employing the proper configuration and doing some extra work.

    A mapped drive exists only in the account in which the mapping was created. Thus the LocalSystem account, the default for all window services, will not "see" any drives mapped into a regular, interactive user account.

    Configuring your service to run in a specific user's account (via the Log On setting) has the potential to overcome the problem, but unfortunately persistent network connections are not restored by the service's non-interactive login. To access the drive by letter, your service must explicitly map the network drive by either:

    1. Running the versatile NET USE command (something like "NET USE W: \\server\folder" — no password should be necessary), or

    2. Calling the powerful WNetAddConnection2 API function if you can modify the code.

    Note that a service can access the drive's underlying UNC path ("\\server\folder") without having to perform the steps above. Consider having your service work with the UNC path instead of the drive letter if you can. apache start service error 1069 src="https://cdn.coretechnologies.com/images/top.jpg" width="50" height="18" alt="Windows Services: Overview">

    When should I use a scheduled task instead of a Windows Service?

    Using a scheduled task to run your application or batch file may be superior to a windows service when:

    1. You want to run at a few fixed times each day, week or month.

      For example, a batch file that periodically deletes the contents of a temporary folder would be perfect as a scheduled task. Services are better suited for running 24/7.

    2. You want to run whenever a user logs in, potentially bypassing the UAC prompt.

      A windows service doesn't provide that capability.

    3. You can do without error reporting when your application/batch file fails to start.

      All such errors from a windows service are reported to the Windows Event Log.

    4. You don't need to start or stop your application manually.

      Services are easily started and stopped from the services control panel (or from the command line), but there is no such "console" to manage the ad-hoc execution of a scheduled task.

    5. You don't need to start or stop your task from a remote machine.

      There is no equivalent of "NET START" and "NET STOP" for a scheduled task.

    6. You don't care about restarting (or taking more elaborate actions) when your application crashes.

      The Task Scheduler does not offer any of the recovery options available to windows services.

    In summary, a scheduled task is often better for periodic, maintenance-type chores that don't demand sophisticated control.

  • apache start service error 1069 width="50" height="18" alt="Windows Services: Overview">

    Can I use SC to install my executable to run as a Windows Service?

    Yes, SC will happily install any exe file as a service, but the executable will only start if it is a "true" Windows Service — one explicitly constructed to interface with the Windows Service Control Manager (SCM). Regular, non-service executables will fail with error 1053 when you try to start them from the Services Control Panel.

  • Windows Services: Overview

    How can my Windows Service access an ODBC connection?

    If you want your service to access a user-specific ODBC data source (a "user DSN"), set the user's account on the service's Log On apache start service error 1069

    Windows Services Control Panel: Log On tab

  • Windows Services: Overview

    Are Windows Services available on UNIX/Linux?

    No. Windows Services can only exist on Windows operating apache start service error 1069.

    UNIX implements long running daemons in a very different way.

  • Windows Services: Overview

    What is an elevated/administrative command prompt? How do I start one?

    The command prompt is a Windows application that accepts textual commands to control your computer. It is typically used by administrators and other technical users who are comfortable typing instructions instead of manipulating graphical applications.

    The command prompt can be started by running CMD.EXE; its distinctive window looks like this:

    Windows Command Prompt

    An elevated command prompt is a command prompt started with administrative rights.

    With full rights, apache start service error 1069, an elevated command prompt can run many administrative tasks, such as installing software, updating system files and manipulating windows services. A normal ("unelevated") command prompt cannot perform those privileged operations.

    How to start an elevated command prompt

    1. Click the Start button.

    2. Type cmd.

    3. After a few seconds, an entry for the command prompt (or cmd) should appear in the list of results. Right-click that entry and select Run as administrator:

      Start Command Prompt as administrator

    4. You may be prompted to confirm that you want to run as an administrator. Click Yes to proceed:

      Confirm run as administrator

    The elevated command prompt window will appear on your desktop.

  • Windows Services: Overview

    My service is stuck in the "Stop Pending" (or "Start Pending") state. How do I stop it?

