Access vba error msgbox

access vba error msgbox

Errors occur during the execution of a VBA function or sub procedure due to a variety of reasons, including the use of incorrect code and the. Once the Error Trapping issue is resolved, you need to add error handling to your application. Unfortunately, VB6/VBA does not support a global error handler to. Error Handling In Microsoft Access · Break on all errors» Stops code execution when an error is encountered. · Break in class module» Stops code execution in.

Access vba error msgbox - correctly. opinion

In an Access desktop database, the MsgBox Function displays a message in a dialog box, waits for the user to click a button, and returns an Integer indicating which button the user clicked.

Syntax

MsgBox(prompt [, buttons ] [, title ] [, helpfile ] [, context ] )

The MsgBox function syntax has these arguments:

Argument

Description

prompt

Required. String expression displayed as the message in the dialog box. The maximum length of prompt is approximately characters, depending on the width of the characters used. If prompt consists of more than one line, you can separate the lines using a carriage return character (Chr(13)), a linefeed character (Chr(10)), or carriage return – linefeed character combination (Chr(13) & Chr(10)) between each line.

buttons

Optional. numeric expression that is the sum of values specifying the number and type of buttons to display, the icon style to use, the identity of the default button, and the modality of the message box. If omitted, the default value for buttons is 0.

title

Optional. String expression displayed in the title bar of the dialog box. If you omit title, the application name is placed in the title bar.

helpfile

Optional. String expression that identifies the Help file to use to provide context-sensitive Help for the dialog box. If helpfile is provided, context must also be provided.

context

Optional. Numeric expression that is the Help context number assigned to the appropriate Help topic by the Help author. If context is provided, helpfile must also be provided.

Settings

The buttonsargument settings are:

Constant

Value

Description

vbOKOnly

0

Display OK button only.

vbOKCancel

1

Display OK and Cancel buttons.

vbAbortRetryIgnore

2

Display Abort, Retry, and Ignore buttons.

vbYesNoCancel

3

Display Yes, No, and Cancel buttons.

vbYesNo

4

Display Yes and No buttons.

vbRetryCancel

5

Display Retry and Cancel buttons.

vbCritical

16

Display Critical Message icon.

vbQuestion

32

Display Warning Query     icon.

vbExclamation

48

Display Warning Message     icon.

vbInformation

64

Display Information Message icon.

vbDefaultButton1

0

First button is default.

vbDefaultButton2

Second button is default.

vbDefaultButton3

Third button is default.

vbDefaultButton4

Fourth button is default.

vbApplicationModal

0

Application modal; the user must respond to the message box before continuing work in the current application.

vbSystemModal

System modal; all applications are suspended until the user responds to the message box.

vbMsgBoxHelpButton

Adds Help button to the message box

VbMsgBoxSetForeground

Specifies the message box window as the foreground window

vbMsgBoxRight

Text is right aligned

vbMsgBoxRtlReading

Specifies text should appear as right-to-left reading on Hebrew and Arabic systems

Tip: In Access , the Expression Builder has IntelliSense, so you can see what arguments your expression requires.

The first group of values (0–5) describes the number and type of buttons displayed in the dialog box; the second group (16, 32, 48, 64) describes the icon style; the third group (0, , ) determines which button is the default; and the fourth group (0, ) determines the modality of the message box. When adding numbers to create a final value for the buttons argument, use only one number from each group.

Note: These constants are specified by Visual Basic for Applications. As a result, the names can be used anywhere in your code in place of the actual values.

Return Values

Constant

Value

Description

vbOK

1

OK

vbCancel

2

Cancel

vbAbort

3

Abort

vbRetry

4

Retry

vbIgnore

5

Ignore

vbYes

6

Yes

vbNo

7

No

Remarks

When both helpfile and context are provided, the user can press F1 (Windows) or HELP (Macintosh) to view the Help topic corresponding to the context. Some host applications, for example, Microsoft Excel, also automatically add a Help button to the dialog box.

If the dialog box displays a Cancel button, pressing the ESC key has the same effect as clicking Cancel. If the dialog box contains a Help button, context-sensitive Help is provided for the dialog box. However, no value is returned until one of the other buttons is clicked.

Note: To specify more than the first named argument, you must use MsgBox in an expression. To omit some positional arguments, you must include the corresponding comma delimiter.

Example

Note: Examples that follow demonstrate the use of this function in a Visual Basic for Applications (VBA) module.

This example uses the MsgBox function to display a critical-error message in a dialog box with Yes and No buttons. The No button is specified as the default response. The value returned by the MsgBox function depends on the button chosen by the user. This example assumes that sprers.eu is a Help file that contains a topic with a Help context number equal to

On Error statement

  • Article
  • 6 minutes to read

Enables an error-handling routine and specifies the location of the routine within a procedure; can also be used to disable an error-handling routine.

Syntax

On Error GoToline
On Error Resume Next
On Error GoTo 0

The On Error statement syntax can have any of the following forms:

StatementDescription
On Error GoTolineEnables the error-handling routine that starts at line specified in the required lineargument.

The line argument is any line label or line number.

If a run-time error occurs, control branches to line, making the error handler active.

The specified line must be in the same procedure as the On Error statement; otherwise, a compile-time error occurs.
On Error Resume NextSpecifies that when a run-time error occurs, control goes to the statement immediately following the statement where the error occurred and execution continues. Use this form rather than On Error GoTo when accessing objects.
On Error GoTo 0Disables any enabled error handler in the current procedure.

If you don't use an On Error statement, any run-time error that occurs is fatal; that is, an error message is displayed and execution stops.

An "enabled" error handler is one that is turned on by an On Error statement; an "active" error handler is an enabled handler that is in the process of handling an error. If an error occurs while an error handler is active (between the occurrence of the error and a Resume, Exit Sub, Exit Function, or Exit Property statement), the current procedure's error handler can't handle the error. Control returns to the calling procedure.

If the calling procedure has an enabled error handler, it is activated to handle the error. If the calling procedure's error handler is also active, control passes back through previous calling procedures until an enabled, but inactive, error handler is found. If no inactive, enabled error handler is found, the error is fatal at the point at which it actually occurred.

Each time the error handler passes control back to a calling procedure, that procedure becomes the current procedure. After an error is handled by an error handler in any procedure, execution resumes in the current procedure at the point designated by the Resume statement.

Note

An error-handling routine is not a Sub procedure or Function procedure. It's a section of code marked by a line label or line number.

Error-handling routines rely on the value in the Number property of the Err object to determine the cause of the error. The error-handling routine should test or save relevant property values in the Err object before any other error can occur or before a procedure that might cause an error is called. The property values in the Err object reflect only the most recent error. The error message associated with sprers.eu is contained in sprers.euption.

On Error Resume Next causes execution to continue with the statement immediately following the statement that caused the run-time error, or with the statement immediately following the most recent call out of the procedure containing the On Error Resume Next statement. This statement allows execution to continue despite a run-time error. You can place the error-handling routine where the error would occur, rather than transferring control to another location within the procedure. An On Error Resume Next statement becomes inactive when another procedure is called, so you should execute an On Error Resume Next statement in each called routine if you want inline error handling within that routine.

Note

The On Error Resume Next construct may be preferable to On Error GoTo when handling errors generated during access to other objects. Checking Err after each interaction with an object removes ambiguity about which object was accessed by the code. You can be sure which object placed the error code in sprers.eu, as well as which object originally generated the error (the object specified in sprers.eu).

On Error GoTo 0 disables error handling in the current procedure. It doesn't specify line 0 as the start of the error-handling code, even if the procedure contains a line numbered 0. Without an On Error GoTo 0 statement, an error handler is automatically disabled when a procedure is exited.

To prevent error-handling code from running when no error has occurred, place an Exit Sub, Exit Function, or Exit Property statement immediately before the error-handling routine, as in the following fragment:

Here, the error-handling code follows the Exit Sub statement and precedes the End Sub statement to separate it from the procedure flow. Error-handling code can be placed anywhere in a procedure.

Untrapped errors in objects are returned to the controlling application when the object is running as an executable file. Within the development environment, untrapped errors are only returned to the controlling application if the proper options are set. See your host application's documentation for a description of which options should be set during debugging, how to set them, and whether the host can create classes.

If you create an object that accesses other objects, you should try to handle errors passed back from them unhandled. If you cannot handle such errors, map the error code in sprers.eu to one of your own errors, and then pass them back to the caller of your object. You should specify your error by adding your error code to the vbObjectError constant. For example, if your error code is , assign it as follows:

Note

System errors during calls to Windows dynamic-link libraries (DLL) or Macintosh code resources don't raise exceptions and cannot be trapped with Visual Basic error trapping. When calling DLL functions, you should check each return value for success or failure (according to the API specifications), and in the event of a failure, check the value in the Err object's LastDLLError property. LastDLLError always returns zero on the Macintosh.

Example

This example first uses the On Error GoTo statement to specify the location of an error-handling routine within a procedure. In the example, an attempt to delete an open file generates error number The error is handled in the error-handling routine, and control is then returned to the statement that caused the error. The On Error GoTo 0 statement turns off error trapping.

The On Error Resume Next statement is then used to defer error trapping so that the context for the error generated by the next statement can be known for certain. Note that sprers.eu is used to clear the Err object's properties after the error is handled.

See also

Support and feedback

Have questions or feedback about Office VBA or this documentation? Please see Office VBA support and feedback for guidance about the ways you can receive support and provide feedback.

Home

Error Handling

Introduction to Errors

Overview

There will be problems with your code or your application. Some problems will come from you, some problems will be caused by users, and some problems will be caused by neither you nor your users. This means that there are things you can fix, those you can avoid as much as possible, and there are situations beyond your control. Still, as much as you can, try anticipating any type of problem and take early action to avoid bad situations.

