404 error page

404 error page

A error is an HTTP status code that means that the page you were trying to reach on a website couldn't be found on their server. Anyone with Internet access has most likely seen the ' Not Found' caption when trying to visit a web page. The error means that the requested page. Something along the lines of ' Not Found'. A error is the standardized HTTP status code. The message is sent from the webserver of an.

404 error page - consider

The Best Pages: 37 Examples You Need to See

An epic page likely isn’t going to win your business any awards. I get it.

But it shows that you care about your customers.

A great page can be a smart way to show off your brand’s personality.

But is it worth it to invest in a fancy page?

It can be.

Because when users land on your page, they aren’t finding what they needed.

Using links, smart graphics, and witty copy can make them forget that you (maybe) messed up and get them back on track.

In light of the importance of pages, what follows is a list of 37 of the best examples of pages that you can find online.

Before diving into the examples, let’s take a moment to review the basics of a page.

What Is a Page?

A page is a landing page that tells your site viewers the requested page is unavailable or, in some cases, doesn’t exist.

A error tells users the page cannot be accessed – and it can be a major problem.

When users can’t access a page, they can’t find the information they need.

It also tells Google that your site offers a poor customer experience, which can result in less traffic and lower rankings.

Ideally, site visitors would never land on a page, but the reality is that they do happen from time to time – even from well-maintained sites.

Why Might a Visitor Land on a Page?

Why might a user get a error?

There are several reasons, which include:

  • The server is down.
  • The page moved and wasn’t redirected.
  • The page never existed.
  • The user typed the URL in wrong.
  • The URL is broken.

Basically, if a user tries to visit a page that cannot be found, they’ll be sent to your page.

What’s the Point of Making a Page That Stands Out?

A visually appealing, user-friendly error page shows customers that you care about their experience and are interested in keeping them on your website.

When done well, a good page helps users forgive you for the error (even if it was their own fault by typing the URL in wrong) and keeps them on your site.

A great page can make users smile and – most importantly – help them find what they are looking for.

We reviewed dozens of pages to find the best ones that show off brands’ creativity and personality.

Here are 37 of the best examples of pages done well.

1. Disney

 page disney

Disney knocks it out of the park with their page by highlighting one of the most popular characters known for destruction – Wreck-it Ralph.

They also feature KnowsMore, a side character in Ralph Breaks The Internet.

Both characters are appropriate for the page, but notice what is right next to KnowsMore: a little search bar.

There’s another one at the top of the page, but this one is dead in the center where users will see it. This search bar keeps users on-page by helping them find what they are looking for.

2. Drift

 page dift

Drift is a conversion marketing tool and sales platform that offers tools for live chat, landing pages, and more.

The copy on their page stays on-brand by mentioning “conversations,” but also works to keep people on the Drift website by offering links to their homepage, their blog, and links to a few of their most popular pieces of content.

In the upper right corner, they also offer a path to conversion by providing the Get Drift Free button.

3. Help Scout

 page help scout

Help Scout provides companies by providing tools for help desk software, email-based customer support, and online knowledge bases.

Like Drift, their page offers links to their blog and other posts, but they use a cute graphic of cute dogs to keep people smiling.

4. Apartment Therapy

 page apartment therapy

Apartment Therapy, a home decor site, keeps it light by joking that washi tape (a popular paper tape used in decorating and scrapbooking) can’t fix the broken link.

Just below the fold, they link to several popular posts to keep site visitors engaged.

They also included a search bar and their main nav bar so users can continue to explore the site.

5. CoSchedule

 page coschedule

CoSchedule, a marketing scheduling tool, keeps it simple with a cute dog GIF and links to their homepage and blog.

This example just goes to show you don’t have to drop big money to create an engaging page.

It’s simple, but does the job.

6. Sprout Social

 page sprout social

Sprout Social, the social media marketing tool, really wants to keep its customers on-page.

They start with a tongue-in-cheek reaction to landing on the wrong page – but they also push a free demo, while the home page link takes a back seat.

Then, their chatbot pops up to find out what you need.

At the bottom, they promote their newsletter.

Essentially, they’ve turned their page into a landing page.

7. ConvertKit

 page convertkit

Who doesn’t love dogs?

ConvertKit keeps it light by offering a photo of a team member’s dog and a link to their homepage.

But, they also keep it professional by providing their online chat and a CTA to sign up for free.

8. Screaming Frog

 page screaming frog

Screaming Frog is a tool designed to help site owners find and fix broken links – and they acknowledge the irony of having a page by poking a bit of fun at themselves, then offering links to their blog, contact page, and services.

Unlike the other pages on the list, this one isn’t static.

The flies move around the page, the fish float, and the lily pads spin.

It’s a small change, but it makes the page feel well thought out.

9. Moz

 pages moz

Moz keeps it simple with a cameo from Roger Mozbat, the brand’s mascot.

His presence is on brand and an easy way to make most people smile.

Moz also gives you a site search bar so you can find what you are looking for.

BigCommerce

 page bigcommerce

BigCommerce’s page offers many of the same features we’ve seen before – the CTA to contact, request a demo, and an easy way to explore the site.

But what stands out is the well-designed outer space image, which makes the page feel thought-out and planned.

There’s a good chance that users who land on your page are going to be annoyed – a creative graphic helps it feel like you’ve got your stuff together and this was just a small misstep.

Kinsta

 page kinsta

Kinsta, a cloud-based WordPress hosting company, takes a similar approach to BigCommerce by offering a well-designed image on their page.

They keep their top navigation and search bar, so users can easily find other information.

They also use a pop up to suggest gated content, which likely helps drive email subscribers.

Lego

 page lego

Lego keeps it light using a large image of a Lego man along with the quip “Sorry we can’t find that page! Don’t worry, though everything is STILL AWESOME!” which is a reference to a song from the Lego Movie.

They also offer a link to their shop to keep users on-site.

Slack

 page slack

Slack’s page is incredible.

The image above actually scrolls to show you a forest with flying butterflies, pigs, flowers, and chickens.

It also goes black and white if you go to another tab which, unfortunately, makes it hard to get a screenshot of the awesomeness.

Head over to their site for the full experience.

Mailchimp

 page mailchimp

Email tool Mailchimp keeps it simple – yet clever – with their animated page of an animal searching in a hole for, presumably, the page that is lost.

It’s smart and shows their page isn’t an afterthought.

okta

 page okta

Okta is a cloud-based access management company based in San Francisco.

Their page is pretty simple, but I really like that they offer reasons why the link might be broken, which helps users understand what might have gone wrong.

Swiss

 page swiss

Swiss Airlines doesn’t offer any additional information, other than a link to their homepage and the navigation bar, but the image on their page is really neat.

The clouds move as you guide your cursor over the page, enveloping you in clouds.

It’s an interesting feature that kept me on their page longer than I’d like to admit.

Wizarding World

 page wizarding world

As many Harry Potter fans will know, Harry gets lost the first time he tries to use Floo powder, a glittery substance that lets wizards travel by transporting them to nearly any other house or building with a fireplace.

The image above shows the scene where Harry comes out of the fireplace where he accidentally transported himself covered in soot – making it the perfect image for a page.

Southwest

 page southwest

Here’s another page that made me smile – first, they use a “Star Wars” reference, which keeps it light.

The page also features a moving baton used by aircraft marshallers who direct planes on the tarmac.

Next to the image, Southwest offers quick links to help users find what they need.

It’s functional but still stands out.

9GAG

 page 9gag

9GAG, the online platform for memes and videos, uses a totally on-brand GIF for their page and offers a single link that directs users to their app.

It is simple, but staying on-brand ensures site visitors know they are on the right site, despite not finding the page they were looking for.

Flywheel

 page flywheel

Flywheel, a managed WordPress hosting company, offers this quirky page to let folks know they landed on the wrong page.

The casual language reflects their overall brand feel, and the link to the homepage helps users find their way.

Like several other brands, they also offer a chat function to further help users who have lost their way.

Dan Woodger

 page dan woodger

Dan Woodger, an artist and illustrator, features his own work on his page. His bright and cheery hamburger is right at home.

Notice that he doesn’t mention it’s a page or give any other information, other than a link to his work.

This example goes to show a great page doesn’t have to be complicated.

Distilled

 page distilled

A lot of brands call in their page. They figure not many people will see the page, so what does it matter.

But showcasing your brand’s style on a (seemingly) insignificant page carries a lot of weight.

If you care about your page, there’s a good chance you care about your clients and customers too.

Distilled uses an infographic-like image to explain what the page is and what might have gone wrong.

Taco Bell

 page taco bell

Taco Bell is known for being a bit irreverent. Their page is no exception.

The page features a dancing taco who slips and spills their fillings, then scoops them back into their shell.

It’s a funky reminder that they know something went wrong.

The page also includes a link to the site’s homepage, menu, locations, and where to buy gift cards and merchandise.

Magnt

 page magnt

Magnt offers an easy to use builder and tools for creating sites, and they pride themselves on being better than your standard template-based website builder.

Their page highlights the brand’s creativity with a clever Venn diagram that explores the reasons why you might have ended up on the page – “We broke something” or “You can’t type.”

Dribble

 page dribble

Dribble, a creative marketplace for design professionals, offers up a fully-functional page.

Users can drag the dot below the font to explore designers within a specific color range.

Clicking on the blocks that make up the numbers takes you to those specific designers.

They also offer a search bar, for users who’d rather search the site that way.

Overflow

overflow page

Overflow’s personality is placed front and center on their page.

Their conversational tone and humor are inviting and welcoming which connects with me to want to click back to their home page.

And, the same voice and tone are conveyed on the homepage.

Wendy’s

wendys page

By now, you’ve probably laughed at one or two tweets from Wendy’s.

But, similar to Overflow, Wendy’s continues the same voice and tone flow to their website, even their page.

They created an interactive video game for users similar to Pac-Man on their page.

See if you can get Wendy to the end!

Red Bull

redbull page

Red Bull’s page is a dream for any SEO or marketing professional.

It’s jam-packed with links to articles and playlist of videos.

Red Bull even rotates the video playlist for their most recent event.

You can see from the image above, Red Bull was using their Red Bull Big Wave surfing event as the source of inspiration.

Blizzard

page-blizzard

Blizzard Entertainment, the creators of World of Warcraft, also known as WOW if you’re a geek like me. &#;

Blizzard features one of their most well-known characters, a Murloc, to help rescue you from their page.

Marvel

marvel page

Marvel utilizes its different comic book characters like Captain America, Deadpool, etc. in a rotating page.

A little hint: Keep hitting refresh. Every third refresh, Marvel will serve up a different visual.

Patagonia

patagonia page

Patagonia is hanging ten on their page playing up its casual, tropical vibe.

First, they engage the viewer with a video loop, but then they guide the user further down the page to links to their popular shopping categories.

Backcountry

backcountry page

Backcountry, a popular outdoor gear website that I often spend way too much time shopping for things I’ll never buy, shows off its funny side while connecting with its audience.

Nintendo

nintendo page

Nintendo does lack some visually engaging pieces, which I was surprised by, you know, being Nintendo and all.

But, what’s important is that Nintendo adds links for resources for the user.

It forces users to stay on the website and not bounce back to the SERPs.

Zillow

zillow page

Zillow offers an interactive GIF benefit to its home searchers.

Zillow utilizes customer data to see that their users are pet lovers.

And, to keep those pet lovers engaged, they created this interactive cat that adds a little chuckle at the end when it breaks something in the living room.

As an animal lover, I can connect to this!

H&R Block

h&r block page

H&R Block is another look at a not-so-appealing page, but it does offer more information to users to keep them clicking and engaged on their website.

World of Warcraft

world of warcraft page

The team at World of Warcraft acknowledges their audience’s skillset with a few jokes about CDNs and above the fold.

Playstation

playstation page

Playstation gives a nice shout out to one of its newer games on its page.

Plus, they provide options to go back to the homepage or get advice from the help center.

Summary

In a perfect world, no one would ever see your pages.

They would stay hidden far away, like the bag of Reese’s thins I keep hidden in my closet. You know, for drastic times.

But in the real world, things happen.

Links get truncated, fat fingers slip, and sometimes you just forget to redirect a page. Start by using a tool like Screaming Frog to find those broken links.

Remember, it takes time to create a creative pages that draw users in rather than chasing them away.

More Resources:


Image Credits

Featured Image: Created by author, August
All screenshots taken by author, August

Originally published in Updated April

Error Pages play a very important role in both SEO and website usability. While often perceived as the bubonic plague of SEO 👀, s serve a simple purpose that should be strategically embraced. 

Over the years, we've dealt with “ page not found errors” exhaustively. And in doing so, we've been asked a lot of questions. Below we've compiled FAQs that we get from clients about Not Found pages, including things that commonly go wrong (so you know how to fix them), plus advice on how to set up and monitor errors properly.

This guide is extensive, so use the links below in the table of contents to find the questions that are most relevant to you.

The Basics of Errors

Grasp the fundamentals of Error Pages and other 4{xx} codes and familiarize yourself with the basics.

What Is A Error?

A error (HTTP ), also called a “header response code” or “http status code”, or simply "crawl errors", is the computer equivalent of saying “Not Found” or “Page Not Found.”

 page design example

Here’s the “tech speak” definition:

The server has not found anything matching the Request-URI. No indication is given of whether the condition is temporary or permanent. The (Gone) status code SHOULD be used if the server knows, through some internally configurable mechanism, that an old resource is permanently unavailable and has no forwarding address. This status code is commonly used when the server does not wish to reveal exactly why the request has been refused, or when no other response is applicable.”
- via
sprers.eu

In other (less technical) words, the response code essentially tells search engines - and users - that the resource (or requested URL) being referenced does not exist or literally can’t be found.

It’s a robot’s version of a shrug and blank look.

There are many other response error types, and all URLs return response codes of some sort. A correctly functioning page, for example, should return a “” status code, which means “Found.” The other major error type is called "server errors", represented by HTTP status codes Different error types help webmasters diagnose the source of the errors so they can fix them appropriately.

errors are generally the most common error type. They are also often handled incorrectly by well-meaning people - hence the purpose of writing this article! HTTP errors are sometimes called "Client Errors", where the "client" typically refers to the user's web browser (Google Chrome, IE, Firefox, etc.)

What Is A Soft ?

A soft is essentially a page that doesn’t return a response code, but Google(bot) nevertheless believes the page is experiencing an error. Soft errors occur when the server sends a status for the requested page (implying the page exists) but Google thinks that the page should return a error.

What's The Difference Between a and a Soft ?

Essentially, a soft does not issue a header status code; it (perhaps incorrectly) issues a (Okay) status code instead. However, Google thinks that the page should return a , thereby issuing the page a soft

A proper page, on the other hand, does correctly issue a (Page Not Found) HTTP status code. So while errors simply indicate pages that do not exist, soft errors are slightly more ambiguous, indicating a page that should not or does not exist but still does in fact exists according to the CMS.

Soft Error Report - GSC

Can Pages Be Useful?

A error tells search engines, website visitors, and webmasters when page URLs are broken, or never existed in the first place. From a technical perspective, s are useful communication tools that help webmasters take action.

When we can see where these error codes occur, we can fix the problem for future website visitors (generally via a redirect to the new location of that content), thereby preserving the power of the page that once existed ( or the incorrect link to a page that never did. That’s what we call “broken backlink building".)

If you don’t issue a response code, you won’t inherently know that the page - and therefore the user - is experiencing an error.

So YES. A page is useful. You can’t fix what you don’t know about!

What are s, s and other 4{xx} pages?

Errors to are all various types of Client Errors. Some other common 4xx errors include:

  • (Bad Request) - the server can't process the request due to a perceived client error, such as inaccurate request syntax or invalid request message framing.
  • (Unauthorized) - the request cannot be fulfilled because it lacks valid authentication credentials.
  • (Forbidden) - this one commonly occurs when you crawl a site too quickly and the platform/server (e.g. Shopify!) will deny you access to reduce their web server load.
  • (Gone) - whatever this resource was, it's now gone - and that's permanent & intentional.
  • Find a full list of all the 4{xx} status errors.

How And When Do Errors Occur?

There are several instances that can cause errors to occur. Some of the most common reasons how and when pages experience s include: 

  • When pages have been moved (e.g. a missing page, perhaps due to it getting moved to a different section of your website) or removed (e.g. a non-existent or deleted page was forgotten and never redirected)
  • When a webmaster, CMS user, or software engineer mistypes a URL on a page or "page template" or has a copy-and-paste mistake (e.g. the wrong URL was linked to)
  • When broken links or accidentally truncated links occur on web pages, social media posts, or in an email message
  • Real soft s occur when a page issues a (OK) status when it should have issued some other error because something went wrong. Most commonly the website should have issued a error, but didn’t. Usually, this is an indication that s aren’t functioning properly. Sometimes it works in some sections of your site, but not others.

Errors and SEO

Understand the relationship between errors and SEO, including common mistakes and the repercussions of inadequate setups.

Can I let pages ? (Google says it’s okay!)

Yes, they do say this! But unfortunately, Google sometimes says things that aren’t – strictly speaking – accurate. (See:Marketers Say Most of Google’s Public Statements Are False or Misleading.) Here are some clarifying points behind why you shouldn’t allow pages to keep ing in most cases

  • Actively linking to s is just bad - for everyone. Lost users, and therefore lost revenue opportunities.
  • Having too many s, or other site errors, can contribute to an overall high error rate on your site, which can cause Google to distrust your site over time. Plus, you really don’t want Googlebot spending time crawling your s instead of your functional, high-quality content - right?
  • Error URLs can have SEO equity - that you can't/don't receive if you don't fix them.
  • When there is a business case for not redirecting some URLs - consider issuing a “Gone” message instead. Use cases for not redirecting things: your website site got hacked and the URLs in question were spammy / malware issues! Or your purchased your domain from a 3rd party, and there used to be pages for a different business - and you actively don’t want them associated with your new business.) Googlebot tends to respect s much more quickly than s.

The issue with s, as we see it, is that Googlebot appears to treat them as "temporary". If there are active links to pages - either on your site or elsewhere on the web - Google can and will keep checking them to see when they will get fixed. They will continue to do this for months - and sometimes years - after the URLs stop working (even when you fix these), if you don’t resolve them.

You can validate this yourself by viewing your log files, and seeing the quantity/frequency Googlebot hits ing pages.

If/when you need to "vet" what gets redirected (eg if there are business or budget or tech reasons NOT to do so), here's our recommended process.

Are s Errors Bad for SEO?

There is some dissent online debating the question of whether errors are bad for SEO.  Here’s a breakdown of why s can be disruptive for both SEO and user experience. 

In theory, at least, errors are "bad" because they represent errors on your website (or on the web, but relating to your website). But mistakes happen, and they are easily forgiven on a small scale.

That said, a user that comes across a page is less likely to return to that site later. (We’ll cover how to make this less likely, below.)

Too many header response errors - or s, s, or really any other type of 4{xx} or 5{xx} error - across a site can create an overall high error rate vs. success rate. This results in trust issues: if Google (or Bing, etc.) sees too many errors vs. functional pages, they won’t want to send users to your site. 