    This short video shows you how to forcibly stop a stuck service:

    A pending state usually means one of two things. Either:

    • the service is working normally and is just taking a long time to complete a necessary operation, or
    • the service has hung and is not interacting normally with the Windows Services Control Manager.

    If you have waited long enough to rule out the first situation, then we have the second, and the only way to stop the service is to reboot the machine or terminate its underlying process. To terminate the process:

    1. Find the process identifier (PID) of the Service's process using the SC command. For a Service named MyService, run:

      sc queryex MyService

      (Be sure to enclose the service name in quotes if it contains spaces.)

      Here is the result for the UI0Detect Service:

      Using SC to query Service information

      Make a note of the number on the PID line (4388 in the screenshot above).

    2. Run the taskkill command to forcibly terminate the process. For PID 4338, use:
      taskkill /F /T /PID 4388
      You should see a SUCCESS message if all went well:

      Using Taskkill to terminate a process

      If you get "Access Denied", please ensure apache start service error 1069 you have the necessary administrative privileges by running the Command Prompt as an Administrator. (Darn UAC!)

  • Windows Services: Overview

    My Windows Service fails to start (or stops working unexpectedly), apache start service error 1069. How do I figure out what's wrong?

    Most Windows Services report information, warnings and errors to the Windows Event Logs, so start there. You can review those messages using the Windows Event Viewer Control panel application.

    Windows Services will place their messages in the Windows Logs > Application section (on the left hand side). The Source column in the central window contains the name of the service reporting the event. Here is an information event reported by the Avira AntiVir service:

    Event Viewer: Windows Service Information Message

    When a Service encounters a problem and cannot create a log entry, the Service Control Manager (SCM) will write an entry in the Windows Logs > System section. For example, here is the SCM telling us why the ActiveBooks service failed to start:

    Event Viewer: System log - logon error

    Hopefully the Event Log messages will shed some light on what is going wrong!

  • Windows Services: Overview

    My application works when I run it normally but it fails when started from a Windows Service. What is the problem?

    You probably need to specify an account that can run the application normally on the service's Log On tab:

    Windows Services Control Panel: Log On tab

    By default, your service is run in the LocalSystem account which may be very different from the account that you log in to. Your application will encounter trouble if it:

    • Uses a printer or a network apache start service error 1069 and LocalSystem does not have sufficient rights to use those devices
    • Has never been installed in the LocalSystem account and com + error_operation_aborted + cancelio cannot find its settings there
    • Needs to access registry values or environment variables in your "normal" account

    Specifying your normal account on the Log On tab should solve those kind of problems.

  • Windows Services: Overview

    Why doesn't my Windows Service start automatically after a reboot?

    There can be many reasons why a service doesn't start automatically as expected. Check the Windows Event Log to see if you can find out what happened as the OS booted up.

    The most common problems include:

    1. The service has the wrong password. Update the password on the service's Logon tab and you should be good to go.
    2. A dependent service fails to start. Determine why the dependent service is failing and resolve the issue, or remove the dependency if doing so won't compromise your system.
    3. The service logs on as a domain user and it is starting before Active Directory is ready. Set your service's Startup type to Automatic (Delayed Start) to give AD time to spin up and log you into the account you have specified.
    4. A required resource is unavailable at boot. For example, if your service uses a database but the database is not yet fully initialized when your service starts, the service may quickly shut down. Check your service's log files for concrete errors and add dependencies on any other critical services that are needed for support. Setting your service to start Automatic (Delayed Start) to give other components more time to start up in advance may also resolve the issue.
    5. The service is missing its executable or important DLLs. Check that the service's executable is present and that all necessary DLLs and other files are in place. Use the excellent Dependency Walker utility to identify missing components, and keep mind that re-running your service's installer may help by restoring missing files.
  • Windows Services: Overview

    The Stop button is greyed out. How do I stop the service?

    The Stop button is unavailable when the service is busy and unable to accept a request to stop, apache start service error 1069. If the service is off doing its work, simply waiting some time for the pending tasks to be completed may resolve the situation.