Practical Learning: Introducing Error Handling

  1. Start Microsoft Access
  2. In the list of files, click Business Mathematics from the previous lesson
  3. In the Navigation Pane, right-click Brokerage Company1 used in Lesson 14 and click Design View (or use the Brokerage Company2 form)
  4. On the form, right-click the Calculate button and click Build Event

Error Categories

There are three main types of problems that you will deal with, directly or indirectly:

  1. Syntax: A syntax error comes from your mistyping a word or forming a bad expression in your code. It could be that you misspelled a keyword such as ByVel instead of ByVal. It could also be a bad expression such as + + It could be a "grammar" error such as providing the name of a variable before its data type when declaring a variable (quite common for those who regularly transition from different languages (C/C++, Pascal, C#, Java, F#))

    When you use Microsoft Visual Basic to write your code, it would point out the errors while you are writing your code, giving you time to fix them. When your database runs, it can let you know about other syntax errors. For this reason, syntax errors are almost the easiest to fix because, most of the time, the problem would be pointed out and you can fix it
  2. Run-Time: After all syntax errors have been fixed, the program may be ready for the user. There are different types of problems that a user may face when interacting with your database. Imagine that, in your code, you indicate that a picture would be loaded and displayed to the user but you forget to ship the picture or the directory of the picture indicated in your code becomes different when a user opens your database. This is a type of run-time error.
    Run-time errors are mostly easy to fix because you will know what problem is occurring and why
  3. Logic: These are errors that don't fit in any of the above categories. They could be caused by the user misusing your database, a problem with the computer on which the database is used while the same database is working fine in another computer. Because logic errors can be vague, they can also be difficult to fix

Handling Errors

Introduction

The Code Editor in Microsoft Visual Basic can help you detect syntax errors. For example, when a certain error occurs while you are writing your code, a message box would display, prompting you to fix the problem:

Error Detection

Error Detection

If there is a syntax error that that the Editor didn't signal or that you ignored when writing your code, you would find it out when the form or report is used.

A run-time error is one that occurs when using your application. Consider the following form:

Calculation

Private Sub cmdCalculate_Click() Dim Number# Dim Twice# Number = [txtNumber] Twice = Number * 2 [txtResult] = Twice End Sub

Here is an example of executing it:

Calculation

The first aspect you should take into consideration is to imagine what could cause a problem. If you think there is such a possibility, you can create a label that could be used to transfer code if a problem occurs.

Practical Learning: Introducing Errors

  1. Change the code as follows: Private Sub cmdCalculate_Click() Dim principal As Double, commission As Double Dim numberOfShares As Integer, pricePerShare As Double numberOfShares = CInt(Nz(txtNumberOfShares)) pricePerShare = CDbl(Nz(txtPricePerShare)) principal = numberOfShares * pricePerShare If principal = 0# Then commission = 0# End If If (principal > 0#) And (principal <= #) Then commission = + (principal * ) End If If (principal > #) And (principal <= #) Then commission = 45# + (principal * ) End If If (principal > #) And (principal <= #) Then commission = 60# + (principal * ) End If If (principal > #) And (principal <= #) Then commission = 75# + (principal * ) End If If (principal > #) And (principal <= #) Then commission = + (principal * ) End If If (principal > #) Then commission = + (principal * ) End If txtPrincipal = FormatNumber(principal) txtCommission = FormatNumber(commission) txtTotalInvestment = FormatNumber(principal + commission) ThereWasAProblem: MsgBox "There was a problem when executing your instructions." End Sub
  2. Return to Microsoft Access and switch the form to Form View
  3. If you create a label as done in the above code, you should specify when to jump to that label. Otherwise, as in this case, the label section would always execute. To see this, click the Calculate button

    Introducing Error Handling

  4. Click OK on the message box
  5. Click Number of Shares and type
  6. Click Price per Share and type
  7. Click the Calculate button

    Introducing Error Handling

  8. Click OK on the message box
  9. Return to Microsoft Visual Basic
  10. In this case, we want the label section to execute only when we want. To prevent the execution from reaching this section if not directed so, you can add an Exit Sub line above the label section. For an example, change the code as follows: Private Sub cmdCalculate_Click() Dim principal As Double, commission As Double Dim numberOfShares As Integer, pricePerShare As Double numberOfShares = CInt(Nz(txtNumberOfShares)) pricePerShare = CDbl(Nz(txtPricePerShare)) principal = numberOfShares * pricePerShare If principal = 0# Then commission = 0# End If If (principal > 0#) And (principal <= #) Then commission = + (principal * ) End If If (principal > #) And (principal <= #) Then commission = 45# + (principal * ) End If If (principal > #) And (principal <= #) Then commission = 60# + (principal * ) End If If (principal > #) And (principal <= #) Then commission = 75# + (principal * ) End If If (principal > #) And (principal <= #) Then commission = + (principal * ) End If If (principal > #) Then commission = + (principal * ) End If txtPrincipal = FormatNumber(principal) txtCommission = FormatNumber(commission) txtTotalInvestment = FormatNumber(principal + commission) Exit Sub ThereWasAProblem: MsgBox "There was a problem when executing your instructions." End Sub
  11. Return to Microsoft Access
  12. Click Number of Shares and press Delete
  13. Click Price per Share and press Delete
  14. This time, if you use appropriate values, the label section would not be reached.
    Click the Calculate button

    Introducing Error Handling

  15. Click Number of Shares and type
  16. Click Price per Share and type
  17. Click the Calculate button

    Introducing Error Handling

  18. Return to Microsoft Visual Basic

In Case Of Error, Jump To Label

The above code will work if the right value is provided. When you preview the form, imagine that the user types an inappropriate value such as 24$ instead of $ In this case, the value is not a number. You would like the program to let the user know that there was a problem.

With some experience, you would know what the problem was, otherwise, you would face a vague explanation. If a problem occurs when a person is using your database, the computer may display an insignificant message. Therefore, you can start by creating an appropriate label as introduced above. An error normally occurs in a procedure. To make your code easier to read, you should create a label that shows that it is made for an error instead of being a regular label. The label should also reflect the name of the procedure. This is just a suggestion, not a rule.

Practical Learning: Jumping to a Label

  1. Change the label to cmdCalculate_Click_Error as follows: Private Sub cmdCalculate_Click() Dim principal As Double, commission As Double Dim numberOfShares As Integer, pricePerShare As Double numberOfShares = CInt(Nz(txtNumberOfShares)) pricePerShare = CDbl(Nz(txtPricePerShare)) principal = numberOfShares * pricePerShare If principal = 0# Then commission = 0# End If If (principal > 0#) And (principal <= #) Then commission = + (principal * ) End If If (principal > #) And (principal <= #) Then commission = 45# + (principal * ) End If If (principal > #) And (principal <= #) Then commission = 60# + (principal * ) End If If (principal > #) And (principal <= #) Then commission = 75# + (principal * ) End If If (principal > #) And (principal <= #) Then commission = + (principal * ) End If If (principal > #) Then commission = + (principal * ) End If txtPrincipal = FormatNumber(principal) txtCommission = FormatNumber(commission) txtTotalInvestment = FormatNumber(principal + commission) Exit Sub cmdCalculate_Click_Error: MsgBox "There was a problem when executing your instructions." End Sub
  2. When you think there will be a problem in your code, somewhere in the lines under the name of the procedure but before the line that could cause the problem, type On Error GoTo followed by the name of the label that would deal with the error. For an example, change the code as follows: Private Sub cmdCalculate_Click() On Error GoTo cmdCalculate_Click_Error Dim principal As Double, commission As Double Dim numberOfShares As Integer, pricePerShare As Double numberOfShares = CInt(Nz(txtNumberOfShares)) pricePerShare = CDbl(Nz(txtPricePerShare)) principal = numberOfShares * pricePerShare If principal = 0# Then commission = 0# End If If (principal > 0#) And (principal <= #) Then commission = + (principal * ) End If If (principal > #) And (principal <= #) Then commission = 45# + (principal * ) End If If (principal > #) And (principal <= #) Then commission = 60# + (principal * ) End If If (principal > #) And (principal <= #) Then commission = 75# + (principal * ) End If If (principal > #) And (principal <= #) Then commission = + (principal * ) End If If (principal > #) Then commission = + (principal * ) End If txtPrincipal = FormatNumber(principal) txtCommission = FormatNumber(commission) txtTotalInvestment = FormatNumber(principal + commission) Exit Sub cmdCalculate_Click_Error: MsgBox "There was a problem when executing your instructions." End Sub

    This informs the compiler that, if there is a problem when this code executes, jump to the indicated label. When the On Error GoTo statement is used, this indicates that if any type of error occurs while the code of this procedure executes, transfer the compilation to the label. In this case, as soon as something bad happens, the compiler marks the area where the problem occurred, skips the normal code and jumps to the label indicated by the On Error GoTo line. After the section of that label has executed, the compiler returns where the error occurred. If there is nothing to solve the problem, the compiler continues down but without executing the lines of code involved. In this case, it would encounter the Exit Sub line and get out of the procedure.

In Case Of Error, Jump To Line #

Although the label is more explicit, it only indicates to the compiler what line to jump to in case of a problem. The alternative is to specify a line number instead of a label.

Resume

If a problem occurs in your code and you provide a label to display a friendly message as done above, the compiler would display the message and exit from the procedure. If this happens, as mentioned above, when the compiler returns where the problem occurred, you can provide an alternative. For example, in our program, if the user provides an inappropriate value that causes the error, you can provide an alternate value and ask the compiler to continue as if nothing happened. In this case, you want to compiler to "resume" its activity.

