Antiterror alfa accosiation of veterans

antiterror alfa accosiation of veterans

RUSSIAN FEDERATION VINTAGE SEWING PATCH. ASSOCIATION OF VETERANS OF THE SPECIAL DIVISION OF ANTITERRORISM ALFA-K (RUSSIA F P-03). Kyiv branch of the International Association of veterans of anti-terror unit "Alpha"National Academy of Administration of Culture and Arts. The head of the Public Organization of Veterans of Alpha Anti-Terrorist Unit in the Kyrgyz Republic, General Arthur Medetbekov told 24.kg. antiterror alfa accosiation of veterans

Antiterror alfa accosiation of veterans - situation familiar

Alfa veteran Goncharov explained that the assassination attempt on Abe became possible due to a security error

The President of the Association of Veterans of the Alpha Anti-Terror Unit, Sergey Goncharov, explained the mistake of the guards of the former Prime Minister of Japan Shinzo Abe, who allowed the assassination of the politician. He spoke about this in a conversation with Pravda.ru.

According to the veteran, the assassination attempt became possible because the ex-premier was not organized a real security service for a high-ranking official. “In this case, no security in the sense in which I understand, and those who deal with security issues understand, nothing was organized,” he said.

In addition, he assessed the work of the security guards as poor, because they stood behind Abe and did not react to anything. According to him, an indicator of this is the fact that the criminal managed to “approach with a sawn-off shotgun and shoot the ex-premier twice in the back.” “In this situation, this is an absolute blunder of those people who organized this speech by the former prime minister,” Goncharov stated.

Earlier, an expert in the field of integrated security, a veteran of the special forces unit of the Vityaz security group of companies, Petr Fefelov, also said that the assassination of Shinzo Abe could have been avoided if the security service had not made a number of mistakes.

#Veteran #Alpha #explained #mistake #guards #killed #Abe

PTSD Treatment for Veterans: What’s Working, What’s New, and What’s Next

REFERENCES

1. Institute of Medicine Treatment for posttraumatic stress disorder in military and veteran populations final assessment. Report Brief June 2014. Available at: www.nationalacademies.org/hmd/~/media/Files/Report%20Files/2014/PTSD-II/PTSD-II-RB.pdf. Accessed April 1, 2016. [PubMed] [Google Scholar]

2. U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs How common is PTSD? Aug 13, 2015. Available at: www.ptsd.va.gov/public/PTSD-overview/basics/how-common-is-ptsd.asp. Accessed March 23, 2016.

3. Norris FH, Slone LB. Understanding research on the epidemiology of trauma and PTSD. PTSD Research Quarterly. 2013;24(2–3):1–13. Available at: www.ptsd.va.gov/professional/newsletters/research-quarterly/V24n2-3.pdf. Accessed March 15, 2016. [Google Scholar]

4. American Public Health Association Removing barriers to mental health services for veterans. Available at: www.apha.org/policies-and-advocacy/public-health-policy-statements/policy-database/2015/01/28/14/51/removing-barriers-to-mental-health-services-for-veterans. Accessed April 3, 2016.

5. Tanielian T, Jaycox LH, editors. Invisible Wounds of War: Psychological and Cognitive Injuries, Their Consequences, and Services to Assist Recovery. Santa Monica, California: RAND Corporation; 2008. [Google Scholar]

6. Swartz MH. Textbook of Physical Diagnosis: History and Examination. 7th ed. Philadelphia, Pennsylvania: Elsevier; 2014. [Google Scholar]

7. Abdul-Hamid WK, Hughes JH. Nothing new under the sun: post-traumatic stress disorders in the ancient world. Early Sci Med. 2014;19:549–557. [PubMed] [Google Scholar]

8. Iribarren J, Prolo P, Neago N, Chiappelli F. Post-traumatic stress disorder: evidence-based research for the third millennium. Evid Based Complement Alternat Med. 2005;2:503–512.[PMC free article] [PubMed] [Google Scholar]

9. Da Costa JM. On irritable heart: A clinical study of a form of functional cardiac disorder and its consequences. Am J Med Sci. 1871;61:17–52.[Google Scholar]

10. Crocq M-E. From shell shock and war neurosis to posttraumatic stress disorder: a history of psychotraumatology. Dialogues Clin Neurosci. 2000;2:47–55.[PMC free article] [PubMed] [Google Scholar]

11. American Psychiatric Association . Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders. 3rd ed. Washington, D.C.: American Psychiatric Association; 1980. [Google Scholar]

12. Eber S, Barth S, Kang H, et al. The National Health Study for a New Generation of United States Veterans: methods for a large-scale study on the health of recent veterans. Mil Med. 2013;178:966–969. [PubMed] [Google Scholar]

13. U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs PTSD in Iraq and Afghanistan veterans. Jun 3, 2015. Available at: www.publichealth.va.gov/epidemiology/studies/new-generation/ptsd.asp. Accessed July 1, 2016.

14. Thompson M. Unlocking the secrets of PTSD. Time. 2015;185:40–43. [PubMed] [Google Scholar]

15. Carlock D. A guide to resources for severely wounded Operation Iraqi Freedom (OIF) and Operation Enduring Freedom (OEF) veterans. Issues in Science and Technology Librarianship. 2007. Available at: www.istl.org/07-fall/internet2.html. Accessed April 5, 2016.

16. Kessler RC, Sonnega A, Bromet E, et al. Posttraumatic stress disorder in the National Comorbidity Survey. Arch Gen Psych. 1995;52:1048–1060. [PubMed] [Google Scholar]

17. Rytwinski NK, Scur MD, Feeny NC, et al. The co-occurrence of major depressive disorder among individuals with posttraumatic stress disorder: a meta-analysis. J Trauma Stress. 2013;26:299–309. [PubMed] [Google Scholar]

18. Hoge CW, Auchterlonie JL, Milliken CS. Mental health problems, use of mental health services, and attrition from military service after returning from deployment to Iraq or Afghanistan. JAMA. 2006;295(9):1023–1032. [PubMed] [Google Scholar]

19. Milliken CS, Auchterlonie JL, Hoge CW. Longitudinal assessment of mental health problems among active and reserve component soldiers returning from the Iraq war. JAMA. 2007;298:2141–2148. [PubMed] [Google Scholar]

20. Richardson LK, Frueh BC, Acierno R. Prevalence estimates of combat-related post-traumatic stress disorder: critical review. Aust N Z J Psychiatry. 2010;44:4–19.[PMC free article] [PubMed] [Google Scholar]

21. Kulka RA, Schlenger WE, Fairbank JA, et al. The National Vietnam Veterans Readjustment Study: tables of findings and technical appendices. New York, New York: Brunner/Mazel; 1990. Available at: http://search.proquest.com/docview/42404631?accountid=28179. Accessed April 1, 2016. [Google Scholar]

22. Seal KH, Cohen G, Waldrop A, et al. Substance use disorders in Iraq and Afghanistan veterans in VA healthcare, 2001–2010: implications for screening, diagnosis and treatment. Drug Alcohol Depend. 2011;116:93–101. [PubMed] [Google Scholar]

23. McCauley JL, Killeen T, Gros DF, et al. Posttraumatic stress disorder and co-occurring substance use disorders: advances in assessment and treatment. Clin Psychol Sci Prac. 2012;19:283–304.[PMC free article] [PubMed] [Google Scholar]

24. Hamblen JL, Kivlahan D. PTSD and substance use disorders in veterans. U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs. Feb 23, 2016. Available at: www.ptsd.va.gov/professional/co-occurring/ptsd_sud_veterans.asp. Accessed July 1, 2016.

25. Gironda RJ, Clark ME, Massengale JP, Walker RL. Pain among veterans of Operations Enduring Freedom and Iraqi Freedom. Pain Medicine. 2016;7:339–343. [PubMed] [Google Scholar]

26. Clark ME. Post-deployment pain: a need for rapid detection and intervention. Pain Medicine. 2014;5:333–334. [PubMed] [Google Scholar]

27. U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs. Chronic pain and PTSD: a guide for patients. Aug 13, 2015. Available at: www.ptsd.va.gov/public/problems/pain-ptsd-guide-patients.asp. Accessed April 11, 2016.

28. Xue C, Ge Y, Tang B, et al. A meta-analysis of risk factors for combat-related PTSD among military personnel and veterans. PLoS One. 2015;10(3):e0120270.[PMC free article] [PubMed] [Google Scholar]

29. Management of Post-Traumatic Stress Working Group . VA/DoD Clinical Practice Guideline for the Management of Post-Traumatic Stress. Washington D.C.: Department of Veterans Affairs and Department of Defense; Oct, 2010. Available at: www.healthquality.va.gov/PTSD-FULL-2010c.pdf. Accessed June 5, 2016. [Google Scholar]

30. Magruder K, Serpi T, Kimerling R, et al. Prevalence of post-traumatic stress disorder in Vietnam-era women veterans: The Health of Vietnam-Era Women’s Study (HealthVIEWS) JAMA Psychiatry. 2015;72:1127–1134.[PMC free article] [PubMed] [Google Scholar]

31. Surís A, Lind L, Kashner TM, et al. Sexual assault in women veterans: an examination of PTSD risk, health care utilization, and cost of care. Psychosom Med. 2004;66:749–756. [PubMed] [Google Scholar]

32. Kimerling R, Gima K, Smith MW, et al. The Veterans Health Administration and military sexual trauma. Am J Public Health. 2007;97:2160–2166.[PMC free article] [PubMed] [Google Scholar]

33. American Psychiatric Association . Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders. 5th ed. Washington, D.C.: American Psychiatric Association; 2013. [Google Scholar]

34. U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs. How is PTSD measured? Aug 10, 2015. Available at: www.ptsd.va.gov/public/assessment/ptsd-measured.asp. Accessed April 4, 2016.