    If you have waited a while and the problem persists, the next potential solution is to forcibly terminate the service's underlying executable using TASKKILL (or via the Task Manager), but this may not be a viable option when the process is hosting many services (like Microsoft's svchost). In that second situation a reboot may be your only recourse.

  • Windows Services: Overview

    My service is disabled. How do I start it?

    You cannot start a disabled service. Not with NET START, SC START or even via the Services application.

    To start the service you have to "un-disable" it first, apache start service error 1069. That is, you must set its Startup type to Manual, Automatic or Automatic (Delayed). That is best done via the Services application (services.msc):

    hp 2420dn 52 .00 error alt="Set Service Startup Type">

    You should be able to start the service once you have made that change.

    Note that you can also re-enable your service from the command line using the SC command. Run:

    SC config <Service-Name> start= demand

    where <Service-Name> is the name of the service, apache start service error 1069.

    Replace "demand" with "auto" to have Windows start the service automatically at boot (instead of manually, on demand).

  • Windows Services: Overview
  • Windows Services: Overview

    What changed in Windows Vista (2006)?

    Microsoft made significant adjustments to Windows Services in Vista. The main changes are:

    • Session 0 is now "isolated" and no user can log in there to interact with the GUI from a Service. This change — effected primarily for security concerns — makes it much more difficult to work with GUI-based Windows Services. The situation is extensively discussed in the "Can a Windows Service have a GUI?" entry.

    • In an attempt to reduce resource contention as the computer boots, services that should be started at boot now have the option of being delayed and starting shortly after boot. In practice, this means delaying service startup by 1-2 minutes — quite appropriate for some services.

      The new setting is available in the Startup type field — Automatic (Delayed Start):

      Windows Services Control Panel: Startup Type

    The complete technical details are available in this article from Microsoft Developer's Network.

  • Windows Services: Overview

    What changed in Windows 7 and Windows Server 2008 R2 (2009)?

    The adjustments made in 2009 were highly technical and not very visible to end users. Only the following is of note:

    • Services can be automatically started or stopped in response to one or more Trigger events. Trigger events include:

      • A specific device (e.g. memory stick) arrives or is present when the system starts
      • The port is opened or closed
      • A machine or user policy changes
      • The first IP address becomes available or the last IP address becomes unavailable
      Microsoft does not provide a GUI for managing triggers so you must use the SC command (or the free Service Trigger Editor).

    The complete technical details are available in this article from Microsoft Developer's Network.

  • Windows Services: Overview

    What changed in Windows 8 and Windows Server 2012?

    Not much. The few, highly technical adjustments error no valid rrsig resolving entirely "under the hood":

    • A service can retrieve information on how it was started
    • Services can be notified when a user initiates a reboot
    • Three new service triggers were introduced, but they are merely placeholders awaiting definition from Microsoft

    There were no user interface changes.

  • Windows Services: Overview

    What is Session 0 Isolation?

    A Session (also known as a Logon Session) is created whenever a user logs in to Windows. Each session has a numeric identifier, called a Session ID. Windows creates a single session when your PC boots and all the Windows Services (and many other administrative processes) will run in that session. Since the ID of that session is 0, it has been nicknamed Session 0.

    On Windows NT, 2000, apache start service error 1069, XP and Server 2003, the first user to log into the physical PC is automatically placed into the already created Session 0. A RDP/Terminal Services user can log in to Session 0 by specifying a special flag when opening the connection (/admin). And once in Session 0, a user can see and interact with the graphical elements of any program running there, including those created by Windows Services. In this way, Microsoft (perhaps inadvertently?) allowed users to freely interact with Windows Services that choose to display a user interface.

    Ultimately, Microsoft realized that easily allowing apache start service error 1069 to interact with Windows Services could lead to security problems. Indeed, a virus installing itself as a service running from a high privilege account could wreak havoc on a user's desktop!