To indicate that the program should continue, you can use the Resume keyword. Here is an example:

Private Sub cmdCalculate_Click() On Error GoTo cmdCalculate_Click_Error Dim Number# Dim Twice# Number = [txtNumber] Resume Twice = Number * 2 [txtResult] = Twice Exit Sub cmdCalculate_Click_Error: MsgBox "There was a problem when executing your instructions" End Sub

When an error occurs, if you want the program to continue with an alternate value than the one that caused the problem, in the label section, type Resume Next.

Practical Learning: Resuming the Execution

  1. Change the code as follows: Private Sub cmdCalculate_Click() On Error GoTo cmdCalculate_Click_Error Dim principal As Double, commission As Double Dim numberOfShares As Integer, pricePerShare As Double numberOfShares = CInt(Nz(txtNumberOfShares)) pricePerShare = CDbl(Nz(txtPricePerShare)) principal = numberOfShares * pricePerShare If principal = 0# Then commission = 0# End If If (principal > 0#) And (principal <= #) Then commission = + (principal * ) End If If (principal > #) And (principal <= #) Then commission = 45# + (principal * ) End If If (principal > #) And (principal <= #) Then commission = 60# + (principal * ) End If If (principal > #) And (principal <= #) Then commission = 75# + (principal * ) End If If (principal > #) And (principal <= #) Then commission = + (principal * ) End If If (principal > #) Then commission = + (principal * ) End If txtPrincipal = FormatNumber(principal) txtCommission = FormatNumber(commission) txtTotalInvestment = FormatNumber(principal + commission) Exit Sub cmdCalculate_Click_Error: MsgBox "There was a problem when executing your instructions." Resume Next End Sub
  2. In this case, since any numeric variable is initialized with 0, when the compiler returns to the line of code that caused the problem, it would use 0 as a substitute to the inappropriate value. Based on this, you can provide a new value to use in case of error. For an example, change the code as follows: Private Sub cmdCalculate_Click() On Error GoTo cmdCalculate_Click_Error Dim principal As Double, commission As Double Dim numberOfShares As Integer, pricePerShare As Double numberOfShares = CInt(Nz(txtNumberOfShares)) pricePerShare = CDbl(Nz(txtPricePerShare)) principal = numberOfShares * pricePerShare If principal = 0# Then commission = 0# End If If (principal > 0#) And (principal <= #) Then commission = + (principal * ) End If If (principal > #) And (principal <= #) Then commission = 45# + (principal * ) End If If (principal > #) And (principal <= #) Then commission = 60# + (principal * ) End If If (principal > #) And (principal <= #) Then commission = 75# + (principal * ) End If If (principal > #) And (principal <= #) Then commission = + (principal * ) End If If (principal > #) Then commission = + (principal * ) End If txtPrincipal = FormatNumber(principal) txtCommission = FormatNumber(commission) txtTotalInvestment = FormatNumber(principal + commission) Exit Sub cmdCalculate_Click_Error: MsgBox "There was a problem when executing your instructions." numberOfShares = 0# pricePerShare = 0# Resume Next End Sub
  3. Return to Microsoft Access
  4. Click Number of Shares and press Delete
  5. Click Price per Share and press Delete
  6. This time, if you use inappropriate values, the form will respond rightly.
    Click the Calculate button

    Introducing Error Handling

  7. Click Number of Shares and type 7 thousands
  8. Click Calculate
  9. Click OK on the message box
  10. Click Price per Share and type $ and
  11. Click the Calculate button

    Introducing Error Handling

  12. Click OK on the message boxes
  13. Click Number of Shares and type
  14. Click Price per Share and type
  15. Click Calculate

    Introducing Error Handling

  16. Save and close the form
  17. In the Navigation Pane, right-click Straight-Line Method1 accessed in Lesson 4 and continued in Lesson 9. Click Design View (or use the Straight-Line Method3 form)
  18. On the form, right-click the Calculate button and click Build Event
  19. From what we learned above, change the event as follows: Private Sub cmdCalculate_Click() On Error GoTo cmdCalculate_Click_Error Dim cost Dim salvageValue Dim estimatedLife Dim depreciation cost = CDbl(Nz(txtCost)) salvageValue = CDbl(Nz(txtSalvageValue)) estimatedLife = CDbl(Nz(txtEstimatedLife)) depreciation = SLN(cost, salvageValue, estimatedLife) txtDepreciation = FormatCurrency(depreciation) Exit Sub cmdCalculate_Click_Error: MsgBox "There seems to be a problem with the values you provided or something else caused this error.", _ vbOKCancel Or vbInformation, "Business Mathematics - Depreciation" Resume Next End Sub

An Exit Label

To explicity indicate where a proedure should stop, create a label just above the Exit Sub line. By tradition, this label should use the name of the event followed by _Exit.

Practical Learning: Using an Exit Label

  1. To create an exit label, change the event as follows: Private Sub cmdCalculate_Click() On Error GoTo cmdCalculate_Click_Error Dim cost Dim salvageValue Dim estimatedLife Dim depreciation cost = CDbl(txtCost) salvageValue = CDbl(txtSalvageValue) estimatedLife = CDbl(txtEstimatedLife) depreciation = SLN(cost, salvageValue, estimatedLife) txtDepreciation = FormatCurrency(depreciation) cmdCalculate_Click_Exit: Exit Sub cmdCalculate_Click_Error: MsgBox "There seems to be a problem with the values you provided or something else caused this error.", _ vbOKCancel Or vbInformation, "Business Mathematics - Depreciation" Resume Next End Sub
  2. After creating the exit label, on the last line of the error label section, create a line that includes the Resume keyword followed by the exit label. For an example, change the code as follows: Private Sub cmdCalculate_Click() On Error GoTo cmdCalculate_Click_Error Dim cost Dim salvageValue Dim estimatedLife Dim depreciation cost = CDbl(Nz(txtCost)) salvageValue = CDbl(Nz(txtSalvageValue)) estimatedLife = CDbl(Nz(txtEstimatedLife)) depreciation = SLN(cost, salvageValue, estimatedLife) txtDepreciation = FormatCurrency(depreciation) cmdCalculate_Click_Exit: Exit Sub cmdCalculate_Click_Error: MsgBox "There seems to be a problem with the values you provided or something else caused this error.", _ vbOKCancel Or vbInformation, "Business Mathematics - Depreciation" Resume cmdCalculate_Click_Exit End Sub
  3. Return to Microsoft Access and switch the form to Form View
  4. Click the Calculate button
  5. Click OK on the message box
  6. Click Asset Original Value and type a bad number such as 24$
  7. Click Salvage Value and type a bad number such as 50;00
  8. Click Estimated Life and type a natural number such 8
  9. Click the Calculate button:

    Formatting a Currency Value

  10. Click the Calculate button
  11. Click Asset Original Value and change the number to a good one such as
  12. Click Salvage Value and and change the number to a good one such as
  13. Click the Calculate button:

    Formatting a Currency Value

  14. Close the form
  15. When asked whether you want to save, click No

The Err Object

Introduction

To support error handling, the Visual Basic language provides a class, or global object, named Err. This allows you to identify the error and its description. Because an error depends on what caused it and why, the values of the Err object also depend and are not always the same.

The Error Number

There ar different types of run-time errors that can occur when your database is used. When an error occurs, Microsoft Access displays a message box with the corresponding error number. Here is an example of a run-time error number

Error

To assist you with the errors, the Err class is equipped with a property named Number that allows you to identify an error by its number. The Number property is a constant integer. Most of the times, when a run-time error occurs, the above dialog box would show you the error number that occurred.

Practical Learning: Introducing the Err Object

  1. In the Navigation Pane, double-click Compound Interest1 (accessed in Lesson 14 or use the Compound Interest2 form)
  2. On the form, click the Calculate button
  3. On the Input Box, click OK

    Introducing the Err Object

  4. Click Principal and type ;00
  5. Click Interest Rate and type
  6. Click Periods and type 8
  7. Click the Calculate button

    Error

  8. On the message box, click End
  9. Click Principal and delete ;00
  10. Click Interest Rate and type 7&35
  11. Click Calculate
  12. On the message box, click End
  13. Click Interest Rate and type
  14. Click Calculate
  15. In the input box, type Daily and click OK
  16. On the message box, click End
  17. Click Periods and type 3;55
  18. Click the Calculate button
  19. If the user clicks Debug, the line that caused the error would be highlighted. For an example, on the message box, click Debug

    Error Detection

    Notice that, in the previous screen, we got the error number
  20. If you get an error number and know what it represents, you can write a conditional statement that isolate the error number and consequently you can display a message to the user. For an example, change the code as follows: Private Sub cmdCalculate_Click() On Error GoTo cmdCalculate_Click_ErrorExit Sub cmdCalculate_Click_Error: If sprers.eu = 13 Then MsgBox "Please provide a decimal number for the principal and the interest rate. " & _ "Also provide a natural number for the periods (as a number of years) and " & _ "type a natural number in the Input Box for the compound frequency.", _ sprers.euly Or sprers.eurmation, "Compound Interest" End If Resume Next End Sub
  21. Return to Microsoft Access
  22. Click the Calculate button:

    Introducing the Err Object

  23. Click OK on the message box
  24. In the Input Box, accept 1 and click OK
  25. Click Periods and type
  26. Click Calculate
  27. In the Input Box, type 3 and click OK

    Introducing the Err Object

  28. Save and close the form

The Error Message

Obviously an error number does not mean much. To indicate what each error number refers to, the Err class is equipped with a property named Description, which is a string. To display this message, you can create an On Error GoTo expression and indicate where to jump if an error occurs. Here is an example:

Private Sub cmdCalculate_Click() On Error GoTo cmbCalculate_Error Dim Number# Dim Twice# Number = [txtNumber] Twice = Number * 2 [txtResult] = Twice Exit Sub cmbCalculate_Error: MsgBox "Error Message: " & sprers.euption End Sub

This time, if the type of error you are anticipating occurs, you can rightfully display the description. Here is an example:

Calculation

Once again, notice that the type of message of the sprers.euption string may not mean much to a regular user. For this reason, you should make it a habit to anticipate as many types of errors that may occur in your application and display more meaningful messages. You can do this in the section where the code would jump when an error occurs.