35. Weathers FW, Blake DD, Schnurr PP, et al. The Clinician- Administered PTSD Scale for DSM-5 (CAPS-5). 2013. Available at: www.ptsd.va.gov. Accessed March 29, 2016.

36. Wilkins KC, Lang AJ, Norman SB. Synthesis of the psychometric properties of the PTSD Checklist (PCL) military, civilian, and specific versions. Depress Anxiety. 2011;28:596–606.[PMC free article] [PubMed] [Google Scholar]

37. U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs. Mississippi Scale for Combat-Related PTSD (M-PTSD). Feb 23, 2016. Available at: www.ptsd.va.gov/professional/assessment/adult-sr/mississippi-scale-m-ptsd.asp. Accessed March 29, 2016.

38. Forbes D, Creamer M, Phelps A, et al. Australian Guidelines for the Treatment of Adults with Acute Stress Disorder and Post-traumatic Stress Disorder. Aust N Z J Psychiatry. 2007;41:637–648. [PubMed] [Google Scholar]

39. National Collaborating Centre for Mental Health (UK) NICE Clinical Guidelines, No. 26. Leicester (UK): Gaskell; 2005. Post-traumatic stress disorder: the management of PTSD in adults and children in primary and secondary care. [Google Scholar]

40. Ursano RJ, Bell C, Eth S, et al. Practice guideline for the treatment of patients with acute stress disorder and posttraumatic stress disorder. Am J Psychiatry. 2004;161(suppl 11):S3–S31. [PubMed] [Google Scholar]

41. Institute of Medicine Treatment of PTSD: an assessment of the evidence. Oct, 2007. Available at: http://nationalacademies.org/hmd/~/media/Files/Report%20Files/2007/Treatment-of-PTSD-An-Assessment-of-The-Evidence/PTSDReportBriefFINAL2.pdf. Accessed March 15, 2016.

42. Resick PA, Schnicke MK. Cognitive processing therapy for sexual assault victims. J Consult Clin Psychol. 1992;60:748–756. [PubMed] [Google Scholar]

43. Eftekhari A, Ruzek JI, Crowley JJ, et al. Effectiveness of national implementation of prolonged exposure therapy in Veterans Affairs care. JAMA Psychiatry. 2013;70(9):949–955. [PubMed] [Google Scholar]

44. U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs. Prolonged exposure therapy. Aug 14, 2015. Available at: www.ptsd.va.gov/public/treatment/therapy-med/prolonged-exposure-therapy.asp. Accessed April 5, 2016.

45. U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs. Cognitive processing therapy. Aug 14, 2015. Available at: www.ptsd.va.gov/public/treatment/therapy-med/cognitive_processing_therapy.asp. Accessed April 5, 2016.

46. Foa EB, Keane TM, Friedman MJ, Cohen JA, editors. Effective Treatments for PTSD: Practice Guidelines of the International Society for Traumatic Stress Studies. New York, New York: Guilford Press; 2009. [Google Scholar]

47. World Health Organization . Guidelines for the Management of Conditions Specifically Related to Stress. Geneva, Switzerland: WHO; 2013. [Google Scholar]

48. Puetz TW, Youngstedt SD, Herring MP. Effects of pharmacotherapy on combat-related PTSD, anxiety, and depression: A systematic review and meta-regression analysis. PLoS One. 2015;10(5):e0126529.[PMC free article] [PubMed] [Google Scholar]

49. Jeffreys M. Clinician’s guide to medications for PTSD. U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs. Available at: www.ptsd.va.gov/professional/treatment/overview/clinicians-guide-to-medications-for-ptsd.asp. Accessed April 4, 2016.

50. Berger W, Mendlowicz MV, Marques-Portella C, et al. Pharmacologic alternatives to antidepressants in posttraumatic stress disorder. Prog Neuropsychopharmacol Biol Psychiatry. 2009;33:169–180.[PMC free article] [PubMed] [Google Scholar]

51. Davidson J. Treatment of posttraumatic stress disorder with venlafaxine extended release: a 6-month randomized controlled trial. Arch Gen Psychiatry. 2006;63:1158–1165. [PubMed] [Google Scholar]

52. Effexor XR (venlafaxine HCl) prescribing information. Philadelphia, Pennsylvania: Wyeth Pharmaceuticals; Aug, 2015. Available at: http://labeling.pfizer.com/showlabeling.aspx?ID=100. Accessed December 19, 2015. [Google Scholar]

53. Davis LL, Jewell ME, Ambrose S, et al. A placebo-controlled study of nefazodone for the treatment of chronic posttraumatic stress disorder: a preliminary study. J Clinical Psychopharmacol. 2004;24:291–297. [PubMed] [Google Scholar]

54. McRae AL, Brady KT, Mellman TA, et al. Comparison of nefazodone and sertraline for the treatment of posttraumatic stress disorder. Depress Anxiety. 2004;19(3):190–196. [PubMed] [Google Scholar]

55. Schneier FR, Campeas R, Carcamo J, et al. Combined mirtazapine and SSRI treatment of PTSD: a placebo-controlled trial. Depress Anxiety. 2015;32(8):570–579.[PMC free article] [PubMed] [Google Scholar]

56. Krystal JH, Rosenheck RA, Cramer JA, et al. Adjunctive risperidone treatment for antidepressant-resistant symptoms of chronic military service-related PTSD. JAMA. 2011;306(5):493–502. [PubMed] [Google Scholar]

57. Raskind MA, Peskind ER, Hoff DJ, et al. A parallel group placebo controlled study of prazosin for trauma nightmares and sleep disturbance in combat veterans with post-traumatic stress disorder. Biol Psychiatry. 2007;61(8):928–934. [PubMed] [Google Scholar]

58. Yeh MS, Mari JJ, Costa MC, et al. A double-blind randomized controlled trial to study the efficacy of topiramate in a civilian sample of PTSD. CNS Neurosci Ther. 2011;17(5):305–310.[PMC free article] [PubMed] [Google Scholar]

59. Andrus MR, Gilbert E. Treatment of civilian and combat-related posttraumatic stress disorder with topiramate. Ann Pharmacother. 2010;44(11):1810–1816. [PubMed] [Google Scholar]

60. Greer GR, Grob CS, Halberstadt AL. PTSD symptom reports of patients evaluated for the New Mexico Medical Cannabis Program. J Psychoactive Drugs. 2014;46(1):73–77. [PubMed] [Google Scholar]

61. Forbes D, Creamer M, Bisson JI, et al. A guide to guidelines for the treatment of PTSD and related conditions. J Trauma Stress. 2010;23:537–552. [PubMed] [Google Scholar]

62. Cuijpers P, Sijbrandij M, Koole SL, et al. Adding psychotherapy to antidepressant medication in depression and anxiety disorders: a meta-analysis. World Psychiatry. 2014;13:56–67.[PMC free article] [PubMed] [Google Scholar]

63. U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs. Health Services Research and Development. RRP 13-242–HSR&D Study: Strategies to Improve PTSD Care. Mar 24, 2014. Available at: www.hsrd.research.va.gov/research/abstracts.cfm?Project_ID=2141703966. Accessed April 10, 2016.

64. Alderman CP, McCarthy LC, Marwood AC. Pharmacotherapy for post-traumatic stress disorder. Expert Rev Clin Pharmacol. 2009;2:77–86. [PubMed] [Google Scholar]

65. Ravindran LN, Stein MB. Pharmacotherapy of PTSD: premises, principles, and priorities. Brain Res. 2009;1293:24–39.[PMC free article] [PubMed] [Google Scholar]

66. Hoskins M, Pearce J, Bethell A, et al. Pharmacotherapy for post-traumatic stress disorder: systematic review and meta-analysis. Brit J Psych. 2015;206:93–100. [PubMed] [Google Scholar]

67. Congressional Budget Office. The Veterans Health Administration’s treatment of PTSD and traumatic brain injury among recent combat veterans. Feb, 2012. Available at: www.cbo.gov/sites/default/files/112th-congress-2011-2012/reports/02-09-PTSD_0.pdf. Accessed March 30, 2016. [Google Scholar]

68. Guina J, Welton RS, Broderick PJ, et al. DSM-5 criteria and its implications for diagnosing PTSD in military service members and veterans. Curr Psychiatry Rep. 2016;18(5):43. [PubMed] [Google Scholar]

69. U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs. U.S. Department of Defense. VA/DoD clinical practice guideline for assessment and management of patients at risk for suicide. Jun, 2103. Available at: www.healthquality.va.gov/guidelines/MH/srb/VADODCP_SuicideRisk_Full.pdf. Accessed April 1, 2016.