    Microsoft's solution is to prohibit users from logging in to Session 0. The first user creates Session 1, the second Session 2, etc., and there is simply no way to access Session 0 via login. This policy — introduced in Windows Vista in 2006 — is known as Session 0 Isolation. It is described in great detail in this technical document from Microsoft.

    Session 0 Isolation is enforced in all current versions of Windows.

  • Windows Services: Overview

    How do I switch to Session 0 from the Command Line?

    You can switch to Session 0 from the command line by running:

    rundll32.exe winsta.dll,WinStationSwitchToServicesSession

    Save one of these files to your desktop to easily access Session 0 on demand:

    Note that the Interactive Services Detection service (UI0Detect) must be running for switching to work!

  • Windows Services: Overview

    Why doesn't "Allow service to interact with desktop" work on Windows 11/10/8 or Server 2022/2019/2016/2012?

    In older versions of Windows apache start service error 1069, 2000, XP and Server 2003), services are allowed to show their windows and tray icons on the desktop of the user logged on to the PC. This ability was enabled by checking the Allow service to interact with desktop option in the service's Log On properties:

    Windows Services Control Panel: Startup Type

    Although that setting still exists on Windows 11/10/8 or Server 2022/2019/2016/2012, it no longer has the desired effect, apache start service error 1069. Microsoft's security-centric Session 0 Isolation modifications ensure that no user can log on to Session 0 — the desktop where the windows created by a service are displayed. While checking the Allow service to interact with desktop box still enables the service's windows to be displayed in Session 0, since no user can log in to Session 0 to see the service's windows on a regular desktop, the setting has been effectively marginalized.

  • Windows Services: Overview

    How can I start my non-service application in Session 0?

    Sometimes it makes sense to launch an application on the isolated Session apache start service error 1069. For example, does the application work properly when launched in the context of a Windows Service?

    Microsoft's advanced "process-launcher" utility, PsExec, apache start service error 1069, will start any program in Session 0. Use it like this:

    psexec -i 0 -s <executable>

    where:

    <executable> is the full path to the program to run,
    -i 0 indicates to start the process interatively in Session 0, and
    -s runs the process in the system account. (Optional — omit it to run the process with your own credentials.)

    For example, apache start service error 1069, this line will start the command prompt in the system account in Session 0:

    psexec -i 0 -s C:\Windows\System32\cmd.exe

    You can switch to Session 0 and run whoami at the prompt to confirm that it is running as the system user:

    CMD running in Session 0

  • Windows Services: Overview

    What does it mean to start my service Automatic (Delayed Start)?

    Automatic Delayed Start

    Services configured to start Automatic will be immediately kicked off by Windows as the machine boots up. In contrast, those set to Automatic (Delayed Start) will be held back from that first wave and will start 2 minutes after the last Automatic service is launched.

    The setting is most useful in two respects:

    1. It can alleviate the "mad rush" at boot, when all services try to start simultaneously. By designating non-critical services for a delayed start, the really important services can secure a larger slice of the machine's precious resources and become available sooner.

    2. It can delay a service from starting until other critical supporting services are operational. For example, without the delay it is possible for a service to start before the network is fully initialized, leading to very strange problems.

  • Windows Services: Overview

    How do I adjust when "Automatic (Delayed start)" services are started?

    By default, services designated as "Automatic (Delayed start)" start 2 minutes after the last "Automatic" service is launched. That delay can be adjusted for all services by changing (or adding) the AutoStartDelay (DWORD/REG_DWORD) value in the registry:

    HKLM\SYSTEM\CurrentControlSet\Control\AutoStartDelay

    The value is in milliseconds.

    For example, this screenshot shows us setting a 10 minute (600000 millisecond) delay:

    Set the AutoStartDelay registry value

    Please keep in mind that this setting applies to all delay-start services. Use it with caution!

  • Windows Services: Overview

    What are "Trigger Start Services"?

    Instead of starting automatically at boot or manually (on demand), a service can be configured to start (or stop) in response to specific operating system events. A service starting from an event is called a Trigger Start Service.