Practical Learning: Using the Error Message

The Source of the Error

It is assumed that an error would be caused when using your application. In fact, the database on which the user is working when the error occurred is considered as the source of the error. This information can be valuable at times. The application that caused an error is recognized as the Source property of the Err object. Most of the time, you will know this. Still, if you want to get this information, you can access the Source property of the Err object and get this as a string.

Debugging and the Immediate Window

The Immediate Window

Debugging consists of examining and testing portions of your code or parts of your database to identify problems that may occur whilee somebody is using your database. Microsoft Visual Basic provides as many tools as possible to assist you with this task.

The Immediate window is an object you can use to test functions and expressions. It is available in the Microsoft Visual Basic programming environment. To display the Immediate window, on the main menu of Microsoft Visual Basic, click View and click Immediate Window. It's a habit to keep the Immediate window in the bottom section of the Code Editor but you can move it from there by dragging its title bar:

The Immediate Window

Probably the simplest action you can perform in the Immediate window consists of testing an expression. For example, you can write an arithmetic operation and examine its result. To do this, in the Immediate window, type the question mark "?" followed by the expression and press Enter. Here is an example that tests the result of +

Immediate Window

One of the most basic actions you can perform in the Immediate window consists of testing a built-in function. To do this, type ? followed by the name of the function and its arguments, if any. Here is an example:

? UCase("République d'Afrique du Sud")

After typing the function and pressing Enter, the result would display in the next line:

Immediate Window

The Debug Object

The Immediate window is recognized in code as the Debug object. To programmatically display something, such as a string, in the Immediate window, the Debug object provides the Print method. The simplest way to use it consist of passing it a string. For example, imagine you create a button on a form, you name it cmdTestFullName and initialize it with a string. Here is an example of how you can display that string in the Immediate window:

Private Sub cmdTestFullName_Click() Dim strFullName$ strFullName$ = "Daniel Ambassa" sprers.eu strFullName$ End Sub

When you click the button, the Immediate window would display the passed string:

Immediate Window

In the same way, you can create a more elaborate expression and test its value in the Immediate window:

Immediate Window

You can also pass a value, such as a date, that can easily be converted to a string.

Practical Learning: Ending the Lesson

Even when your code is perfectly constructed, the user might not always do what you would expect.  For this reason, you need to insert error handlers into your code whenever there might be a reason that an error might occur.

Contents

Handling an error when incorrect data is inputted by the user

If you were to populate an integer with a text string as in the procedure below&#;

Sub TestError Dim intA as Integer intA = InputBox("Please enter a value", "Testing errors") End sub

When you run the routine, an input box will ask you to enter a value.

Messagebox saying "please enter a value"

Enter some text.

The value "forty" entered into the messagebox

Because text was entered, and not a value, an error will be returned.

Run-time error 13 type mismatch

Clicking on debug will show you the error, and resting your mouse on the line of code will give you the values or any variables or constants that occur in that line of code.

intA = 0 is displayed in debugging mode

In the above example, due to the fact that the variable is an integer variable, it will not accept a text string – we therefore have a type mismatch.  We need to trap this error to make sure that the user does not type text into this particular text box – but only types a number.

We therefore need to create an error handler at the top of the procedure using .

Sub TestError1() On Error GoTo errorhandler

And at the end of the procedure before , we need to put an , and then put the label , and a message box with the error message.

Exit Sub errorhandler: MsgBox ("Please make sure a number is inputted") End Sub

Therefore is anyone does type text into the input box, a message box will appear telling them to type a number:

Messagebox saying "Please make sure a number is inputted"

Your entire code would therefore look like this:

Sub TestError1() On Error GoTo errorhandler Dim intA As Integer intA = InputBox("Please enter a value", "Testing errors") Exit Sub errorhandler: MsgBox ("Please make sure a number is inputted") End Sub

Handling an error when incorrect data comes from a spreadsheet

You may encounter an error when your macro is looking for a specific object, like a worksheet, but fails to find it.

Sub TestWorksheet Sheets(3).Activate End sub

However, our workbook may only contain 2 sheets!

Sheet 1 and Sheet 2

Therefore, this error would occur when the procedure is run.

Run time error 9 subscript out of range

To avoid this happening, we once again need an error trap.  The error line goes just below the line

Sub TestWorksheet() On Error GoTo ErrorHandler

And we then need a label called , and a message to let us know what has occurred.

Exit Sub ErrorHandler: Msgbox ("Sheet does not exist!") End Sub Exit Sub ErrorHandler: Msgbox ("Sheet does not exist!") End Sub

And when you run the code, you&#;ll get the following message:

Messagebox saying Sheet does not exist

Examining the error code syntax

  • You always need to have at the beginning of a procedure, below the procedure name.
  • The line need to refer to a LABEL that the code will jump to should an error occur.  The label above is but it can be any text that you like (eh, continue, carryon etc).
  • The label but have a colon after it eg:
  • There MUST be an EXIT SUB above the label line – otherwise when the code is run and an error DOES NOT occur, the error message will show anyway.

       For example, in the code below, the has been commented out so the code continues to the error handler.

Exit sub has been commented out
Sheet does not exist

The correct code looks as per the example below:

Sub TestWorksheet() 'error trap line On Error GoTo ErrorHandler 'go to sheet three Sheets(3).Activate 'exit the sub if sheet three is not found Exit Sub 'error handle label ErrorHandler: 'error handle activity if error exists MsgBox ("Sheet does not exist") End Sub

How to avoid errors

  • Design your application carefully by writing down what you want the application to achieve and the relevant events that you are going to create.  Write down the way you want your code to respond to each event and give each event procedure and general procedure a well-defined purpose.
  • Comment your code generously – it will make it a lot easier to go back and analyze and understand.
  • Explicitly refer to variable and constants.  Declare variables with the relevant data type.  Use Option Explicit to avoid spelling mistakes in variable names.
  • Develop a consistent naming scheme for variables, controls and other objects.
  • Use functions like IFERROR for additional error handling

See also: How to handle unpredictable input in input boxes

Tagged with:Error, error handling, Goto Line, Label, messages, VBA, vba error

How to Include Error Handling in VBA Code

For Microsoft® Access, Excel and Word, how to include error handling in VBA code to intercept and process errors if and when they occur.

Last updated on by David Wallis.


Preface

Errors occur during the execution of a VBA function or sub procedure due to a variety of reasons, including the use of incorrect code and the macro running under circumstances for which it was not intended.

Introducing error trapping in all your VBA procedures puts you in control of errors and in a position to direct the code to make appropriate responses.

By managing errors you can spare your users from being thrown into a panic at not knowing how to respond to threatening looking error messages, like this one.

Excel error message

Failure to include error handling may result in unwelcome and undesirable behaviour of the software. Your users could be faced with loss of changes they have made to their data or application, or with their application freezing and refusing to function at all.


Simple Error Handler

There are a number of ways in which you might choose to include code for error handling in a macro. This is the skeleton code for a simple way:

Sub YourProcedureName()

On Error Goto errHandler

your code here

procDone:

Exit Sub

errHandler:

MsgBox sprers.eu & ": " & sprers.euption

Resume procDone

End Sub

The On Error statement turns on error trapping. Information about any error that occurs subsequent to this statement is stored in a VBA error object named Err.

In the event of an error, the On Error Goto errHandler statement instructs the procedure to stop executing your code at the point at which the error occurs and to pick it up again at the errHandler label.

MsgBox sprers.eu & ": " & sprers.euption sends a message box to the screen displaying information about the nature of the error:

  • sprers.eu is a unique identification number for the error object drawn from VBA’s library of errors
  • sprers.euption is a description of that error.

Resume procDone instructs the macro to resume executing at the procDone label.


Refined Error Handling Code

Let’s assume you have wrapped a new procedure in the error-handling code described above. As you test your macro an error results. Therefore you are presented with the message box from which you learn the error number and the nature of the error.

Now you are in a position to revise your error handler to respond to this specific error (in this example the error number ):

Sub YourProcedureName()

On Error Goto errHandler

your code here

procDone:

Exit Sub

errHandler:

Select Case sprers.eu

Case

your code for handling error

Case Else

' All outstanding errors

MsgBox sprers.eu & ": " & sprers.euption

End Select

Resume procDone

End Sub

As you test your macro and uncover other potential errors, you can extend the Select Case statement by including other Cases accordingly. In the following refinement of the macro, the messages to users are made specific:

Sub YourProcedureName()

On Error Goto errHandler

Dim msg$, title$, icon&

your code here

procDone:

Exit Sub

errHandler:

icon& = vbOKOnly + vbCritical

Select Case sprers.eu

Case 53

title$ = "Missing File"

msg$ = "Macro cannot locate an essential file."

msg$ = msg$ & vbNewline & vbNewLine

msg$ = msg$ & "Please notify IT support."

Case Else

title$ = "Unanticipated Error"

msg$ = sprers.eu & ": " & sprers.euption

msg$ = msg$ & vbNewline & vbNewLine

msg$ = msg$ & "Please make a note of this message"

End Select

MsgBox sprers.eu & ": " & sprers.euption

Resume procDone

End Sub

If when your procedure completes its run you want the user to be given a message about any error, then here is a further refinement of your code:

Sub YourProcedureName()

On Error Goto errHandler

Dim msg$, title$, icon&

your code here

title$="Macro Run Completed"

msg$ = "Please continue using the workbook"

icon& = vbOKOnly + vbExclamation

procDone:

MsgBox msg$, icon&, title$

Exit Sub

errHandler:

icon& = vbOKOnly + vbCritical

Select Case sprers.eu

Case 53

title$ = "Missing File"

msg$ = "Macro cannot locate an essential file."

msg$ = msg$ & vbNewline & vbNewLine

msg$ = msg$ & "Please notify the developer."