Why would they? That user will get lost and mad, and have a bad experience. It would mean that Google failed at their job - helping the user quickly & easily find the answer to their question.

If your website is actively linking to a bunch of non-functional pages, that means you are passing "page rank" (e.g. SEO equity) … to nothing. Picture a scenario wherein your website is like a purse with holes in it, with money dripping out. No bueno!

That said - errors can and will happen no matter what. A properly functioning page will notify the webmaster that the error occurred, and where it occurred. Then we can go about fixing it via a (permanent) redirect. The user, and search engines, never need to come across this particular issue again.

Key Point: Some teams see s as “bad” and so avoid this inherent "badness" by simply choosing not to issue a status code on a page. The trouble is - the errors real users are experiencing can and will occur no matter what. Let’s not “shoot the messenger!” Mistakes happen, and error codes help us identify those! Issuing a correct status code means that you can more easily find issues in order to fix them.

So… to state the obvious… don’t forget to fix them! Too many outstanding, unfixed s can be actively bad, or can be big missed opportunities. Plus it’s just a bad user experience.

What Are The Most Common Mistakes?

Mistakes and improper setups with pages are not uncommon. Here are some of the most prevalent mishaps involving setups.

  • Redirecting to a page. This hurts everyone. Users are lost, search engines think everything is honky-dory when it's not, and since you don't know when it's happening - you can't fix it.
  • Automatically redirecting to the page you assume search engines and users want. A risky solution, that can easily go wrong (typically because they are sent to irrelevant content - like your homepage.) It's best not to assume. Find the issue and fix it.
  • Serving a message on the page visually, but not delivering the corresponding http response code. This hurts everyone (for the same reason as the "redirect to a page" item above.)
  • Serving a different status code to different user agents. For example, are you sending Bingbot a (not found), and users in a browser a (okay) message? Sometimes this occurs across different devices, e.g. there's a on mobile (and for Googlebot-Mobile) but not on desktop browsers.
  • Not finding & resolving critical errors - on a regular basis. Engineering teams are busy - and they don't want more work, so it's not uncommon for them to refuse to do to. Especially when they don't fully understand the value of the work to the business.
  • SPAs (Single Page Applications) can't create a proper "out of the box". Here’s the correct way to fix that.

What Are The Consequences of Setup Mistakes?

When errors are neglected or setup mistakes go overlooked, the following repercussions can unfold:

  • If there are too many errors occurring on the website, the URL itself can start ranking (an issue that occurs when you combine a redirect to a page with a URL that doesn't issue a proper http header response).
  • Pages on the website that should be benefiting from the link are not, lowering the overall search engine ranking potential. This results in less traffic to the website overall and you are left to figure out what to do next to recover your traffic.
  • Users see a page - instead of the page they should be seeing - often causing them to leave.

Unfortunately, these users are not likely to return:

  • pages have a high bounce rate - i.e., the percentage of visitors who visit this page first (often via a search engine) and immediately leave the website.
  • pages have a high exit rate - i.e., the percentage of visitors that find this page from clicking a link somewhere on your website, whereupon they immediately leave.

Finding and Fixing Errors

Learn the techniques and processes used to identify errors and what action you can take to fix them.

How Can I Find Errors On My Website?

There are several good ways to pinpoint errors on your site. We’d honestly recommend doing them all, since some tools can find issues that other tools don’t see.

  • Crawl your website. There are a host of really great crawlers, including Screaming Frog for small sites, and DeepCrawl for very large/enterprise sites (both often work in all situations, it’s often a personal preference or budget consideration. Sitebulb is another fantastic tool.) Each will tell you what status code errors are linked on your site.
  • Check the Google Search Console (GSC - formerly known as Google Webmaster Tools) Coverage Report, in the Excluded section:
The Google Search Console (GSC) Coverage report. Click the “Excluded” box to see what URLs on your site are excluded.
This version helps you see URLs that Google believes are Soft s.
If you have errors that Google has discovered, you will find them by clicking on this header.
  • Check Google Analytics (GA) Search for page titles that contain “not found” or “” - this is a nice list that tells you how many times a particular page has been hit, and therefore can better help you prioritize which errors need fixing first.
Finding s in Google Analytics
  • Check Your Log Files. This is our favorite way to check for errors (and other issues too!), since you can see exactly who - aka which bot - is hitting what errors, on what specific pages, how frequently, and your site's total "error rate". Unfortunately, not everyone can get access to log files, depending on your platform and host. Talk to your IT and/or development team to see if this is an option for you. You’ll need a log analyzing tool to do this; our favorite is from Screaming Frog.

How Can I Find Errors On The Pages They Are (Allegedly) Linked From?

If you are having issues finding the 4{xx} error on the page it’s linked from (e.g. from internal links), here are some things you can test. If you can’t find the URL using any of these methods, it’s likely that the issue used to be present but has been fixed.

1) Periodically run a new crawl of the site to find and fix errors old and new.

Screaming Frog report on error types
  • First, check if the link is from an inlink or a redirect. Screaming Frog’s inlink report will tell you which is which; other crawlers like DeepCrawl and Sitebulb can give you similar data.
  • If the answer is “AHREF”, then it's findable via a direct hyperlink and you can proceed to the steps below.
  • If the answer is “HTTP Redirect”, then the source of the link is another linked URL, which then redirects to your broken page. Check your redirect file for the original URL (e.g. in Apache, or an Htaccess file) or your website's admin center/CMS (for example, in a WordPress redirect plugin.) Update the redirect location so it’s no longer pointing to a broken page.
Google Analytics Navigation Summary Report can help you find the source of linked errors

2) View Source on the URL in question and Control+Find (C+F) for the broken URLs’ path.

3) View Rendered Source (3rd party browser plugins like this View Rendered Source plugin for Chrome) will show you source code AFTER the browser has rendered it (e.g after JavaScript and CSS have run.) Again, C+F to find the broken URL path.

4) Use Google Analytics and search for "" or "Page Not Found" in the Title. Once you narrow down into the offending URL, click into the Navigation panel to find the previous pages in that path

5) Run the URL through the Mobile-Friendly Tool from GSC. Once it’s run, click the HTML tab, and Copy + Paste the contents of the results into a Word doc, text editor, etc. Again, C+F to find the broken URL path.

Pro Tip: Using the Mobile-Friendly Tool gives you actual Googlebot-rendered code - an EXCELLENT resource for QAing issues like this.
Googlebot rendered HTML in the Google Mobile Friendly Tool

How Can I Find Errors That Aren't Linked on My Website?

It’s not uncommon for errors to happen on URLs that never existed on your website. This is generally due to either:

  • Issues with Googlebot crawling JS, HTML or CSS incorrectly. Find these errors via GSC > in the Excluded report. Fortunately, as Google has improved its ability to crawl JS effectively, so this happens less and less commonly.
  • External links to your site that have broken paths (e.g. another website is actively linking to a non-functional page on your website.) You can discover these with 3rd party tools. My favorite is the Broken Backlink report in Ahrefs (a paid SEO tool.) You can export this data in a CVS file, then crawl each URL in List Mode to see what’s actively ing today.

Pro Tips:

1) Sometimes you'll see errors in GSC without a "source", and which you can't find any links to - internally or externally. Depending on the volume, you might ignore these, or just redirect them anyway.

2) Web caching can be a blocker to the QA process - it's possible that a particular URL is not currently ing, but was - or that it wasn't, but it is now. So remember to clear your website's cache, and your browser's cache too, if you experience any weirdness.

3) Beware creating "redirect hops" (a redirect from page A to page B and then to page C, for example) or "redirect loops" (e.g. a redirect from page D to page E and then back to page F, so the web visitor can't access any functional URL!) Most good crawlers can help you identify these in action.

4) Keep in mind that not every external link is worth redirecting. If the broken link is from a spammy or really low-value website, you might be better off ignoring it. You can determine this answer for yourself, again via paid 3rd party tools OR via a manual visual inspection. Examples of ways to determine quality quickly include: Ahref’s DR (domain rating) and UR (URL rating metrics,) Moz’s DA (Domain Authority), or Spam scores. Learn more about vetting errors to determine what you fix.

How Do You Fix Errors, and Can You Prevent Them?

There are a variety of ways to fix errors, depending on your site’s setup/platform and your software development team’s capabilities/priorities. But the simplest way to fix a error is to implement a redirect.

  • You might be able to implement this for yourself in your website’s admin center. If so, this is the easiest way to do so! Just pick out the best new URL this page should be redirected to (ideally something highly relevant.)
  • Sometimes you’ll need to go through your software or IT team. It’s not uncommon for them to push back on doing this work - full stop, or due to how many there are to implement (sometimes there are a lot). They don’t always see the value, and they are spread thin working on other business priorities. It’s generally something we do recommend fighting for, within limits.See more on this below.

Can you prevent errors from occurring? Nope. They are just a reality of the world, and ignoring them won’t help. Consider s "technical debt" that you need to find/vet/resolve periodically.

Want to learn more about redirects? Semrush can help!

How Do I Fix Soft Errors?

Part 1: Vet your GSC “Soft ” list to ensure that any issues found are actually issues to fix because they aren’t always.

To do so, export the Soft error URLs from GSC, and inspect them 1) manually (visually - do they look like they have content?), 2) via a crawler for status code checker (for the actual status code they issue), and potentially 3) via a JavaScript audit.

One fascinating use case about Soft s was shared by the amazing Paige Ford: "We discovered multiple Soft s on valid Help Center articles, and theorized that Google wouldn’t index them because the help articles were explaining error codes - where those messages could be misinterpreted as messages. We kept error codes (that weren’t or ) but removed the error message, and Google ended up indexing  it."
  • For items that were errors and you actively want those URLs indexed - and you believe they are okay now - submit them for indexing via GSC.
  • For items that aren’t a priority to index, you may be able to ignore them. It really depends on how many there are - don't let there be so many you don't see actual, real issues!

Part 2: Share your vetted list of issues with your software development team or fix them directly. In most cases it’s one of the following:

  • It’s not a valid page that search engines should be accessing or indexing anyway. In this case, you can either block the page/page path via the sprers.eu file, or via the Remove URL tool in GSC if you need to get it deindexed.
  • It’s a page that should have issued a error, but didn’t. Your software team will need to dig in to understand why that’s happening and resolve it. Once it’s correctly issuing a again, you can proceed to part 3.
  • There's a JavaScript crawling or rendering issue resulting in visible content that users can see - but search engine bots can't. To troubleshoot if this is happening, you can use the Inspect URL tool in GSC, or use rendering tools like View Rendered Source, your browser's Inspect Element tooltip, or the HTML that's rendered from the Mobile-Friendly Tool.

Part 3:Follow the steps outlined to fix regular s, above.

How Do You Handle Errors in Javascript?

JavaScript and Single Applications Pages (SPAs) present unique challenges in handling s and other status codes.

With SPAs, users get the same HTML regardless of the URL they're visiting. They download the site’s JavaScript application code, and the SPA renders the appropriate content. 

While the experience feels a lot like browsing multiple pages, you're only viewing one JavaScript application and technically just one “page” (per the actual number of sprers.eu pages being served.)

So, error pages in SPAs don’t work the same. Unlike static pages, Google has no way of telling which "pages" in SPAs are valid, and which or not. And this can create problems for SEO.

To cover for these JS gaps, we break down several potential solutions and Apache/Nginx code examples in a related post found here. Two of those techniques include:

  • Whitelist solution: Of the simplest options for smaller sites is the Whitelist solution, which involves creating a 'whitelist' sitemap and adding a block of config code that explicitly returns a for those whitelisted URLs. 
  • Blacklist solution: Like the whitelist technique but the inverse, you can create a sitemap of URLs that you know people are accessing but are not valid on the site. When pages are frequently added and removed, the blacklist solution can work best.

How To Vet and Prioritize s and Other Errors for Fixing

Though we generally recommend fixing s and other errors via redirects, there are times when fixing them all is not possible, or not feasible, often due to technical constraints, competing business priorities, or internal politics. (Sometimes it's just not a battle worth fighting!)

Here's how we approach this "error vetting & prioritization " process:

  • Identify error pages that website visitors experience. Use Google Analytics and/or your log files to identify these. Prioritize them by frequency, and potentially by historically-driven revenue (e.g. redirect pages that made you a lot of money in the past!)
  • Identify error pages that search engine bots experience. Use your log files to identify these pages. Prioritize them by frequency and longevity (in other words - is Googlebot still hitting a page months and years after it was retired? If so, consider redirecting it. Googlebot is checking it repeatedly for a reason!)
  • Identify error pages that have live/functional backlinks to them. URLs with more/better backlinks are more important to redirect, so you can benefit from the power of these existing links; this is called "broken backlink building."

You might also consider using GSC's Prioritization Insights in the error report - allegedly, these are in rank priority order.

If the URLs you see in GSC don't meet any of the above qualifications, you may be safe ignoring them (and letting them keep ing.) Alternatively, consider utilizing a (Gone) status code instead of a Google tends to respect errors more quickly (e.g. by deindexing them and stopping crawling them.)

How Do You QA a Page?

Here’s our step-by-step process to confirm if your page is working as expected:

1) Find a URL & audit it manually.

  • This can be as simple as sticking a random string of letters after the domain / homepage and clicking enter, e.g. at sprers.euy/i-made-this-up
  • DO NOTE, however, that larger, more complex sites might have functionality differences in different site sections - in other words, the page might work in some places on your site, but not in others.
  • If you have a small site, don’t worry about this. If you have a large site, at minimum, try these QA steps within each major site section (e.g. sprers.euy/services/i-made-this-up AND sprers.euy/clients/i-made-this-up.) Monitor GSC more carefully for errors and soft errors, just in case.

2) Confirm that the page is issuing the correct response. We recommend sprers.eu Copy + paste the fake URL into the field and click the Check Status button (you can check multiple URLs at one time, and also test via different user agents):

This is where you enter the URL (or list of URLs) to test them in sprers.eu
  • Confirm that it’s issuing a code. (Rinse and repeat as needed for s in other site sections)
  • It should not: redirect ( or ) to a , OR issue a (ok) status.

3) Outside of this, the primary items to pay attention to are around usability: if/when the user hits the page, do you successfully help them find their way again? How can you do that better? Read more about this and best practices for pages. (You can also learn more about QA for SEO.)

Should s be indexed?

No, definitely not. Don't index error pages! That's like asking for a less ideal user experience!

(This question was contributed by Sarah McDowell, who's needed to answer this question for her clients. Sarah co-hosts WTSEO's Community Podcast - be sure to check it out!)

Page Examples and Best Practices

Advance your craft in handling s with next-level thinking. Explore the best practices and the best examples on how to use pages effectively.

How Should A Page Function? (User Experience Matters!)

The best pages should offer more than just on-brand messaging and clear next steps. They should also abide by certain UX and functionality standards, as instructed below.

  • Step 1: Remain at the URL that was called, (for example: sprers.euy/i-made-this-up/) - e.g. DON’T redirect this to some other page like /html. The error should load on the URL with the error, so we can see the error - where it occurred - and therefore fix it properly.
  • Step 2: A "http status error" should be issued from the server. Use a tool like sprers.eu to double-check that it’s working.
  • Step 3: A message - visible to the website visitor, on the page - should clearly explain what happened, and include resources, links, and ideally the ability to search your site to find what they were looking for. More on how to make this UX friendly below.
Example results from sprers.eu

What Are The Best Practices of User-Friendly Pages?

There are several things you can do to improve your website's page - and the likelihood that website visitors will stick around and check out the rest of your site. Below are some of the most important page best practices to keep in mind.

  • Explain, in plain English (or whatever language your site targets), exactly what happened. This is for the user's benefit…. because that matters!
  • Include a link to your contact page so users can attempt to solve the issue with your help.
  • Include a simplified HTML sitemap (embedded in the body of the page) so the user can find their own way. Track what's being searched most often and make those resources easier to find.
  • Consider adding a search bar to the page template - so the user can look for the resource if they don't see listed already.
  • Make sure the template’s title includes the text “” or “Page Not Found” - this way you can figure out which pages your site's visitors are hitting, and the frequency this occurs at, in Google Analytics (or your analytics tracking tool of choice.)

Have fun with it! Extend your brand's personality & connect with your audience. Examples of great implementations of this can be found here.

What are the best pages?

Based on some of the page best practices mentioned above, we’ve compiled several of our favorite examples. In addition to using logic and including helpful ways to get users back on track, keep your pages on-brand with added personality and creativity.

Airbnb’s Error Page
Discord's Page Template
Adobe’s Error Page
Magnt’s Error Page
Ben & Jerry’s Error Page
Moz’s Error Page
New Yorker’s Error Page
Brooks Running’s Error Page
Bell’s Beer Error Page
Progressive’s Error Page

Contact us if you need help fixing or improving the page functionality on your website - we’d love to help!

HTTP

Internet error message

" Not Found" redirects here. For the TV episode, see Not Found (Mr. Robot).

In computer network communications, the HTTP , not found, , error, page not found or file not founderror message is a hypertext transfer protocol (HTTP) standard response code, to indicate that the browser was able to communicate with a given server, but the server could not find what was requested. The error may also be used when a server does not wish to disclose whether it has the requested information.[1]

The website hosting server will typically generate a " Not Found" web page when a user attempts to follow a broken or dead link; hence the error is one of the most recognizable errors encountered on the World Wide Web.

Overview

When communicating via HTTP, a server is required to respond to a request, such as a web browser request for a web page, with a numeric response code and an optional, mandatory, or disallowed (based upon the status code) message. In code , the first digit indicates a client error, such as a mistyped Uniform Resource Locator (URL). The following two digits indicate the specific error encountered. HTTP's use of three-digit codes is similar to the use of such codes in earlier protocols such as FTP and NNTP. At the HTTP level, a response code is followed by a human-readable "reason phrase". The HTTP specification suggests the phrase "Not Found"[1] and many web servers by default issue an HTML page that includes both the code and the "Not Found" phrase.

A error is often returned when pages have been moved or deleted. In the first case, it is better to employ URL mapping or URL redirection by returning a Moved Permanently response, which can be configured in most server configuration files, or through URL rewriting; in the second case, a Gone should be returned. Because these two options require special server configuration, most websites do not make use of them.

errors should not be confused with DNS errors, which appear when the given URL refers to a server name that does not exist. A error indicates that the server itself was found, but that the server was not able to retrieve the requested page.

Soft errors

Some websites report a "not found" error by returning a standard web page with a " OK" response code, falsely reporting that the page loaded properly; this is known as a soft . The term "soft " was introduced in by Ziv Bar-Yossef et al.[2]

Soft s are problematic for automated methods of discovering whether a link is broken. Some search engines, like Yahoo and Google, use automated processes to detect soft s.[3] Soft s can occur as a result of configuration errors when using certain HTTP server software, for example with the Apache software, when an Error Document (specified in a .htaccess file) is specified as an absolute path (e.g. sprers.eu) rather than a relative path (/sprers.eu).[4] This can also be done on purpose to force some browsers (like Internet Explorer) to display a customized error message rather than replacing what is served with a browser-specific "friendly" error message (in Internet Explorer, this behavior is triggered when a is served and the received HTML is shorter than a certain length, and can be manually disabled by the user).