    Trigger Start Services were introduced in Windows 7 and Server 2008 R2 (2009). They were created to improve efficiency and speed up the boot apache start service error 1069 after Microsoft realized that many of the 100+ services set to start automatically at boot and run 24/7 in the background didn't really need to be active all the time. The trigger mechanism was put in place to encourage services to remain dormant until needed.

    Looking at the Services application on sharp ar 5012 error l1 Windows Server 2019 machine, apache start service error 1069, there are more than 60 Trigger Start Services installed. Each says Automatic (Trigger Start) or Manual (Trigger Start) in the Startup Type column. Here are a few:

    Trigger Start Services

    Strangely, you won't see any mention of a trigger when you examine a Trigger Start Service's properties. The Startup type simply says "Automatic" or "Manual" and there are no trigger settings to be found anywhere (as seen with the DNS Client service):

    DNS Client service: Properties

    Use Service Trigger Editor to examine and manage Trigger Start Services. Our free utility shows you what events start or stop the service, allow you to add other triggering events, and much more.

    Here is Service Trigger Editor working with the DNS Client service:

    Service Trigger Editor

  • Windows Services: Overview

    Error 5: Access is denied

    Error 5 denotes a lack of permissions. Your Windows account does not have the rights apache start service error 1069 to work with the service.

    Windows will usually inform you where your account falls short. For example, you may apache start service error 1069 be able to start the service:

    Error 5: Access denied starting service

    Or you may not be able to open the service:

    Error 5: Access denied opening service

    In any case, your only recourse is to seek additional rights for your account. Your systems administrator (or our free Service Security Editor utility) should be able to help.

  • Windows Services: Overview

    Error 1053: The service did not respond to the start or control request in a timely render creation error unknown framebuffer mode src="https://www.coretechnologies.com/WindowsServices/windows-service-error-1053.png" alt="Windows Service Error 1053">

    This error comes up about 30 seconds after an attempt to start the service, because the service fails to report to the Windows Service Control Manager (SCM) that it has started. You're probably facing one of the following problems:

    1. The application being launched by the service is not a true windows service. Only an executable specifically constructed to interact with the SCM can signal that it has started and is running properly. A non-service application — such as a batch file or program you normally launch from a desktop icon — will not send the required signal and eventually the SCM will give up waiting and declare that the service failed to start.

      If you are unable (or unwilling) to modify your application's code to make it a true windows service, you can use a "wrapper" to start your application as a service. Microsoft's Srvany will do the basic job for free but more robust commercial alternatives are also available.

    2. Your windows service application is taking too long to start and report back to the SCM. If you have access to the code, restructure the application logic to move expensive operations (such as accessing a database, web site or other remote resource) outside of the startup sequence (OnStart() in C# programs).

    3. Your windows service application is getting hung during startup and never tells the SCM that it has started. If this is your own code, it is time to debug! Either attach the debugger, or sprinkle your startup code with print statements to see where your application is going astray. Watch out for calls to MessageBox() and other blocking functions!

  • Windows Services: Overview

    Error 1061: The service cannot accept control messages at this time

    Windows Service Error 1061

    This mysterious message comes up when a service is unable to perform the operation you attempted, apache start service error 1069. Essentially, your request arrived at a "bad time", when the service is unable to fulfill it.

    At any given time, the operations a service can perform depend on its current state — what it's doing. For example, a running service may accept the Stop command but not the Pause or Resume commands.

    To determine what is allowed, Windows asks a service the following question: What operations can you currently perform? The service responds with a list of what it can do.

    You encounter Error 1061 when you try to perform an action that is not on the list of allowed operations.

  • Windows Services: Overview

    Error apache start service error 1069 The process terminated unexpectedly

    Windows Service Error 1067

    This error occurs when the process created by the service exits quickly, without notifying the Windows Service Control Manager (SCM), apache start service error 1069. It can happen for a variety of reasons, including:

    1. There is a configuration problem preventing eliminar error 5 canon mp160 service application from starting properly. Check that configuration files are in the expected locations with valid contents, and that startup options reflect reality.