70. Reger MA, Smolenski DJ, Skopp NA, et al. Risk of suicide among U.S. military service members following Operation Enduring Freedom or Operation Iraqi Freedom deployment and separation from the U.S. military. JAMA Psychiatry. 2015;72:561–569. [PubMed] [Google Scholar]

71. Ramsawh HJ, Fullerton CS, Herberman Mash HB. Risk for suicidal behaviors associated with PTSD, depression, and their comorbidity in the U.S. Army. J Affect Disord. 2014;161:116–122. [PubMed] [Google Scholar]

72. Sareen J, Cox BJ, Stein MB, et al. Physical and mental comorbidity, disability, and suicidal behavior associated with posttraumatic stress disorder in a large community sample. Psychosom Med. 2007;69(3):242–248. [PubMed] [Google Scholar]

73. Fontana A, Rosenheck R. Attempted suicide among Vietnam veterans: a model of etiology in a community sample. Amer J Psychiatry. 1995;152:102–109. [PubMed] [Google Scholar]

74. U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs. Access Audit—System-Wide Review of Access (May 12, 2014–June 3, 2014). Available at: www.va.gov/health/docs/VAAccessAuditFindingsReport.pdf. Accessed August 18, 2016.

75. Oppel RA, Goodnough A. Doctor shortage is cited in delays at VA hospitals. The New York Times. 2014 May 29; Available at: www.nytimes.com/2014/05/30/us/doctor-shortages-cited-in-va-hospital-waits.html. Accessed January 20, 2016. [Google Scholar]

76. Department of Defense Task Force on Mental Health . An Achievable Vision: Report of the Department of Defense Task Force on Mental Health. Falls Church, Virginia: Defense Health Board; 2007. [Google Scholar]

77. Institute of Medicine Committee on Crossing the Quality Chasm . Improving the Quality of Health Care for Mental and Substance-Use Conditions. Washington, DC: National Academies Press; 2006. Adaptation to Mental Health and Addictive Disorders Increasing workforce capacity for quality improvement. Available at: www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK19820. Accessed August 18, 2016. [Google Scholar]

78. New Freedom Commission on Mental Health . Subcommittee on Rural Issues: Background Paper. Rockville, Maryland: 2004. DHHS Pub. No. SMA-04-3890. Available at: http://annapoliscoalition.org/wp-content/uploads/2014/03/presidents-new-freedom-commission-background-paper.pdf. Accessed August 18, 2016. [Google Scholar]

79. VHA Office of Policy and Planning Office of Rural Health (ORH). Fiscal Years 2012–2014—ORH Strategic Plan Refresh. Available at: www.ruralhealth.va.gov/docs/ORH_StrategicPlanRefresh_FY2012-2014.pdf. Accessed April 10, 2016.

80. Corrigan P. How stigma interferes with mental health care. Am Psychol. 2004;59:614–625. [PubMed] [Google Scholar]

81. Committee on the Assessment of the Readjustment Needs of Military Personnel, Veterans, and Their Families, Board on the Health of Select Populations, Institute of Medicine . Returning Home from Iraq and Afghanistan: Assessment of Readjustment Needs of Veterans, Service Members, and Their Families. Washington, D.C: National Academies Press; 2013. Available at: www.nap.edu/read/13499/chapter/1. Accessed August 19, 2016. [PubMed] [Google Scholar]

82. Fortney JC, Pyne JM, Kimbrell TA, et al. Telemedicine-based collaborative care for posttraumatic stress disorder: a randomized clinical trial. JAMA Psychiatry. 2015;72(1):58–67. [PubMed] [Google Scholar]

83. Tanielian T, Farris C, Batka C, et al. Ready to Serve: Community-Based Provider Capacity to Deliver Culturally Competent, Quality Mental Health Care to Veterans and Their Families. Santa Monica, California: RAND Corporation; 2014. Available at: www.rand.org/pubs/research_reports/RR806.html. Accessed April 3, 2016. [Google Scholar]

84. Center for Deployment Psychology. Mission, vision, and history. Available at: http://deploymentpsych.org/about/mission. Accessed July 15, 2016.

85. Star Behavioral Health Providers homepage. Available at: www.starproviders.org. Accessed July 15, 2016.

When US Bases Need Backup, This Is Who They Call: FAST Marines

The Marine Corps is a small organization that does a good job of producing a united front. Marketing people call it consistent messaging, and the Corps has long made it a part of their communications strategy. It's simple. Marines are Marines. There are no special Marines.

While this narrative approach gives the Corps a consistent message and appearance, it also fails to highlight many of the special missions the Corps accomplishes that involve small teams of elite, specifically trained, warfighters. Today we are going to highlight one of those small teams of elite service members, commonly called FAST Marines.

FAST stands for Fleet Anti-terrorism Security Team. These FAST units fall under the branch's Security Force Regiment, which provides a dedicated security force and anti-terrorism unit made up of Security Force Marines. These Marines usually guard a variety of installations like Naval bases and others too sensitive to leave without an armed presence.

FAST Marines have a very specific and specialized job. FAST teams are highly trained Marines who deploy across the world to serve as security at United States government installations. Imagine an embassy is threatened, and they need an immediate shot of highly trained Marines with a whole lot of guns.

They are called FAST, and those Marines live up to their acronym. FAST Marines do non-traditional deployments to Guantanamo Bay, Bahrain, Spain, and Japan, where they essentially stage as a just-in-case precaution. These 'staging' deployments allow them to deploy at a moment's notice to nearly anywhere in the world. On these deployments, they train extensively and keep their skills sharp in case they are called upon. FAST Marines also deploy stateside to aid Marine Security Forces in guarding nuclear subs and ships during nuclear rod replacement.

History of FAST

FAST saw its establishment in 1987. The 1970s and 1980s saw the rise of modern terrorism, and American interests overseas become targets of it. The President issued an order for the military and federal law enforcement to enhance their anti-terrorism capabilities. The Marines did as ordered and found a weakness in their Security Force infrastructure.

In the event of an attack that could overwhelm a Security Force detachment, they had no dedicated quick reaction force to enhance a Security Force's numbers and capabilities. Thus, FAST Marines were born. Their mission was simple: they exist to reinforce an installation's security force when the threat outguns the security forces on hand.

Since then, FAST has been called in to help secure Naval stations In Panama, where they engaged with what they believed to be Cuban special forces in an intense 30-minute firefight. From there, the Fast Marines would continue into Operation Just Cause, or the full invasion of Panama, in December of 1989.

FAST Marines deployed to Bahrain to protect the Naval Installations during Desert Storm, and in 1991, helped evacuate U.S. personnel from Liberia. When the U.S. established a liaison office in Mogadishu, they called FAST to provide security.

Without going through the entire history of FAST, it's easy to say they've operated at a relatively high tempo since their inception, and have always been there when the Marine Corps and their nation called upon them.

How to become a FAST Marine

FAST Marines have a long pipeline of training before they become active-duty operators. It starts with speaking to a recruiter and obtaining a Security Forces contract. Like everyone in the Corps, it starts at a recruit training depot.

From there, Security Force Marines will attend Infantry Training At the School of Infantry West or East and obtain a MOS of 0311. Security Force Marines will maintain an infantry MOS as their primary MOS.

After SOI, they attend Security Force School. Here they can volunteer for FAST company. There is no guarantee for acceptance, and it's all based on the needs of the Corps.

After acceptance into FAST Company, they begin 5 Weeks of FAST training. From there, they go to an 8-week Close Quarter Battle School. The CQB school teaches FAST Marines how to fight in extremely close quarters. Here they become experts in clearing rooms, hallways, stairways, as well as dynamic entry and various other tasks associated with urban combat.

Following CQB school, they take a tactical driving course. Here Marines learn Motorcade Operations, high-risk driving, evasive driving, PIT maneuvers, ramming, close proximity driving, and driver down drills.

Marines then become bodyguards at a High-Risk Personnel course where they learn close quarters protection tactics.

From there, they begin training in individual nonlethal weapons. This course teaches them tactics and weaponry they can use to deal with threats in a nonlethal manner. Finally, they attend the Helicopter and Rope Suspension Techniques Master Course, where they learn how to fast rope, rappel down structures and out of helicopters, and use SPIE rigging.

Life as a FAST Marine

After all that training, they'll still be expected to know basic Marine skills. This includes basic and advanced trauma medicine, how to use nearly every weapon in the Corps' arsenal, how to use night vision and thermal optics, land navigation, HMMWV course, and more.

FAST Marines will be stationed in either Naval Station Norfolk or Naval Weapons Station Yorktown in beautiful Virginia in companies Alpha, Bravo, or Charlie. 400 Marines and Sailors make up a FAST company.

From there, they can look forward to a potential deployment at the Platoon level to one of several naval stations where they can further their training and be on call for a mission. FAST Marines can expect to be constantly training in one direction or another.

FAST Marines utilize a lot of the same gear as their infantry counterparts. This includes the M4 and likely the M27 in the near future, as well as the Beretta M9, the M249SAW, and M240B medium machine gun. Shotguns from Mossberg and Benelli offer a powerful close-quarters fighting tool, as well as a nonlethal option with the right rounds. Some Senior FAST Marines may have even been to designated marksman school and be wielding specialized rifles for that role.