Case Else

title$ = "Unanticipated Error"

msg$ = sprers.eu & ": " & sprers.euption

msg$ = msg$ & vbNewline & vbNewLine

msg$ = msg$ & "Please make a note of this message."

End Select

Resume procDone

End Sub

For users who are adept at computer usage, as developer you will get targeted information about an error if you refine your error handler even further:

errHandler:

icon& = vbOKOnly + vbCritical

Select Case sprers.eu

Case 53

title$ = "Missing File"

msg$ = "Macro cannot locate an essential file."

msg$ = msg$ & vbNewline & vbNewLine

msg$ = msg$ & "Please notify the developer."

Case Else

title$ = "Unanticipated Error"

msg$ = _

"An unexpected error has occurred in your program." & _

vbCrLf & vbCrLf & _

"Please send a screen print of this message to the developer." & _

vbCrLf & vbCrLf & _

"If you're unable to, please make a note of these details:" & _

vbCrLf & vbCrLf & _

"Calling Proc: NameOfYourProcedure" & _

vbCrLf & _

"Error Number: " & sprers.eu & _

vbCrLf & _

"Description: " & sprers.euption & _

vbCrLf & vbCrLf & _

"Program will now … "

End Select

Resume procDone

The Case Else block responds to any error for which you have not specifically coded. So the bulk of the message it displays is information useful to you, the developer.

NameOfYourProcedure is the name you’ve given to the procedure in which you’ve included this error handler.

Program will now … is your message to the user about what will happen as a result of the error. You’ll adapt this message as you deploy the error handler throughout your code modules.


Take Care—Test to Destruction

Always test your macros fully before putting them into service. Best to test on a back-up copy of your application.

“Pretty good testing is easy to do (that’s partly why some people like to say ‘testing is dead’ — they think testing isn’t needed as a special focus because they note that anyone can find at least some bugs some of the time). Excellent testing is quite hard to do.”

James Bach (Satisfice, Inc.)

Testing takes time. To the time I estimate for writing the code, I add 30% at least for the testing.


Your Support for DMW TIPS

Please support this website by making a donation to help keep it free of advertising and to help towards cost of time spent adding new content.

To make a contribution by PayPal in GBP (&#; sterling) —

To make a contribution by PayPal in USD ($ US) —

Thanks, in anticipation.

Error Handling in VBA

Microsoft Access Tips for Serious Users

Provided by Allen Browne, June Updated September


Every function or sub should contain error handling. Without it, a user may be left viewing the faulty code in a full version of Access, while a run-time version just crashes. For a more detailed approach to error handling, see FMS' article on Error Handling and Debugging.

The simplest approach is to display the Access error message and quit the procedure. Each procedure, then, will have this format (without the line numbers):

1 Sub

You can watch a thematic video

How to Use the MsgBox Command in Microsoft Access VBA to Create an \

Even when your code is perfectly constructed, the user might not always do what you would expect.  For this reason, you need to insert error handlers into your code whenever there might be a reason that an error might occur.

Contents

Handling an error when incorrect data is inputted by the user

If you were to populate an integer with a text string as in the procedure error for saving db5 TestError Dim intA as Integer intA = InputBox("Please enter a value", "Testing errors") End sub

When you run the routine, an input box will ask you to enter a value.

Messagebox saying "please enter a value"

Enter some text.

The value "forty" entered into the messagebox

Because text was entered, and not a value, an error will be returned.

Run-time error 13 type mismatch

Clicking on debug will show you the error, and resting your mouse on the line of code will give you the values or any variables or constants that occur in that line of code.

intA = 0 is displayed in debugging mode

In the above example, due to the fact that the variable is an integer variable, it will not accept a text string – we therefore have a type mismatch.  We need to trap this error access vba error msgbox make sure that the user does not type text into this particular text box – but only types a number.

We therefore need to create an error handler at the top of the procedure using .

Sub TestError1() On Error GoTo errorhandler

And at the end of the procedure beforewe need to put anand then put the labeland a message box with the error message.

Exit Sub errorhandler: MsgBox ("Please make sure a number is inputted") End Sub

Therefore is anyone does type text into the input box, a message box will appear telling them to type a number:

Messagebox saying "Please make sure a number is inputted"

Your entire code would therefore look like this:

Sub TestError1() On Error GoTo errorhandler Dim intA As Integer intA = InputBox("Please enter a value", "Testing errors") Exit Sub errorhandler: MsgBox ("Please make sure a number is inputted") End Sub

Handling an error when incorrect data comes from a spreadsheet

You may encounter an error when your macro is looking for a specific object, like a worksheet, but fails to find it.

Sub TestWorksheet Sheets(3).Activate End sub

However, access vba error msgbox, our workbook may only contain 2 sheets!

Sheet 1 and Sheet 2

Therefore, this error would occur when the procedure is run.

Run time error 9 subscript out of range

To avoid this happening, we once again need an error trap.  The error line goes just below the line

Sub TestWorksheet() On Error GoTo ErrorHandler

And we then need a label calledand a message to let us know what has occurred.

Exit Sub ErrorHandler: Msgbox ("Sheet does not exist!") End Sub Exit Sub ErrorHandler: Msgbox ("Sheet does not exist!") End Sub

And when you run the code, you&#;ll get the following message:

Messagebox saying Sheet does not exist

Examining the error code syntax

  • You always need to have at the beginning of a procedure, below the procedure name.
  • The line need to refer to a LABEL that the code will jump to should an error occur.  The label above is but it can be any text that you like (eh, continue, carryon etc).
  • The label but have a colon after it eg:
  • There MUST be an EXIT SUB above the label line – otherwise when the code is run and an error DOES NOT occur, the error message will show anyway.

       For example, in the code below, the has been commented out so the code continues to the error handler.

Exit sub has been commented out
Sheet does not exist

The correct code looks as per the example below:

Sub TestWorksheet() 'error trap line On Error GoTo ErrorHandler 'go to sheet three Sheets(3).Activate 'exit the sub if sheet three vb6 ieframe.dll error not found Exit Sub 'error handle label ErrorHandler: 'error handle activity if error exists MsgBox ("Sheet does not exist") End Sub

How to avoid errors

  • Design your application carefully by writing down what you want the application to achieve and the relevant events that you are going to create.  Write down the way you want your code to respond to each event and give each event procedure and general procedure a well-defined purpose.
  • Comment your code generously – it will make it a lot easier to go back and analyze and understand.
  • Explicitly refer to variable and constants.  Declare variables with the relevant data type.  Use Option Explicit to avoid spelling mistakes in variable names.
  • Develop a consistent naming scheme for variables, controls and other objects.
  • Use functions like IFERROR for additional error handling

See also: How to handle unpredictable input in input boxes

Tagged with:Error, access vba error msgbox, error handling, Goto Line, Label, messages, VBA, vba error

Handling Errors in VBA

When one of the statements in your VBA code cannot be successfully executed at run time, an error condition is raised. If you have made provision for that possibility, your code can recover gracefully and continue or terminate as appropriate; if not, Access will do its best to handle the error itself -- usually not in the way you would prefer.

An untrapped, or unhandled, error is one that is raised by your application and not handled by error-handling code that you write. Such errors are then dealt with by Access's default error-handling routine, which displays the description of the error and, depending on your option settings, may allow you to debug the code, access vba error msgbox. But it also tends to reset the VBA project, so that all global variables are returned to their uninitialized states. And if the database is run using the Access run-time module and not the full version of Access, the application will simply shut down.

To avoid having this happen, put error-handling code in (at least) all your top-level VBA procedures. By "top-level" procedures, I mean those that are not called by other procedures you write, but rather are triggered by events. You can also write whatever specialized error-handling you want for lower-level procedures that are called from the top-level procedures, but if a lower-level procedure doesn't have its own error-handling code, its errors will be handled by a higher-level procedure's error-handler, if there is one, so you don't *necessarily* have to write an error-handler for every procedure.

By error-handling code, I refer to using the On Error statement to define what will happen and where code execution will continue in xerox 5020 n9 error event of an error being asus fatal error chassis intruded by your code. Most often you will want to use the "On Error GoTo" form of the statement, to transfer control to an error-handling section in the procedure, from which section, eventually, the Resume statement is used to continue execution after the error has been dealt with. An alternative to this is "in-line" error-handling, which is done by using the "On Error Resume Next" statement. In that case, your own code checks after executing each statement, to see if an error has occurred, and deals with errors right there.

Here's a very basic example of error-handling using "On Error GoTo", with comments on the essential elements:

code: click in the frame, Select Fotos hd de terror, then Paste into your code editor

Here's an example of in-line error-handling:

code: click in the frame, Select All, then Paste into your code editor

Note that you can use a combination of error-handler blocks and in-line error-handling in the same procedure, and you can have more than one error-handler block. Also, you can write your error-handler block to resume execution at different locations depending on your evaluation of the error that occurred, access vba error msgbox. Error-handling can be quite sophisticated, if you take the trouble to program it that way.

For more information about VBA error-handling, I suggest you start reading with the VBA help-file topic for the On Error statement, and branch out from there.

Relevance: Microsoft Access
Versions: Access 95 to
Categories: VBA, Tutorial, Error-Handling
Date: 13 June

Tips Index


VBA: How to display an error message just like the standard error message which has a "Debug" button?