There are also "soft 3XX" errors where content is returned with a status but comes from a redirected page, such as when missing pages are redirected to the domain root/home page.

Proxy servers

Some proxy servers generate a error when a range error code would be more correct. If the proxy server is unable to satisfy a request for a page because of a problem with the remote host (such as hostname resolution failures or refused TCP connections), this should be described as a 5xx Internal Server Error, but might deliver a instead. This can confuse programs that expect and act on specific responses, as they can no longer easily distinguish between an absent web server and a missing web page on a web server that is present.

Intentional s

In July , the UK telecom provider BT Group deployed the Cleanfeed content blocking system, which returns a error to any request for content identified as potentially illegal by the Internet Watch Foundation.[5] Other ISPs return a HTTP "forbidden" error in the same circumstances.[6] The practice of employing fake errors as a means to conceal censorship has also been reported in Thailand[7] and Tunisia.[8] In Tunisia, where censorship was severe before the revolution, people became aware of the nature of the fake errors and created an imaginary character named "Ammar " who represents "the invisible censor".[9]

Microsoft Internet Server substatus error codes

The webserver software developed by Microsoft, Microsoft's Internet Information Services (IIS), returns a set of substatus codes with its responses. The substatus codes take the form of decimal numbers appended to the status code. The substatus codes are not officially recognized by IANA and are not returned by non-Microsoft servers.

Substatus codes

Microsoft's IIS , IIS , and IIS servers define the following HTTP substatus codes to indicate a more specific cause of a error:

  • – Not found.
  • – Site Not Found.
  • – ISAPI or CGI restriction.
  • – MIME type restriction.
  • – No handler configured.
  • – Denied by request filtering configuration.
  • – Verb denied.
  • – File extension denied.
  • – Hidden namespace.
  • – File attribute hidden.
  • – Request header too long.
  • – Request contains double escape sequence.
  • – Request contains high-bit characters.
  • – Content length too large.
  • – Request URL too long.
  • – Query string too long.
  • – DAV request sent to the static file handler.
  • – Dynamic content mapped to the static file handler via a wildcard MIME mapping.
  • – Query string sequence denied.
  • – Denied by filtering rule.
  • – Too Many URL Segments.

Custom error pages

The Wikimedia message

Web servers can typically be configured to display a customised error page, including a more natural description, the parent site's branding, and sometimes a site map, a search form or page widget. The protocol level phrase, which is hidden from the user, is rarely customized. Internet Explorer, however, will not display custom pages unless they are larger than bytes, opting instead to display a "friendly" error page.[10]Google Chrome included similar functionality, where the is replaced with alternative suggestions generated by Google algorithms, if the page is under bytes in size.[11] Another problem is that if the page does not provide a favicon, and a separate custom page exists, extra traffic and longer loading times will be generated on every page view.[12][13]

Many organizations use error pages as an opportunity to inject humor into what may otherwise be a serious website. For example, Metro UK shows a polar bear on a skateboard, and the web development agency Left Logic has a simple drawing program.[14] During the UK general election campaign the main political parties all used their pages to either take aim at political opponents or show relevant policies to potential supporters.[15] In Europe, the NotFound project, created by multiple European organizations including Missing Children Europe and Child Focus, encourages site operators to add a snippet of code to serve customized error pages[16] which provide data about missing children.[17]

While many websites send additional information in a error message—such as a link to the homepage of a website or a search box—some also endeavor to find the correct web page the user wanted. Extensions are available for some content management systems (CMSs) to do this.[18]

Tracking errors

A number of tools exist that crawl through a website to find pages that return status codes. These tools can be helpful in finding links that exist within a particular website. The limitation of these tools is that they only find links within one particular website, and ignore s resulting from links on other websites. As a result, these tools miss out on 83% of the s on websites.[19] One way around this is to find errors by analyzing external links.[20]

One of the most effective ways to discover errors is by using Google Search Console, Google Analytics or crawling software.

Another common method is tracking traffic to pages using log file analysis.[21] This can be useful to understand more about what s users reached on the site. Another method of tracking traffic to pages is using JavaScript-based traffic tracking tools.[22]

See also

References

  1. ^ ab"RFC , HTTP/ Semantics and Content, Section Not Found". sprers.eu June Retrieved 13 December
  2. ^Ziv Bar-Yossef; Andrei Z. Broder; Ravi Kumar; Andrew Tompkins (). Sic Transit Gloria Telae: Towards an Understanding of the Web's Decay. Proceedings of the 13th International Conference on World Wide Web (WWW). pp.&#;– doi/ ISBN&#;. S2CID&#;
  3. ^"Why is your crawler asking for strange URLs that have never existed on my site?". Yahoo Ysearch Help page. Archived from the original on 15 July Retrieved 4 September
  4. ^"Farewell to soft s". Google Official Blog. Retrieved 20 September
  5. ^"LINX Public Affairs&#;» Cleanfeed: the facts". sprers.eu 10 September Archived from the original on 13 May Retrieved 6 March
  6. ^"DEMON – Error ". Retrieved 14 June
  7. ^Sambandaraksa, Don (18 February ). "The old fake ' Not Found' routine - Dead link". Bangkok Post. Retrieved 12 September
  8. ^Noman, Helmi (12 September ). "Tunisian journalist sues government agency for blocking Facebook, claims damage for the use of error message instead of ". Open Net Initiative. Retrieved 21 November
  9. ^"Anti-censorship movement in Tunisia: creativity, courage and hope!". Global Voices Advocacy. 27 May Retrieved 28 August
  10. ^"Friendly HTTP Error Pages". sprers.eu 18 August Archived from the original on 2 December Retrieved 14 June
  11. ^"Issue Chrome needs option to turn off "Friendly " displays". sprers.eu. Retrieved 25 December
  12. ^Heng, Christopher (7 September ). "What is sprers.eu and How to Create a Favicon Icon for Your Website". The Site Wizard. Retrieved 23 February
  13. ^"The Dastardly "sprers.eu not found" Error". Internet Folks. 3 August
  14. ^"From skateboarding bears to missing children: The power of the Not Found error page". Metro. 6 June Retrieved 16 April
  15. ^"The political Page war". BBC Newsbeat. 27 April Retrieved 18 May
  16. ^"sprers.eu". notfound. notfound. Archived from the original on 2 September
  17. ^"Missing children messages go on error pages". BBC News. 27 September Retrieved 20 September
  18. ^Swenson, Sahala (19 August ). "Make your pages more useful". Official Google Webmaster Central Blog. Google, Inc. Retrieved 28 August
  19. ^"Sources Leading To s". SpringTrax. Retrieved 11 February
  20. ^Cushing, Anne (2 April ). "A Data-Centric Approach To Identifying Pages Worth Saving". Search Engine Land. Retrieved 7 June
  21. ^"Tracking and Preventing Errors". sprers.eu Retrieved 7 June
  22. ^"Understand Errors". sprers.eu Retrieved 7 June

External links

 Error PageThis post is the ultimate guide to error pages in

In this all-new guide, you’ll learn precisely what error pages are, why they’re essential, and exactly how to use custom pages to drive higher rankings and conversions.

Plus, I’m sharing over fifty page examples you can use for inspiration or simply swipe and deploy.

Here’s an overview of what this guide covers:

  • What is a error (and how to avoid them)
  • Five reasons you&#;re seeing page not found and what you need to do about it
  • How you can win-back traffic using a custom page
  • The eleven elements to an alluring HTTP response page
  • Exactly how to build a page using HTML or WordPress
  • Over fifty stunning page examples (including my top-ten picks)

Let&#;s jump in.

DOWNLOAD:A free checklist that will show you step-by-step how to create the perfect page. You’ll also get my secret swipe file of over one hundred forty page examples.

What is a Error Page? (and Why the Heck Should You Care) 

A page is a website landing page that tells your website visitors the page they requested is unavailable or, in some cases, doesn’t exist.

Its primary purpose is to inform your users they&#;ve reached a error.

(Don&#;t worry I&#;m about to explain what a error is).

 Error Page Definition

But first, why&#;s a page so important?

If you don&#;t create a page, your server can’t provide an adequate response for a resource that isn’t found.

And, that&#;s BAD for two reasons:

  • Users won&#;t know why the URL they&#;re trying to visit isn&#;t working resulting in a really shoddy user experience.
  • Googlebot won&#;t get the correct status code ( or ) to know it&#;s not there.

Both send negative signals to Google that can destroy your ranking chances.

But don&#;t make the mistake of thinking that&#;s it when it comes to error pages, there&#;s WAY more to pages than merely conserving ranking performance.

The good news is, I&#;ll be sharing EVERY single one of those things in this post&#;

What is a Error? A Jargon Free Definition

In simple terms, a page error is an HTTP status code that means the page a user wants to access on a website cannot be found on the server.

A page not found error will be returned to you when;

  • You insert the wrong URL in your browser.
  • You try to access a page that’s been removed.
 Error Definition

Pretty straight forward, but still;

Let’s break this down in a bit more detail.

The Not Found error message is an HTTP standard response code indicating your web browser was able to communicate with the website’s server, but the server could not find the resource you requested.

Anytime you enter a URL into your browser, the browser makes a request on your behalf.

It goes like this:

Server Process Flow Chart

(1). You click a link via your browser. (e.g., sprers.eu)

(2). Your browser routes your request through the internet to the domain you are trying to visit (e.g., sprers.eu).

(3). The domain is converted to an IP. (e.g. )

(4). Your request goes through to that IP address.

(5). Once it reaches the computer on that IP address, there is a web server listening.

(6). The web server will look for that resource and if it does not find it will send back a message via an error page.

This is the error page we’ve configured to show when our server responds with an HTTP page not found error:

SEO Sherpa Error Page

In short, a error simply means “page not found.”

But, there are many common ways you’ll see an HTTP error displayed to you on a webpage:

  • Error
  • Not Found
  • Error
  • The requested URL sprers.eu was not found on this server.
  • HTTP
  • Error Not Found
  • File or Directory Not Found
  • HTTP Not Found
  • Page Not Found
  • Error The page you&#;re looking for can&#;t be found.

Google on the other hand uses &#;, that&#;s an error.&#;

Google Error Page

Are you following along so far?

Great, next, let’s cover why errors occur.

What Causes a Error? Five Reasons Why You See a Page Not Found Message

To be clear, when an HTTP appears on your screen, it means the server is reachable, BUT the specific page you&#;re looking for is not.

Bowser Server Communication

There are many reasons why the server might be sending you a error message for the page you are trying to access. 

Let’s dive into the five main ones:

Reason #1 &#; The Page Got Deleted from the Website

Simply, the page was located there before but has since gotten removed.

This can result from an intentional website clean up or accidental deletion of a page.

Either way, the page got deleted and is no longer there.

And that’s why the server can’t find it.

PRO TIP:

Before deleting any page from your website, you should check if links are pointing to the page.

If there are, go to each link’s source and either remove the link or point it to a new (live) location. This will help minimize errors that result from pages being removed.

Reason #2 &#; The Page Got Moved

It’s common for pages to get moved from one URL slug to another.

For example;

You might decide to reorganize your website’s content and, in turn, drag a page from one folder to another;

 Page Moved

Or, you may choose to update a page’s permalink (AKA “slug”), which means the address of the page &#; known as the URL &#;  gets changed.

Page URL Slug

In either scenario, if a user goes looking for the page at its original address…

Unless the server gets instructions about the page’s new location, it will return a not found error.

Reason #3 &#; The URL Was Typed Incorrectly

This one’s straightforward.

If a user types a URL into their browser that doesn’t exist, the server will return a Page Not Found Error.

 Broken Link

Even the smallest typo in a URL can cause an HTTP

  • The use of upper case if the URL gets written as lower (and vice versa).
  • When space is added to the URL unnecessarily. 
  • The addition &#; or removal &#; of a trailing slash at the end of the URL.
  • The use of an underscore when the URL uses a dash (”-”) as a separator.
  • Etc, etc.

You get the point!

If the address used by a user is anything but the actual URL on which a page is located;

The server may return a message.

PRO TIP:

To minimize errors resulting from mistyped URLs, make sure your permalinks are human friendly. For that, follow these four recommendations:

  • Keep your URLs short. One to five words is ideal.
  • Use only lower case. Mixing upper and lower case is more likely to lead to type-in errors.
  • Use dashes to separate words &#; Using dashes between words makes your URLs more readable and less likely to be mistyped. 
  • Make your URLs memorable. In other words, use a concise name that perfectly describes the page. 

Reason #4 &#; The Domain Name Doesn’t Exist Anymore

It goes without saying:

If the page you are trying to access is on a domain that no longer exists &#; the server will not find it.

This error type will occur when a domain name expires, or when a website gets moved from one domain to another.

If ever you move your website to a new domain, it’s essential you use redirects. 

A HTTP status code (AKA “ redirect”) informs users and search engines of the new location of your webpages &#; and redirects them there (more on that later).

If you don’t use ’s when moving your domain, users get hit with a error.

Custom Page by Phillip Kovalev

Reason # 5 &#; A Server Error

A server error can happen when the server hosting your website is not running, or the connection is broken.

It can also occur when you move your website to a new host, and the domain name servers (DNS) are yet to propagate fully. 

In short, the DNS for some users may temporarily remain pointed to the old hosting provider where there is no website anymore.

While 99% of website hosts do everything they can to minimize this downtime, it still happens every once in a while.

PRO TIP:

If you plan to move your website to a new host, you can minimize downtime by migrating your site when traffic is lowest. Depending on your business, this may be weekends, overnight, or at other dead times, for example, 11 PM to 8 AM:

Google Analytics Low Traffic Hours

Here’s the long and short of it concerning errors:

Regardless of HOW a user lands on a , the fact they HAVE means the page they wanted was unreachable.

As you’d expect, inaccessible pages are a bad thing for the user experience.

But how about SEO? 

I’m going to give you the full low down on that next.

How Errors Affect Usability and SEO (Hint: They’re Harmful)

According to Google: 

Four hundred four errors don’t impact your site’s ranking in Google, and you can safely ignore them.

But, that’s not entirely true!

Sure, errors themselves are not negative ranking factors, but their impact on link signals is detrimental.

Let me explain:

When third-party websites link to your site and those links are broken (e.g., the links lead to errors), the link equity from those inbound links doesn’t pass through to your domain, at least not entirely.

Broken Links

In other words, when you have broken backlinks, you miss out on ranking signals

What’s more, a high number of errors wastes a search bots crawl budget&#; 

And raises the risk that robots won’t crawl your most important pages.

Add to that the obvious negative implications on user experience when a visitor hits a error page (as opposed to the page they expected to find);

It’s clear that lessening the number of ’s will positively impact your website’s performance.

STEP 1 &#; Run a crawl to identify your website’s s

Site crawlers like Screaming Frog, Ahrefs, and SEMrush are a great way to find broken links that lead to errors. 

To find s using Screaming Frog, simply run a site audit, then, click on Response Codes in the top menu.

Next, filter for Client Error (4XX), and Screaming Frog will list every page with a status code.

Screaming Frog 4XX Errors

Real simple.

Another excellent tool for uncovering your website’s errors is; Google Search Console.

All you need to do to see the errors Google Bots found on your site is&#; 

Log in to Search Console, click Coverage, and then select the Excluded tab.

There you’ll see a list of hard errors marked Not found () and soft errors marked Soft

Hard and Soft s in Google Search Console

Click on each item to see a full list of pages returning errors.

Side note &#; we also have a free website audit tool at sprers.eu:

SEO Sherpa Website Grader

You can run audits on any website you want, and in just a few seconds the tool will show you issues with your site, including a list of broken links if you have any.

STEP 2 &#; Fix the broken links

Now it’s time to fix the errors you’ve found.

For that, you have three main options:

(1). Redirect the error: Redirecting users to another relevant page via a redirect is the easiest way to fix errors on your site. 

When implementing redirects, be sure to send the redirect to a relevant page  — redirecting the link to an irrelevant destination may be detrimental to ranking performance. 

How to Fix Errors with Redirects

(2). Restore the page: If you determine there’s still significant demand for a page you’ve deleted, and there’s no suitable page to redirect users to, consider restoring the original version.

You can either restore the page from an old backup or recreate the page by referring to WayBack When archives.

(3). Correct the link: If broken links exist between pages on your site, you can simply edit the source to point to the correct URL. 

Correct Broken Link

On the other hand, if the broken link exists on a third party domain, try reaching out to the site owner via email. If you&#;re having difficulty finding the right email address, our email address guide has got your covered.

And since it’s in the best interest of all website owners to fix their dead links…

I’ll bet my bottom dollar A LOT of your outreach is successful.

What to Do with Pages: How to Finding New Opportunities from Lost Traffic

So you’ve fixed all the errors you can.

Good job, you’ve gone a long way toward improving the user experience of your website and recovering lost traffic and rankings.

What’s next?

It’s time to work on the error page itself.

But, before we dive into what makes a GREAT page (and how to create one)&#;

Let me first explain why you need a customized page in the first place.

Generic Pages

Out of the box, generic pages look this:

Generic Page

Or this:

 File or Directory Not Found

I’m sure you’ve run into a few online.

The question is, how did they make you feel?

Frustrated, confused, and unsure what to do next?

The trouble with generic pages is the user experience sucks. 

 Not Found Page

They use technical language, offer no path forward, and force users back and off your site.

If leaving your website visitors frustrated and clueless is okay for you&#;

Sure, stick with a generic page.

On the other hand, if you are committed to better user experience, traffic, and search engine rankings, creating a custom page is a MUST.

Custom Pages

Deploying a custom page requires time, effort, and energy. 

Jeez, if your website is custom coded, you may even need to hire a developer &#; and that comes at an expense.

If you’ve already minimized errors through the steps I shared above, why invest extra resources into a custom error page when a relatively small percentage of visitors see it?

At least we hope.

Here are five reasons why:

(1). Use Your Custom Page to Ensure Your Tough to Index Pages Get Crawled

If your website is extensive and famous, it’s going to have dead links.

There’s no escaping it.

When you have lots of URLs, there’s also a chance your most essential pages don’t get crawled as frequently as you would like.

That’s part and parcel of having a big website and a limited crawl budget.

Google Crawl Budget

How would you like to ramp up your search traffic by getting your highest priority pages indexed?

Well, you can do that via your error page.

Sounds cool, right?

To do so, create a list of the pages you want to be indexed, and use a script like this to randomly insert them into your page.

Because you’ll always have many inbound links to your HTTP response page, search engine spiders will crawl it frequently and discover the new pages you want indexing.

Neil Patel used this technique to improve Tech Crunches traffic by 9%.

Random Link Insertion Page Neil Patel

In short, it works great!

Give it a try and let me know the results you get for your site.

(2). Leverage a Custom Page to Elevate Your Brand to Reduce Your Bounce Rate

If your website users arrive at a dead page from an internal link.

And the page they land on looks like this:

Generic Error Page Example

They might get confused into thinking they are on a different website or blocked from accessing your site by a web server.

Either way, it’s a shoddy user experience.

This is just one reason why I recommend a custom page that inherits your website&#;s header, navigation, color scheme, fonts, and logo.

If a user lands upon a , with consistent branding, they’ll understand they are on your website&#; even if they didn’t find the specific page they were looking for.