Per their contract, a Security Force Marine will only serve two years active duty with Security Forces. After these two years, most will be reassigned to conventional infantry forces. It's an odd system that doesn't make much sense to me. It seems like after an expansive series of schools that FAST Marines would stay FAST Marines, but the Force dictates differently.

In the Infantry

Security Force Marines often have difficulty adjusting to the infantry. They've spent years in Security Forces and often come to the infantry as Non commissioned officers. Their specialized training is just that, specialized. It doesn't translate over to conventional infantry operations, and because they lack the experience of most infantry Marines, they can feel like a fish out of water in the new surroundings and operational environment.

FAST Marines do come to the 'fleet' with a more advanced set of skills and can serve as excellent advisors in close quarter's combat, however. Urban terrain has been a big factor in recent wars, and knowing how to properly fight in it is invaluable.

Loaded Up

FAST is simply one small cog in a large Marine Corps. These small teams of specialists always interest me, and I think the Marine Corps does a disservice to itself by failing to highlight their unique capabilities. Regardless, when American installations overseas dial 911, it's FAST that answers the call.

Read the original article on Sandboxx.

Interested in Joining the Military?

We can put you in touch with recruiters from the different military branches. Learn about the benefits of serving your country, paying for school, military career paths, and more: sign up now and hear from a recruiter near you. 

Show Full Article
© Copyright 2022 Sandboxx. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

Film about deceased soldier of Alpha unit to be screened at festival in Bishkek

«Exchange» film about a soldier of Alpha special forces will be shown at Umut Young Cinema Forum of the CIS Countries. The head of the Public Organization of Veterans of Alpha Anti-Terrorist Unit in the Kyrgyz Republic, General Arthur Medetbekov told 24.kg news agency.

According to him, the film screening took place for the cadets of the Military Institute. In addition, they met with the Vice President of the International Association of Veterans of Alpha Anti-Terror Unit Aleksey Filatov and other veterans of the unit. The short film is based on his book «People A».

«The movie is based on real events. This is the story of a unit employee who sacrificed his life to save a foreigner — an embassy employee taken hostage. He changed places with him and died. The film participates in the Young Cinema Festival,» he said.

At the meeting, Aleksey Filatov gifted his books. In an introduction to the book, he wrote that it was about the people with whom he served in the anti-terror unit «A».

«There are no chronicles of Alpha operations, stories about training of security officers in the book. A lot of books, articles and other materials have been written on this subject. They are mostly available. What is not available is optional. This is a true story about several soldiers of the unit, the living and the dead. Some of them are known as Colonel Savelyev, who died at the Swedish Embassy, ​​or Colonel Torshin, who is still remembered in Chechnya. Some of them are remembered only by family and close friends. But they all lived a worthy life, decent and interesting. It’s worth telling about it,» he wrote.

link: https://24.kg/english/134438/
views: 741

Print

Who We Are

The Global War on Terrorism (GWOT) Memorial Foundation was formed in 2015 as a 501(c)(3) nonprofit corporation by a small group of like-minded veterans, military spouses, and supportive Americans to honor the service and sacrifice of all individuals – both uniformed and non-uniformed – who have contributed to global counterterrorism efforts since September 11th, 2001. In 2017, Congress designated the Foundation as the official entity to lead the construction of a Memorial in Washington, D.C.

Arlington Ceremony

A distinguished Board of Directors comprised of individuals from both military and non-military backgrounds leads the Foundation, with former President George W. Bush serving as the Foundation’s Honorary Chairman.

Michael “Rod” Rodriguez, a former U.S. Army Green Beret medic and sniper who deployed ten times, is the Foundation’s President and CEO. Rod’s involvement with the GWOT Memorial Foundation began in 2016, when he joined the organization as a board member. Rod later led the organization as President and CEO from March 2018 to September 2020 before taking a leave of absence for a personal matter and an overseas deployment. He was re-appointed President and CEO in December 2021.

Rod is a New Mexico native who comes from a family with a strong tradition of military service. Both his grandfathers served during World War II, and his father is a Vietnam veteran. His eldest son is currently serving with the 82nd Airborne Division and has deployed to the same regions of Afghanistan as Rod. Rod has been an outspoken advocate for veterans and their families and often speaks publicly on the need to increase understanding of life experiences between the civilian and military communities.

“This Memorial will honor the multiple generations of Americans and their families who have served and sacrificed around the world to keep our country safe from terrorism since 9/11. As a veteran of the Global War on Terrorism, I know there are countless other veterans and their families who are eager for a Memorial that will honor the heroism performed in America’s longest war. Our Foundation is laser-focused on this mission, and we welcome the support of all Americans to make the dream of a reverent, inclusive, and apolitical Memorial become a reality.”

– Michael “Rod” Rodriguez, Global War on Terrorism Memorial Foundation President and CEO

Our Vision And Mission

Our vision for the Memorial is for it to be an inclusive, reverent, and apolitical place of honor for all who have served and sacrificed in the ongoing Global War on Terrorism, as well as the countless civilians, family members, and others who have supported them. The Memorial will:

Honor

Salute all who served in this conflict: service members, civilians, and their families.

Heal

Provide a focal point for healing and reflection on a complex, multigenerational conflict.

Empower

Engage and educate civilian and military communities to build mutual understanding

Unite

Foster and sustain the sense of patriotism that brought all Americans together in the wake of 9/11, and catalyze support for those continuing to serve.

Ruck the Reserve

Our Mission

Our sole mission is to construct an inclusive place of honor for both uniformed and non-uniformed personnel who have served and sacrificed as part of global counterterrorism operations since September 11th, 2001.

Given that the Korean War, Vietnam War, and World War II Memorials are located on the National Mall, we have insisted on the Mall as the only appropriate site for the Memorial. In December 2021, the Foundation achieved this objective, our greatest accomplishment to date. Thanks to outstanding bipartisan support on Capitol Hill, Congress authorized the construction of a national Global War on Terrorism Memorial specifically in the Reserve area of the National Mall. The legislation was passed as an amendment to the 2022 National Defense Authorization Act.

Location And Design

As of February 2022, no specific site has been determined, but we anticipate being able to announce one by 2023. With the Global War on Terrorism Memorial Location Act becoming law in December 2021, it is certain that the National Mall will be the Memorial’s home. The Foundation continues to work with authorities such as the National Park Service, the Commission of Fine Arts, and the National Capital Memorial Advisory Commission, as well as other stakeholders, to determine the most appropriate site.

The map below highlights the Reserve portion of the Mall:

The Global War On Terrorism

The Global War on Terrorism encompasses all counterterror operations undertaken since the terrorist attacks of September 11th, 2001. While many Americans conceive of the GWOT strictly as the U.S-led wars in Afghanistan and Iraq, the reality is the GWOT has entailed various forms of combat and non-combat operations undertaken across several continents. Now continuing more than twenty years, the GWOT is the longest war in American history.

According to the U.S. Census Bureau, from 9/11 to 2018 approximately 3.7 million veterans served in the U.S. military.[1] As of December 20, 2021, approximately 7,054 U.S. servicemembers have been killed and 53,323 have been wounded in overseas contingency operations as part of America’s Global War on Terrorism since 9/11.[2]

Vespa, Jonathan, “Those Who Served: America’s Veterans from World War II to the War on Terror,” American Community Survey Report issued June 2020.

U.S. Dept. of Defense, Defense Casualty Analysis System. December 20, 2021.

* * *

Timeline Of Accomplishments

Notable Media Coverage

  • President and CEO Michael “Rod” Rodriguez appearance on the American Legion’s Tango Alpha Lima podcast, January 2022.
  • Rodriguez appearance on Fox and Friends, December 2021.
  • Washington Postop-ed from six former U.S. Secretaries of Defense calling for the Memorial’s construction, September 2021.
  • Advisory Board Member and Gold Star Wife Jennie Taylor USA Today op-ed on the importance of a GWOT Memorial on the National Mall, September 2021.
  • Advisory Board Member and Gold Star Wife Jane Horton and Joe Kent op-ed at FoxNews.com, May 2020.

Social Media

Follow the Foundation on Twitter, Facebook, Instagram, and LinkedIn.

The Event Dedicated to the 25th Anniversary of the International Association of Veterans of the Alpha Anti-Terror Group

On October 25, 2017 the State Kremlin Palace will host a festive concert dedicated to the 25th anniversary of establishing the International Association of Veterans of the Alfa anti-terror group.
The association of Veterans of the Alfa anti-terror group was founded in Moscow on October 26, 1992.
The Association consists of more than 600 members who have a significant influence in the society and enjoy prestige in the whole world. The main purpose of the association is the consolidation of veterans of special operations units, both Russian and foreign, to protect their civil rights and freedoms, as well as to assist the state in the fight against terrorism. At this solemn event, the best representatives of special operations units, including those who arrived from neighboring or far countries, will gather at the Kremlin Palace, on the main stage of the country this evening.
Without intermission. Duration up to 2 hours.