This answer does not address the Debug button (you'd have to design a form and use the buttons on that to do something like the method in your next question). But it does address this part:

now I don't want to lose the comfortableness of the default handler which also point me to the exact line where the error has occured.

First, I'll assume you don't want this in production code - you want it either for debugging or for code you personally will be using. I use a compiler flag to indicate debugging; then if I'm troubleshooting a program, I can easily find the line that's causing the problem.

Note: the exception to is if the error occurs in a sub-procedure without an error handling routine, then will take you to the line in this proc that called the sub-procedure with the error. But you can still step into and through the sub-procedure, using until it errors out again. If the sub-procedure's too long to make even that tedious, then your sub-procedure should probably have its own error handling routine.

There are multiple ways to do this. Sometimes for smaller programs where I know I'm gonna be stepping through it anyway when troubleshooting, I just put these lines right after the MsgBox statement:

It will never get to the Resume statement, unless you're stepping through and set it as the next line to be executed, either by dragging the next statement pointer to that line, or by pressing with the cursor on that line.

Here's an article that expands on these concepts: Five tips for handling errors in VBA. Finally, if you're using VBA and haven't discovered Chip Pearson's awesome site yet, he has a page explaining Error Handling In VBA.

Function 6 Err_SomeName: 7 Smart samsung end-to-end-error sprers.eu & sprers.euption 8 Resume Exit_SomeName 9 End Sub
Home

Error Handling

Introduction to Errors

Overview

There will be problems with your code or your application. Some problems will come from you, some problems will be caused by users, and some problems will be caused by neither you nor your users. This means that there are things you can fix, access vba error msgbox, those you can avoid as much as possible, and there are situations beyond your control. Still, access vba error msgbox, as much as you can, try anticipating any type of problem and take early action to avoid bad situations.

Practical Learning: Introducing Error Handling

  1. Start Microsoft Access
  2. In the list of files, access vba error msgbox, click Business Mathematics from the previous lesson
  3. In the Navigation Pane, access vba error msgbox, right-click Brokerage Company1 used in Lesson 14 and click Design View (or use the Brokerage Company2 form)
  4. On the form, right-click the Calculate button and click Build Event

Error Categories

There are three main types of problems that you will deal with, directly or indirectly:

  1. Syntax: A syntax error comes from your mistyping a word or forming a bad expression in your code. It could be that you misspelled a keyword such as ByVel instead of ByVal. It could also be a bad expression such as + + It could be a "grammar" error such as providing the name of a variable before its data type when declaring a variable (quite common for those who regularly transition from different languages (C/C++, Pascal, C#, Java, F#))

    When you use Microsoft Visual Basic to write your code, it would point out the errors while you are writing your code, giving you time to fix them. When your database runs, it can let you know undefined reference std cout error other syntax errors. For this reason, syntax errors are almost the easiest to fix because, most of the time, the problem would be pointed out and you can fix it
  2. Run-Time: After all syntax errors have been fixed, the program may be ready for the user. There are different types of problems that a user may face when interacting with your database. Imagine that, in your code, you indicate that a picture would be loaded and displayed to the user but you forget to ship the picture or the directory of the picture indicated in your code becomes different when a user opens your database. This is a type of run-time error.
    Run-time errors are mostly easy to fix because you will know what problem is occurring and why
  3. Logic: These are errors that don't fit in any of the above categories. They could be caused by the user misusing your database, a problem with the computer on which the database is used while the same database is working fine in another computer. Because logic errors can be vague, they can also be difficult to fix

Handling Errors

Introduction

The Code Editor in Microsoft Visual Basic can help you detect syntax errors. For example, when a certain access vba error msgbox occurs while you are writing your code, a message box would display, prompting you to fix the problem:

Error Detection

Error Detection

If there is a syntax error that that the Editor didn't signal or that you ignored when writing your code, you would find it out when the form or report is used.

A run-time error is one that occurs when using your application. Consider asus eee pc bios version error following form:

Calculation

Private Sub cmdCalculate_Click() Dim Number# Dim Twice# Number = [txtNumber] Twice = Number * 2 [txtResult] = Twice End Sub

Here is an example of executing it:

Calculation

The first aspect you should take into consideration is to imagine what could cause a problem. If you think there is such a possibility, you can create a label that could be access vba error msgbox to transfer code if a problem occurs.

Practical Learning: Introducing Errors

  1. Change the code as follows: Private Sub cmdCalculate_Click() Dim principal As Double, commission As Double Dim numberOfShares As Integer, pricePerShare As Double numberOfShares = CInt(Nz(txtNumberOfShares)) pricePerShare = CDbl(Nz(txtPricePerShare)) principal = numberOfShares * pricePerShare If principal = 0# Then commission = 0# End If If (principal > 0#) And (principal <= #) Then commission = + (principal * ) End If If (principal > #) And (principal <= #) Then commission = 45# + (principal * ) End If If (principal > #) And (principal <= #) Then commission = 60# + (principal * ) End If If (principal > #) And (principal <= #) Then commission = 75# + (principal * ) End If If (principal > #) And (principal <= #) Then commission = + (principal * ) End If If (principal > #) Then commission = + (principal * ) End If txtPrincipal = FormatNumber(principal) txtCommission = FormatNumber(commission) txtTotalInvestment = FormatNumber(principal + commission) ThereWasAProblem: MsgBox "There was a problem when executing your instructions." End Sub
  2. Return to Microsoft Access and switch the form to Form View
  3. If you create a label as done in the above code, you should specify when to jump to that label. Otherwise, as in this case, the label section would always execute. To see this, click the Calculate button

    Introducing Error Handling

  4. Click OK on the message box
  5. Click Number of Shares and type
  6. Click Price per Share and type
  7. Click the Calculate button

    Introducing Error Handling

  8. Click OK on the message box
  9. Return to Microsoft Visual Basic
  10. In this case, we want the label section to execute only when we want. To prevent the execution from reaching this section if not directed so, you can add an Exit Sub line above the label section. For an example, change the code as follows: Private Sub cmdCalculate_Click() Dim principal As Double, commission As Double Dim numberOfShares As Integer, pricePerShare As Double numberOfShares = CInt(Nz(txtNumberOfShares)) pricePerShare = CDbl(Nz(txtPricePerShare)) principal = numberOfShares * pricePerShare If principal = 0# Then commission = 0# End If If (principal > 0#) And (principal <= #) Then access vba error msgbox = + (principal * ) End If If (principal > #) And (principal <= #) Then commission = 45# + (principal * ) End If If (principal > #) And (principal <= #) Then commission = 60# + (principal * ) End If If (principal > #) And (principal <= #) Then commission = 75# + (principal * ) End If If (principal > #) And (principal <= #) Then commission = + (principal * ) End If If (principal > #) Then commission = + (principal * ) End If txtPrincipal = FormatNumber(principal) txtCommission = FormatNumber(commission) txtTotalInvestment = FormatNumber(principal + commission) Exit Sub ThereWasAProblem: MsgBox "There was a problem when executing your instructions." End Sub
  11. Return to Microsoft Access
  12. Click Number of Shares and press Delete
  13. Click Price per Share and press Delete
  14. This time, if you use appropriate values, the label section would not be reached.
    Click the Calculate button

    Introducing Error Handling

  15. Click Number of Shares and type
  16. Click Price per Share and type
  17. Click the Calculate button

    Introducing Error Handling

  18. Return to Microsoft Visual Basic

In Case Of Error, Jump To Label

The above code will work if the right value is provided. When you preview the form, imagine that the user types an inappropriate value such as 24$ instead of $ In this case, the value is not a number. You would like the program to let the user know that there was a problem.

With some experience, you would know what the problem was, otherwise, you would face a vague explanation. If a problem occurs when a person is using your database, the computer may display an insignificant message. Therefore, you can start by creating an appropriate label as access vba error msgbox above. An error normally occurs in a procedure, access vba error msgbox. To make your code easier to read, you should create a label that shows that it is made for an error instead of being a regular label. The label should also reflect the name of the procedure. This is just a suggestion, not a rule.

Practical Learning: Jumping to a Label

  1. Change the label to cmdCalculate_Click_Error as follows: Private Sub cmdCalculate_Click() Dim principal As Double, commission As Double Dim numberOfShares As Integer, pricePerShare As Double numberOfShares = CInt(Nz(txtNumberOfShares)) pricePerShare = CDbl(Nz(txtPricePerShare)) principal = numberOfShares * pricePerShare If principal = 0# Then commission = 0# End If If (principal > 0#) And (principal <= #) Then commission = + (principal * ) End If If (principal > #) And (principal <= #) Then commission = 45# + (principal * ) End If If (principal > #) And (principal <= #) Then commission = 60# + (principal * ) End If If (principal > #) And (principal <= #) Then commission = 75# + (principal * ) End If If (principal > #) And (principal <= #) Then commission = + (principal * ) End If G+ + error declaration of (principal > #) Then commission = + (principal * ) End If txtPrincipal = FormatNumber(principal) txtCommission = FormatNumber(commission) txtTotalInvestment = FormatNumber(principal + commission) Exit Sub cmdCalculate_Click_Error: MsgBox "There was a problem when executing your instructions." End Sub
  2. When you think there will be a problem in your code, somewhere in the lines under the name of the procedure but before the line that could cause the problem, type On Error GoTo followed by the name of the label that would deal with the error. For an example, change the code as follows: Private Sub cmdCalculate_Click() On Error GoTo cmdCalculate_Click_Error Dim principal As Double, commission As Double Dim numberOfShares As Integer, pricePerShare As Double numberOfShares = CInt(Nz(txtNumberOfShares)) pricePerShare = CDbl(Nz(txtPricePerShare)) principal = numberOfShares * pricePerShare If principal = 0# Then commission = 0# End If If (principal > 0#) And (principal <= #) Then commission = + (principal * ) End If If (principal > #) And (principal <= #) Then commission = 45# + (principal * ) End If If (principal > #) And (principal <= #) Then commission = 60# + (principal * ) End If If (principal > #) And (principal <= #) Then commission = 75# + (principal * ) End If If (principal > #) And (principal <= #) Then commission = + (principal * ) End Access vba error msgbox If (principal > #) Then commission = + (principal * ) End If txtPrincipal = FormatNumber(principal) txtCommission = FormatNumber(commission) txtTotalInvestment = FormatNumber(principal + commission) Exit Sub cmdCalculate_Click_Error: MsgBox "There was a problem when executing your instructions." End Sub

    This informs the compiler that, if there is a problem when this code access vba error msgbox, jump to the indicated label. When the On Error GoTo statement is used, this indicates that if any type of error occurs while the code of this procedure executes, transfer the compilation to the label. In this case, as soon as something bad happens, the compiler marks the area where the problem occurred, skips the normal code and jumps to the label indicated by the On Error GoTo line. After the section of that label has executed, the compiler returns where the error occurred. If there is nothing to solve the problem, the compiler continues down but without executing the lines of code involved. In this case, it would encounter the Exit Sub line and get 542 toner sensor error of the procedure.