And, that should at least mean they stick around.

(3). Use a Custom Page to Engage (And Surprise)

A error page is a natural cause for frustration. 

Unless that is you lighten the mood.

By using a custom page to engage your visitors via games, humor, and exciting visuals:

You can turn a user&#;s initial frustration into a moment of delight. 

Email Center Page AFter

I’ll share several excellent examples of this later in the post.

(4). Utilize a Custom Page to Guide Visitors Along the Path (to Purchase)

A generic page is a digital dead end.

It leaves users with nowhere to go but back from where they came.

On the other hand, a custom page allows you to layout links that might be relevant and useful.

Healthline Page

In this way, a user can continue through your website and find what they’re looking for, or at least something that interests them.

You retain the user; they continue browsing &#; everyone wins! 

(5). Use a Custom Page to Generate Conversions

Most website owners think about their pages in terms of recovering lost traffic.

What if I told you that some websites had used their pages to increase conversions and revenue?

Sounds hard to believe, right?!

Well, it shouldn’t be because it’s done easily. 

For instance, you can add a coupon code to your page just like Ballard Designs:

According to Which Test Won, this error page with product recommendations and a 20% discount code led to increased total purchases and a higher add-to-cart rate.

You can also use your pages to display a lead magnet:

OptinMonster Page

OptinMonster has used their page to great effect by adding the option to download a free case study in exchange for a user&#;s name and email. 

According to OptinMonster’s website, this page “converts like gangbusters.”

Now you WHY a custom page is so important.

Let me show you WHAT makes an effective one.

Error Page Best Practices: Eleven Elements to an Alluring Page

I’m now going to lay out exactly what makes a highly effective response page.

This is a thorough list of the components that go into the very best pages on the web.

You don’t necessarily need to incorporate all of my recommendations, but the more you do use the better response rate you are likely to get.

(1). A REALLY Simple Error Message

This may sound obvious, but it’s imperative.

You see, the issue with generic pages is that they use technical language.

And, most users will not understand what an “HTTP ” is.

So cut the jargon and use uncomplicated language your users will understand:

Simple Error Message

Something like: 

“Sorry, the page you were looking for doesn’t exist” will do just fine.

You can also add further context as to why the error “might” have occurred.

I stress might, because the error may have resulted from a user error (e.g. your visitor typed in the wrong URL).

Stating “the error occurred because” (or similar) sounds like you are playing the blame game and may turn your visitors off.

Instead, opt for wording like:

  • You may be seeing this page because
  • You might have ended up here due to

Here’s an excellent example from X Cart with the reasons all spelled out.

Xcart Page

(2). Use a Consistent Look and Feel for Your Error Page Template

I mentioned this already…

But it’s so important I want to drill it home here:

Use a consistent brand look and feel!

Flywheel Page

That means all of the following should run through your error page:

  • Your brand’s logo
  • Your website color scheme
  • Your standard fonts and design style.

When a user lands on your page, they should know immediately they are on YOUR website.

Mint Not Found Page

If they don’t, there’s a high chance they’ll decide they’re in the wrong place and click elsewhere.

That’s not the outcome you want.

To minimize bounce rate, make sure your page design is consistent with the rest of your website.

Next up, I’ll share another way you can keep page visitors browsing your site&#;

(3). Refer Your to Your Homepage

A simple technique used frequently on pages is a homepage reference link.

I strongly recommend directing users to your homepage from your page as it’s a great way to keep users around.

That’s because a well-designed home page acts as a navigational page to the rest of your content.

Simply add a prominent link or button with a clear call to action, and you’re done.

Hootsuite Custom

Just like Hootsuite did above.

(4). Link Your Page Not Found to Your Best Content

You’ve done the hard job of earning a click to your site.

It would suck real bad to lose even one visitor due to a lack of options.

That’s why I recommend you also include links to your most popular pages and posts.

A quick scan through Google Analytics will help you identify your most in-demand content.

Steve Madden offers links to to its trending products on its custom error page.

Steve Madden Page

AirBnB provides a link to their Traveling and Hosting pages when you land upon their http status code.

AirBnB Page

The goal here is to serve up the content your users are most likely looking for.

For the rest, do this:

(5). Add a Search Box: It’s Insurance for Your HTTP Visitors

You don’t want your visitor to scan your list of links and still conclude:

“I don’t see what I’m looking for, I’m outta here.”

So, instead, you should serve a search box:

And help your visitor in finding whatever he or she is looking for.

Most popular content management systems like WordPress and Shopify have search functions built-in.

We leveraged the standard WordPress search functionality on the SEO Sherpa page:

SEO Sherpa Page Search Function

I tell you what; it’s a real no brainer. 

(6). Page Design: Less Clutter = Higher Success Rates

As you already know, I advocate including several popular links on your page. 

But don’t infer my advice to mean:

Let’s show visitors everything we got and see if they bite. 

Bad idea!

Overwhelming a user with a page jam-packed with links to every nook and cranny of your site is a dead cert way to overload an already frustrated visitor.

Numerous studies support this notion: 

The more options you give to consumers, the more you debilitate consumer decision-making.

To avoid the “paradox of choice” keep your design simple and clickable actions lean.

Dropbox gets the balance of just enough, but too many links, right with their minimalist design:

They include internal links to their most important pages overlaid on a clean and simple design.

Spot on!

(7). Include Your Contact Details

The primary purpose of most business websites is to convince and convert visitors into customers.

And what’s the most effective mechanism of converting website traffic into sales?

Human interaction. 

A BIA/Kelsey study discovered that phone calls are times more likely to convert than leads over the web.

Yet, most websites hide their phone number out of sight.

Remember, too that users landing upon your pages are likely feeling frustrated.

Would you want to add another barrier and make it difficult for them to get in touch?

No, right! 

To minimize frustration and show users that you care &#; include your contact information prominently on your error page.

We include our telephone number as well as live chat.

The channels you include are up to you.

Just be sure to include your contact information front and center.

(8). Display Consistent Header and Footer Navigation Through Your Website AND Page

Another best practice is to include your regular header and footer navigation.

Like adding popular links, this ensures that users can quickly and easily navigate your website’s main pages.

Apple Page

It also has the added advantage of making your page consistent with the rest of your website, which as I mentioned earlier, is vital to reducing bounce rates.

(9). Translate Your Page into Multiple Languages

terminology is confusing enough without it being in languages your users do not read.

If you have a multilingual website, then you should create multiple pages in each of the languages you serve. 

Once done, you can then set up rules to display the appropriate version depending on the language directory the user was trying to access.

It goes without saying, people like to consume content in their native language. 

By translating your error page, your visitors will connect better with your brand and website.

Disney Error Page

Disney does a great job of creating various language versions of their page.

(10). Make an Offer via Exit Intent and

Exit-intent technology is not something that gets commonly used on pages, but it should.

It reduces bounce rate, increases conversions, and is easy to set up with tools like OptinMonster or Sumo.

Exit-intent technology works by detecting when a user is about to abandon your error page.

Exit Intent Technology

Then displays a popup to them at that very moment.

Showcasing a relevant offer before the exit button gets clicked can help you retain some of the 70% of users who would otherwise leave your site, never to return.

Here’s a great example of a popup containing a search box that&#;s perfect for a error page:

Exit Intent Pop Up

You can also use exit-intent to provide a discount code or to promote a free consult: 

Exit Intent Pop Up

There are no limits to the ways in which you can use exit intent technology on your page.

Pull out the stops and get creative!

(11). Inject a Little Humor in to Your Page

Landing on a ‘page not found’ can quickly drive visitors nuts.

One of the best ways to ease their frustration and lighten the mood is with a healthy dose of humor.

A funny gag, or an engaging animation can quickly turn “oh shit” into “that’s awesome?”

Not the comedic type?

Don’t worry; I’ve got plenty of inspiration for you later in this post.

Okay, so hopefully, by now, you know what makes up a seductive page.

Let’s recap:

  • Show a jargon-free error message
  • Adopt a consistent look and feel
  • Link to your homepage
  • Include links to your best content
  • Embed a search box
  • Make your design clutter-free
  • Display your contact details
  • Incorporate your website&#;s header and footer navigation
  • Create versions for different languages
  • Display an exit popup
  • Inject humor into your page

Got it, cool?

Let me next show you how to turn your design into a functioning page.

How to Create a Error Page in HTML

Nowadays, most content management systems have a built-in feature for error pages.

But that’s not always the case. 

If your infrastructure doesn’t support pages out of the box, then you’ll need to configure your server. 

Here are technical instructions for common server types:

Each of these server environments will require you to update your .htaccess file (or their equivalent).

This code tells the server, that if an error occurs to display the page named

Note &#; you should not use the domain name in this .htaccess line, as search engines will often interpret this as a soft error. 

Once you’ve done that, you next need to create the page in HTML.

The fastest way to do that is to copy the source code of a regular website page and change the main content section to show the error message &#; and the other elements I describe above.

You should also update the title tag to something relevant too.

 Page Title

And add your Google Analytics tag to the page so it can be tracked.

PRO TIP

You can create a segment in Google Analytics to track visits to pages returning ’s. To do that, go to ‘Admin’, then ‘Segments’ and then ‘New Segment’

Next, click on ‘Conditions’ and set a filter to segment all pages displaying the page title you previously set. e.g., “Page not found &#; SEO Sherpa”

Page Not Found GA Filter

Use this report to find and fix errors as well as monitor the effectiveness of your error page as indicated by the exit percentage. For SEO Sherpa just 26% of users seeing a page exit the website, not bad!

Once done, save the page in your server’s root directory with the name “” and you’re done.

 Error Page Bounce Rate

How to Create a Custom Page in WordPress

The easiest way to create a error page in WordPress is by using a plugin.

The one I recommend is this one.

All you need to do is create your page as a standard page in WordPress and name it Page.

Update the page title:

Page Not Found Title Tag

And then in the plugin settings select that page as the page you want to display:

WordPress Page Not Found Plugin

Easy as that!                       

How to Test Your Page (Making Sure It Works)

Testing your Page is an essential last step.

Aside from ensuring your page displays correctly, you must make sure it displays the status code.

If your page returns a status code (the standard response for a working web page), you’ll cause all kinds of confusion for crawlers.

 Status Code

And you will receive soft errors inside Google Search Console. 

To test the correct HTTP status code is returned, check your page using HTTP status code checker.

Simply enter a random URL like sprers.eu  and then “Check status”

HTTP Status Code Checker

If the random (non-existent) page returns a status code and no redirects, then you are golden:

HTTP Status Code OK

Custom Page Design: Fifty Page Examples

Hopefully, by now you know the ingredients that make up a KILLER page &#; and have gotten some ideas for your own custom

If not, don&#;t fear:

As promised, here are fifty of my favorite error page examples from around the web.

I hope they inspire you and help you create your own brilliantly designed error page.

Best Overall Pages &#; My Top-Ten Picks

These are some of the top page examples I&#;ve found.

Each one of my picks does a fantastic job of fulfilling the functional requirements of an effective error page, as well as incorporating unique design (and in many instances humor).

Let&#;s begin:

1. AirBnB Page

This page by AirBnB uses a fun animation to turn a moment of frustration into delight. It&#;s also a great example of using internal linking to drive link equity and users to the most sought after pages on the website.

2. Steve Madden Page

The Steve Madden error page incorporates witty copy, a search box, consistent navigation, and prominent contact information. It also features its hottest products prominently below the fold, which helps Steve Madden turn lost traffic into sales. This error page is a stellar example of how to do e-commerce pages right.

3. Drift Page

Drift Error Page

The Drift page is a wonderful example of a long-form page that takes a lost user along a journey of discovery to Drift&#;s best content. I really like the simple design, the embedded &#;Try Drift Free&#; and &#;Get a Demo call-to-actions, and the live chat feature. This a simple but effective error page that any SAAS business could follow.

4. Slack Page

I love Slack&#;s page. It uses a brilliant interactive scene to hook and engage browsers coupled with consistent site wide branding and navigation. Over the top of the interactive background is a jargon free error message which links to their Help Center.

5. Big Commerce Page

Big Commerce Page

The Big Commerce page is a great all-around error page. Some of the things this page does well are; consistent branding and navigation, fun design style, internal linking, and prominent call-to-action.

6. Dribbble Page

The Dribbble error page is another fantastic example of using interactivity to surprise and delight. The hex code slider can be moved from left to right to change the color of the error montage. It&#;s really addictive, and coupled with a simple search function offers a very effective user experience too.

7. Kinsta Page

Kinsta uses it&#;s pages to inform and educate by showcasing it&#;s most helpful articles and blogs. It also has a low-threat call to action, enticing visitors to subscribe to their newsletter. These reasons, plus great use of branded design and internal linking, make this one of my top picks.

8. Wendy&#;s Page

Wendy&#;s uses a fun game it calls Burger Time to engage it&#;s page visitors. Functionally the page is very good too, with a clear error message, user-friendly navigation, and a set of helpful links.

9. Modcloth Page

I really like ModCloth&#;s paired-down error page. It uses light-hearted humor in a creative way to navigate users towards its products. It also displays a variety of support information to cater to their customer&#;s varying preferences in modalities. Simple design and on-brand too.

Flipping Book Page

Flipping Book uses a condensed sitemap on its error page to help users find what they&#;re looking for. This aids both user experience and internal linking which positively improves SEO performance. Their page is also a great illustration of how to incorporate humor and brand into a page which they do via a custom illustration that ties back to their product.

Page Examples &#; Best of the Rest

If you&#;re still looking for more page ideas, here is my best of the rest.

Another forty of my favorite error pages from around the world-wide-web to fuel you with inspiration for your own custom page not found.

Tide Error Page

Tide Error Page

Amazon Error Page

Amazon Error Page

Unbounce Error Page

Unbounce Error Page

Ueno Error Page

Ueno Error Page

Tripomatic Error Page

Tripomatic Error Page

The North Face Error Page

The North Face Error Page

The Irish Times Error Page

The Irish Times Error Page

The Creation Museum Error Page

The Creation Museum Error Page

Taco Bell Error Page

Taco Bell Error Page

Sure Dev Error Page

Sure Dev Error Page

Spotify Error Page

Spotify Error Page

Southwest Airlines Error Page

Southwest Airlines Error page

Shutterstock Error Page

Shuttestock Error Page

Ready To Go Survival Error Page

Ready to Go Survival Error Page

Pixar Error Page

Pixar Error Page

Page Magnt Error Page

Page Magnt Error Page

Omelet Error Page

Omelet Error Page

The New Yorker Error Page

The New Yorker Error Page

Firefox Error Page

Mozilla Firefox Error Page

Matra Labs Error Page

Matra Labs Error Page

Lego Error Page

Lego Error Page

Kualo Error Page

Kualo Error Page

Jake Rabbit Error Page

Jake Rabbit Error Page

Hubspot Error Page

Hubspot Error Page

HBO Error Page

HBO Error Page

Good Dog Design Error Page

Good Dog Design Error Page

Giant Eagle Error Page

Giant Eagle Error Page

Get Response Error Page

Get Response Error Page

Eharmony Error Page

Eharmony Error Page

Distilled Error Page

Distilled Error Page

Dan Woodger Error Page

Dan Woodger Error page

CSS Tricks Error Page

CSS Tricks Error Page

Coolappse Error Page

Coolappse Error Page

Buzzalot Error Page

Buzzalot Error Page

Brandstack Error Page

Brandstack Error Page

Blue Path Error Page

Blue Path Error Page

Blue Laser Design Error Page

Blue Laser Design Error Page

Apartment Home Living Error Page

Apartment Home Living Error Page

AMC Theaters Error Page

AMC Theaters Error Page

st Legion Error Page

st Legion Error Page

Over To You

Are you ready to create your own custom page?

To make things really easy for you, I made a handy PDF checklist that outlines the most important elements of an effective error page and exactly how to implement those things to increase your rankings, traffic, and conversions.

I&#;m also including my secret swipe file containing one hundred and forty page examples from the webs top brands.

Download the free checklist and swipe file right now:

And finally, if you&#;ve come across an example of a GREAT page, I&#;d love for you to share it in the comments below.

Join 23,+ subscribers and get access to proven SEO tips.

Includes exclusive strategies not found on the blog.
James Reynolds

About the author:James Reynolds is passionate about helping you get more traffic and sales from search engines.

Karl

About the author:Karl Tablante is the Inbound Marketing Manager for SEO Sherpa, a top-rated organic SEO agency that lives and breathes all things search.

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What if we told you that your error page could actually increase your conversions and boost revenue?

We know it sounds too good to be true. But with some effort crafting the right page design and proper optimization, you can turn lost visitors into loyal customers.

In this post, we’re going to cover 21 of the best pages we’ve seen. Plus, we&#;ll explain why they work.

Before we dive into the list, though, let&#;s get clear on what pages are and why they&#;re so crucial to your digital marketing strategy.

What Is a Page (& Why They Matter)

pages are designated pages that your visitors will land on when they enter or click a faulty URL related to your site&#;s domain.

So, for example, if you were looking for a specific page on OptinMonster but misspelled the URL, you&#;d land on this page:

optinmonster page example

The user would instantly know they&#;ve landed in the wrong spot and are given options for where to go instead.

In the example above, the user could either go to the Home page, the Contact Us page, or use the navigational search bar to go where they&#;re looking for.

pages are crucial to keeping user experience (UX) high across your site. As you grow your website, your links may change or break over time.

As users click to navigate through your site, they may land on one of these faulty links. If your site doesn&#;t have a page, you can likely say goodbye to that potential lead forever.

But WITH a professional page, you can redirect users where they want to go. From there, you can guide them down your sales funnel to create more loyal customers and boost sales.

And to create your own custom pages, we recommend using SeedProd:

SeedProd landing page creation tool homepage-min

SeedProd is hands down the BEST page and landing page builder for WordPress. It&#;s easy to get started and doesn&#;t require any code at all.

That&#;s because this plugin comes with ready-made page templates and a visual drag and drop builder. Literally anyone can create professional and high-converting pages that redirect users and improve UX.

Plus, you can add a variety of powerful elements to your pages, including optin forms, featured products, CTA buttons, FAQ sections to answer customer questions, and more.

When you&#;re using SeedProd, you don&#;t need to be a professional designer (or even be &#;tech-savvy, for that matter). Instead, you&#;ll be able to create stunning pages in minutes.

Want to try it out yourself? Click here to start your % risk-free SeedProd account today!

And for some added inspiration, we&#;re going to look at 21 of the best error page examples we can find.

Best Page Examples

1. OptinMonster &#; Page Example

optinmonster page example

Why it works:

We&#;ve already caught a glimpse of OptinMonster’s page earlier in the post. But since it&#;s such a straightforward example, we&#;ll start the list here.

Again, the main highlight of this page is how functional it is. The users have 3 options. They can either go:

  • Back to the Home page
  • To the Contact Us page
  • Navigational search bar

But the goal is always the same: keeping users on the OptinMonster site.

And we can say with experience that this page does what it was made to do.

2. WPForms

wpforms page example

Why It Works

Here&#;s another example of a stripped-back error page example. It uses playful language (&#;whoops&#;) and invites users to navigate the site with their search bar.