The Event Dedicated to the 25th Anniversary of the International Association of Veterans of the Alpha Anti-Terror Group

On October 25, 2017 the State Kremlin Palace will host a festive concert dedicated to the 25th anniversary of establishing the International Association of Veterans of the Alfa anti-terror group.
The association of Veterans of the Alfa anti-terror group was founded in Moscow on October 26, 1992.
The Association consists of more than 600 members who have a significant influence in the society and enjoy prestige in the whole world. The main purpose of the association is the consolidation of veterans of special operations units, both Russian and foreign, to protect their civil rights and freedoms, as well as to assist the state in the fight against terrorism. At this solemn event, the best representatives of special operations units, including those who arrived from neighboring or far countries, will gather at the Kremlin Palace, on the main stage of the country this evening.
Without intermission. Duration up to 2 antiterror alfa accosiation of veterans

Who We Are

The Global War on Terrorism (GWOT) Memorial Foundation was formed in 2015 as a antiterror alfa accosiation of veterans nonprofit corporation by a small group of like-minded veterans, military spouses, and supportive Americans to honor the service and sacrifice of all individuals – both uniformed and non-uniformed – who have contributed to global counterterrorism efforts since September 11th, 2001. In 2017, Congress designated the Foundation as the official entity to lead the construction of a Memorial in Washington, D.C.

Arlington Ceremony

A distinguished Board of Directors comprised of individuals from both military and non-military backgrounds leads the Foundation, with former President George W. Bush serving as the Foundation’s Honorary Chairman.

Michael “Rod” Rodriguez, a former U.S. Army Green Beret medic and sniper who deployed ten times, is the Foundation’s President and CEO. Rod’s involvement with the GWOT Memorial Foundation began in 2016, when he joined the organization as a board member. Rod later led the organization as President and CEO from March 2018 to September 2020 before taking a leave of absence for a antiterror alfa accosiation of veterans matter and an overseas deployment. He was re-appointed President and CEO in December 2021.

Rod is a New Mexico native who comes from a family with a strong tradition of military service. Both his grandfathers served during World War II, and his father is a Vietnam veteran. His eldest son is currently serving with the 82nd Airborne Division and has deployed to the same regions of Afghanistan as Rod. Rod has been an outspoken advocate for veterans and their families and often speaks publicly on the need to increase understanding of life experiences between the civilian and military communities.

“This Memorial will honor the multiple generations of Americans and their families who have served and sacrificed around the world to keep our country safe from terrorism since 9/11. As a veteran of the Global War on Terrorism, I know there are countless other veterans and their families who are eager for a Memorial that will honor the heroism performed in America’s longest war. Our Foundation is laser-focused on this mission, and we welcome the support of all Americans to make the dream of a reverent, inclusive, and apolitical Memorial become a reality.”

– Michael “Rod” Rodriguez, Global War on Terrorism Memorial Foundation President and CEO

Our Vision And Mission

Our vision for the Memorial is for it to be an inclusive, reverent, and apolitical place of honor for all who have served and sacrificed in the ongoing Global War on Terrorism, as well as the countless civilians, family members, and others who have supported them. The Memorial will:

Honor

Salute all who served in this conflict: service members, civilians, and their families.

Heal

Provide a focal point for healing and reflection on a complex, multigenerational conflict.

Empower

Engage and educate civilian and military communities to build mutual understanding

Unite

Foster and sustain the sense of patriotism that brought all Americans together in the wake of 9/11, and catalyze support for those continuing to serve.

Ruck the Reserve

Our Mission

Our sole mission is to construct an inclusive place of honor for both uniformed and non-uniformed personnel who have served and sacrificed as part of global counterterrorism operations since September 11th, 2001.

Given that the Korean War, Vietnam War, and World War II Memorials are located on the National Mall, we have insisted on the Mall as the only appropriate site for the Memorial. In December 2021, the Foundation achieved this objective, our greatest accomplishment to date. Thanks to outstanding bipartisan support on Capitol Hill, Congress authorized the construction of a national Global War on Terrorism Memorial specifically in the Reserve area of the National Mall. The legislation was passed as an amendment to the 2022 National Defense Authorization Act.

Location And Design

As of February 2022, no specific site has been determined, antiterror alfa accosiation of veterans, but we anticipate being able to announce one by 2023. With the Global War on Terrorism Memorial Location Act becoming law in December 2021, it is certain that the National Mall will be the Memorial’s home. The Foundation continues to work with authorities such as the National Park Service, the Commission of Fine Arts, and the National Capital Memorial Advisory Commission, as well as other stakeholders, to determine the most appropriate site.

The map below highlights the Reserve portion of the Mall:

The Global War On Terrorism

The Global War on Terrorism encompasses all counterterror operations undertaken since the terrorist attacks of September 11th, 2001. While many Americans conceive of the GWOT strictly as the U.S-led wars in Afghanistan and Iraq, the reality is the GWOT has entailed various forms of combat and non-combat operations undertaken across several continents. Now continuing more than twenty years, the GWOT is the longest war in American history.

According to the U.S. Census Bureau, from 9/11 to 2018 approximately 3.7 antiterror alfa accosiation of veterans veterans served in the U.S. military.[1] As of December 20, 2021, approximately 7,054 U.S. servicemembers have been killed and 53,323 have been wounded in overseas contingency operations as part of America’s Global War on Terrorism since 9/11.[2]

Vespa, Jonathan, “Those Who Served: America’s Veterans from World War II to the War on Terror,” American Community Survey Report issued June 2020.

U.S. Dept. of Defense, Defense Casualty Analysis System. December 20, 2021.

* * *

Timeline Of Accomplishments

Notable Media Coverage

  • President and CEO Michael “Rod” Rodriguez appearance on the American Legion’s Tango Alpha Lima podcast, January 2022.
  • Rodriguez appearance on Fox and Friends, December 2021.
  • Washington Postop-ed from six former U.S. Secretaries of Defense calling for the Memorial’s construction, September 2021.
  • Advisory Board Member and Gold Star Wife Jennie Taylor USA Today op-ed on the importance of a GWOT Memorial on the National Mall, antiterror alfa accosiation of veterans, September 2021.
  • Advisory Board Member and Gold Star Wife Jane Horton and Joe Kent op-ed at FoxNews.com, May 2020.

Social Media

Follow the Foundation on Twitter, Facebook, Instagram, and LinkedIn.

Film about deceased soldier of Alpha unit to be antiterror alfa accosiation of veterans at festival in Bishkek

«Exchange» film about a soldier of Alpha special forces will be shown at Umut Young Cinema Forum of the CIS Countries. The head of the Public Organization of Veterans of Alpha Anti-Terrorist Unit in the Kyrgyz Antiterror alfa accosiation of veterans, General Arthur Medetbekov told 24.kg news agency.

According to him, the film screening took place for the cadets of the Military Institute. In addition, they met with the Vice President of the International Association of Veterans of Alpha Anti-Terror Unit Aleksey Filatov and other veterans of the unit. The short film is based on his book «People A».

«The movie is based on real events. This is the story of a unit employee who sacrificed his life to save a foreigner — an embassy employee taken hostage. He changed places with him and died. The film participates in the Young Cinema Festival,» he said.

At the meeting, Aleksey Filatov gifted his books. In an introduction to the book, he wrote that it was about the people with whom he served in the anti-terror unit «A».

«There are no chronicles of Alpha operations, stories about training of security officers in the book. A lot of books, articles and other materials have been written on this subject. They are mostly available. What is not available is optional. This is a true story about several soldiers of the unit, the living and the dead. Some of them are known as Colonel Savelyev, who died at the Swedish Embassy, ​​or Colonel Torshin, who is still remembered in Chechnya. Some of them are remembered only by family and close friends. But they all lived a worthy life, decent and interesting. It’s worth telling about it,» he wrote.

link: https://24.kg/english/134438/
views: 741

Print

Alfa veteran Goncharov explained that the assassination attempt on Abe became possible due to a security error

The President of the Association of Veterans of the Alpha Anti-Terror Unit, Sergey Goncharov, explained the mistake of the guards of the former Antiterror alfa accosiation of veterans Minister of Japan Shinzo Abe, who allowed the assassination of the politician. He spoke about this in a conversation with Pravda.ru.

According to the veteran, the assassination attempt became possible because the ex-premier was not organized a real security service for a high-ranking official. “In this case, no security in the sense in which I understand, and those who deal with security issues understand, nothing was organized,” he said.

In addition, he assessed the work of the security guards as poor, because they stood behind Abe and did not react to anything. According to him, an indicator of this is the fact that the criminal managed to “approach with a sawn-off shotgun and shoot the ex-premier twice in the back.” “In this situation, this is an absolute blunder of those people who organized this speech by the former prime minister,” Goncharov stated.

Earlier, an expert in the field of integrated security, a veteran of the special forces unit of the Vityaz security group of companies, Petr Fefelov, also said that the assassination of Shinzo Abe could have been avoided if the security service had not made a number of mistakes.

#Veteran #Alpha #explained #mistake #guards #killed #Abe

PTSD Treatment for Veterans: What’s Working, What’s New, and What’s Next

REFERENCES

1. Institute of Medicine Treatment for posttraumatic stress disorder in military and veteran populations final assessment. Report Brief June 2014. Available at: www.nationalacademies.org/hmd/~/media/Files/Report%20Files/2014/PTSD-II/PTSD-II-RB.pdf. Accessed April 1, 2016. [PubMed] [Google Scholar]

2. U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs How common is PTSD? Aug 13, 2015. Available at: www.ptsd.va.gov/public/PTSD-overview/basics/how-common-is-ptsd.asp. Accessed March 23, 2016.