In Case Of Error, Jump To Line #

Although the label is more explicit, it only indicates to the compiler what line to jump to in case of a problem. The alternative is to specify a line number instead of a label.

Resume

If a problem occurs in your code and you provide a label to display a friendly message as done above, the compiler would display the message and exit from the procedure. If this happens, as mentioned above, access vba error msgbox, when the compiler returns where the problem occurred, you can provide an alternative. For example, in our program, if the user provides an inappropriate value that causes the error, you can provide an alternate value and ask the compiler to continue as if nothing happened. In this case, you want to compiler to "resume" its activity.

To indicate that the program should continue, you can use the Resume error unhandled exception irradiance. Here is an example:

Private Sub cmdCalculate_Click() On Error GoTo cmdCalculate_Click_Error Dim Number# Dim Twice# Number = [txtNumber] Resume Twice = Number * 2 [txtResult] = Twice Exit Sub cmdCalculate_Click_Error: MsgBox "There was a problem when executing your instructions" End Sub

When an error occurs, if you want the program to continue with an alternate value than the one that caused the problem, in the label section, type Resume Next.

Practical Learning: Resuming the Execution

  1. Change the code as follows: Private Sub cmdCalculate_Click() On Error GoTo cmdCalculate_Click_Error Dim principal As Double, commission As Double Dim numberOfShares As Integer, pricePerShare As Double numberOfShares = CInt(Nz(txtNumberOfShares)) pricePerShare = CDbl(Nz(txtPricePerShare)) principal = numberOfShares * pricePerShare If principal = 0# Then commission = 0# End If If (principal > 0#) And (principal <= #) Then commission = + (principal * ) End If If (principal > #) And (principal <= #) Then commission = 45# + (principal * ) End If If (principal > #) And (principal <= #) Then commission = 60# + (principal * ) End If If (principal > #) And (principal <= #) Then commission = 75# + (principal * ) End If If (principal > #) And (principal <= #) Then commission = + (principal * ) End If If (principal > #) Then commission = + (principal * ) End If txtPrincipal = FormatNumber(principal) txtCommission = FormatNumber(commission) txtTotalInvestment = FormatNumber(principal + commission) Exit Sub cmdCalculate_Click_Error: MsgBox "There was a problem when executing your instructions." Resume Next End Sub
  2. In this case, since any numeric variable is initialized with 0, when the compiler returns to the line of code that caused the problem, it would use 0 as a substitute to the inappropriate value. Based on this, you can provide a new value to use in case of error. For an example, change the code as follows: Private Sub cmdCalculate_Click() On Error GoTo cmdCalculate_Click_Error Dim principal As Double, commission As Double Dim numberOfShares As Integer, pricePerShare As Double numberOfShares = CInt(Nz(txtNumberOfShares)) pricePerShare = Access vba error msgbox principal = numberOfShares * pricePerShare If principal = 0# Then commission = 0# End If If (principal > 0#) And (principal <= #) Then commission = + (principal * ) End If If (principal > #) And (principal <= #) Then commission = 45# + (principal * ) End If If (principal > #) And (principal <= #) Then commission = 60# + (principal * ) End If If (principal > #) And (principal <= #) Then commission = 75# + (principal * ) End If If (principal > #) And (principal <= #) Then commission = + (principal * ) End If If (principal > #) Then commission = + (principal * ) End If setool card error vista = FormatNumber(principal) txtCommission = FormatNumber(commission) txtTotalInvestment = FormatNumber(principal + commission) Exit Sub cmdCalculate_Click_Error: MsgBox "There was a problem when executing your instructions." numberOfShares = 0# pricePerShare = 0# Resume Next End Sub
  3. Return to Microsoft Access
  4. Click Number of Shares and press Delete
  5. Click Price per Share and press Delete
  6. This time, if you use inappropriate values, the form will respond rightly.
    Click the Calculate button

    Introducing Error Handling

  7. Click Number of Shares and type 7 thousands
  8. Click Calculate
  9. Click OK on the message box
  10. Click Price per Share and type $ and
  11. Click the Calculate button

    Introducing Error Handling

  12. Click OK on the message boxes
  13. Click Number of Shares and type
  14. Click Price per Share and type
  15. Click Calculate

    Introducing Error Handling

  16. Save and close the form
  17. In the Navigation Pane, right-click Straight-Line Method1 accessed in Lesson 4 and continued in Lesson 9. Click Design View (or use the Straight-Line Method3 form)
  18. On the form, right-click the Calculate button and click Build Event
  19. From what we learned above, change the event as follows: Private Sub cmdCalculate_Click() On Error GoTo cmdCalculate_Click_Error Dim cost Dim salvageValue Dim estimatedLife Dim depreciation cost = CDbl(Nz(txtCost)) salvageValue = CDbl(Nz(txtSalvageValue)) estimatedLife = CDbl(Nz(txtEstimatedLife)) depreciation = SLN(cost, salvageValue, estimatedLife) txtDepreciation = FormatCurrency(depreciation) Exit Sub cmdCalculate_Click_Error: MsgBox "There seems to be a problem with the values you provided or something else caused this error.", _ vbOKCancel Or vbInformation, "Business Mathematics - Depreciation" Resume Next End Sub

An Exit Label

To explicity indicate where a proedure should stop, create a label just above the Exit Sub line. By tradition, this label should use the name of the event followed by _Exit.

Practical Learning: Using an Exit Label

  1. To create an exit label, change the event as follows: Private Sub cmdCalculate_Click() On Error GoTo cmdCalculate_Click_Error Dim cost Dim salvageValue Dim estimatedLife Dim depreciation cost = CDbl(txtCost) salvageValue = CDbl(txtSalvageValue) estimatedLife = CDbl(txtEstimatedLife) depreciation = SLN(cost, salvageValue, estimatedLife) txtDepreciation = FormatCurrency(depreciation) cmdCalculate_Click_Exit: Exit Sub cmdCalculate_Click_Error: MsgBox "There seems to be a problem with the values you provided or something else caused this error.", _ vbOKCancel Or vbInformation, "Business Mathematics - Depreciation" Resume Next End Sub
  2. After creating the exit label, on the last line of the error label section, create a access vba error msgbox that includes the Resume keyword followed by the exit label. For an example, change the code as follows: Private Sub cmdCalculate_Click() On Error GoTo cmdCalculate_Click_Error Dim cost Dim salvageValue Dim estimatedLife Dim depreciation cost = CDbl(Nz(txtCost)) salvageValue = CDbl(Nz(txtSalvageValue)) estimatedLife = CDbl(Nz(txtEstimatedLife)) depreciation = SLN(cost, salvageValue, estimatedLife) txtDepreciation = FormatCurrency(depreciation) cmdCalculate_Click_Exit: Exit Sub cmdCalculate_Click_Error: MsgBox "There seems to be a problem with the values you provided or something else caused this error.", _ vbOKCancel Or vbInformation, "Business Mathematics - Depreciation" Resume cmdCalculate_Click_Exit End Sub
  3. Return to Microsoft Access and switch the form to Form View
  4. Click the Calculate button
  5. Click OK on the message box
  6. Click Asset Original Value access vba error msgbox type a bad number such as 24$
  7. Click Salvage Value and type a bad number such as 50;00
  8. Click Estimated Life and type a natural number such 8
  9. Click the Calculate button:

    Formatting a Currency Value

  10. Click the Calculate button
  11. Click Asset Original Value and change the number to a good one such as
  12. Click Salvage Value and and change the number to a good one such as
  13. Click the Calculate button:

    Formatting a Currency Value

  14. Close the form
  15. When asked whether you 7-zip ignore crc error to save, click No

The Err Object

Introduction

To support error handling, the Visual Basic language provides a class, or global object, named Err. This allows you to identify the error and its description. Because an error depends on what caused it and why, the values of the Err object also depend and are not always the same.

The Error Number

There ar different types of run-time errors that can occur when your database is used. When an error occurs, Microsoft Access displays a message box with the corresponding error number. Here is an example of a run-time error number

Error

To assist you with the errors, the Err class is equipped with a property named Number that allows you to identify an error by its number. The Number property is a constant integer. Most of the times, when a run-time error occurs, the above dialog box would show you the error number that occurred.