    2. The process being launched by the service is missing a required component (DLL, library, or other file). Re-installing the service may help here, but watch for dependencies as well. For example, apache start service error 1069, a C# service will fail with 1067 when the underlying .NET installation is corrupt and should be re-installed.

    If you remain in the dark after considering the above, examine the Windows Event Logs. Sometimes a failing service will leave an important clue there before it dies.

  • Windows Services: Overview

    Error 1068: The dependency service or group failed to start

    Windows Service Error 1068

    Apparently your service relies on other services to support its work, and one of those services is unable to start properly. You can identify the dependent services in the Services Control panel:

    Windows Service Dependencies

    Rule out the ones already running; try to start each of the others in turn and identify the culprit!

  • Windows Services: Overview

    Error 1069: The service did not start due to a logon failure

    Windows Service Error 1069

    This error happens when your service is configured to run in a specific user account but that account's password was recently changed, apache start service error 1069. The fix is simple; edit your service in services.msc and specify the new password on the service's Log On tab:

    Windows Services Control Panel: Log On tab

  • Windows Services: Overview

    Error 1072: Apache start service error 1069 specified service has been marked for deletion

    Windows Service Error 1072

    This error happens when your service has been uninstalled but Windows was unable to remove all its associated files because of a conflict. Usually it is caused by having the service open in a service-aware program, like the Services Control Panel, the Windows Event Viewer, or even the Windows Task Manager. Closing all those applications may be enough to have the service fully removed, but if that doesn't work a reboot should do the trick.

  • Windows Services: Overview

    What is Srvany?

    Srvany is a utility developed by Microsoft that can start almost any regular, non-service application as a Windows Service.

    Since a Windows Service must be specially constructed to interface with the operating system (to allow Windows to start, stop or pause it on demand), a regular application without this interface will not function properly as a Service. To solve the problem, Microsoft developed Srvany — an "adapter" (or "wrapper") that can accept the Windows Service commands and translate those into actions that a regular executable seagate spin error 1009 understand.

    Like any good adapter, Srvany is installed in between Windows and the application and handles all interaction between them. For example, when Windows says "Start the service", Srvany intercepts the request and starts the application as if you had double-clicked on it yourself.

    Srvany was developed in the late 1990's for Windows NT and remains mostly unchanged to this day. It is available as part of the Windows Server 2003 Resource Kit Tools package.

  • Windows Services: Overview

    What is Instsrv?

    Instsrv is a Microsoft-developed utility used to install a Srvany Service. It does not participate in the actual running of an application as a service — it just helps with the installation.

  • errordoctor 2007 serial Services: Overview">
  • Windows Services: Overview
  • Windows Services: Overview

    Is there a new version of Srvany for Windows Server 2008? For Windows 7?

    No. Srvany and Instsrv were last released with Windows Server 2003 and no modifications have been made for Windows 7, Vista, Server 2008 or Server 2008 R2.

    Note that these tools will work fine on Windows 2008 and Windows 7, but their lack of knowledge of recent developments in Windows Services (Session Zero isolation, Service Triggers, etc.) can sometimes present problems. Please be cautions in a error* edid checksum is invalid environment!

  • Windows Services: Overview

    Is Srvany supported on Windows Server 2008? Windows 7?

    No. While Srvany.exe runs fine on Windows Server 2008/R2, Srvany (and the rest of the Windows Server 2003 Resource Kit Tools) are only supported on Windows Server 2003 and Windows XP, apache start service error 1069. And even then, the official documentation accompanying the resource kit cautions:

    The SOFTWARE supplied in the Windows Resource Kit Tools is not supported under any Microsoft standard support program or service.
  • Windows Services: Overview

    Is Srvany supported on Windows Server 2012? Windows 8/8.1?