Users aren&#;t given too many options, as that can be overwhelming, and they can still navigate the site with the main header menu at the top of the page.

One thing we might improve, however, is adding a CTA button or link to give users easier access back to the homepage.

Otherwise, this is a sleek and professional page example that we know works.

3. Pixar

pixar page example

Why It Works

When it comes to creativity, Pixar stands far apart from the rest. That&#;s why it should be no surprise that they have a fun, creative, and engaging page example.

What&#;s interesting here is that they don&#;t have a navigational search bar for users to find what they&#;re looking for.

In that department, sites like OptinMonster or WPForms have the better pages.

But Pixar&#;s page is meant to make the user smile, and they certainly accomplish that.

With one of the characters from their movie Inside Out, they play with how frustrating it can be to land on the wrong page. Then people can use the main menu at the top of the page to go back through the site.

4. Disney

 page example from disney

Why It Works

Just like we saw with Pixar, Disney&#;s page is perfectly on-brand.

In fact, as you can see, it comes with animation from their hit movie Ralph Breaks the Internet.

It&#;s a great way to suck users back into the Disney Universe. Plus, they have a navigational search bar (unlike Pixar) to help their audience find what they&#;re looking for.

5. Netflix

netflix page example

Why It Works

Netflix has a fun page from one of the films they offer, Lost in Space. It&#;s a good fit considering the reason people have landed on the page.

The main thing to notice here is the big CTA button in the middle: Netflix Home.

That redirects users back to the homepage so Netflix users can find the page or movie they&#;re looking for.

Again, something as simple as adding a button back to the homepage is more than enough to boost UX from a error page.

6. Hulu

hulu page example (1)

Why It Works

Another example for a page comes from Netflix&#;s rival: Hulu.

What&#;s interesting about this page is how stripped down it is. There aren&#;t any colors, and there&#;s only one button that says &#;OK.&#;

While this button takes users back to the homepage, it&#;s not clear from the copywriting that this is where the user is headed.

But if a mega-brand like Hulu is doing something, chances are that it&#;s because it works.

7. Nerf

nerf page example

Why It Works

Nerf has a detailed page with a fun graphic and a large CTA button that says &#;Go to Brands.&#;

It also explains why the user landed on this page (&#;the link is either outdated or has changed&#;). This explanation is helpful for their target audience: older kids.

This is important because that age group is likely less familiar with a page and probably won&#;t know what it is.

With an added explanation about why the page isn&#;t working, kids and adults alike can redirect themselves to Nerf&#;s product line.

8. Tripadvisor

tripadvisor page

Why It Works

Tripadvisor has a fun and animated page example.

The copywriting jokes about having lost the page but not your luggage. This is perfectly on-brand for the travel site, and it invites the user to navigate to 4 main sections of their site:

  • Hotels
  • Restaurants
  • Things to do
  • Vacation rentals

This is an excellent way of re-engaging the user and helping them further plan their next vacation.

9. Constant Contact

constant contact page example

Why It Works

Constant Contact uses more informal language that resonates with their target audience (younger startups and digital marketers).

The not-so-buttoned-down language gets that across quickly with, &#;Things are not awesome anymore.&#;

They then give users a quick way to get back to the homepage.

One thing we&#;d fix is the language surrounding the CTA. It says, &#;You can go back, or try one of the links below.&#; But after that, there&#;s only one link the user can choose.

If redone, it would be good to change the copy around the CTA or to provide more links for users to follow.

Slack

slack error page example

Why It Works

Slack made an entire animated background for their error page.

This is a great way to keep the user engaged and let them stay on your site a little longer. They also have a link that takes users back to the Help Center, though there is no button to get back to the homepage.

But they do provide several links in the footer menu that can help users navigate back to the page they&#;re looking for.

Lego

lego page example

Why it works:

Not only is Lego’s page % on-brand, but it’s also fun and easy to understand. There’s no technical wording and no reference to a “ error” that some folks may not understand.

All your visitor needs to know is that they didn’t get the page they wanted. They don’t really care about the why; they just want a solution.

Email Center UK

email center uk error message 1

Why it works:

Email Center UK uses a two-part page that takes all of the blame from the visitor, giving users a fun way to work out their frustrations.

You&#;ll also notice that this page doesn&#;t blame the user for the problem. Instead, they&#;re apologetic.

They turn the page into a game that blames the developer for an error. When you click the person you want to fire, you get a follow-up page that looks like this:

email center uk error page 2

This is a way to turn your page into a little game that increases engagement AND the user experience.

List25

list25 best pages ever

Why it works:

This error page from List25 is brilliant and so on-brand it hurts.

A major user experience design best practice is to provide explain what went wrong when delivering an error message. List25 offers 25 explanations &#; some serious and some in jest.

They have a search bar at the top so visitors don’t have to scroll all the way through the list, but we’re pretty sure that most List25 visitors are going to anyway.

Brett Terpstra

brett terpstra page example

Why it works:

One of the most annoying things about error pages is that they can signal a dead end. If the page isn’t well-designed, you may end up with nowhere to go next.

Brett Terpstra’s page provides a list of posts containing keywords related to the link you were trying to access. The posts are linked making it easy and fast to navigate to them.

The page isn’t showy, but it’s exceedingly useful.

Steve Madden

Steve Madden page

Why it works:

Steve Madden’s page offers up options to lost visitors. The search box is a great addition to any error and offering a few different ways of getting help lets visitors know that they’re listening.

They also include links to other popular products to distract visitors from what could be a very frustrating experience. Sneaky and effective.

Help your lost visitors out with your error message text and design. Including some of the ideas below can encourage visitors to continue browsing and searching, extending their time on your site.

Some things to include in your page design:

  • Menu navigation
  • A link back to the homepage
  • A link to your sitemap
  • A search bar
  • Links to popular posts

And with SeedProd, you can easily display products on your error page. Simply drag one of SeedProd&#;s custom WooCommerce blocks and drop it into place.

add product grid to error page with seedprod

You can choose from blocks like products grid, sale products, top-rated products, and more.

9gag

9gag best page ever

Why it works:

9gag’s page has one purpose: to get you to download their app. They don’t even pretend to want anything else.

Adding a full page of the popular Pulp Fiction Travolta gif in the background is a fun touch!

And simplicity is key here.

Yes, we just talked about offering up ways to keep your visitors browsing, but don’t overwhelm them with too many options, either.

Path

path simple page design example

Why it works:

Path’s page is simple and straightforward. They don’t want to have broken links and missing pages so they give visitors the option to contact Path support to report it.

Notice that Path also includes a navigation footer in case the visitor doesn’t want to report the problem and would rather browse around. This gives the power back to the visitor and helps to ease their frustration.

The goal here is to give visitors a chance to report the problem.

You can do this in a few ways. You can keep it simple like Path and include the option to contact support. Another option is to use a feedback form.

IMDB

IMDB page

Why it works:

IMDB shows visitors a movie quote on their page.

The branding is subtle here. There are no movie posters, no trailers competing for the visitor’s attention. IMDB simply offers up a movie quote, a link to the site’s homepage, and a link to the quoted movie.

When designing your error page, make sure to maintain brand familiarity.

Rather than disorienting your users, it will be reassuring for them to experience the same brand that they have come to know and love.

Everipedia

Everipedia page branding

Why it works:

Everipedia’s page is everything its visitors would expect from an online encyclopedia. This reminds visitors why they love the site and keep coming back.

TED speaker and marketer Renny Gleeson said of the error page, &#;A simple mistake can tell me what you aren’t. Or remind me why I love you.&#;

Use your page to remind visitors why they love you. What is your unique value proposition? What sets you apart from your competitors?

If you can quickly answer that from your pages, you&#;ll be set to convert your lost visitors into paying customers.

Heyzap

Heyzap page game

Why it works:

Who doesn’t love to play games?

Heyzap’s page adds an interactive element that will keep visitors entertained and engaged on the site for a while. Maybe even long enough to get over their frustration of landing on an error page in the first place!

No, you don’t have to develop a game. But do consider adding an interactive element to your page.

Adding an interactive element gives your site’s visitors something to do on your error page. This increases time on page and reduces bounce rates, both important for keeping your website in Google’s search results.

Amazon

amazon error page example

Why It Works

If a company like Amazon is having fun with their page, that means you probably should, too.

Amazon starts by apologizing in big, bold letters. It then redirects users to Amazon&#;s homepage OR allows users to meet &#;the dogs of Amazon.&#;

This lighthearted redirect is a great way to keep people on their site for longer. After all, who doesn&#;t love dogs?

And that&#;s it for today! These have been 21 of the best page examples that you can use to create your own pages today!

We hope you enjoyed this post. If you did, you&#;ll definitely want to check out the following resources:

These articles will have everything you need to create better and higher-converting landing pages for your websites.

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Nathan Thompson

Published by Nathan Thompson

Nathan Thompson is a father, a writer, and a lover of travel (in that order). When he’s not wrestling with his kids, you’ll likely find Nathan giving his eyes a much-needed break from screens with a good book or planning a family trip with his awesome wife.

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The Best Pages: 37 Examples You Need to See

An epic page likely isn’t going to win your business any awards. I get it.

But it shows that you care about your customers.

A great page can be a smart way to show off your brand’s personality.

But is it worth it to invest in a fancy page?

It can be.

Because when users land on your page, 404 error page, they aren’t finding what they needed.

Using links, smart graphics, and witty copy can make them forget that you (maybe) messed up and get them back on track.

In light of the importance of pages, what follows is a list of 37 of the best examples of pages that you can find online.

Before diving into the examples, let’s take a moment to review the basics of a page.

What Is a Page?

A page is a landing page that tells your site viewers the requested page is unavailable or, in some cases, doesn’t exist.

A error tells users the page cannot be accessed – and it can be a major problem.

When users can’t access a page, they can’t find the information they need.

It also tells Google that your site offers a poor customer experience, which can result in less traffic and lower rankings.

Ideally, site visitors would never land on a page, but the reality is that they do happen from time to time – even from well-maintained sites.

Why Might a Visitor Land on a Page?

Why might a user get a error?

There are several reasons, which include:

  • The server is down.
  • The page moved and wasn’t redirected.
  • The page never existed.
  • The user typed the URL in wrong.
  • The URL is broken.

Basically, if a user tries to visit a page that cannot be found, they’ll be 404 error page to your page.

What’s the Point of Making a Page That Stands Out?

A visually appealing, user-friendly error page shows customers that you care about their experience and are interested in keeping them on your website.

When done well, 404 error page, a good page helps users forgive you 404 error page the error (even if it was their own fault by typing the URL in wrong) and keeps them on your site.

A great page can make users smile and – most importantly – help them find what they are looking for.

We reviewed dozens of pages to find the best ones that show off brands’ creativity and personality.

Here are 37 of the best examples of pages done well.

1, 404 error page. Disney

 page disney

Disney knocks it out of the park with their page by highlighting one of the most popular characters known for destruction – Wreck-it Ralph.

They also feature KnowsMore, 404 error page, a side character in Ralph Breaks The Internet.

Both characters are appropriate for the page, but notice what is right next to KnowsMore: a little search bar.

There’s another one at the top of the page, but this one is dead in the center where users will see it, 404 error page. This search bar keeps users on-page by helping them find what they are looking for.

2. Drift

 page dift

Drift is a conversion marketing tool and sales platform that offers tools for live chat, landing pages, and more.

The copy on their page stays on-brand by mentioning “conversations,” but also works to keep people on the Drift website by offering links to their homepage, their blog, and links to a few of their most popular pieces of content.

In the upper right corner, they also offer a path to conversion by providing the Get Drift Free button.

3. Help Scout

 page help scout

Help Scout provides companies by providing tools for help desk software, email-based customer support, and online knowledge bases.

Like Drift, their page offers links to their blog and other posts, but they use a cute graphic of cute dogs to keep people smiling.

4. Apartment Therapy

 page apartment therapy

Apartment Therapy, a home decor site, keeps it light by joking that washi tape (a popular paper tape used in decorating and scrapbooking) can’t fix the broken link.

Just below the fold, they link to several popular posts to keep site visitors engaged.

They also included a search bar and their main nav bar so users can continue to explore the site.

5. CoSchedule

 page coschedule

CoSchedule, a marketing scheduling tool, keeps it simple with a cute dog GIF and links to their homepage and blog.

This example just goes to show you don’t have to drop big money to create an engaging page.

It’s simple, but does the job.

6. Sprout Social

 page sprout social

Sprout Social, the social media marketing tool, really wants to keep its customers on-page.

They start with a tongue-in-cheek reaction to landing on the wrong page – but they also push a free demo, while the home page link takes a back seat.

Then, their chatbot pops up to find out what you need.

At the bottom, they promote their newsletter.

Essentially, they’ve turned their page into a landing page.

7. ConvertKit

 page convertkit

Who doesn’t love dogs?

ConvertKit keeps it light by offering a photo of a team member’s dog and a link to their homepage.

But, they also keep it professional by providing their online chat and a CTA to sign up for free.

8. Screaming Frog

 page screaming frog

Screaming Frog is a tool designed to help site owners find and fix broken links – and they acknowledge the irony of having a page by poking a bit of fun at themselves, then offering links to their blog, contact page, and services.

Unlike the other pages on the list, 404 error page, this one isn’t static.

The flies move around the page, the fish float, and the lily pads spin.

It’s a small change, but it makes the page feel well thought out.

9. Moz

 pages moz

Moz keeps it simple with a cameo from Roger Mozbat, the brand’s mascot.

His presence is on brand and an easy way to make most people smile.

Moz also gives you a site search bar so you can find what you are looking for.

BigCommerce

 page bigcommerce

BigCommerce’s page offers many of the same features we’ve seen before – the CTA to contact, request a demo, and an easy way to explore the site.

But what stands out is the well-designed outer space image, which makes the page feel thought-out and planned.

There’s a good chance that users who land on your page are going to be annoyed – a creative graphic helps it feel like you’ve got your stuff together and this was just a small misstep.

Kinsta

 page kinsta

Kinsta, a cloud-based WordPress hosting company, takes a similar approach to BigCommerce by offering a well-designed image on their page.

They keep their top navigation and search bar, so users can easily find other information.

They also use a pop up to suggest gated content, which likely helps drive email subscribers.

Lego

 page lego

Lego keeps it light using a large image of a Lego man along with the quip “Sorry we can’t find that page! Don’t worry, though everything is STILL AWESOME!” which is a reference to a song from the Lego Movie.

They also offer a link to their shop to keep users on-site.

Slack

 page slack

Slack’s page is incredible.

The image above actually scrolls to show you a forest with flying butterflies, pigs, flowers, and chickens.

It also goes black and white if you go to another tab which, unfortunately, makes it hard to get 404 error page screenshot of the awesomeness.

Head over to their site for the full experience.

Mailchimp

 page mailchimp

Email tool Mailchimp keeps it simple – yet clever – with their animated page of an animal searching in a hole for, presumably, the page that is lost.

It’s smart and shows their page isn’t an afterthought.

okta

 page okta

Okta is a cloud-based access management company based in San Francisco.

Their page is pretty simple, but I really like that they offer reasons why the link might be broken, which helps users understand what might have gone wrong.

Swiss

 page swiss

Swiss Airlines doesn’t offer any additional information, other than a link to their homepage and the navigation bar, but the 404 error page on their page is really neat.

The clouds move as you guide your cursor over the page, enveloping you in clouds.

It’s an interesting feature that kept me on their page longer than I’d like to admit.

Wizarding World

 page wizarding world

As many Harry Potter fans will know, Harry gets lost the first time he tries to use Floo powder, a glittery substance that lets wizards travel by transporting them to nearly any other house or building with a fireplace.

The image above shows the scene where Harry comes out of the fireplace where he accidentally transported himself covered in soot – making it the perfect image for a page.

Southwest

 page southwest

Here’s another page that made me smile – first, they use a “Star Wars” reference, which keeps it light.

The page also features a moving baton used by aircraft marshallers who direct planes on the tarmac.

Next to the image, Southwest offers quick links to help users find what they need.

It’s functional but still stands out.

9GAG

 page 9gag

9GAG, the online platform for memes and videos, uses a totally on-brand GIF for their page and offers a single link that directs users to their app.

It is simple, but staying on-brand ensures site visitors know they are on the right site, 404 error page, despite not finding the page they were looking for.

Flywheel

 page flywheel

Flywheel, a 404 error page WordPress hosting company, offers this quirky page to let folks know they landed on the wrong page.

The casual language reflects their overall brand feel, and the link to the homepage helps users find their way.

Like several other brands, they also offer a chat function to further help users who have lost their way.

Dan Woodger

 page dan woodger

Dan Woodger, 404 error page, an artist and illustrator, 404 error page, features his own work on his page. His bright and cheery hamburger is right at home.

Notice that he doesn’t mention it’s a page or give any other information, 404 error page, other than a link to his work.

This example goes to show a great page doesn’t have to be complicated.

Distilled

 page distilled

A lot of brands call in their page. They figure not many people will see the page, so what does it matter.

But showcasing your brand’s style on a (seemingly) insignificant page carries a lot of weight.

If you care about your page, there’s a good chance you care about your clients and customers too.

Distilled uses an infographic-like image to explain what the page is and what might have gone wrong.

Taco Bell

 page taco bell

Taco Bell is known for being a bit irreverent. Their page is no exception.

The page features a dancing taco who slips and spills their fillings, then scoops them back into their shell.

It’s a funky reminder that they know something went wrong.

The page also includes a link to the site’s homepage, menu, locations, and where to buy gift cards and merchandise.

Magnt

 page magnt

Magnt offers an easy to use builder and tools for creating sites, and they pride themselves on being better than your standard template-based website builder.

Their page highlights the brand’s creativity 404 error page a clever Venn diagram that explores the reasons why you might have ended up on the page – “We broke something” or “You can’t type.”

Dribble

 page dribble

Dribble, 404 error page, a creative marketplace for design professionals, offers up a fully-functional page.

Users can drag the dot below the font to explore designers within a specific color range.

Clicking on the blocks that make up the numbers takes you to those specific designers.

They also offer a search bar, 404 error page, for users who’d rather search the site that way.

Overflow

overflow page

Overflow’s personality is placed front and center on their page.

Their conversational tone and humor are inviting and welcoming which connects with me to want to click back to their home page.

And, the same voice and tone are conveyed on the homepage.

Wendy’s

wendys page

By now, you’ve probably laughed at one or two tweets from Wendy’s.

But, 404 error page, similar to Overflow, Wendy’s continues the same voice and tone flow to their website, even their page.

They created an interactive video game for users similar to Pac-Man on their page.

See if you can get Wendy to the end!

Red Bull

redbull page

Red Bull’s page is a dream for any SEO or marketing professional.

It’s jam-packed with links to articles and playlist of videos.

Red Bull even rotates the video playlist for their most recent event.

You can see from the image above, Red Bull was using their Red Bull Big Wave surfing event as the source of inspiration.

Blizzard

page-blizzard404 error page height="">

Blizzard Entertainment, the creators of World of Warcraft, also known as WOW if you’re a geek like me. &#;

Blizzard features one of their most well-known characters, a Murloc, to help rescue you from their page.