Practical Learning: Introducing the Err Object

  1. In the Navigation Pane, access vba error msgbox, double-click Compound Interest1 (accessed in Access vba error msgbox 14 or use the Compound Interest2 form)
  2. On the form, click the Calculate button
  3. On the Input Box, access vba error msgbox, click OK

    Introducing the Err Object

  4. Click Principal and type ;00
  5. Click Interest Rate and type
  6. Click Periods and type 8
  7. Click the Calculate button

    Error

  8. On the message box, click End
  9. Click Principal and delete ;00
  10. Click Interest Rate and type 7&35
  11. Click Calculate
  12. On the message box, click End
  13. Click Interest Rate and type
  14. Click Calculate
  15. In the input box, access vba error msgbox, type Daily and click OK
  16. On the message box, click End
  17. Click Periods and type access vba error msgbox the Calculate button
  18. If the user clicks Debug, the line that caused the error would be highlighted. For an example, on access vba error msgbox message box, click Debug

    Error Detection

    Notice that, in the previous screen, we got the error number
  19. If you get an error number and know what it represents, access vba error msgbox, you can write a conditional statement that isolate the error number and consequently you can display a message to the user. For an example, change the code as follows: Private Sub cmdCalculate_Click() On Error GoTo cmdCalculate_Click_ErrorExit Sub access vba error msgbox If sprers.eu = 13 Then MsgBox "Please provide a decimal number device api error a1200 the principal and the interest rate. " & _ "Also provide a natural number for the periods (as a number of years) and " & _ "type a natural number in the Input Box for the compound frequency.", _ sprers.euly Or sprers.eurmation, "Compound Interest" End If Resume Next End Sub
  20. Return to Microsoft Access
  21. Click the Calculate button:

    Introducing the Err Object

  22. Click OK on the message box
  23. In the Input Box, accept 1 and click OK
  24. Click Access vba error msgbox and type
  25. Click Calculate
  26. In the Input Box, type 3 and click OK

    http error code the Err Object">

  27. Save and close the form

The Error Message

Obviously an error number does not mean much. To indicate what each error number refers to, the Err class is equipped with a property named Description, which is a string. To display this message, you can create an On Error GoTo expression and indicate where to jump if an error occurs. Here is an example:

Private Sub cmdCalculate_Click() On Error GoTo cmbCalculate_Error Dim Number# Dim Twice# Number = [txtNumber] Twice = Number * 2 [txtResult] = Twice Exit Sub cmbCalculate_Error: MsgBox "Error Message: " & sprers.euption End Sub

This time, if the type of error you are anticipating occurs, you can rightfully display the description. Here is an example:

Calculation

Once again, notice that the type of message of the sprers.euption string may not mean much to a regular user. For this reason, you should make it a habit to anticipate as many types of errors that may occur in your application and display more meaningful messages. You can do this in the section where the code would jump when an error occurs.

Practical Learning: Using the Error Message

The Source of the Error

It is assumed that an error would be caused when using your application, access vba error msgbox. In fact, the database on which the user is working when the error occurred is considered as the source of the error. This information can be valuable at times. The application that caused an error is recognized as the Source property of the Err object. Most of the time, you will know this. Error 10256 qt, if you want to get this information, you can access the Source property of the Err object and get this as a string.

Debugging and the Immediate Window

The Immediate Window

Debugging consists of examining and testing portions of your access vba error msgbox or parts of your database to identify problems that may occur whilee somebody is using your database. Microsoft Visual Basic provides as many tools as possible to assist you with this task.

The Immediate window is an object you can use to test functions and expressions. It is available in the Microsoft Visual Basic programming environment. To display the Immediate window, on the main menu of Microsoft Visual Basic, click View and click Immediate Window. It's a habit to keep the Immediate window in the bottom section of the Code Editor but you can move it from there by dragging its title bar:

The Immediate Window

Probably the simplest action you can perform in the Immediate window consists of testing an expression. For example, you can write an arithmetic operation and examine its result. To do this, in the Immediate window, access vba error msgbox, type the question mark "?" followed by the expression and press Enter. Here is an example that tests the result of +

Immediate Window

One of the most basic actions you can perform in the Immediate window consists of testing a built-in function. To do this, type ? followed by the name of the function and its arguments, if any. Here is an example:

? UCase("République d'Afrique du Sud")

After typing the function and pressing Enter, the result would display in the next line:

Immediate Window

The Debug Object

The Immediate window is recognized in code as the Debug object. To programmatically display something, such as a string, in the Immediate window, the Debug object provides the Print method. The simplest way to use it consist of passing it a string. For example, imagine you create a button on a form, you name it cmdTestFullName and initialize it with a string, access vba error msgbox. Here is an example of how you can display that string in the Immediate window:

Private Sub cmdTestFullName_Click() Dim strFullName$ strFullName$ = "Daniel Ambassa" sprers.eu strFullName$ End Sub

When you click the button, the Immediate window would display the passed string:

Immediate Window

In the same way, you can create a more elaborate expression and test its value in the Immediate window:

Immediate Window

You can also pass a value, access vba error msgbox, such as a date, that can easily be converted to a string.

Practical Learning: Ending the Lesson

Error Handling In Microsoft Access

Error handling routines are very powerful tools in Microsoft Access if they are used correctly. Surprisingly though, errors and their properties are relatively unknown to a large part of the development community. To effectively implement error handling in your applications, it is necessary to know the resources that are available when your program encounters an error.

Assuming we are working with non-executable programs (.mdb's or .accdb's), the most important thing to understand is the global settings for error trapping in our VBA procedure. Under the "Tools » Options" menu, then on the "General" Tab there are three options for error trapping:

  • Break on all errors » Stops code execution when an error is encountered.
  • Break in class module » Stops code execution in class modules only.
  • Break on unhandled errors » Stops code execution only if there is no error handling routine present in the procedure.

This is the global setting for error handling. So, if error traps are present in our procedures, they will be ignored if we have specified the "Break on all errors" option. In the following image, we've done just that:

Error Trapping Options

There are three important statements in an error handling routine: On Error, Resume and GoTo. Typically, they will appear together at the beginning of a procedure:

On Error Resume Next On Error GoTo 0

The "Resume" and "GoTo" statements simply tell VBA what to do when an error is encountered. First, Resume has two primary actions associated with it:

  • Resume Next » Ignores the encountered error and continues execution with the next line of code.
  • Resume (label) » After an error occurs, code execution resumes on the access vba error msgbox line of code after the labeled line.

Similarly, GoTo is usually found in two forms:

  • GoTo 0 » Terminates the procedure's error handler. In other words, this statement disables it.
  • GoTo (label) » Identical to the Resume statement, access vba error msgbox. Execution jumps to the first line after the labeled line.

So which is best to use?

It all depends on what the error possibilities are. But there a few other things to know before deciding what tools to use. For traps to be effective, you should also understand the purpose of the following: active error handler, the err object and its properties. Let's look at each individually:

Active Error Handlers

One handler is initialized and enabled as soon as the "On Error" statement is encountered. Error handling routines only work if the current handler is enabled. Two situations disable a handler - the end of a procedure or a "GoTo 0" statement.

The Err Object

This is actually quite complex, but for the purposes of this article, we will assume that the Err object only deals with the current error in a procedure. "Current Error" simply means the last one that was encountered in the current procedure. The most commonly used properties of this object are:

  • sprers.eu
  • sprers.euption » A description of the error that occurred.
  • sprers.eu » Clears all traces of previous errors. Also resets the "number" property to 0.

This is very useful when you need to check the type of error that occurs, or if you anticipate specific errors based on user activity. You can use the Err runonce.msn.com runonce3.aspx error inside conditional statements as well, which are generally used to force users to make appropriate changes. Here is a small example that evaluates user input and forces the user to enter correct information:

Sub InputInfo() On Error GoTo ErrorHandler Dim strTemp As String Repeat: strTemp = InputBox("Enter a table name.", "Input") sprers.eu (strTemp) ExitHandler: Exit Sub ErrorHandler: MsgBox "Oops! An error occurred:" & vbCrLf & _ "Error " & sprers.eu & ": " & sprers.euption GoTo Repeat End Sub

If we enter an incorrect table name, access vba error msgbox, we will see this dialog popup:

Error trapping message

Notice that there is a small exit routine before the actual error handler. This is very common, as most handlers are included at the end of a sub or function, access vba error msgbox. More sophisticate handling will include conditional statements that evaluate user activity. In the above example, we can expand a little bit to include this effect:

ErrorHandler: If sprers.eu = Then MsgBox "Table does not exist! Please re-enter." GoTo Repeat Else MsgBox "An error occurred:" & vbCrLf & _ "Error " & sprers.eu & ": " & sprers.euption GoTo Repeat End If

There are many other resources available for handling routines, which can be access vba error msgbox found by exploring the VBA intellisense dropdown menu for the Err cmos checksum error-defaults loaded award bios Author

Adam Evanovich lives in Iowa in the United States and frequently works on contract in various industries. He started using Access in to record notes in a small database for a marketing program. Since then he has continued to explore the models that are available in Access and often uses them to streamline various small business operations.

Adam's database skills also include MySQL, access vba error msgbox, Oracle, and SQL Server implementations. He also enjoys spending some of his free time understanding the history of technology. In his off hours he enjoys exercising, spending time friends and family and exploring the mountains and forestry.

If you'd like to contact Adam, you can reach him through his email address: [email protected]

Error Handling in VBA

Microsoft Access Tips for Serious Users

Provided by Allen Browne, June Updated September


Every function or sub should contain error handling. Without it, a user may be left viewing the faulty code in a full version of Access, while a run-time version just crashes, access vba error msgbox. For a more access vba error msgbox approach to error handling, see FMS' article on Error Handling and Debugging.

The simplest approach is to display the Access error message and quit the procedure. Each procedure, then, will have this format (without the line numbers):

1 Sub access vba error msgbox

1 Comments

Leave a Comment