3. Norris FH, Slone LB. Understanding research on the epidemiology of trauma and PTSD. PTSD Research Quarterly. 2013;24(2–3):1–13. Available at: www.ptsd.va.gov/professional/newsletters/research-quarterly/V24n2-3.pdf. Accessed March 15, 2016. [Google Scholar]

4. American Public Health Association Removing barriers to mental health services for veterans. Available at: www.apha.org/policies-and-advocacy/public-health-policy-statements/policy-database/2015/01/28/14/51/removing-barriers-to-mental-health-services-for-veterans. Accessed April 3, 2016.

5. Tanielian T, Jaycox LH, editors. Invisible Wounds of War: Psychological and Cognitive Injuries, Their Consequences, and Antiterror alfa accosiation of veterans to Assist Recovery. Santa Monica, California: RAND Corporation; 2008. [Google Scholar]

6. Swartz MH. Textbook of Physical Diagnosis: History and Examination. 7th ed. Philadelphia, Pennsylvania: Elsevier; 2014. [Google Scholar]

7. Abdul-Hamid WK, Hughes JH. Nothing new under the sun: post-traumatic stress disorders in the ancient world. Early Sci Med. 2014;19:549–557. [PubMed] [Google Scholar]

8. Iribarren J, Prolo P, Neago N, Chiappelli F. Post-traumatic stress disorder: evidence-based research for the third millennium. Evid Based Complement Alternat Med. 2005;2:503–512.[PMC free article] [PubMed] [Google Scholar]

9. Da Costa JM. On irritable heart: A clinical study of a form of functional cardiac disorder and its consequences. Am J Med Sci. 1871;61:17–52.[Google Scholar]

10. Crocq M-E. From shell shock and war neurosis to posttraumatic stress disorder: a history of psychotraumatology. Dialogues Clin Neurosci. 2000;2:47–55.[PMC free article] [PubMed] [Google Scholar]

11. American Psychiatric Association . Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders. 3rd ed. Washington, D.C.: American Psychiatric Association; 1980. [Google Scholar]

12. Eber S, Barth S, Kang H, et al. Sony hcd-gnz7d error c 31 00 National Health Study for a New Generation of United States Veterans: methods for a large-scale study on the health of recent veterans. Mil Med. 2013;178:966–969. [PubMed] [Google Scholar]

13. U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs PTSD in Iraq and Afghanistan veterans. Jun 3, 2015. Available at: www.publichealth.va.gov/epidemiology/studies/new-generation/ptsd.asp. Accessed July 1, 2016.

14. Thompson M. Unlocking the secrets of PTSD. Time. 2015;185:40–43. [PubMed] [Google Scholar]

15. Carlock D. A guide to resources for severely wounded Operation Iraqi Freedom (OIF) and Operation Enduring Freedom (OEF) veterans. Issues in Science and Technology Librarianship. 2007. Available at: www.istl.org/07-fall/internet2.html. Accessed April 5, 2016.

16. Kessler RC, Sonnega A, Bromet E, et al. Posttraumatic stress disorder in the National Comorbidity Survey. Arch Gen Psych. 1995;52:1048–1060. [PubMed] [Google Scholar]

17. Rytwinski NK, Scur MD, Feeny NC, et al, antiterror alfa accosiation of veterans. The co-occurrence of major depressive disorder among individuals with posttraumatic stress disorder: a meta-analysis. J Trauma Stress. 2013;26:299–309. [PubMed] [Google Scholar]

18. Hoge CW, Auchterlonie JL, Milliken CS. Mental health problems, use of mental health services, and attrition from military service after returning from deployment to Iraq or Afghanistan. JAMA. 2006;295(9):1023–1032. [PubMed] [Google Scholar]

19. Milliken CS, Auchterlonie JL, Hoge CW. Longitudinal assessment of mental health problems among active and reserve component soldiers returning from the Iraq war. JAMA. 2007;298:2141–2148. [PubMed] [Google Scholar]

20. Richardson LK, Frueh BC, Acierno R. Prevalence estimates of combat-related post-traumatic stress disorder: critical review. Aust N Z J Psychiatry. 2010;44:4–19.[PMC free article] [PubMed] [Google Scholar]

21. Kulka RA, Schlenger WE, Fairbank JA, antiterror alfa accosiation of veterans, et al. The National Vietnam Veterans Readjustment Study: tables of findings and technical appendices. New York, New York: Brunner/Mazel; 1990. Available at: http://search.proquest.com/docview/42404631?accountid=28179. Accessed April 1, 2016. [Google Scholar]

22. Seal KH, Cohen G, Waldrop A, et al. Substance use disorders in Iraq and Afghanistan veterans in VA healthcare, 2001–2010: implications for screening, diagnosis and treatment. Drug Alcohol Depend. 2011;116:93–101. [PubMed] [Google Scholar]

23. McCauley JL, Killeen T, Gros DF, et al. Posttraumatic stress disorder and co-occurring substance use disorders: advances in assessment and treatment. Clin Psychol Sci Prac. 2012;19:283–304.[PMC free article] [PubMed] [Google Scholar]

24. Hamblen JL, Kivlahan D. PTSD and substance use disorders in veterans. U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs. Feb 23, 2016. Available at: www.ptsd.va.gov/professional/co-occurring/ptsd_sud_veterans.asp. Accessed July 1, 2016.

25. Gironda RJ, Clark ME, Massengale JP, Walker RL. Pain among veterans of Operations Enduring Freedom and Iraqi Freedom. Pain Medicine. 2016;7:339–343. [PubMed] [Google Scholar]

26. Clark ME, antiterror alfa accosiation of veterans. Post-deployment pain: a need for rapid detection and intervention. Pain Medicine. 2014;5:333–334. [PubMed] [Google Scholar]

27. U.S. Antiterror alfa accosiation of veterans of Veterans Affairs. Chronic pain and PTSD: a guide for patients. Aug 13, 2015. Available at: www.ptsd.va.gov/public/problems/pain-ptsd-guide-patients.asp. Accessed April 11, 2016.

28. Xue C, Ge Y, Tang B, et al. A meta-analysis of risk factors for combat-related PTSD among military personnel and veterans. PLoS One. 2015;10(3):e0120270.[PMC free article] [PubMed] [Google Scholar]

29. Management of Post-Traumatic Stress Working Group . VA/DoD Clinical Practice Guideline for the Management of Post-Traumatic Stress. Washington D.C.: Department of Veterans Affairs and Department of Defense; Oct, 2010. Available at: www.healthquality.va.gov/PTSD-FULL-2010c.pdf. Accessed June 5, 2016. [Google Scholar]

30. Magruder K, Serpi T, Kimerling R, et al. Prevalence of post-traumatic stress disorder in Vietnam-era women veterans: The Health of Vietnam-Era Women’s Study (HealthVIEWS) JAMA Psychiatry. 2015;72:1127–1134.[PMC free article] [PubMed] [Google Scholar]

31. Surís A, Lind L, Kashner TM, et al. Sexual assault in women veterans: an examination of PTSD risk, health care utilization, and cost of care. Psychosom Med. 2004;66:749–756. runtime error 216 autodata [Google Scholar]

32. Kimerling R, Gima K, Smith MW, et al. The Veterans Health Administration and military sexual trauma. Am J Public Health. 2007;97:2160–2166.[PMC free article] [PubMed] [Google Scholar]

33. American Psychiatric Association . Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders. 5th ed. Washington, D.C.: American Psychiatric Association; 2013. [Google Scholar]

34. U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs. How is PTSD measured? Aug 10, 2015. Available at: www.ptsd.va.gov/public/assessment/ptsd-measured.asp. Accessed April 4, 2016.

35. Weathers FW, Blake DD, antiterror alfa accosiation of veterans, Schnurr PP, et al. The Clinician- Administered PTSD Scale for DSM-5 (CAPS-5). 2013. Available at: www.ptsd.va.gov. Accessed March 29, 2016.

36. Wilkins KC, Lang AJ, Norman SB. Synthesis of the psychometric properties of the PTSD Checklist (PCL) military, civilian, and specific versions. Depress Anxiety. 2011;28:596–606.[PMC free article] [PubMed] [Google Scholar]

37. U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs. Mississippi Scale for Combat-Related PTSD (M-PTSD). Feb 23, 2016. Available at: www.ptsd.va.gov/professional/assessment/adult-sr/mississippi-scale-m-ptsd.asp. Accessed March 29, 2016.

38. Forbes D, Creamer M, Phelps A, et al. Australian Guidelines for the Treatment of Adults with Acute Stress Disorder and Post-traumatic Stress Disorder. Aust N Z J Psychiatry. 2007;41:637–648. [PubMed] [Google Scholar]

39. National Collaborating Centre for Mental Health (UK) NICE Clinical Guidelines, No. 26. Leicester (UK): Gaskell; 2005. Post-traumatic stress disorder: the management of PTSD in adults and children in primary and secondary care. [Google Scholar]

40. Ursano RJ, Bell C, Eth S, et al. Practice guideline for the treatment of patients with acute stress disorder and posttraumatic stress disorder. Am J Psychiatry. 2004;161(suppl 11):S3–S31. [PubMed] [Google Scholar]

41. Institute of Medicine Treatment of PTSD: an assessment of the evidence. Oct, 2007. Available at: http://nationalacademies.org/hmd/~/media/Files/Report%20Files/2007/Treatment-of-PTSD-An-Assessment-of-The-Evidence/PTSDReportBriefFINAL2.pdf. Accessed March 15, 2016.