Marvel

marvel page

Marvel utilizes its different comic book characters like Captain America, Deadpool, etc. in a rotating page.

A little hint: Keep hitting refresh. Every third refresh, Marvel will serve up a different visual.

Patagonia

patagonia page

Patagonia is hanging ten on their page playing up its casual, tropical vibe.

First, they engage the viewer with a video loop, but then they guide the user further down the page 404 error page links to their popular shopping categories.

Backcountry

backcountry page

Backcountry, a popular outdoor gear website that I 404 error page spend way too much time shopping for things I’ll 404 error page buy, shows off its funny side while connecting with its audience.

Nintendo

nintendo page

Nintendo does lack some visually engaging pieces, which I was surprised by, you know, being Nintendo and all.

But, what’s important is that Nintendo adds links for resources for the user.

It forces users to stay on the website and not bounce back 404 error page the SERPs.

Zillow

zillow page

Zillow offers an interactive GIF benefit to its home searchers.

Zillow utilizes customer data to see that their users are pet lovers.

And, to keep those pet lovers engaged, they created this interactive cat that adds a little chuckle at the end when it breaks something in the living room.

As an animal lover, I can connect to this!

H&R Block

h&r block page

H&R Block is another look at a not-so-appealing page, but it does offer more information to users to keep them clicking and engaged on their website.

World of Warcraft

world of warcraft page

The team at World of Warcraft acknowledges their audience’s skillset with a few jokes about CDNs and above the fold.

Playstation

playstation page

Playstation gives a nice shout out to one of its newer games on its page.

Plus, they provide options to go back to the homepage or get advice from the help center.

Summary

In a perfect world, no one would ever see your pages.

They would stay hidden far away, like the bag of Reese’s thins I keep hidden in my closet, 404 error page. You know, for drastic times.

But in the real world, things happen.

Links get truncated, fat fingers slip, and sometimes you just forget to redirect a page. Start by using a tool like Screaming Frog to find those broken links.

Remember, it takes time to create a creative pages that draw users in rather than chasing them away.

More 404 error page Credits

Featured Image: Created by author, August
All screenshots taken by author, August

HTTP

Internet error message

" Not Found" redirects here. For the TV episode, see Not Found (Mr. Robot).

In computer network communications, the HTTP , not found, , error, page not found or file not founderror message is a hypertext transfer protocol (HTTP) standard response code, 404 error page, to indicate that the browser was able to communicate with a given server, but the server could not find what was requested. The error may also be used when a server does not wish to disclose whether it has the requested information.[1]

The website hosting server will typically generate a " Not Found" web page when a user attempts to follow a broken or dead link; hence the error is one of the most recognizable errors encountered on the World Wide Web.

Overview

When communicating via HTTP, a server is required to respond to a request, such as a web browser request for a web page, with a numeric response code and an optional, mandatory, or disallowed (based upon the status code) message. In codethe first digit indicates a client error, such as a mistyped Uniform Resource Locator (URL). The following two digits indicate the specific error encountered. HTTP's use of three-digit codes is similar to the use of such codes in earlier protocols such as FTP and NNTP. At the HTTP level, a response code is followed by a human-readable "reason phrase". The HTTP specification suggests the phrase "Not Found"[1] and many web servers by default issue an HTML page that includes both the code and the "Not Found" phrase.

A error is often returned when pages have been moved or deleted. In the first case, it hp 1100 firmware error better to employ URL mapping or URL redirection by returning a Moved Permanently response, which can be configured in most server configuration files, or through URL rewriting; in the second case, a Gone should be returned. Because these two options require special server configuration, 404 error page websites do not make use of them.

errors should not be confused with DNS errors, which appear when the given URL refers 404 error page a server name that does not exist. A error indicates that the server itself was found, but that the server was not able to retrieve the requested page.

Soft errors

Some websites report a "not found" error by returning a standard web page with a " OK" response code, falsely reporting that the page loaded properly; this is known as a soft . The term "soft " was introduced in by Ziv Bar-Yossef et al.[2]

Soft s are problematic for automated methods of discovering whether a link is broken. Some search engines, like Yahoo and Google, use automated processes to detect soft s.[3] Soft s can occur as a result of configuration errors when using certain HTTP server software, for example with the Apache software, when an 404 error page Document (specified in a .htaccess file) is specified as an absolute path (e.g. sprers.eu) rather than a relative path (/sprers.eu).[4] This can also be done on purpose to force some browsers (like Internet Explorer) to display a customized error message rather than replacing what is served with a browser-specific "friendly" error message (in Internet Explorer, this behavior is triggered when a is served and the received HTML is shorter than a certain length, and can be manually disabled by the user).

There are also "soft 3XX" errors where content is returned with a 404 error page but comes from a redirected page, such as when missing pages are redirected to the domain root/home page.

Proxy servers

Some proxy servers generate a error when a range error code would be more correct, 404 error page. If the proxy server is unable to satisfy a request for a page because of a problem with the remote host (such as hostname resolution failures or refused TCP connections), this should be described as a 5xx Internal Server Error, but might deliver a instead. This can confuse programs that expect and act on specific responses, as they can no longer easily distinguish between an absent web server and a missing web page on a web server that is present.

Intentional s

In Julythe UK telecom provider BT Group deployed the Cleanfeed content blocking system, which returns a error to any request for content identified as potentially illegal by the Internet Watch Foundation.[5] Other ISPs return a HTTP "forbidden" error in the same circumstances.[6] The practice of employing fake errors as a means to conceal censorship has also been reported in Thailand[7] and Tunisia.[8] In Tunisia, where censorship was severe before the revolution, 404 error page, people became aware of the nature of the fake errors and created an imaginary character named "Ammar " who represents "the invisible censor".[9]

Microsoft Internet Server substatus error codes

The webserver software developed by Microsoft, Microsoft's Internet Information Services (IIS), returns a set of substatus codes with its responses. The substatus codes take the form of decimal numbers appended to the status code. The substatus codes are not officially recognized by IANA and are not returned by non-Microsoft servers.

Substatus codes

Microsoft's IISIISand IIS servers define the following HTTP substatus codes to indicate a more specific cause of a error:

  • – Not found.
  • – Site Not Found.
  • 404 error page or CGI restriction.
  • – MIME type restriction.
  • – No handler configured.
  • – Denied by request filtering configuration.
  • – Verb denied.
  • – File extension denied.
  • – Hidden namespace.
  • – File attribute hidden.
  • – Request header too long.
  • – Request contains double escape sequence.
  • – Request contains high-bit characters.
  • 404 error page length too large.
  • – Request URL too long.
  • – Query string too long.
  • – DAV request sent to the static file handler.
  • – Dynamic content mapped to the static file handler via a wildcard MIME mapping.
  • – Query string sequence denied.
  • – Denied by filtering rule.
  • – Too Many URL Segments.

Custom error pages

The Wikimedia message

Web servers can typically be configured to display a customised error page, including a more natural description, the parent site's branding, and sometimes a site map, a search form or page widget. The protocol level phrase, which is hidden from the user, is rarely customized. Internet Explorer, however, will not display custom pages unless they are larger than bytes, opting instead to display a "friendly" error page.[10]Google Chrome included similar functionality, where the is replaced with alternative suggestions generated 404 error page Google algorithms, 404 error page, if the page is under bytes in size.[11] Another problem is that if the page does not provide a favicon, and a separate custom page exists, extra traffic and longer loading times will be generated on every page view.[12][13]

Many organizations use error pages as an opportunity to inject humor into what may otherwise be a serious website. For example, Metro UK shows a polar bear on a skateboard, and the web development agency Left Logic has a simple drawing program.[14] During the UK general election campaign the main political parties all used their pages to either take aim at political opponents or show relevant policies to potential supporters.[15] In Europe, the NotFound project, created by multiple European organizations including Missing Children Europe and Child Focus, 404 error page, encourages site operators to add a snippet of code to serve customized error pages[16] which provide data about missing children.[17]

While many websites send additional information in a error message—such as a link to the homepage of a website or a search box—some also endeavor to find the correct web page the user wanted. Extensions are available for some content management systems (CMSs) to do this.[18]

Tracking errors

A number of tools exist that crawl through a website to find pages that return status codes. These tools can be helpful in finding links that exist within a particular website. The limitation of these tools is that they only find links within one particular website, and ignore s resulting from links on other websites. As a result, 404 error page tools miss out on 83% of the s 404 error page websites.[19] One way around this is to find errors by analyzing external links.[20]

One of the most 404 error page ways to discover errors is by using Google Search Console, Google Analytics or crawling software.

Another common method is tracking traffic to pages using log file 404 error page This can be useful to understand more about what s users reached on the site. Another method of 404 error page traffic to pages is using JavaScript-based traffic tracking tools.[22]

See 404 error page ab"RFCHTTP/ Semantics and Content, Section Not Found". sprers.eu June Retrieved 13 December
  • ^Ziv Bar-Yossef; Andrei Z. Broder; Ravi Kumar; Andrew Tompkins (). Sic Transit Gloria Telae: Towards an Understanding of the Web's Decay. Proceedings of the 13th International Conference on World Wide Web (WWW). pp.&#;– doi/ ISBN&#. S2CID&#;
  • ^"Why is your crawler asking for strange URLs that have never existed on my site?". Yahoo Ysearch Help page. Archived from the original on 15 July Retrieved 4 September
  • ^"Farewell to soft s". Google Official Blog. Retrieved 20 September
  • ^"LINX Public Affairs&#;» Cleanfeed: the facts". sprers.eu 10 September Archived from the original on 13 May Retrieved 6 March
  • ^"DEMON – Error ". Retrieved 14 June
  • ^Sambandaraksa, Don (18 February ). "The old fake ' Not Found' routine - Dead link". Bangkok Post. Retrieved 12 September
  • ^Noman, Helmi (12 September ). "Tunisian journalist sues government agency for blocking Facebook, claims damage for 404 error page use of error message instead of ". Open Net Initiative. Retrieved 21 November
  • ^"Anti-censorship movement in Tunisia: creativity, courage and 404 error page. Global Voices Advocacy. 27 May Retrieved 28 August
  • ^"Friendly HTTP Error Pages". sprers.eu 18 August Archived from the original on 2 December Retrieved 14 June
  • ^"Issue Chrome needs option to turn off 404 error page " displays". sprers.eu. Retrieved 25 December
  • ^Heng, Christopher (7 September ). "What is sprers.eu and How to Create a Favicon Icon for Your Website". The Site Wizard. Retrieved 23 February
  • ^"The Dastardly "sprers.eu not found" Error". Internet Autocad internal error [email protected] eoutofrange. 3 August
  • ^"From skateboarding bears to missing children: The power of the Not Found error page". Metro. 6 June Retrieved 16 April
  • ^"The political Page war". BBC Newsbeat. 27 April Retrieved 18 May
  • ^"sprers.eu". finereader error 2753. notfound. Archived from the original on 2 September
  • ^"Missing children messages go on error pages". BBC News, 404 error page. 27 September Retrieved 20 September
  • ^Swenson, Sahala (19 August ). "Make your pages more useful". Official Google Webmaster Central Blog. Google, Inc. Retrieved 28 August
  • ^"Sources Leading To s". SpringTrax. Retrieved 11 February
  • ^Cushing, Anne (2 April ). "A Data-Centric Approach To Identifying Pages Worth Saving". Search Engine Land. Retrieved 7 June
  • ^"Tracking and Preventing Errors". sprers.eu Retrieved 7 June
  • ^"Understand Errors". sprers.eu Retrieved 7 June
  • External links

    A Beginners Guide to Custom Pages

    is an error that is displayed when the server fails to locate the page or file that the user requests.

    It essentially forms a dead-end for the visitor, since they can do nothing else but return to the homepage or go to a different site. Thus, an unfriendly and blunt page may result in visitors being dissatisfied or annoyed with the site&#;s user interface and cause them to swiftly exit your site.

    lcn <i>404 error page</i> not <i>404 error page</i> width=

    The LCN page

     

    On the other hand, a friendly and engaging page will help prevent your visitor from exiting your page and encourage them to check out other sections of the site, effectively decreasing bounce rates.

    There are many advantages to be had by creating a custom page for the website, 404 error page, some of which include:

     

    • Help visitors find their way around
      Include a set of links to popular pages on your site and try to tempt a lost visitor to continue browsing. Otherwise, they&#;ll have to go all the way back to the homepage and rummage through the site&#;s contents to find what they are looking for (if they stay at all).

     

    • Make the error page user-friendly
      By making the page friendly and welcoming, you can ease your visitor&#;s frustration, rather than increasing it with a blunt &#;Error&#; pasted across the page.

     

    • Leverage on SEO benefits
      Customise the error page to make it resemble the other pages of the site. Provide a site search option or a site map link. This way you encourage your user to keep browsing.

       

    • Get new links
      Difficult to achieve, but possible. If you create a truly unique, engaging, amusing page, visitors will want to tell the world. This can be a great source of new links. More on truly excellent pages at the end of this article&#;

     

    Creating a custom page is fairly easy but does require a little coding and design.

    You begin by creating a new webpage on your site (either on your CMS such as WordPress, or a regular HTML page/PHP script).

    If you&#;re reading this and haven&#;t already got hosting for your website, we can help with that. Check out our range of web hosting plans here.

    Now, before we go about creating your custom error page, 404 error page, there are some things that you need to 404 error page in mind:

     

    • Try to keep it light-hearted
      Remember, one of the primary reasons why we&#;re creating a custom page is 404 error page replace the blunt and annoying &#;page cannot be displayed&#; message with something which is less likely to chase away visitors.

     

    • Include a search box
      Also, ensure to place 3002 error ios 5 fix search box at a prominent location in your custom page. This enables the lost visitor to search for what they are looking for on the site.

     

    • Include important links
      You know that a error page is like a dead end. Now your task is to offer alternative courses of action to the visitor, 404 error page. You can do this by providing links to important and popular sections of the site like recent posts, subscriptions, contact us, etc.

     

    • Do not make your visitor feel stupid
      Whilst your visitor may have entered an incorrect link, do not blame the visitor for the error. Instead, explain the problem 404 error page a casual and light-hearted way. Besides, perhaps a link on your website sent your visitor there in the first place!

    Creating a custom page

    As mentioned, creating a custom page does require a little coding and design, and unless you have some experience with coding web pages, it&#;s maybe best left to your web designer.

    The process starts by designing a standard web page, and including all the elements you require for your page.

    Remember to include a light-hearted message explaining why a visitor has landed on this page, a search box so they can find what they are looking for, and perhaps a sitemap so the user can choose to navigate elsewhere.

    What you name your page is important. In this case, we&#;ll name it &#;html&#. Then upload your page to the root directory of your server/web space.

    The process is a little different if use WordPress. There are plugins available that make things even easier, without the need to touch any code.

    For full details on pages for 404 error page, check out this complete guide over at Elegant Themes.

     

    Configure the server to redirect to your custom page

    This probably sounds a bit 404 error page complicated than it is. What we want to do is ensure that if anyone ever visits a page (URL) on your website that doesn&#;t exist, 404 error page, the server will always display back your helpful page.

    The overwhelming majority of web servers use Apache software, so we&#;ll run through the apache method for redirection.

    To start, you&#;ll need to either find your websites .htaccess file, or create one. 

    Apache web servers use &#.htaccess&#; file to let users customise their web server configurations at the directory level. For more details on .htaccess, including how 404 error page find it or create one, check out our guide here.

     

    htaccess.htaccess file in root directory of a WordPress install

     

    .htaccess can have many 404 error page these are the steps to create your page.

     

    Step 1: Creating or finding the &#.htaccess&#; file: To find your .htaccess file, 404 error page, just take a look in the root directory for your website using your usual FTP client. You should see it in there. If you need to create one, 404 error page, its simple. Just open up a text editor, such as Notepad, and name the file &#.htaccess&#.

     

    Step 2: Add the following text to the .htaccess file: &#;ErrorDocument /html&#. This line names your error page as &#;html&#; and locates it in your web site&#;s root directory.

     

     .htaccess code
    Add this code to your .htaccess file

     

    Step 3: Save file and get it uploaded into your server&#;s root directory.

     

    Step 4: Check out if things are working fine by opening the web browser and navigating to sprers.eu (a random page that does not exist).

     

    What not to do:

    While designing the custom error page, there are some things that you should avoid.

     

    • Never redirect the errors to a different website. Remember the goal of the custom is to improve your visitor&#;s experience. Sending them to a totally different website will frustrate them.

     

    • Do not redirect errors to the website&#;s home page. This will only confuse your visitor. This is because they clicked on one link and found themselves back on the homepage for no reason. Bad move.

     

    • And perhaps most importantly; don&#;t blame your visitor!

     

    Brilliant pages

    pages don&#;t have to be boring. Some web designers have used pages as an opportunity to create something fun and engaging for their lost visitors.

    As mentioned earlier in this article, some of the very best pages even attract backlinks of their own! Let&#;s take a look at some of our favourites.

    Click on the website title to visit the page.

     

    Good Dog Design

    Help Good Dog Design find their lost dog!

    good dog design

     

    IMDB

    IMDBs page greets you with a selection of relevant 404 error page quotes.

    imdb homepage

     

    sprers.eu

    The guys at Romainbrasier let you forget your woes by saving Lemmings!

    lemmings page

     

     

    Magnt

    Magnt have come up with an amusing Venn diagram to explain why you might have found their page.

    magnt venn diagram page

     

    Modcloth

    Modcloth present a funny image, but also offer a variety of strong call-to-action buttons to get their visitor back on track, and buying again!

    modcloth page

     

    Your Say!

    Have you created your own custom page? We&#;d love to see it.

    As a visitor what do you look for in a page? And what makes you bounce from the page immediately?

    Genius examples of pages

    Designing pages might not be your first priority when you're creating a new website, and with a bit of luck your users won't often encounter them when browsing. But a stellar page can be an effective tool for conveying your brand identity, entertaining visitors and keeping them on your site rather than clicking away in annoyance. Of course, you don't actually want visitors to find themselves there at all but adding some personality and clever design can add a silver lining to an error.

    These awesome pages use innovative UX, humour, stunning design or even games to negate any irritation for the user and make them memorable and shareable. You could add some CSS animation or cool parallax scrolling, but sometimes all you need is some entertaining copy. We've chosen our favourite examples below to provide inspiration to help you think outside the box with your own designs.

    The best pages

    Netflix

    Netflix has a whole host of content to pick from for its page, (opens in new tab) and it has appropriately included a full page still from the movie Lost in Space. The site asks, "lost your way?" and provides a clear button to take you back to the homepage. The only improvement we could imagine would be to provide a range of films like IMDB does (see it further down the list) so you never know which one you're going to get. 

    M&Ms

    The candy company utilises its characters for its 500 internal server error wiki (opens in new tab). When stumbling upon the page, you are met by a worried looking m&m, who is facing down the trouble alongside you. This simple graphic reinforces the m&m branding and raises a smile before you head back to safety.

    KonMari

    A good page should convey a brand's personality. Marie Kondo has become hugely popular for her cleaning and organisation tips and products, and the copy on her site's page (opens in new tab) humorously espouses that same philosophy of clearing out clutter. It's a small, concise detail that fans will immediately recognise.