    No. While Srvany.exe runs fine on Windows Server 2012 (and its R2 variant), Srvany (and the rest of the Windows Server 2003 Resource Kit Tools) are only supported on Windows Server 2003 and Windows XP. And even then, the official documentation accompanying the resource kit cautions:

    The SOFTWARE supplied in the Windows Resource Kit Tools is apache start service error 1069 supported under any Microsoft standard support program or service.
  • Windows Services: Overview

    Is Srvany supported on Windows 10? Windows Server 2019?

    No. While Srvany.exe runs fine on Windows 10 and Server 2019, Srvany (and the rest of the Windows Server 2003 Resource Kit Tools) are only supported on Windows Server 2003 and Windows XP. And even then, the official documentation accompanying the resource kit cautions:

    The SOFTWARE supplied in the Windows Resource Kit Tools is not supported under any Microsoft standard support program or service.
  • Windows Services: Overview

    Is Srvany supported on 64-bit Windows?

    No. Even though the 32-bit executable runs fine apache start service error 1069 64-bit versions of Windows, Srvany (and the rest of the Windows Server 2003 Resource Kit Tools) are not officially supported on 64-bit platforms. There is no 64-bit version of Srvany.exe.

  • Windows Services: Overview

    Will Srvany close my application when I stop the service?

    Yes, but somewhat abruptly.

    Instead of sending the usual WM_CLOSE or WM_QUIT messages to gracefully shut down the application, Srvany will forcibly terminate it. This can be quite disruptive, as highlighted in the old Srvany documentation (Srvany.wri, included with the original Windows NT 4.0 resource kit):

    "WARNING: When the service is stopped, it terminates the application via the WIN32 TerminateProcess() API: this is a drastic way to end an application. For example, it would not allow the apache start service error 1069 to prompt the user to save changes. Therefore, it is recommended to close the application BEFORE stopping the service."
  • Windows Services: Overview

    How do I remove a Srvany service?

    A service created with Srvany is much like any other and can be removed using the versatile SC command.

    The service can also be removed using the Instsrv utility. Run it like this:

    Instsrv MyService remove
  • Windows Services: Overview

    If my program crashes, will Srvany start it again?

    Unfortunately, no. Srvany doesn't monitor your application in any way and will not run a new copy if it fails.

    Indeed, Srvany may continue to run even after your application exits! You can't rely on the service's status to tell you if your application is up or not.

  • Windows Services: Overview

    Can I use Srvany to run multiple applications on a single server?

    Yes, you can install as many Srvany-created services as you like — each with its own unique name of course! Even though each service will reference the same Srvany.exe file, each service will run entirely independently and can be managed as such.

  • Windows Services: Overview

    Why can't my application access mapped drives when run with Srvany?

    This is not a "Srvany thing" — by default, Windows Services do not have access to mapped drive letters. UNC paths (which look like "\\Server\Path") should be fully accessible, but if using them is not an option this answer discusses some ways to make mapped drives available in the context of a Windows Service.

  • Windows Services: Overview

    Can a Windows Service have a GUI? Should a Windows Service have a GUI?

    Can it? Yes.

    Should it? No.

    But things are never that black and white.

    First, realize that the Windows Services architecture does not impose any GUI-related restrictions on a service. Services are free to create windows, tray icons, alert boxes or any other GUI elements, just like conventional windows applications can. The key question is this: When a service creates a window, where will it be shown?

    By default, the GUI elements from a Service appear in Session 0 — the session/desktop created by Windows when your PC boots. A user logging in to Session 0 can see the windows from a Service and interact with them normally. Interactive services "just work" there.

    On Windows 2000, XP and Server 2003, the first non-remote user to log in to the PC was placed in Session 0. If you walked up to the keyboard and mouse and logged in, apache start service error 1069, you would almost surely end up in Session 0. Remote users could log in to Session 0 by starting the Remote Desktop application with the "/admin" flag. For those users, interactive services worked as expected and many Windows programs were architected to take advantage of that.

    However, Microsoft changed the playing field for interactive services in Windows Vista (2007). Session 0 has been "isolated", and no user is allowed to log in there. (This was done mainly for security concerns — a virus infecting a service could force itself onto any user's desktop, which the folks at Redmond recognized as a security risk.) The upshot is that the windows from a Service will no longer show obsdx9 .exe error on any user's desktop, effectively dealing a death blow the entire notion of interactive services.