42. Resick PA, Schnicke MK. Cognitive processing therapy for sexual assault victims. J Consult Clin Psychol. 1992;60:748–756. [PubMed] [Google Scholar]

43. Eftekhari A, Ruzek JI, Crowley JJ, et al. Effectiveness of national implementation of prolonged exposure therapy in Veterans Affairs care. JAMA Psychiatry. 2013;70(9):949–955. [PubMed] [Google Scholar]

44. U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs. Prolonged exposure therapy. Aug 14, 2015. Available at: www.ptsd.va.gov/public/treatment/therapy-med/prolonged-exposure-therapy.asp. Accessed April 5, 2016.

45. U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs. Cognitive processing therapy. Aug 14, 2015. Available at: www.ptsd.va.gov/public/treatment/therapy-med/cognitive_processing_therapy.asp. Accessed April 5, 2016.

46, antiterror alfa accosiation of veterans. Foa EB, Keane TM, Friedman MJ, Cohen JA, editors. Effective Treatments for PTSD: Practice Guidelines of the International Society for Traumatic Stress Studies. New York, New York: Guilford Press; 2009. [Google Scholar]

47. World Health Organization . Guidelines for the Management of Conditions Specifically Related to Stress. Geneva, Switzerland: WHO; 2013. [Google Scholar]

48. Puetz TW, Youngstedt SD, Herring MP. Effects of pharmacotherapy on combat-related PTSD, anxiety, and depression: A antiterror alfa accosiation of veterans review and meta-regression analysis. PLoS One. 2015;10(5):e0126529.[PMC free article] [PubMed] [Google Scholar]

49. Jeffreys M. Clinician’s guide to medications for PTSD. U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs. Available at: www.ptsd.va.gov/professional/treatment/overview/clinicians-guide-to-medications-for-ptsd.asp. Accessed April 4, 2016.

50. Berger W, Mendlowicz MV, Marques-Portella C, et al, antiterror alfa accosiation of veterans. Pharmacologic alternatives to antidepressants in posttraumatic stress disorder. Prog Neuropsychopharmacol Biol Psychiatry. 2009;33:169–180.[PMC free article] [PubMed] [Google Scholar]

51. Davidson J. Treatment of posttraumatic stress disorder with venlafaxine extended release: a 6-month randomized controlled trial. Arch Gen Psychiatry. 2006;63:1158–1165. [PubMed] [Google Scholar]

52. Effexor XR (venlafaxine HCl) prescribing information. Philadelphia, Pennsylvania: Wyeth Pharmaceuticals; Aug, 2015. Available at: http://labeling.pfizer.com/showlabeling.aspx?ID=100. Accessed December 19, 2015. [Google Scholar]

53. Davis LL, Jewell ME, Ambrose S, antiterror alfa accosiation of veterans, et al. A placebo-controlled study of nefazodone for the treatment of chronic posttraumatic stress disorder: a preliminary study. J Clinical Psychopharmacol. 2004;24:291–297. [PubMed] [Google Scholar]

54. McRae AL, Brady KT, Mellman TA, et al. Comparison of nefazodone and sertraline for the treatment of posttraumatic stress disorder. Depress Anxiety. 2004;19(3):190–196. [PubMed] [Google Scholar]

55. Schneier FR, Campeas R, Carcamo J, et al. Combined mirtazapine and SSRI treatment of PTSD: a placebo-controlled trial. Depress Anxiety. 2015;32(8):570–579.[PMC free article] [PubMed] [Google Scholar]

56. Krystal JH, Rosenheck RA, Cramer JA, et al. Adjunctive risperidone treatment for antidepressant-resistant symptoms of chronic military service-related PTSD. JAMA. 2011;306(5):493–502. [PubMed] [Google Scholar]

57. Raskind MA, Peskind ER, Hoff DJ, et al. A parallel group placebo controlled study of antiterror alfa accosiation of veterans for trauma nightmares and sleep disturbance in combat veterans with post-traumatic stress disorder. Biol Psychiatry. 2007;61(8):928–934. [PubMed] [Google Scholar]

58. Yeh MS, Mari JJ, Costa MC, et al. A double-blind randomized controlled trial to study the efficacy of topiramate in a civilian sample of PTSD. CNS Neurosci Ther. 2011;17(5):305–310.[PMC free article] [PubMed] [Google Scholar]

59. Andrus MR, Gilbert E. Treatment of civilian and combat-related posttraumatic stress disorder with topiramate. Ann Pharmacother. 2010;44(11):1810–1816. [PubMed] [Google Scholar]

60. Greer GR, Grob CS, Halberstadt AL. PTSD symptom reports of patients evaluated for the New Mexico Medical Cannabis Program. J Psychoactive Drugs, antiterror alfa accosiation of veterans. 2014;46(1):73–77. [PubMed] [Google Scholar]

61. Forbes D, Creamer M, Bisson JI, et al. A guide to guidelines for the treatment of PTSD and related conditions. J Trauma Stress. 2010;23:537–552. [PubMed] [Google Scholar]

62. Cuijpers P, Sijbrandij M, Koole SL, et al. Adding psychotherapy to antidepressant medication in depression and anxiety disorders: a meta-analysis. World Psychiatry. 2014;13:56–67.[PMC free article] [PubMed] [Google Scholar]

63. U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs. Health Services Research and Development. RRP 13-242–HSR&D Study: Strategies to Improve PTSD Care. Mar antiterror alfa accosiation of veterans, 2014, antiterror alfa accosiation of veterans. Available at: www.hsrd.research.va.gov/research/abstracts.cfm?Project_ID=2141703966. Accessed April 10, 2016.

64. Alderman CP, McCarthy LC, Marwood AC. Pharmacotherapy for post-traumatic stress disorder. Expert Rev Clin Pharmacol. 2009;2:77–86. [PubMed] [Google Scholar]

65. Ravindran LN, Stein MB. Pharmacotherapy of PTSD: premises, principles, and priorities. Brain Res. 2009;1293:24–39.[PMC free article] [PubMed] [Google Scholar]

66. Hoskins M, Pearce J, Bethell A, et al. Pharmacotherapy for post-traumatic stress disorder: systematic review and meta-analysis. Brit J Psych. 2015;206:93–100. [PubMed] [Google Scholar]

67. Congressional Budget Office. The Veterans Health Administration’s treatment of PTSD and traumatic brain injury among recent combat veterans. Feb, 2012. Available at: www.cbo.gov/sites/default/files/112th-congress-2011-2012/reports/02-09-PTSD_0.pdf. Accessed March 30, 2016. [Google Scholar]

68. Guina J, Welton RS, Broderick PJ, et al. DSM-5 criteria and its implications for diagnosing PTSD in military service members and veterans. Curr Psychiatry Rep. 2016;18(5):43. [PubMed] [Google Scholar]

69. U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs. U.S. Department of Defense. VA/DoD clinical practice guideline for assessment and management of patients at risk for suicide. Jun, 2103. Available at: www.healthquality.va.gov/guidelines/MH/srb/VADODCP_SuicideRisk_Full.pdf. Accessed April 1, 2016.

70. Reger MA, Smolenski DJ, Skopp NA, et al. Risk of suicide among U.S. military service members following Operation Enduring Freedom or Operation Iraqi Freedom deployment and separation from the U.S. military. JAMA Psychiatry. 2015;72:561–569. [PubMed] [Google Scholar]

71. Ramsawh HJ, Fullerton CS, Herberman Mash HB. Risk for suicidal behaviors associated with PTSD, depression, and their comorbidity in the U.S. Army. J Affect Disord. 2014;161:116–122. [PubMed] [Google Scholar]

72. Sareen J, Cox BJ, Stein MB, et al. Physical and mental comorbidity, disability, and suicidal behavior associated with posttraumatic stress disorder in a large community sample. Psychosom Med. 2007;69(3):242–248. [PubMed] [Google Scholar]

73. Fontana A, Rosenheck R. Attempted suicide among Vietnam veterans: a model of etiology in a community sample. Amer J Psychiatry. 1995;152:102–109. [PubMed] [Google Scholar]

74. U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs. Access Audit—System-Wide Review of Access (May 12, 2014–June 3, 2014). Available at: www.va.gov/health/docs/VAAccessAuditFindingsReport.pdf. Accessed August 18, 2016.