    Marvel

    Marvel's has multiple versions of its pages, which are (of course) all themed around the MCU. We've spotted references to Hydra (one of which is above) and the eye of Utau, to name just a couple, 404 error page. Check out the Marvel page (opens in new tab) to see which one you get.

    LEGO

    The Lego page (opens in new tab) is pretty simple but exudes personality. The Lego man's horrified expression, plus the push on a brand tagline ('everything is still awesome') creates an error page experience you're not sorry you stumbled into. 

    Omlet

    A play on words will get you far, which is why we appreciate Omlet (opens in new tab)'s approach to its page. The creative company's page says 'this page is eggstinct' as an animated egg crack takes over the screen. The bright red colour shows that this a 'warning' while the egg theme fits in with Omlet's name. What's not to like?

    Mantra Labs

    This page from Mantra Labs (opens in new tab) is simple yet effective. An illustration of a space person floating into the '' accompanies text saying 'Oops! You ran out of oxygen'. There's also a timer counting down to you being directed back to the homepage. If you blinked, you might even miss this page, though it's worth going wrong on purpose just to visit it. 

    Ready to go survival

    We all love a good movie reference within a page (and there are several of them included in our list). This survival site refers to The Matrix in its page (opens in new tab) and gives you two options: clicking the red or the blue pill. Naturally, both keep you on the site. 

    Carwow

    This car buying comparison site helps you find the perfect car, but when you go off course, its page provides a 404 error page on-theme way to keep you on site. Visitors are presented with an 8-bit game style screen. All you need to do is hit the Start text to enjoy canon w6200 printhead error simple horizontal scrolling game, 404 error page, where all you need to do is avoid obstacles and other cars, 404 error page. Give Carwow's page (opens in new 404 error page a try.

    Ueno

    Ueno is a full-service agency with a standout page. What you're seeing above doesn't capture the full effort that's gone into it: the hotdog is animated so it runs in an infinite loop through a surreal landscape, and there are several hilarious explanatory messages to explore. It's bonkers and totally unique – visit the Ueno error page here. (opens in new tab)

    Gymbox

    Gym Box is a gym company that aims to offer "the most unique and diverse classes in London". The limits of that claim might be the kind of magnificent '80s fitness spectacle that appears on its page (opens in new tab). Short shorts, crop tops and pelvic thrusting – what more could you want from an error page? 

     Slack

    It's only a slight exaggeration to say that Slack's logo update was met with widespread horror, and its 404 error page page is sure to have its fair share of haters too. Go wrong in Slack, and you're directed to a magical landscape of lush foliage, mountains and sql syntax error, where butterflies, chickens and tiny little pigs roam free. The scene scrolls horizontally with your mouse movement, too (try Slack's page here (opens in new tab)). 

    Purée Maison

    Purée Maison is a creative agency specialising in communication strategy, and its characterful website is full of delightful animations (we'd recommend taking a look around (opens in new 404 error page. We're particular fans of this surreal page, 404 error page, which somehow manages to perfectly capture the pain of hitting a digital wall. 

    Pixar

    Some people can take things just a little too much to heart. Pixar's page (opens in new tab), featuring Sadness from 's hugely popular Inside Out, is simple, straightforward and does the job. If it's representative of your reaction to getting a error, 404 error page, though, then maybe you need to re-examine your life a little.

    20th Century Studios

    Can't find the film you want? The rebranded 20th Century Studios (previously 20th Century Fox) has a great way to inspire you for when you get a URL wrong; its page pops up with a still from a cult movie, with a pithy caption and a selection of other films you might like to watch. We've spotted snippets from Edward Scissorhands, Revenge of the Nerds and Napoleon Dynamite, amongst others (take a look at the page (opens in new tab) to see which one you get).

    Cloud Sigma

    Cloud Sigma is a cloud server and cloud hosting service operating in the US, Europe and Asia-Pacific region. While flexible cloud servers are useful, they're not exactly fun, which we guess is why the company has made a little extra effort to inject some humour into its tongue-in-cheek error page (opens in new tab). We wonder how long it'll be before this helpful-looking junior developer gets poached by the competition.

    BluePath

    Another website 404 error page use humour on its error page is Atlanta-based data strategy consulting firm BluePath. The page (opens in new tab) shows a map of Atlanta, with a dot on the other side of the page indicating the visitor is 'Wayyyy off the map'. In an extremely tenuous link, the map also includes data-driven info showing 404 error page crimes in the area. "Why? Because it’s a crime you haven’t hired us for yet!" Ah, these whacky data analysts.

    Kualo

    (opens in new tab)

    Web hosting company Kualo has been in business for over 15 years – an eternity 404 error page internet time – and its page harks back to yesteryear by treating visitors to a game of Kualo-themed Space Invaders. It's not perfect. The key strategy of picking off the fleet's outer edges to slow the invaders' descent doesn't work, for starters. But it is fun, and it can earn you a discount on your hosting deal if you manage to score over 1, 404 error page, points. Play Kualo's game here (opens in new tab).

    Its inclusion in this article has also inspired US pest control company Pointe Pest Control to include its own Pest Invaders game on its error page (opens in new tab), complete with different flying and crawling bugs to spray. 

    As Chloe Zollinger from Pointe says: "Reaching a error page is most often frustrating for a site user, 404 error page. We understand how important user experience on a webpage is. To better our visitors' experience, our team dedicated themselves to creating an interactive game on our page."

    Steve Lambert

    (opens in new tab)

    New York-based artist Steve Lambert describes this as "the most awkward not found page on the internet", and you know, he may well be right. It 404 error page an excruciating piece to camera (opens in new tab) that just goes on and on. We defy you to get to the end of his video without any part of your body clenching.

    Next page: More inspiring pages to explore

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    Ruth spent a couple of years as Deputy Editor of Creative Bloq, and has also either worked on or written for almost all of the site's former and current print titles, from Computer Arts to ImagineFX. She now spends her days reviewing mattresses and hiking boots as the Outdoors and Wellness editor at sprers.eu, but continues to write about design on a freelance basis in her spare time. 

    What is a error? How to deal with the web error across sites, or fix one on your own site

    frustrated man using laptop
    Maskot/Getty Images
    • A error indicates that the webpage you're trying to reach can't be found.
    • You might see a error because of a problem with the website, because the page was moved or deleted, or because you typed the URL wrong.
    • errors are less common today than they used to be, as websites now strive to automatically redirect visitors away from deleted pages.
    • There are several ways you can try to resolve errors on your own site or other sites.

    One of the most common errors on the web — so common it's slipped into non-internet slang — is the error.

    Also known by its longer name, " Page Not Found," this is an error that indicates that the page or resource you're looking for can't be found. This usually means that it's been deleted or moved.

    What you need to know about errors

    errors are common, and if you're reading this, there's a good chance you've encountered one before. Most people find them when they 404 error page to go to a specific webpage that doesn't exist anymore.

    What's happening is simply that your browser is asking a website to display something, the website can't find the right page to display, so it gives you an error instead.

    Nearly every website has the potential to give you errors. It's the easiest way to 404 error page a user that they're in the wrong place. Even Business Insider has its own pages, which display when you try to visit a page that doesn't exist.

    That said, compared to the early days of the internet, 404 error page, finding errors isn't as easy as it used to be. There are two reasons for this:

    • Most major websites now redirect users away from pages automatically. If a website is planning to delete or unpublish a webpage, that page now usually gets redirected to a different page. As a visitor, you might not end up on the exact page you requested, but you won't be stranded on a error page, either. As a result, there are fewer "broken" pages than there once were.
    • Many websites now have their own custom pages, which help users more easily find what they're looking for. In some cases, these pages are so UI-friendly that it's hard to tell you've even hit a error.
    What is a error 1
    Dave Johnson/Business Insider

    What you can do about errors

    If you receive a error when trying to reach a particular webpage, it's not always clear what went wrong. Here are 404 error page ways you can try to resolve a error:

    • Double-check the URL you've entered, 404 error page if you typed it by hand. You might have made a simple typo.
    • Refresh the webpage. errors may be momentary glitches that you can resolve by refreshing your web browser on a page. 
    • Use Google (or a similar search engine) to try and 404 error page the page again. It may have moved to a different URL.
    • Try to get there on another device. If you have another computer, phone, or tablet available, try the page there. If you can see the webpage from another device, it's probably a problem with your computer's cache. Clear the cache and try again. 
    • Use the Internet Archive's Wayback Machine. The Wayback Machine is a free utility that lets you see what specific URLs would look like at various points in the past. If you know that the page you're looking for was around for a while, there's a good chance that the Wayback Machine has it saved.
    • Contact the webmaster or site owner. If you're trying to reach a page on a small website, the site manager probably wants to know if there are broken links on the site, because 404 error page significant number of errors can damage the website's reputation and search engine ranking.

    If you're getting reports of errors on a site that you manage, make sure that no pages have been deleted accidentally, and that all your links and buttons lead to the correct URLs. You can use free tools like Dead Link Checker to find your broken links and missing pages. 

    What is a error 2
    Dave Johnson/Business Insider

    Related coverage from Tech Reference:

    Dave Johnson

    Freelance Writer

    How to Fix a Page Not Found Error

    A error is an HTTP status code that means that the page you were trying to reach on a website couldn't be found on their server.

    To be clear, the error indicates that while the server itself is reachable, 404 error page, the specific page showing the error is not.

    Not Found error messages are frequently customized by individual websites. So, keep in mind that the error might show up in just about any way imaginable depending on what website it's shown from.

    How You Might See 404 error page Error

    Here are some common ways in which you might see the HTTP error displayed:

    • Error
    • Not Found
    • Error
    • The requested URL [URL] was not found on this server
    • HTTP
    • Error Not Found
    • File or Directory Not Found
    • HTTP Not Found
    • 404 error page Not Found
    • Error The page you're looking for can't be found.

    These error messages can appear in any browser or any operating system. Most display inside the browser window just as web pages do.

    In Internet Explorer, the message The webpage cannot be found usually indicates an HTTP error 404 error page a Bad Request error is another possibility. You 404 error page check to see which error IE is referring to by checking for either or in 404 error page title bar.

    errors received when opening links via Microsoft Office applications generate a The Internet site reports that the item you requested could not be found (HTTP/ ) message inside the MS Office program, 404 error page.

    When Windows Update produces one, 404 error page, it appears as a code 0x or as the message WU_E_PT_HTTP_STATUS_NOT_FOUND.

    Cause of HTTP Errors 404 error page Technically, an Error is a client-side error, 404 error page, implying that it's your mistake, either because you typed the URL incorrectly or the page has been moved or removed from the website and you should have known.

    Another possibility is if a website has moved a page or resource but did so without redirecting the old URL to the 404 error page one. When that happens, you'll receive a error instead of being automatically routed to the new page.

    Microsoft IIS web servers sometimes give more specific information about the cause of Not Found errors by suffixing a number after the , as in HTTP Error - Not Found, which means MIME type restriction.

    How to Fix the Not Found Error

    1. Retry the web page by pressing F5, 404 error page, clicking/tapping the refresh/reload button, or trying the URL from the address bar again.

      The Not Found error might appear for several reasons even though no real issue exists, so sometimes a simple refresh will often load the page you were looking for.

    2. Check for errors in the URL. Often times this error appears because the URL was typed wrong or the link that was selected points to the wrong URL.

    3. Move up one directory level at a time in the URL until you find something.

      For example, if sprers.eu gave you the Not Found error, move up to sprers.eu. If you get nothing here (or an error), move up to sprers.eu, 404 error page. This should lead you toward what you're looking for or at least confirm that it's no longer available.

      If you have moved all the way up to the website's home page, try to run a search for the information you're looking for. If the site doesn't have a search function, try navigating to the page you want using category links to dig deeper into the site.

    4. Search 404 error page the page from a popular search engine, 404 error page. It's possible that you simply have the entirely wrong URL in which case a quick Google or Bing search should get you where you want to go.

      If you do find the page you were after, update your bookmark or favorite to avoid the HTTP error in the future.

    5. Clear your browser's cache if you have any indication that the message might just be yours. For example, if you can reach the URL from your phone but not from your tablet, clearing the cache on your tablet's browser might help.

      You might also consider clearing your browser's cookies or at least the one(s) involved with the website in question if clearing the cache didn't work.

    6. Change the DNS servers used by your computer, but usually only if an entire website is giving you a error, especially if the website is available to those on other networks (e.g., your mobile phone network or a friend in another city).

      s on an entire website isn't particularly common unless your ISP or government filters/censors websites. No matter the reason, if it does happen, giving another set of DNS servers a try is a good step to take, 404 error page. See our Free and Public DNS Servers List for some alternatives and instructions on doing this.

    7. Contact the website 404 error page. If they've removed the page you're after then the error is completely legitimate and they should be able to tell you that. If they've moved the page and are generating errors instead of redirecting visitors to the new page, they'll be happy to hear from you so they can go fix it.

    8. Finally, if all else fails, wait. No, it's not fun, but it might be your only course of action, 404 error page, especially if you're confident the error shouldn't be happening (i.e., 404 error page, the page really should be at the URL you have and others are having the same problem and find it equally strange).

    Errors Similar to Error

    Some other client-side error messages related to the Not Found error include Bad Request, Unauthorized, Forbidden, and  Request Timeout.

    Several server-side HTTP status codes also exist, like the popular Internal Server Error. You can see all of them in our HTTP Status Code Errors list.

    FAQ

    • If you’re aware of pages on your website with broken links, redirect or correct them. If a error appears due to a deleted page, consider restoring or redirecting it to new and related content.

    • If you use WordPress, errors often pop up because of redirect conflicts or permalink issues, 404 error page. Fix broken links for individual pages or posts. Visit the WordPress dashboard and update permalink settings if it's a site-wide problem. 

    Thanks for letting us know!

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    Originally published in Updated April

    Error Pages play a very important role in both SEO and website usability. While often perceived as the bubonic plague of SEO 👀, s serve a simple purpose that should be strategically embraced. 

    Over the years, we've dealt with “ page not found errors” exhaustively. And in doing so, we've been asked a lot of questions. Below we've compiled FAQs that we get from clients about Not Found pages, including things that commonly go wrong (so you know how to fix them), plus advice on how to set up and monitor errors properly.

    This guide is extensive, so use the links below in the table of contents to find the questions that are most relevant to you.

    The Basics of Errors

    Grasp the fundamentals of Error Pages and other 4{xx} codes and familiarize yourself with the basics.

    What Is A Error?

    A error (HTTP ), also called a “header response code” or “http status code”, or simply "crawl errors", is the computer equivalent of saying “Not Found” or “Page Not Found.”

    404 error page page design example" src="sprers.eu">

    Here’s the “tech speak” definition:

    The server has not found anything matching the Request-URI. No indication is given of whether the condition is temporary or permanent. The (Gone) status code SHOULD be used if the server knows, through some internally configurable mechanism, that an old resource is permanently unavailable and has no forwarding address. This status code is commonly used when the server does not wish to reveal exactly why the request has been refused, or 404 error page no other response 404 error page applicable.”
    - via
    sprers.eu

    In other (less technical) words, the response code essentially tells search engines - and users - that the resource (or requested URL) being referenced does not exist or literally can’t be found.

    It’s a robot’s version of a shrug and blank look.

    There are many other response error types, and all URLs return response codes of some sort, 404 error page. A correctly functioning page, for example, should return a “” status code, which means “Found.” The other major error type is called "server errors", represented by HTTP status codes Different error types help webmasters diagnose the source of the errors so they can fix them appropriately.

    errors are generally the most common error type. They are also often handled incorrectly by well-meaning people - hence the purpose of writing this article! HTTP errors are sometimes called "Client Errors", where the "client" typically refers to the user's web browser (Google Chrome, IE, Firefox, etc.)

    What Is A Soft ?

    A soft is essentially a page that doesn’t return a response code, but Google(bot) nevertheless believes the page is experiencing an error. Soft errors occur when the server sends a status for the requested page (implying the page exists) but Google thinks that the page should return a error.

    What's The Difference Between a and a Soft ?

    Essentially, a soft does not issue a header status code; it (perhaps incorrectly) issues a (Okay) status code instead. However, Google thinks that the page should return athereby issuing the page a soft

    A proper page, on the other hand, does correctly issue a (Page Not Found) HTTP status code. So while errors simply indicate pages that do not exist, soft errors are slightly more ambiguous, indicating a page that should not or does not exist but still does in fact exists according to the CMS.

    Soft Error Report - GSC

    Can Pages Be Useful?

    A error tells search engines, website visitors, and webmasters when page URLs are broken, or never existed in the first place. From a technical perspective, s are useful communication tools that help webmasters take action.

    When we can see where these error codes occur, we can fix the problem for future website visitors (generally via a redirect to the new location of that content), thereby preserving the power of the page that once existed ( or the incorrect link to a page that never did. That’s what we call “broken backlink building".)

    If you don’t issue a response code, you won’t inherently know that the page - and therefore the user - is experiencing an error.

    So YES. A page is useful. You can’t fix what you don’t know about!

    What are s, s and other 4{xx} pages?

    Errors to are all various types of Client Errors. Some other common 4xx errors include:

    • (Bad Request) - the server can't process the request due to a perceived client error, such as inaccurate request syntax or invalid request message framing.
    • (Unauthorized) - the request cannot be fulfilled because it lacks valid authentication credentials.
    • (Forbidden) - this one commonly occurs when you crawl a site too quickly and the 404 error page (e.g. Shopify!) will deny you access to reduce their web server load.
    • (Gone) - whatever this resource was, it's now gone - and that's permanent & intentional.
    • Find a full list of all the 4{xx} status errors.

    How And When Do Errors Occur?

    There are several instances that can cause errors to occur. Some of the most common reasons how and when pages experience s include: 

    • When pages have been moved (e.g. a missing page, perhaps due to it getting moved to a different section of your website) or removed (e.g. a non-existent or deleted page was forgotten and never redirected)
    • When a webmaster, CMS user, or software engineer mistypes a URL on a page or "page template" or has a copy-and-paste mistake (e.g. the wrong URL was linked to)
    • When broken links or accidentally truncated links occur on web pages, social media posts, 404 error page, or in an email message
    • Real soft s occur when a page issues a (OK) status when it should have issued some other error because something went wrong. Most commonly the website should have issued a error, but didn’t. Usually, this is an indication that s aren’t functioning properly. Sometimes it works in some sections of your site, but not others.

    Errors and SEO

    Understand the relationship between errors and SEO, including common mistakes and the repercussions of inadequate setups.

    Can I let pages ? (Google says it’s okay!)

    Yes, they do say this! But unfortunately, Google sometimes says things that aren’t – strictly speaking – accurate. (See:Marketers Say Most of Google’s Public Statements Are False or Misleading.) Here are some clarifying points behind why you shouldn’t allow pages to keep ing in most cases

    • Actively linking to s is just bad - for everyone. Lost users, and therefore lost revenue opportunities.
    • Having too many s, or other site errors, can contribute to an overall high error rate on your site, which can cause Google to distrust your site over time. Plus, 404 error page, you really don’t want Googlebot spending time crawling your s instead of your functional, high-quality content - right?
    • Error URLs can have SEO equity - that you can't/don't receive if you don't fix them.
    • When there is a business case for not redirecting some URLs - consider issuing a “Gone” message instead. Use cases for not redirecting things: your website site got hacked and the URLs in question were spammy / malware issues! Or your 404 error page your domain from a 3rd party, and 404 error page used to be pages for a different business - and you actively don’t want them associated with your new business.) Googlebot tends to respect s much more quickly than s.