    Realizing that it would be difficult to do away with interactive services by decree however, Microsoft made several concessions to keep interactive services on life support. The Interactive Services Detection Service (ISDS) was introduced to alert a user whenever a service shows a window or message box on Session 0. After flashing a few times on the task bar, the window it displays looks like this:

    Interactive Services Detection Dialog

    Clicking on the View the message button initiates a gut wrenching transition from the normal desktop to the very strange looking world of Session 0 where the Service's windows are running (Notepad.exe in this case):

    Session 0 Desktop

    Despite the austere appearance, you can interact normally with your service's windows in Session 0. And when you are done, clicking on the Return now button will magically transport you back you to your regular desktop.

    It is easy to see that most users would be inconvenienced by always having to perform such an awkward switch to Session 0 to interact with an application. This effectively limits the attractiveness of an interactive service and any sane computer professional will certainly recommend against constructing one today!

  • Windows Services: Overview

    Can a Windows Service start a GUI application?

    Yes, a service can definitely launch a GUI application.

    However, that application will run in Session 0 — the background desktop where services reside. You will not see the application on your desktop.

  • Windows Services: Overview

    Why won't the Interactive Service Detection service start on Windows 8 and Windows Server 2012?

    Attempting to start the Interactive Service Detection (UI0Detect) service on Windows 8 and Windows Server 2012 can fail with the incomprehensible "Error 1: Incorrect function" message:

    UI0Detect fails to start - Error 1: Incorrect function

    This is because Microsoft has disabled interactive services in these new operating systems!

    Fortunately, it is easy to re-enable interactive services by editing the registry:

    1. Start the registry editor ("regedit.exe")
    2. Navigate to HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SYSTEM\CurrentControlSet\Control\Windows on the left side
    3. On the right, double-click the NoInteractiveServices entry and change its value from 1 to 0
    4. Click OK to record your change
    5. Close the registry editor

    Enable Interactive Services with the NoInteractiveServices registry value

    The Interactive Service Detection service should start properly after this change.

  • Windows Services: Overview

    How do I disable/suppress the Interactive Services Detection Dialog?

    There are three ways to prevent the Interactive Services Detection Dialog from alerting you of a GUI application running in Session 0. All involve stopping the Interactive Services Detection (ISD) service, which runs in the background and summons the ISD dialog whenever it detects activity in Session 0:

    1. Stop the Interactive Services Detection Service

      Simply stopping the service will cause the dialog to disappear. This may not be a permanent fix though; the dialog may return if someone else (or another application) restarts the service.

      To stop the service, run "services.msc", right-click on the Interactive Services Detection entry in the list and select Stop from the menu:

      Stop the Interactive Services Detection Service

    2. Disable the Interactive Services Detection Service

      By changing the service's startup type to Disabled, you will ensure that no person (or application) can start the service. The dialog will never be shown.

      To disable the service, run "services.msc", double-click on the Interactive Services Detection entry in the list and change the Startup type to Disabled:

      Disable the Interactive Services Detection Service

    3. Set the NoInteractiveServices registry key

      When it starts, The ISD service checks the NoInteractiveServices registry key. If the value is 1, the service will refuse to start, and you will never see the ISD dialog.

      Follow these instructions to set the NoInteractiveServices registry key — just set the DWORD value to 1 instead of 0.

    Note that the Interactive Services Detection service also provides the ability to switch to Session 0 to view your Session 0 desktop. Switching to Session 0 will not be available when the ISD service is not running!

  • Windows Services: Overview

    Why can't I switch to Session 0 on Windows 10?

    Unfortunately access to Session 0 has been removed in Windows 10 and Server 2019. And it's not coming back!

    Note that services and applications continue to run as normal in Session 0 — you just can't see them.

    This article digs into the technical details.

  • Windows Services: Overview