75. Oppel RA, Goodnough A. Doctor shortage is cited in delays at VA hospitals. The New York Times. 2014 May 29; Available at: www.nytimes.com/2014/05/30/us/doctor-shortages-cited-in-va-hospital-waits.html. Accessed January 20, 2016. [Google Scholar]

76. Department of Defense Task Force on Mental Health . An Achievable Vision: Report of the Department of Defense Task Force on Mental Health. Falls Church, Virginia: Defense Health Board; 2007. [Google Scholar]

77. Institute of Medicine Committee on Crossing the Quality Chasm . Improving the Quality of Health Care for Mental and Substance-Use Conditions. Washington, DC: National Academies Press; 2006. Adaptation to Mental Health and Addictive Disorders Increasing workforce capacity for quality improvement. Available at: www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK19820. Accessed August 18, 2016. [Google Scholar]

78. New Freedom Commission on Mental Health . Subcommittee on Rural Issues: Background Paper. Rockville, Maryland: 2004. DHHS Pub, antiterror alfa accosiation of veterans. No. SMA-04-3890. Available at: http://annapoliscoalition.org/wp-content/uploads/2014/03/presidents-new-freedom-commission-background-paper.pdf. Accessed August 18, 2016. [Google Scholar]

79. VHA Office of Policy and Planning Office of Rural Health (ORH). Fiscal Years 2012–2014—ORH Strategic Plan Refresh. Available at: www.ruralhealth.va.gov/docs/ORH_StrategicPlanRefresh_FY2012-2014.pdf. Accessed April 10, 2016.

80. Corrigan P. How stigma interferes with mental health care, antiterror alfa accosiation of veterans. Am Psychol. 2004;59:614–625. [PubMed] [Google Scholar]

81. Committee on the Assessment of the Readjustment Needs of Military Personnel, Veterans, and Their Families, Board on the Health of Select Populations, Institute of Medicine . Returning Home from Iraq and Afghanistan: Assessment of Readjustment Needs of Veterans, Service Members, and Their Families. Washington, D.C: National Academies Press; 2013. Available at: www.nap.edu/read/13499/chapter/1. Accessed August 19, 2016. [PubMed] [Google Scholar]

82. Fortney JC, Pyne JM, Kimbrell TA, et al. Telemedicine-based collaborative care for posttraumatic stress disorder: a randomized clinical trial. JAMA Psychiatry, antiterror alfa accosiation of veterans. 2015;72(1):58–67. [PubMed] [Google Scholar]

83. Tanielian T, Farris C, Batka C, et al. Ready to Serve: Community-Based Provider Capacity to Deliver Culturally Competent, Quality Mental Health Care to Veterans and Their Families. Santa Monica, California: RAND Corporation; 2014. Available at: www.rand.org/pubs/research_reports/RR806.html. Accessed April 3, 2016. [Google Scholar]

84. Center for Deployment Psychology. Mission, vision, and history. Available at: http://deploymentpsych.org/about/mission. Accessed July 15, 2016.

85. Star Behavioral Health Providers homepage. Available at: www.starproviders.org. Accessed July 15, 2016.

When US Bases Need Backup, This Is Who They Call: FAST Marines

The Marine Antiterror alfa accosiation of veterans is a small organization that does a good job of producing a united front. Marketing people call it consistent messaging, and the Corps has long made it a part of their communications strategy. It's simple. Marines are Marines. There are no special Marines.

While this narrative approach gives the Corps a consistent message and appearance, it also fails to highlight many of the special missions the Corps accomplishes that involve small teams of elite, specifically trained, warfighters. Today we are going to highlight one of those small teams of elite service members, commonly called FAST Marines.

FAST stands for Fleet Anti-terrorism Security Team. These FAST units fall under the branch's Security Force Regiment, which provides a dedicated security force and anti-terrorism unit made up of Security Force Marines. These Marines usually guard a variety of installations like Naval bases and others too sensitive to leave without an armed presence.

FAST Marines have a very specific and specialized job. FAST teams are highly trained Marines who deploy across the world to serve as security at United States government installations. Imagine an embassy is threatened, and they need an immediate shot of highly trained Marines with a whole lot of guns.

They are called FAST, and those Marines live up to their acronym. FAST Marines do non-traditional deployments to Guantanamo Bay, Bahrain, Spain, and Japan, where they essentially stage as a just-in-case precaution. These 'staging' deployments allow them to deploy at a moment's notice to nearly anywhere in the world. On these deployments, they train extensively and keep their skills sharp in case they are called upon. FAST Marines also deploy stateside to aid Marine Security Forces in guarding nuclear subs and ships during nuclear rod replacement.

History of FAST

FAST saw its establishment in 1987. The 1970s and 1980s saw the rise of modern terrorism, and American interests overseas become targets of it. The President issued an order for the military and federal law enforcement to enhance their anti-terrorism capabilities. The Marines did as ordered and found a weakness in their Security Force infrastructure.

In the event of an attack that could overwhelm a Security Force detachment, they had no dedicated quick reaction force to enhance a Security Force's numbers and capabilities. Thus, FAST Marines were born. Their mission was simple: they exist to reinforce an installation's security force when the threat outguns the security forces on hand.

Since then, FAST has been called in to help secure Naval stations In Panama, where they engaged with what they believed to be Cuban special forces in an intense 30-minute firefight. From there, the Fast Marines would continue into Operation Just Cause, or the full invasion of Panama, in December of 1989.

FAST Marines deployed to Bahrain to protect the Naval Installations during Desert Storm, and in 1991, helped evacuate U.S. personnel from Liberia. When the U.S. established a liaison office in Mogadishu, they called FAST to provide security.

Without going through the entire history of FAST, it's easy to say they've operated at a relatively high tempo since their inception, and have always been there when the Marine Corps and their nation called upon them.

How to become a FAST Marine

FAST Marines have a canon mp160 e 15 error pipeline of training before they become active-duty operators. It starts with speaking to a recruiter and obtaining a Security Forces contract. Like everyone in the Corps, it starts at a recruit training depot.

From there, Security Force Marines will attend Infantry Training At the School of Infantry West or East and obtain a MOS of 0311. Security Force Marines will maintain an infantry MOS as their primary MOS.

After SOI, they attend Security Force School. Here they can volunteer for FAST company. There is no guarantee for acceptance, and it's all based on the needs of the Corps.

After acceptance into FAST Company, they begin 5 Weeks of FAST training. From there, they go to an 8-week Close Quarter Battle School. The CQB school teaches FAST Marines how to fight in extremely close quarters. Here they become experts in clearing rooms, hallways, stairways, as well as dynamic entry and various other tasks associated with urban combat.

Following CQB school, they take a tactical driving course. Here Marines learn Motorcade Operations, high-risk driving, evasive driving, PIT maneuvers, ramming, close proximity driving, and driver down drills.

Marines then become bodyguards at a High-Risk Personnel course where they learn close quarters protection tactics.

From there, they begin training in individual nonlethal weapons. This course teaches them tactics and weaponry they can use to deal with threats in a nonlethal manner. Finally, they attend the Helicopter and Rope Suspension Techniques Master Course, where they learn how to fast rope, rappel down structures and out of helicopters, and use SPIE rigging.

Life as a FAST Marine

After all that training, they'll still be expected to know basic Marine skills. This includes basic and advanced trauma medicine, how to use nearly every weapon in the Corps' arsenal, how to use night vision and thermal optics, land navigation, HMMWV course, and more.

FAST Marines will be stationed in either Naval Station Norfolk or Naval Weapons Station Yorktown in beautiful Virginia in companies Alpha, Bravo, or Charlie. 400 Marines and Sailors make up a FAST company.

From there, they can look forward to a potential deployment at the Platoon level to one of several naval stations where they can further their training and be on call for a mission. FAST Marines can expect to be constantly training in one direction or another.

FAST Marines utilize a lot of the same gear as their infantry counterparts. This includes the M4 and likely the M27 in the near future, as well as the Beretta M9, the M249SAW, and M240B medium machine gun. Shotguns from Mossberg and Benelli offer a powerful close-quarters fighting tool, as well as a nonlethal option with the right rounds, antiterror alfa accosiation of veterans. Some Senior FAST Marines may have even been to designated marksman school and be wielding specialized rifles for that role.

Per their contract, a Security Force Marine will only serve two years active duty with Security Forces. After these two years, most will be reassigned to conventional infantry forces. It's an odd system that doesn't make much sense to me. It seems like after an expansive series of schools that FAST Marines would stay FAST Marines, but the Force dictates differently.

In the Infantry

Security Force Marines often have difficulty adjusting to the infantry. They've spent years in Security Forces and often come to the infantry as Non commissioned officers. Their specialized training is just that, specialized. It doesn't translate over to conventional infantry operations, and because they lack the experience of most infantry Marines, they can feel like a fish out of water in the new surroundings and operational environment.

FAST Marines do come to the 'fleet' with a more advanced set of skills and can serve as excellent advisors in close quarter's combat, however, antiterror alfa accosiation of veterans. Urban terrain has been a big factor in recent wars, and knowing how to properly fight in it is invaluable.

Loaded Up

FAST is simply one small cog in a large Marine Corps. These small teams of specialists always interest me, and I think the Marine Corps does a disservice to itself by failing to highlight their unique capabilities. Regardless, when American installations overseas dial 911, it's FAST that answers the call.

Read the original article on Sandboxx.

Interested in Joining the Military?

We can put you in touch with recruiters from the different military branches. Learn about the benefits of serving your country, paying for school, military career paths, and more: sign up now and hear from a recruiter near you. 

Show Full Article
© Copyright 2022 Sandboxx. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

1 Comments

Leave a Comment