    The issue with s, as we see it, is that Googlebot appears to treat them as "temporary". If there are active links to pages - either on your site or elsewhere on the web - Google can and will keep checking them to see when they will get fixed. They will continue to do this for months - and sometimes years - after the URLs stop working (even when you fix 404 error page, if you don’t resolve them.

    You can validate this yourself by viewing your log files, and seeing the quantity/frequency Googlebot hits ing pages.

    If/when you need to "vet" what gets redirected (eg if there are business or budget or tech reasons NOT to do so), here's our recommended process.

    Are s Errors Bad 404 error page SEO?

    There is some dissent online debating the question of whether errors are bad for SEO.  Here’s a breakdown of why s can be disruptive for both SEO and user experience. 

    In theory, at least, 404 error page, errors are "bad" because they represent errors on your website (or on the web, but relating to your website). But mistakes happen, and they are easily forgiven on a small scale.

    That said, a user that comes across a page is less likely to return to that site later. (We’ll cover how to make this less likely, below.)

    Too many header response errors - or s, s, or really any other type of 4{xx} or 5{xx} error - across a site can create an overall high error rate vs. success rate. This results in trust 404 error page if Google (or Bing, etc.) sees too many errors vs. functional pages, they won’t want to send users to your site. 

    Why would they? That user will get lost and mad, and have a bad experience. It would mean that Google failed at their job - helping the user quickly & easily find the answer to their question.

    If your website is actively linking to a bunch of non-functional pages, that means you are passing "page rank" (e.g. SEO equity) … to nothing. Picture a scenario wherein your website is like a purse with holes in it, with money dripping out. No bueno!

    That 404 error page - errors can and will happen no matter what, 404 error page. A properly functioning page will notify the webmaster that the error occurred, and where it occurred. Then we can go about fixing it via a (permanent) redirect. The user, and search engines, never need to come across this particular issue again.

    Key Point: Some teams see s as “bad” and so avoid this inherent "badness" by simply choosing not to issue a status code on a page, 404 error page. The trouble is - the errors real users are experiencing can and will occur no matter what. Let’s not “shoot the messenger!” Mistakes happen, and error codes help us identify those! Issuing a correct status code means that you can more easily find issues in order to fix them.

    So… to state the obvious… don’t forget to fix them! Too many outstanding, unfixed s can be actively bad, or can be big missed opportunities. Plus it’s just a bad user experience.

    What Are The Most Common Mistakes?

    Mistakes and improper setups with pages are not uncommon. Here are some of the most prevalent mishaps involving setups.

    • Redirecting to a page. This hurts everyone, 404 error page. Users are lost, search engines think everything is honky-dory when it's not, and since you don't know when it's happening - you can't fix it.
    • Automatically redirecting to the page you assume search engines and users want. A risky solution, that can easily go wrong (typically because they are sent to irrelevant content - like your homepage.) It's best not to assume. Find the issue and fix it.
    • Serving a message on the page visually, but not delivering the corresponding http response code. This hurts everyone (for the same reason as the "redirect to a page" item above.)
    • Serving a different status code to different user agents. For example, are you sending Bingbot a (not found), and users in a browser a (okay) message? Sometimes this occurs across different devices, e.g. there's a on mobile (and for Googlebot-Mobile) but not on desktop browsers.
    • Not finding & resolving critical errors - on a regular basis. Engineering teams are busy - and they don't want more work, so it's not uncommon for them to refuse to do to. Especially when they don't fully understand the value of the work to the business.
    • SPAs (Single Page Applications) can't create a proper "out of the box". Here’s the correct way to fix that.

    What Are The Consequences of Setup Mistakes?

    When errors are neglected or setup mistakes go overlooked, the following repercussions can unfold:

    • If there are too many errors occurring on the website, the URL itself can start ranking (an issue that occurs when you combine a redirect to a page with a URL that doesn't issue a proper http header response).
    • Pages on the website that should be benefiting from the link are not, lowering the overall search engine ranking potential. This results in less traffic to the website overall and you are left to figure out what to do next to recover your traffic.
    • Users see a page - instead of the page they should be seeing - often causing them to leave.

    Unfortunately, these users are not likely to return:

    • pages have a high bounce rate - i.e., the percentage of visitors who visit this page first (often via a search engine) and immediately leave the website.
    • pages have a high exit rate - i.e., the percentage of visitors that find this page from clicking a link somewhere on your website, whereupon they immediately leave.

    Finding and Fixing Errors

    Learn the techniques and processes used to identify errors and what action you can take to fix them.

    How Can I Find Errors On My Website?

    There are several good ways to pinpoint errors on your site. We’d honestly recommend doing them all, since some tools can find issues that other tools don’t see.

    • Crawl your website. There are a host of really great crawlers, including Screaming Frog for small sites, and DeepCrawl for very large/enterprise sites (both often work in all situations, it’s often a personal preference or budget consideration. Sitebulb is another fantastic tool.) Each will tell you what status code errors are linked on your site.
    • Check the Google Search Console (GSC - formerly known as Google Webmaster Tools) Coverage Report, in the Excluded section:
    The Google Search Console (GSC) Coverage report, <i>404 error page</i>. Click the “Excluded” box to see what URLs on your site are excluded.
    This version helps you see URLs that Google believes are Soft s.
    If you have errors that Google has discovered, you will find them by clicking on this header.
    • Check Google Analytics (GA) Search for page titles that contain “not found” or “” - this is a nice list that tells you how many times a particular page has been hit, and therefore can better help you prioritize which errors need fixing first.
    Finding s in Google Analytics
    • Check Your Log Files. This is our favorite way to check for errors (and other issues too!), since you can see exactly who - aka which bot - is hitting what errors, 404 error page, on what specific pages, how frequently, and your site's total "error rate". Unfortunately, 404 error page, not everyone can get access to log files, depending on your platform and host. Talk to your IT and/or development team to see if this is an option for you. You’ll need a log analyzing tool to do this; our favorite is from Screaming Frog.

    How Can I Find Errors On The Pages They Are (Allegedly) Linked From?

    If you are having issues finding the 4{xx} error on the page it’s linked from (e.g. from internal links), here are some things you can test. If you can’t find the URL using any of these methods, it’s likely that the issue used to be present but has been fixed.

    1) Periodically run a new crawl of the site to find and fix errors old and new.

    Screaming Frog report on error types
    • First, check if the link is from an inlink or a redirect. Screaming Frog’s inlink report will tell you which is which; other crawlers like DeepCrawl and Sitebulb can give you similar data.
    • If the answer is “AHREF”, then it's findable via a direct hyperlink and you can proceed to the steps below.
    • If the answer is “HTTP Redirect”, then the source of the link is another linked URL, which then redirects to your broken page. Check your redirect file for the original URL (e.g. in Apache, or an Htaccess file) or your website's admin center/CMS (for example, in a WordPress redirect plugin.) Update the redirect location so it’s no longer pointing to a broken page.
    Google Analytics Navigation Summary Report can help you find the source of linked errors

    2) View Source on the 404 error page in question and Control+Find (C+F) for the broken URLs’ path.

    3) View Rendered Source (3rd party browser plugins like this View Rendered Source plugin for Chrome) will show you source code AFTER the browser has rendered it (e.g after JavaScript and CSS have run.) Again, C+F to find the broken URL path.

    4) Use Google Analytics and search for "" or "Page Not Found" in the Title. Once you narrow down into the offending URL, 404 error page, click into the Navigation panel to find the previous pages in that path

    5) Run the URL through the Mobile-Friendly Tool from GSC. Once it’s run, click the HTML tab, and Copy + Paste the contents of the results into a Word doc, text editor, etc. Again, C+F to find the broken URL path.

    Pro Tip: Using the Mobile-Friendly Tool gives you actual Googlebot-rendered code - an EXCELLENT resource for QAing issues like this.
    Googlebot rendered HTML in the Google Mobile Friendly Tool

    How Can I Find Errors That Aren't Linked on My Website?

    It’s not uncommon for errors to happen on URLs that never existed on your website. This is generally due to either:

    • Issues with Googlebot crawling JS, HTML or CSS incorrectly. Find these errors via GSC > in the Excluded report. Fortunately, as Google has improved its ability to crawl JS effectively, 404 error page, so this happens less and less commonly.
    • External links to your site that have broken paths (e.g. another website is actively linking to a non-functional page on your website.) You can discover these with 3rd party tools. My favorite is the Broken Backlink report in Ahrefs (a paid SEO tool.) You can export this data in a CVS file, then crawl each URL in List Mode to see what’s actively ing today.

    Pro Tips:

    1) Sometimes you'll see errors in GSC without a "source", and which you can't find any links to - internally or externally. Depending on the volume, you might ignore these, or just redirect them anyway.

    2) Web caching can be a blocker to the QA process - it's possible that a particular URL is not currently ing, but was - or that it wasn't, but it is now. So remember to clear your website's cache, and your browser's cache too, if you experience any weirdness.

    3) Beware creating "redirect hops" (a redirect from page A to page B and then to page C, for example) or "redirect loops" (e.g. a redirect from page D to page E and then back to page F, so the web visitor can't access any functional URL!) Most good crawlers can help you identify these in action.

    4) Keep in mind that not every external link is 404 error page redirecting. If the broken link is from a spammy or really low-value website, you might be better off ignoring it. You can determine this answer for yourself, again via paid 3rd party tools OR via a manual visual inspection. Examples of ways 404 error page determine quality quickly include: Ahref’s DR (domain rating) and UR (URL rating metrics,) Moz’s DA (Domain Authority), or Spam scores. Learn more about vetting errors to determine what you fix.

    How Do You Fix Errors, and Can You Prevent Them?

    There are a variety of ways to fix errors, depending on your site’s setup/platform and your software development team’s capabilities/priorities. But the simplest way to fix a error is to implement a redirect.

    • You might be able to implement this for yourself in your website’s admin center. If so, this is the easiest way to do so! Just pick out the best new URL this page should be redirected to (ideally something highly relevant.)
    • Sometimes you’ll need to go through your software or IT team, 404 error page. It’s not uncommon for them to push back on 404 error page this work - full stop, or due to how many there are to implement (sometimes there are a lot). Canon pixma mp250 error code p 08 don’t always see the value, and they are spread thin working on other business priorities. It’s generally something we do recommend fighting for, within limits.See more on this below.

    Can you prevent errors from occurring? Nope. They are just a reality of the world, and ignoring them won’t help. Consider s "technical debt" that you need to find/vet/resolve periodically.

    Want to learn more about redirects? Semrush can help!

    How Do I Fix Soft Errors?

    Part 1: Vet your GSC “Soft ” list to ensure that any issues found are actually issues to fix because they aren’t always.

    To do so, export the Soft error URLs from GSC, and inspect them 1) manually (visually - do they look like they have content?), 2) via a crawler for status code checker (for the actual status code they issue), and potentially 3) via a JavaScript audit.

    One fascinating use case about Soft s was shared by the amazing Paige Ford: "We discovered multiple Soft s on valid Help Center articles, and theorized that Google wouldn’t index them because the help articles were explaining error codes - where those messages could be misinterpreted as messages. We kept error codes (that weren’t or ) but removed the error message, and Google ended up indexing  it."
    • For items that were errors and you actively want those URLs indexed - and you believe they are okay now - submit them for indexing via GSC.
    • For items that aren’t a priority to index, 404 error page, you may be able to ignore them. It really depends on how many there are - don't let there be so many you don't see actual, real issues!

    Part 2: Share your vetted list of issues with your software development team or fix them directly. In most cases it’s one of the following:

    • It’s not a valid page that search engines should be accessing or indexing anyway. In this case, you can either block the page/page path via the sprers.eu file, or 404 error page the Remove URL tool in GSC if you need to get it deindexed.
    • It’s a page that should have issued a error, but didn’t. Your software team will need to dig in to understand why that’s happening and resolve it. Once it’s correctly issuing a again, 404 error page, you can proceed to part 3.
    • There's a JavaScript crawling or rendering issue resulting in visible content that users can see - but search engine bots can't, 404 error page. To troubleshoot if this is happening, you can use the Inspect URL tool in GSC, or use rendering tools like View Rendered Source, your browser's Inspect Element tooltip, or the HTML that's rendered from 404 error page Mobile-Friendly Tool.

    Part 3:Follow the steps outlined to fix regular s, above.

    How Do You Handle Errors in Javascript?

    JavaScript and Single Applications Pages (SPAs) present unique challenges in handling s and other status codes.

    With SPAs, users get the same HTML regardless of the URL they're visiting. They download the site’s JavaScript application code, and the SPA renders the appropriate content. 

    While the experience feels a lot like browsing multiple pages, you're only viewing one JavaScript application and technically just one “page” (per the actual number of sprers.eu pages being served.)

    So, error pages in SPAs don’t work the same. Unlike static pages, Google has no way of telling which "pages" in SPAs are valid, and which or not. And this can create problems for SEO.

    To cover for these JS gaps, we break down several potential solutions and Apache/Nginx code examples in a related post found here. Two of those techniques include:

    • Whitelist solution: Of the simplest options for smaller sites is the Whitelist 404 error page, which involves creating a 'whitelist' sitemap and adding a block of config code that explicitly returns a for 404 error page whitelisted URLs. 
    • Blacklist solution: Like the whitelist technique but the inverse, you can create a sitemap of URLs that you know people are accessing but are not valid on the site. When pages are frequently added and removed, the blacklist solution can work best.

    How To Vet and Prioritize s and Other Errors for Fixing

    Though we generally recommend fixing s and other errors via redirects, there are times when fixing them all is not possible, or not feasible, 404 error page, often due to technical constraints, competing business priorities, or internal politics. (Sometimes it's just not a battle worth fighting!)

    Here's how we approach this "error vetting & prioritization " process:

    • Identify error pages that website visitors experience. Use Google Analytics and/or your log files to identify these. Prioritize them by frequency, and potentially by historically-driven revenue (e.g. redirect pages that made you a lot of money in the past!)
    • Identify error pages that search engine bots experience. Use your log files to identify these pages. Prioritize them by frequency and longevity (in other words - is Googlebot still hitting a page months and years after it was retired? If so, consider redirecting it. Googlebot is checking it repeatedly for a reason!)
    • Identify error pages that have live/functional backlinks to them. URLs with more/better backlinks are more important to redirect, so you can benefit from the power of these existing links; this is called "broken backlink building."

    You might also consider using GSC's Prioritization Insights in the error report - allegedly, these are in rank priority order.

    If the URLs you see in GSC don't meet any of the above qualifications, you may be safe ignoring them (and letting them keep ing.) Alternatively, consider utilizing a (Gone) status code instead of a 404 error page tends to respect errors more quickly (e.g. by deindexing them and stopping crawling them.)

    How Do You QA a 404 error page our step-by-step process to confirm if your page is working as expected:

    1) Find a URL & audit it manually.

    • This can be as simple as sticking a random string of letters after the domain / homepage and clicking enter, e.g. at sprers.euy/i-made-this-up
    • DO NOTE, however, 404 error page, that larger, more complex sites might have functionality differences in different site sections - in other words, the page might work in some places on your site, but not in others.
    • If you have a small site, don’t worry about this. If you have a large site, at minimum, try these QA steps within each major site section (e.g. sprers.euy/services/i-made-this-up AND sprers.euy/clients/i-made-this-up.) Monitor GSC more carefully for errors and soft errors, 404 error page, just in case.

    2) Confirm that the page is issuing the correct response. We recommend sprers.eu Copy + paste the fake URL into the field and click the Check 404 error page button (you can check multiple URLs at one time, 404 error page, and also test via different user agents):

    This is where you enter the URL (or list of URLs) to test them in sprers.eu
    • Confirm that it’s issuing a code. (Rinse and repeat as needed for s in other site sections)
    • It should not: redirect ( or ) to aOR issue a (ok) status.

    3) Outside of this, the primary items to pay attention to are around usability: if/when the user hits the page, 404 error page, do you successfully help them find their way again? How can you do that better? Read more about this and best practices for pages, 404 error page. (You can also learn more about QA for SEO.)

    Should s be indexed?

    No, definitely not. Don't index error pages! That's like asking for a less ideal user experience!

    (This question was contributed by Sarah McDowell, who's needed to answer this question for her clients. Sarah co-hosts WTSEO's Community Podcast - be sure to check it out!)

    Page Examples and Best Practices

    Advance your craft in handling s with next-level thinking. Explore the best practices and the best examples on how to use pages effectively.

    How Should A Page Function? (User Experience Matters!)

    The best pages should offer more than just on-brand messaging and clear next steps. They should also abide by certain UX and functionality standards, as instructed below.

    • Step 1: Remain 404 error page the URL that was called, (for example: sprers.euy/i-made-this-up/) - e.g, 404 error page. DON’T redirect this to some other page like /html, 404 error page. The error should load on the URL with the error, so we can see the error - where it occurred - and therefore fix it properly.
    • Step 2: A "http status error" should be issued from the server. Use a tool like sprers.eu to double-check that it’s working.
    • Step 3: A message - visible to the website visitor, on the page - should clearly explain what happened, and include resources, links, and ideally the ability to search your site to find what they were looking for. More on how to make this UX friendly below.
    Example results from sprers.eu

    What Are The Best Practices of User-Friendly Pages?

    There are several things you can do to improve your website's page - and the likelihood that website visitors will stick around and check out the rest of your site. Below are some of the most important page best practices to keep in mind.

    • Explain, in plain English (or whatever language your site targets), exactly what happened. This is for the user's benefit…. because that matters!
    • Include a link to your contact page so users can attempt 404 error page solve the issue with your help.
    • Include a simplified HTML sitemap (embedded in the body of the page) so the user can find their own way. Track what's being searched most often and make those resources easier to find.
    • Consider adding a search bar to the page template - so the user can look for the resource if they 404 error page see listed already.
    • Make sure the template’s title includes the text “” or “Page Not Found” - this way you can figure out which pages your site's visitors are hitting, and the frequency this occurs at, in Google Analytics (or your analytics tracking tool of choice.)

    Have fun with it! Extend your brand's personality & connect with your audience, 404 error page. Examples of great implementations of this can be found here.

    What are the best pages?

    Based on some of the page best practices mentioned above, we’ve compiled several of our favorite examples. In addition to using logic and including helpful ways to get users back on track, 404 error page, keep your pages on-brand with added personality and creativity.

    Airbnb’s Error Page
    Discord's Page Template
    Adobe’s Error Page
    Magnt’s Error Page
    Ben & Jerry’s Error Page
    Moz’s Error Page
    New Yorker’s Error Page
    Brooks Running’s Error Page
    Bell’s <i>404 error page</i> Error Page
    Progressive’s Error Page

    Contact us if you need help fixing or improving the page functionality on your website - we’d love to help!